19 Episode results for "Investigator"

What Does It Mean to Find God?

Andrew Rappaport's Rapp Report Daily

02:00 min | 1 year ago

What Does It Mean to Find God?

"Ref Delia dish where we provide a quick according to this is a ministry of striving for eternity you ever hear people speak about finding God became a Christian but he never referred to it as conversion or becoming a Christian he always said the big moment he referred to it that way engine their life and it's for good no finding God the way they're referring to it really means when somebody repents of their sin odd finds you first off you're the one that's lost I'm the one that was lost God finds us in our lost depravity changes for people I remember I had to do an interview for someone who's getting a clearance and so the investigator was asking because my friend recognizing their center before God and terms to Christ and receive the gift of eternal life that he offers that's called the Gospel odd kind of interesting when we look at our culture they talk about a come to Jesus moment a time where life radically as if they want to detach themselves from something they actually have to do which is to get right with God so when we say what does it mean to find God will actually and redeems us so the idea of finding God is not the way the secular world tries to think about it as if someone makes it big chair always kind of wondered with that is he lost no it's not God who's lost it's us who is lost but what does it mean when people say they found God but that's what it means to find God is podcast is part of the attorney ministries for more content or to request a speaker seminar to your Church Attorney Dot Org.

investigator attorney
The Best and Most Listened to Private Investigator Podcasts

Intermountain PI Podcast

12:58 min | 11 months ago

The Best and Most Listened to Private Investigator Podcasts

"You're listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi Private investigator podcast. I'm Scott Fulmer. UH-HUH UH-HUH WHOA. WHOA YOU and welcome back to another episode of the Inter Mountain? The I private investigator podcast. I'm your host Scott. Fulmer a licensed private investigator and author of confessions of a private eye available now on Amazon. The best and most listened to private investigator podcasts. I've traveled a lot as a as a PI. And I'm sure you do as well and for that reason. I listen to podcasts. Now to the uninitiated. PODCAST is simply an audio recording. Its Talk Radio on demand as a result you can listen whenever and wherever you want and private investigative. PODCASTS are basically free continuing education. I like you I I sometimes get bogged down in the day to day minutiae of investigative work. And then I attend a conference or seminar and I'm exposed to new ideas and new methods and that's essentially what a private investigator podcast offers. So what are the best and most listened to private investigator. podcasts outcasts well I mean. It's obviously upper interpretation but I've listened my personal favorites here. I think there's about eight of them that I've listed by the way I've only listed podcast acid hosted by actual private investigators in other words experienced. Pi's that have something to offer the industry with a couple of exceptions. I think two maybe three. I've only included active private investigator podcasts. So here's the list in no particular order. I is the G. I. M. G.. PODCAST ask that is the global investigators media group it was launched in two thousand fourteen. My Florida private investigator. Tim Roar of the Grafton Group well-known Colorado Colorado private investigators Dean Karen Beers of associates in forensic investigations are also hosts and the team was rounded out by a couple of other Florida. Pi's Richard Harrison Rory Macmahon who you know the entire group basically rotate hosting duties and each hour. Long episode of course is different. They discussed private Dr Investigator News and current industry trends and dean and Karin. Obviously forensics at the PODCAST is inactive. There last episode was earlier this here in two thousand eighteen. However years worth of back episodes that you can still enjoy and the podcast? Production is no frills but it does provide great information nations and overall. It's a really good podcast number. Two is my favorite detective stories and this is a relatively new podcast. It's hosted by private investigator. John a Hoda of Hoda investigations in Milford Connecticut for starters. John's podcast is it's really enjoyable and you can tell that he enjoys is what he does. by the way he interacts with guests he has a storied career in law enforcement. And in private investigations and I think that At least this is my opinion. The podcast cast is his way of mentoring to new private investigators in the industry each forty five minute weekly episode follows the same format he interviews current or or past private investigators on ask them how they got started in the business and ask them a little bit about their specialties. And what kind of niche they fill and in the end he asked the guest talk talk about one of their favourite cases. John Interviewed me for episode number. Twenty nine of my favorite detective stories and you can listen to it on his podcast or and this is applies to all the links that I'm going to all the PODCASTS. On going to mention today you can go to my website at www dot inter mountain dot com. Tom And click on the page listed. The podcast and then on this particular post you will find all the links to not only the podcast asp but all the individuals that I will be discussing today and if you enjoy any of them don't forget to subscribe to them. Never three is the American Pi Nepal Jabe Abe. That's J E B is a Minnesota private investigator or as they say up there in Minnesota and he is the CEO of Hartland Investigative Group. He hosts the the American. Pi podcast and Paul is an acclaimed. Private investigator needs a frequent presenter at industry conferences. His name is probably familiar to you but he is is best known for his work on the interstate. Thirty five West Bridge Collapse in Minnesota that occurred in two thousand seven episodes of the American. Pi podcast or about an hour long sometimes a little bit longer in Alan Goodman from the rocky coast of Maine often joins Paul Goodman is who t his input alone is worth a listen and I will listen to this. PODCAST is rather appreciate for example. They were talking about drones in the Pi Business before anybody was so summarise the podcast features discussions of news current different legislation that is important and industry trends in short. It's one of the best and most listened to private investigator. podcasts all started the podcast in two thousand nine But this podcast is also currently inactive. He has not put a new episode out in about a year and fortunately for us he is very very busy but you can still take take advantage of numerous back episodes. It's a monthly podcast and the production value is very well done by the way. I was also Paul's guest for his February. Two Thousand Fifteen podcast. So if you go to my website again. WWW DOT inter mountain pi dot Com. Go to the podcast and you can find links to my appearance. Next is declassified now this is a weekly podcast it's hosted by private investigator. Francey Keller of special circumstances an investigation firm out of Oakland California and Francey is the former president of both NCIS and Kelly the California Association of license investigators or cases have been featured by the way in print and on television including the TV show unsolved mysteries and in France. He's podcast each episode is about an hour along and she interviews current and past private investigators and discusses within how they got started in the business and a little bit about their niche and about their struggles as a Pi. He I Francis Interview Style is very informal which I like. She allows her gas to just talk and she'll interject important questions now and again. Occasionally she takes she forgets gets to take mandated commercial breaks. But that's because like the rest of us she's get so caught up in what our guests have to say and I was also on Francey show and you can find the link on my website site as well. Pi's declassified should certainly be on the top of your list. We're talking about private investigator podcasts. Some of the best ones and the most listened to and I want remember that they are basically free continuing education. The next one is called sound of pursuit. And this podcast is very well produced. Probably the the best produced of all that I've listed and in fact it sounds like something out of NPR but Tennessee. Private investigator. Hal Humphry is the host and he along with his better half. Kim Greene Produce Reduce Pursuit magazine and he's also the owner of find. Pi So you're probably familiar with him but to begin with sound pursued as unique podcast and it it Unlike like all the others. I've mentioned it features reenactments of interesting cases by real private. Investigators at each episode is intriguing and very well written very well all done my only complaint the episode too short and they're too infrequent and how told me wants today. It's it's really time consuming especially the backroom production efforts and that's what keeps him from turning out more timely episodes and I certainly understand that that and the fact that HAL is in demand as as a private investigator. So as you will find with most of these folks. They're all active active private investigators. And so the podcast is much. It's more of a Labor of love because it's not something that's necessarily bringing home the Bacon Bacon by the way how long Kim. We're in Salt Lake City about a month ago and my wife Valerie and I met them for dinner at our favorite Mexican restaurant. The Red Iguana and how was blown away by the restaurants. What's Moulay I'm talking about the national dish of Mexico not the small Furry Mammal? The next podcast is without warning Tennessee. Private Investigators Sheila was sake the host this new podcast. She is a mother of two and a well known and respected professional investigator and she specializes in cold cases. As a matter of fact it was as her persistence that led to solving the twenty five year old. Cold case murder of Angie Somoza. Angie was Sheila's friend and her former college roommate and this is Kinda what launched her her into the private investigation. Business she does cases have been featured on dateline twenty twenty the podcast criminal and other media outlets. And in fact you you can listen to. Her appearance on criminal is fantastic. podcast not by private investigator. So it's not on my list here that you can hear her appearance on criminal. Go to my website for would link. Incidentally if you're familiar with serial podcast from the creators of this American life then you'll know what to expect from without warning like cereal without warning tells there's one story in sequential episodes over the course of the season and season one features. The Lauren Edgy case. The podcast is produced exceptionally well and weekly episodes so throughout every Thursday and there are about thirty minutes to an hour long and finally my podcast. Yes it's one of my favorite aside from all the others. I would recommend COMMU listening to this one Inter Mountain. Pi a private investigator. podcast aside from hosting this podcast. I'm also the principal at Inter Mountain. Pi a private investigation firm Airman Salt Lake City and I am also the author of the true crime. Memoir Confessions of a private eye which is on Amazon. My podcast comes out on Tuesdays and there is a link on my website. WWW DOT inter mountain pi dot com episodes or about ten to fifteen minutes. Long can be longer. I go into detail about about some aspect of the private investigation. Business for instance when we can talk about how to build rapport interviews and are the following. Week I may discuss how private investigators can help legal professionals nationals but my goal has always been to provide hands on techniques or methods to assist you in becoming better at what you do. So that is the best and most listened to private investigator podcasts. If your podcast did not make the list drop me a line at podcast at Inter Mountain P I dot Com and let me know to summarise three seven podcasts are inactive and that's because producing and hosting a podcast takes time and it takes money and Pi podcasters. I take time away from paid. Investigative work to produce an episode. Therefore if you enjoyed podcasts I would recommend that you consider supporting them financially every a little bit helps at the very least. Please subscribe to the ones that you enjoy and give them five-star reviews on itunes. Or wherever you get your podcasts thought thought leaders in the private investigation industry produces podcasts. Nevertheless whether you're a novice or an experience Pi you're going to learn something. I subscribe to each private five investigator. PODCAST on this list with you. Enjoy my podcast. I I would recommend you check out my first book. Confessions of a private is about my thirty years as a private investigator. And some of the crazy. Wild wacky things that I've experienced by your copy on Amazon and paperback or kindle or you can go to Barnes and noble and get it for with a Nook as well and by the way I'm available for book signings and readings. You can send your request to media at Inter Mountain. Pi Dot Com. Also if you need a speaker for your conference is our seminar Especially here as we enter two thousand nineteen. Give me a call. You can reach me at eight one. Eight seven four eight six five eight and make sure you subscribe arrived to the Inter Mountain. Pi a private investigator. podcast on itunes Google stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts. If you enjoyed this episode good itunes tunes and give me a five star review till your friends and other private investigators about the Inter Mountain. Pi podcasts until next time this is Inter mountain fee. I Scott former former reminding you to game is afoot take.

investigator Inter Mountain Pi investigator. Amazon American Pi Nepal Jabe Abe Scott Fulmer Paul Goodman John Kim Greene Florida Tom And Tennessee Alan Goodman Sheila Francey Hal Humphry Minnesota Google
PI Education and Tennessee Private Investigator Hal Humphreys

Intermountain PI Podcast

44:49 min | 8 months ago

PI Education and Tennessee Private Investigator Hal Humphreys

"The Inter Mountain. Pi podcast follows the real life exploits investigative tips and insightful advice of private investigators Scott Fulmer the principal at Inter Inter Mountain. Pi and author of the critically acclaimed true crime. Memoir Confessions of a private eye. The names locations and other identifying details have been changed to protect protect the privacy of individuals the innocent and the guilty as a private investigator. It's easy to get stuck in the endless list cycle of work in particular the daily Minutia of phone calls reports and dealing with difficult clients. You can spend so much time working working on your business that you can't work on yourself in other words reading books and watching Webinars as well as listening to podcasts or becoming a CF. Not or Cli Jim. Rohn said quote formal education will make you a living self. Education will make you a fortune. Close quote this week on the Inter Mountain. Pi Continuing Education for private investigators. With how Humphries the one guy that's made it his mission in life WCHS. ooh ooh broadcasting from the crossroads of the West in historic Salt Lake City. You're listening to the Inter into mountain. Pi podcast here's your host celebrated Utah Private investigator Scott Fulmer. Welcome back to the PODCAST. I'm Scott Fulmer a a private investigator and author of confessions of a private eye. You can find my book on Amazon and you can find me on the web at. WWW DOT inter mountain on P I dot Com. You're listening to episode number thirty one. Pi Education and Tennessee private investigator. How Humphries to begin with? How can I talk about continuing education for private investigators aside from operating find investigations? Sion's how has a passion for helping other PE- is specifically in helping them become more skilled and professional but first using track ops will increase your professionalism. originalism track OPS is a powerful investigation management platform in fact his used by companies of all sizes in countries all around the world likewise as with features designed for managing every aspect of a PI agency. Track has the tools to streamline your operation from intake to invoice for example with track OPS OPS. Your clients can stream video and view reports twenty four seven so make twenty twenty year you become more professional with traps get track ups free right now now for fifteen days by signing up at traps dot com mentioned you heard about it on the Inter Mountain. Pi and get an additional ten percents off your base. SUBSCRIPTION PRICE TRACK OPS is case management made easy. How Humphries is the executive editor of pursuit magazine and quote the website? It's quote an online community. The of professional sleuths is also a platform for sharing innovative ideas and old school Gumshoe know-how in fact pursued magazine is the nexus for all things continuing canoeing education in the world including book reviews free articles and marketing tips. You should be checking out. Its content on a monthly basis edition. How is the host of the sound of pursuit? podcast probably one of the best private investigator. podcasts it's official PODCASTS. At Pursuit magazine and it covers covers random stories from investigators plus interesting topics and best practices. You can find it at pursuit. MAG DOT COM soundcloud. Or wherever. You get your podcasts. If you go to the show notes at www dot inter mountain pi dot com. For this podcast episode. You'll be able to click on an episode. How is is also owner an educational director at Pi Education and education offers quality continuing education for private investigators not to mention the courses are accepted by about seventeen states for continuing education credits? Moreover the online courses include everything from Ethics and Oh sent to identity theft courses is available through education started at about fifty dollars going up to about one hundred and eighty five and I think the average is about one hundred and thirty dollars a course and finally the Pi. Hi Education Youtube Channel. This is something you really don't WanNa Miss. They offer free monthly webinars. Talk about these resources and more on this episode of the Inter Mountain. Pi So let's get to know education and Tennessee private investigator. How Humphries how welcome to the show? Thanks Scott Glad to be here. Well I appreciate your time and you're Located in Nashville Tennessee. Is that correct. That's right I wanNA spend a lifetime just north of there at Fort Campbell Kentucky. So I'm familiar with Nashville. Oh bless your cotton socks. Well we're GONNA talk about Continuing Education Nation today in the private investigation industry. You are very involved in. It's it's A passion of yours. I wanted to Kinda I discuss in general in terms of continuing education. Why is it necessary in the private investigation industry? What's the big deal? Well there. It's a two fold the answer number one. Many states require continuing education of private investigators. And that's the first answer. Is You know for those that have licenses in states where required. It's just something you have to do. The broader context of continuing education. I think it's really important for professionals to stay on top of Kurt Practices Current Best Practices methods and techniques. And the only way to stay on top of those things is through education. Now you can do self education and research and do things on your own and that's totally fine. Education provides and An online portal for you to go get education on possibly some topics you hadn't considered before and all the information. Is there for you to kind of go through without spending a lot of time doing the research and I just kind of been a broader sense in a we we we run. Pi The education. I have a business partner by the name of Jim McLeod and Jim and I own a business called story board. Which is the parent company of Pge Gatien? We also provide side Online education for real estate appraisers and a real estate agents and other professions where people are required to maintain continuing take a to keep their license up to date. I have found that you know traveling to conferences took get your continuing education is a great thing to do it is expensive you know. I'm a sole practitioner. I as a private investigator. I'm kind of the only guy in the office and for me to travel to get my continuing education. I've got to pay airfare or pay my safe self mileage mileage up got to rent a hotel room for the night. I've got to pay for the conference. I've got to pay for meals while I'm there. It's just really. It can be onerous on top of that while at that conference. I'm not working and making money so slam appointed is kind of a double whammy for self employed people to to travel and do this thing. I'm not saying don't do them. I think it's really useful to go to conferences and meet with your peers and Blair I on people that we're we're all in the same business and and network and do those things but when you need education and you don't have the time or resources assist to travel online. Continue Education is a really good option. It is and you've really made it available for the industry and we're GONNA talk about about the different things that you do. You know. Many moons ago. I attended a tally conference. That was my first drive. Investigator conference at for those who don't know it's Texas Association Association of licensed Investigators Kelly Riddle and all the good people down there. And you know it's it's a great perspective. Because like you I I do have people. I work with but primarily. It's me in the office. It's me running everything and so you get this isolation that you feel when you go about doing your business and you you can get tied up in just the the daily Minutia of billing and reports and and phone calls and everything that you need to do that you forget. There's a big world out there of of other Pi's and so. When I went to that first conference it was amazing I saw professionals in suits and from different places in Texas and from other parts of the US that were very professional that were very skilled in. So if anything at the very least it was kind of a good boost motivation to continue work on my own personal progress so to speak Yeah I've traveled to conferences all over the country and I still do it on a regular basis A Lot five times now. I'm going to Pi Conferences as a presenter as speaker. I love doing that but also you know every at least every other year if if not every year I try to go to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners Conference which is a really large conference is upwards of three thousand. People were at the conference last last year in the primary benefit for doing something like that is just as you said to realize that there are other people out there doing this work and a and we all have similar struggles similar obstacles and similar Things that we face on a daily basis. And it's just nice to get that kind of reassurance that yeah you're doing a good job yeah had a boss years and years ago. WHO said If you ever need to know you're you're doing a good job. Just reach your right arm up above your head you can bend it over and Pat Yourself on the back so sometimes we have to do that. Yeah so let's talk about pursuit magazine. This is kind of the nexus of all things continuing doing education for For private investigators in your world we will talk about. Pi Education here shortly but everything Pretty much can be accessed by going to pursuit magazine which is an online community. Tell us a little bit about what that is so pursuit magazine Is is an online magazine Zine for private investigators and you know it's a bit of a misnomer in that. We don't print a hard copy of the magazine. Probably the more realistic description. Never be. It's it's an online blog for private investigators that is contributed to by investigators around the country so pursuit magazine as you said is kind of our our front of the House operation the the thing that we use to share content gather leads for education. It's a soft cell we we don't we don't use pursuit magazine to really push hard the PI education business but it is the first thing you see on the right hand side of the screen when you open pursue magazine. There's an ad for piano -cation so it's the front of the house is the way we engage with private investigators across the country and you know education is certified and I think think seventeen states I think there may be nineteen states that require continuing education. I'm not exactly sure number. You can double check that but not all. States states require continuing education for private investigators. Some of the states require continuing education do not allow online education which I think is a a bit shortsighted but I understand that but pursuit magazine is a resource for investigators across the country. That don't have to have have continuing education. I think still to this day. California does not require continuing education for private investigators. I know they have tried a number of times times to get that through the legislature. I don't know where they are with it right now. There's one group of investigators that are just dead set against the notion of requiring continuing education. And there's another set of investigators really really wanted to be a requirement either way investigators from California can go under pursuit magazine and find a wealth of information. Nations can be helpful in their business. And it's a way to see kind of what people around the country are dealing with we've got contributors from Utah. Aw Texas New York Georgia Tennessee kind of all over the country California. And it's a really good kind of clearing house of information for Prov. Investigators I gotta say. I'm really proud of pursuit magazine. I think it's a it's a good looking. It's a useful it's it's an informative resource and I'm I'm I'm proud of proud of the work that Kim Green the editor for pursuit magazine does I think she does a fantastic job of wrangling articles out of people glen and putting good content up there for private investigators. She's an article wrangler. I guess that's what she does. Among other things among many other. Yes yes you talked about pursuit being a blog and perhaps by definition it is but it's much more than that. I don't want people get the wrong impression. They needed pursuit. Shoot MAG DOT COM and check it out. There are numerous free articles on different types of investigations different types of talk of topics marketing really excellent let content and as we mentioned it's free and it's It's a really great way to I mean Private Biscuit should be checking on it at least monthly to see what what's going going on with pursuit magazine and just just looking at it. I don't I don't go to pursue magazine as often as I should but you know looking at it it across the top. There's the little kind of drop down toolbar. And you've got the business the life the pitch the repository the wire the business under that. There's there's a tab for investigations and those are all articles just kind of general about investigations. There's one for security for bail enforcement for Serbs a process or skip trace. We've got these things kind of categorize an easy to get through your way. So and then you've got the live you got profiles of private investigators cross country. I'm just kind of fun to read and see what's going on The pitch which is basically about marketing how to sell Your Business But again there are countless stories on pursuit magazine. That are again. We've got some crazy talented writers from across the country who have contributed their time and effort to put together stories. That will help private. Investigators be better what they do. One of the other aspects I like about it is the home of the sound of pursuit. PODCAST which If folks haven't heard it I I love this. PODCAST is probably the best is produced podcast in the industry. My only complaint is. It's too short and you don't do it often enough but I know you have your fingers and a lot of pies. What is the sound of pursuit podcast? I pursuit podcast is a very Strict produced timely every Just totally lying there sounded. Pursuit is is a podcast that we started. I don't know three or four years ago maybe longer. We've got some really good. podcast asked stories up there. We have you know. I'm a working private investigator. Kim Greene is she's got many other commitments. Wants to deal with and we have found that you know Kim comes from public radio background and we started off the sound pursue trying to meet the public radio production in standards. I think we did a good job with some fantastic storytelling in some really highly produced pieces on there. Were dialing back now to putting out interviews and a little bit easier on the production sides side stories. I'm pretty excited. Just today recorded a new podcast with an attorney out of Fort Worth by the name of Reagan win in it is going to be kind of. We're not going to rename the sound of pursuit. But this this podcast is called Profane irreverent and snarky and to which is a reference to animal house thing but I believe so. Yes Reagan win. As an attorney with whom I've worked a great deal in the past couple of years he's crazy smart and he is funny and he profane and he's irreverent which is one of the reasons I I liked him so much? But the podcast is kind of a lawyer and investigator getting together to talk about issues of justice not just stuff for private investigators but issues of justice in general and today we talked about jury selection and Juror Diversity And we had Robert Hirschhorn on who is a jury selection specialist. Probably one of the best in the country. So that podcast will be co-produced reduced by pursuit magazine and education in. I think we'll run it in the same place as the sound pursuits. I'm pretty excited about that. We're going to we're going to do. We've committed to do one a month and so far. I'm really excited about the way. It sounds in Canada the level of production on that so. When will that episode be APP? You know I'd love to say tomorrow. Laura we've got to. I'm in Nashville. Reagan win is in Fort Worth and our guest is calling in from somewhere else. So we're having to do audio on both ends and bring it together and edit together so I'm hoping we'll have something Next week be the best case scenario. Excellent besides the production value it is very well written it's engaging and it really draws you win for lack of a better word. The new format with US speaking with attorneys. I think it's kind of work. I think that'll work great. I look forward to it. Yeah I think it's going to be I think it's going to be full of good information that investigators can use an also since Reagan is committed added to doing this with us for the year. Hopefully we'll get some more attorneys listening in and I think one of the one of the struggles we have is private investigators as a lot of attorneys. Just don't realize what we do or how can have exactly so let's Let's kind of turn the page and go onto. Pi Education Dot Com. We've kind of talked the we've mentioned it here. And there you mentioned now if you go to pursuit MAG which is at pursuit MAG dot com on the right hand side. You'll see a an an ad. I guess for education you can click on that and go right to it or of course you can go to education dot com directly. Tell us a little bit about how the idea came about and what What you offer? What kind of courses do you offer so in terms of how the idea came about you and I are just old enough that we're member I can't I think it was Joe. Let raisers where the guy said. I liked it so much. The company I had taken several courses through education and had gotten to know Stephanie Mitchell who is still the manager of the business while taking courses and basically pestering her because I was having some struggles with tech back issues here and there and got to be friends with her and Scott Herald the guy that founded beatification Scott was looking to make a change and we talked to Scott about about the possibility of of buying the business from him and we did that. Jim McLeod and I have had education and pursuit magazine now for almost ten years and it has been been one of the best things I've ever done really really happy with the decision and I'm happy with the business and I like the content. I mean that's one of the reasons we decided to buy the business. We just we like the concept of offering education online in a format that anybody can access and kind of take at their own pace when you talked about continuing education earlier in the course the licensing and in throughout the US is courses different everywhere. You Go Some states don't even have licensing of private investigators. I think Colorado is certainly been thinking lately about getting rid of it after they fought so hard to get it. But that's another podcast. I know in Texas Texas Texas requires continuing education credits to maintain your license. Utah doesn't so really. It's it's different wherever you go here. But regardless of weather AH private investigator regardless of weather continuing education credits are required. It's an excellent opportunity to learn more to Educate yourself and It it kind of branch out your skills. What type of courses can you give us the names of some of the courses that you offer and these are all online at correct less correct in one before before I go through the course names? I want to just like kind of drive the point home that you just said yes. It's a great resource if you want to expand your business or find another other area of investigative work that you'd like to get into that you don't have any experience with taken in education there. There are several ways to become competent in in an area one is self study one is education another is partnering with someone. Who Does that thing that you'd like to do there? There may be other ways those kind of the main three ways that new to acquire competency. We've had several investigators who were new to the business come. I'm to us at their in states. Were continuing education is not required but they want to learn as much as they can about the business and they take several of our courses and that that's the kind of thing that makes me happy when someone is dedicated enough and curious note that they availed themselves of all the available information to learn as much as I can about the business or getting into. So that's one use for it. The other thing is you know. If if you've been aren't just for instance you retired law enforcement enforcement You've got fifteen twenty years on the force. You did one type of investigation that entire time. Maybe you had resources on the police force that you don't have access to any more. Pi Pursuit magazine for that matter are to resources they can point you in the direction of where you can find not the same resources but equivalent or similar resources so private investigators by-in-large enlarge aren't going to be able to access the national criminal investigations database right and it would be nice but no it's That's a big no-no and you hear some investigators say I'm retired law enforcement. I can still access at them by and large. I don't think they're being one hundred percent forthright. That system is audited. Anyone who does a search on that system. There's a record of the search. They did that kind of business but there are. There are resources that we as private investigators leaders can have access to online databases where we can go and look again not the same information not maybe not as detailed but similar information and it can point us in the right direction so. Pi Education has some courses on for instance skip tracing from start to finish How how to find people it's a great primer on how to use those databases and how to find the information that used to be able to just go to your police force available database? And do that now. You can't you're you're in the private sector. Find people skip tracing from start to finish his a great course to get someone's no one's head around how to do that. Now that the private world vert of the CSI effect When it comes to juries I think there's the private investigator database effect as well where you become a private investigator and for some reason you've watched a lot of TV and you you've watched Jack Bauer twenty four? Just pull of everything up on his databases and you get You Know Dell point or Idei core or something and you just pretty much think it's all going to be there and those databases are great. I believe me I couldn't do my work without them. But things are often more complicated than just that so I it sounds like this course really can point people in the right direction. Yeah and again. I miss you because we don't. I don't think we endorse specific databases. We discuss several databases in these courses. I have gotten out of the endorsement worship business for right now but you know there's that's just one of the courses we offer we've got a course on. Here's a topic that everybody loves is to hear about and learn about Deception detection we have a course on education. It's a six hours to eat course called. It's all lies understanding deception detection and it walks investigator through the process of deception detection using various methods to determine whether or not someone is lying to you spoiler alert by and large most of us can tell fifty per cent coin. Toss whether or or not someone is lying to us if someone spins thirty years studying facial expressions and body language at the academic level. Oh you know frame by frame analysis of interviews and stuff like that. They can increase their chances of telling when someone's lying them to fifty three percent. These are not mine numbers. These these were numbers given to me. By men David Mott's Mata Mata motto out of California. He is a specialist in micro expressions. It's difficult to tell when someone's lying to you you can tell when someone's uncomfortable You can tell when someone is disturbed about a topic you you can tell when they're getting nervous but that doesn't necessarily mean they're lying So there's a there's a six hour. Ce Course on deception detection. I think is fantastic and I'm not just. You're saying that because Kim Green put together with me. I'm saying it because he's really good information. We've got another course surveillance strategies for success. It's a your standard surveillance course I We are in the process right now of updating that course with some pretty cool videos and some other content. So that's there is just P is a really good resource. Investigators that want to learn more about the business and I would point out that you also have a course on ethics and if you have any you state that does require continuing education. Ethics is typically You know required across the board yet. Most states require an ethics course And I think most states require two hours. I will say this about the ethics course we are in the process right now And when I say right now today we worked on a little bit. We've been working the past month now. A brand new ethics course written by our staff produced by the education. A Story Board and I'm pretty excited. United Launch. It we Should go where the next month. Next month's theme for Education for the Webinars and for Pursuit magazine is ethics. will be talking about Ethics all month next month. Everybody's really excited about that. It's funny here. People say study ethics. You're either good or you're not. Here's the thing when you stab daddy ethics as a topic it can provide a framework by which you can make better decisions and we go into some detail about absolute loot morality. And what's right and what's wrong and relative morality and relative ethics no sayings. But it's surprising. How many times I come across situations where I'm unlike somebody asks me to do something like yeah I can do that and I think I don't wait? Wait wait wait. I need to think about this and make sure that it's it's number one number two ethical. Well you heard it first here folks ethics next month this month. The topic was marketing so WE'RE GONNA go into ethics next month. which is well-needed especially in this industry Especially eight and a lot of times clients. Don't know what's legal what we can do So of course there are opportunities to perform unethical ethical Sentences the courses you offer range. I think that the least expensive fifty dollars and the the most goes up to about one eighty five and the average average is about one hundred and forty dollars of course. Is that sound about right to you. That sounds right maybe one of course we've got we offer a course for Georgia private investigators gators that has the pre-licensing core Senate covers it's exhaustive. It's a seventy hour program online so if someone wants to become a private investigator in Georgia they have to take this seventy hour. P- realized this is at course it's three hundred seventy five dollars which is a really good price for seventy hour. Course to be honest with you. Think it's underpriced. There's a lot of really good information in that course. And what's happening with that courses as we update the individual pieces with the ethics course skip tracing and surveillance and we've got a new course criminal defense we're GONNA launch. I think in March march with those courses we those updated. We'll be updating that send the courses what kind of That course aside the seventy hour course aside. What's a typical typical timeframe Would it take a private investigator gets on registers and then decides to take a course. How many hours are they going to spend on on each course dino? Here's here's the thing and I am. Glad Facet question. Because that's been one of the biggest complaints from state regulators about online on education. Well they're not spending enough time in the classroom. My argument is always been you know that I'm a yoga practitioner and and I go to yoga every day. Friend of mine was saying near the East. I wanted this yoga. Classes just wasn't strong enough. It wasn't hard enough me and I'm like dude. Yoga gives as good as it gets. That's rights rights and individual any yoga class as difficult as you want to. You know I've taken continuing education courses that were for twenty hours hours for a designation that I hold. I got into the class and realized a new material pretty well. I skimmed through hit. The highlights lights took the test passed. It may have taken me five hours to get through a twenty hour. Course I've taken three hour courses that I spent fifteen hours in because there's information that are really wanted to to dig into an study and external resource and that kind of thing. So how long does it take people to get through. I don't know the answer to the question I know. Stephanie may have metrics on how long people stay in on average I think the CE hours credits that are listed rested are fairly accurate if someone is to go through and study and really read the material and pay attention to it and try to get their head around the the topics the twelve hour course will probably take about twelve hours to get there maybe get through ten maybe fifteen if somebody just goes through an answer the questions and gets through do the test much less than that but you can go at your own pace you can go at your own pace absolutely well in In response to what you mentioned about the state regulators online education is is certainly the wave of the future. If you look at college courses now I guess when they started out people had the idea that online courses were quote the easy. Some of the most difficult college courses I've ever taken were online. Yeah you know. Here's the thing online. Education is not only the way of the future so wave now I mean. People are learning new brand new skills online in the thing is you don't have to go to college to learn how to do it. Thing correct matter of fact I would argue most people to go to college. They get their degree in whatever. Their degree is in a lot of us are doing something completely different. I think you go to college. Alleged to learn how to think and learn how to deal with human beings and it's it's useful to be in the room with a group of your peers and an instructor and walk through topics and study things. I get that but sometimes it's just not possible. So if you're if you're an investigator in Perry County Tennessee Z.. which is kind of in the middle of nowhere and you can't travel to Washington? DC for conference. You can go online. Take a course. Meet your secrets. It is impossibly learn something new and that's at education dot Com. which is a lot I I would encourage everyone to check it out? We have a lot of folks that listening to this podcast cast. That are either considering a career in private investigation or they are new in the business and and so the courses at P. I. Education Nation Dot Com. We'll get them a really really good start. Yeah and I think here's the thing new investigators. Obviously when I started my piano business has been twelve years ago. Now think I didn't really know that much about the business. I came from a due-diligence background. In with financial institutions and insurance companies in my skill set was deep dive financial analytics. The skills of research and interviewing and writing reports definitely applies to investigations field. But I'd never before twelve years ago even considered doing a savannah tomato job so I read every thing I could read about surveillance and that's how found pursuit magazine was searching for stories about surveillance and how to do it. I took surveillance course from education to get my head around number one how people talk. What what language they use the famous swirled and number two? What are the best practices? Sure so it's for new. Investigators Piatra nation is a fantastic resource for the old grizzled investigator. Like you and me guys in our fifties plus or minus You know we're just just shy of the grave here for guys like us. I think going in taking a course online on some topic. That may be a thing that you're I'm very comfortable with you. Understand when you take an online course and studied. That topic with new is almost every time I'd do it to come up with something new and something that can apply my business that day. Well things change to technology changes methods changes if you were taking a Of course on Social Media Investigations Gatien's five years ago. It's going to be totally different today. I want to mention a couple of other to other things before we tied up here. The first is the free monthly webinars that are provided by education and these are really excellent video webinars that are or about Roughly an hour long. Sometimes they go over to a little bit over an hour and they're on. Pi Educations Youtube Channel. How did that come about and was it? Your idea is well or a you know. I honestly can't say who came up with the idea. I dove into it wholeheartedly. When we started doing webinars owl like VAT platform? We started off to other webinars on just a straight youtube live presentation we have since gotten into using zoom platform to host record the webinars in the we push that to the Youtube Channel but the technical stuff aside being able to have people in the virtual classroom ask questions real time of experts from around the country in various fields is invaluable. I mean I I get so much out of hosting webinars that I would do it even if nobody came to watch. What's the format? Tell tell everybody a little bit about the format that you use. Meaning the the tape format guests and specific topics this year. We've kind of fine tune things. We've got a theme for each month of the year for twenty twenty twenty in the past couple of years. We've literally been like the week of I'm like who should we have on the podcast and calling a friend or someone that knows somebody somebody up this this year here. We're going to a total scheduled. Process of this month is business development. We reached out Tim Santoni a month ago. He agreed to join us today on the Webinar Ebanon redid it. It was great next month is ethics. We've got an ethicist joining us from Belmont University Law School Really excited about that. The following month up got criminal defense lawyer coming lady by the name of Alison Clayton out of Lubbock. Texas works with the innocence project in Texas so each month we have a theme. And what what we do is we. Basically I do. Introduction introduced the guest and then we dive right into talking about the topic of the month. While we're doing that I've got a real time. Feed up of inequality that come from the crowd and some of the questions. We just don't answer because we can't get to them or they're they're meant to bait someone into a thing but for the most part if someone posts a question on the Youtube channel will address it. We'll we'll call them by names. Bill Stevens from Capella Idaho asks and that expert will answer them right there on the spot. We did one couple months ago and I can't remember who the guest was off off the town ahead but it was. It was a well-known attorney who deals with some specific issues in. I got calls after the thing people saying. Oh my God I got to you. Ask a question of silence again. That's that's why we're here this what we're trying to do well and it's very valuable What you're doing in the real time not? Everybody is able to do that so I am glad that the videos are posted afterwards for those who are not able to join you in real time and you know the funny thing is. We'll have between between thirty and one hundred people in the real time session. And since everybody knows they're recorded on a youtube channel air some of our shows that have had wallover thousand hits people go in and watch. I know that one of the ones that I did with you a year or so ago has gotten a number of us. So it's again. It's just another resource we provide and you know Scott. I know this sounds a little bit on the cheesy side to say but I'm crazy passionate about this business. I I love doing the work I like having smart qualified investigators in the pool of people that we work with and if me me and the good staff here at Ti shoot magazine can offer these resources. We're happy to do it. Well it's not cheesy at all I mean and let's think about it other than a handful of podcasts. There's not a whole lot of resources for private investigators out there other than Perhaps a mentor tour or reading a book but with everything that you offer with pursuit magazine with the sound of pursuit podcast with Pi Education Dot Com. And of course now with these free monthly webinars. You're offering some really great content and what you're doing is helping. The industry become more professional which it's sorely needed. I'd like to think so. I have the best of intentions when it comes to being a professional times when I don't behave exactly as professional shoot. We all do that occasionally. If everyone's interested in these free monthly webinars on Youtube. Where do they go? How did they find him? When did they come out? So we're doing doing the webinars on the fourth Thursday of every month they are available on our youtube channel. And I'm just going to see if I can find like my channel so if you're on youtube and you go to search Pi Education. It should come up with our youtube channel all videos as a right there from webinars going back to Jeez a long time ago. Excellent two years old so far and like you said we've got some some of six hundred seventy three hundred eighty US seven hundred ninety views one thousand eight hundred views one thousand five hundred views. There there are a lot of people that are going out there watching these things and I think getting really good information from them. One of the last things I wanted to talk about is something that is new that you're doing this year and it is the weekly briefings things. Tell us what the weekly briefings are. You can blame that on. Kim Greene lawyer her. And how do we find him by the way the weekly briefings are on the Youtube Channel. They're just labeled education weekly briefing. You can also find them in pursuit magazine. A believe Kim is posting those there you can also subscribe Ash. We should tell people people you can subscribe to Youtube and search education. You can subscribe to that channel and so when a new video comes out when a briefing comes out each week you will you get notice of it. Yeah absolutely um so I think a weekly briefing showing up a yeah. It's showing up on the from the editor on the right hand side underneath the education banner. There's a kind of a red card with the the beard sunglasses image. That is my icon. I guess the bearded wonder the bearded wonder you know breath. We'll talk about that another time. But if you click on from the editor section that's where you can find on pursue magazine the weekly briefing in. I'll tell you this. So Kim's idea was let's just do it once a week and talk about what's coming up for the week. There's they're short. They're they're easy there. Quick it's just a way to kind of see what's going on at piano that week in that month and you know if you don't watch some you're certainly not gonNA hurt my feelings but if you do it's a quick way to kind of get your head on what we're doing well and they're short. They're ten ten twelve minutes in length. Ah Good portion of the content that you provide to private. Investigators is free. They really should take advantage of it. That's my My recommendation well. I appreciate that. Yeah I'm just looking at the The last briefing Two minutes and thirty nine seconds like these are really short kind of quick punchy get into it get out of the kind of thing so I I help people find them useful useful I'm happy to do. I think it's fun to get up in front of the camera and do that thing. You've been listening to Tennessee. Private investigator how Humphries on the Inter Mountain Pi. I any final thoughts. You Know Scott my final thoughts of this thank you so much for inviting me to be part of your podcast. I you and I've had a friendship it per while now and the last thing I would like to say is if you find yourself in around Salt Lake City. There's a restaurant you have to go. Oh enjoy Scott the name of the restaurant in the ready Guana yes. We had a meal there. One night. Read Iguana if you get down there and check out the Red Iguana. It's fantastic lasting. Please join us. Pursuit MAG DOT com anytime you want to and if you need or want continuing education. Pi Education Dot Com If you would like to get you some continuing education this month you can use the Discount Code Biz Dev twenty twenty. BIC Levy two zero two zero. And that'll get you a discount on inequality like take from Piatra all right. How thank you for your time Sir? Thank you Scott. You've been listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast the number one show for private investigators who want to take their investigative skills to the next level. So join us every Tuesday on Apple Google spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. And be sure to subscribe rate and give us a five star review Send your comments and questions to podcast at Inter Mountain P I dot Com. That is it for this accepts. Owed until next time. This is Utah private investigators. Scott fulmer reminding you. That game is afoot

investigator pursuit magazine Pi Education Utah Scott Youtube Humphries Tennessee Inter Mountain Texas MAG DOT COM Scott Fulmer attorney Nashville Salt Lake City Pi Pursuit magazine US Kim Green P. I. Education Nation Dot Com Amazon
Review of Jay J Armes Investigator by Jay J Armes

Intermountain PI Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Review of Jay J Armes Investigator by Jay J Armes

"The Inter Mountain. Pi podcast follows the real life exploits investigative tips and insightful advice of private investigators Scott Fulmer the principal at Inter Inter Mountain. Pi and author of the critically acclaimed true crime. Memoir Confessions of a private eye. The names locations and other identifying details have been changed to protect protect the privacy of individuals. Both the innocent and the guilty in the late nineteen seventies. My my uncle George. CAIN was a private investigator in San Antonio at the time I was I think it was sixteen years old and I often tagged along with him on surveillance and during one such a surveillance. Michael handed me a worn paperback book. I got this for you. He said I thought you might like it as it turned out it was a dusty nineteen in seventy seven Avon paperback book and it was entitled. Jj arms the astonishing true story of the world's number one private eye and real-life life six million dollar man. I had never heard of JJ arms. But I started reading the book and I was hooked and you will be too uh-huh uh-huh uh-huh it the broad nestled in the crossroads of the West and historic Salt Lake City. You're listening to the Internet via podcasts. Here's your host celebrated Utah private investigator. Scott fomer everybody. Welcome back to the PODCAST. You can find me on the web at. WWW DOT inter mountain pi dot Com. And my book. Confessions of a private eye is on Amazon. And you're listening to episode Number Sixteen gene a review of JJ arms investigator by JJ arms to begin with Jj arms is an internationally famous El Paso Texas private investigator for one thing. He is generally regarded as one of the world's most successful private investigators. In fact he's a legend in the private investigation community and speaking of being hooked by his book or Hook arms had both hands blown off during an accident when he was a child. Child for this reason he wears two prosthetic cooks. However he's in his sixth decade as a private investigator so I don't think anything seems to slow him down but you can find? Jj arms investigator in paperback and hardback on Amazon. But I wanted to tell you a little bit about. The book. Describes his investigations in his well known cases he's conducted work for lots of different folks. Like Howard Hughes John Lennon and Elizabeth Taylor probably his most famous case involved of the abduction of Marlon Brando Son Christian and arms was able to successfully recover the boy but the book is well written and full of arms as exciting in cases from cover to cover and you might even learn a thing or two in either case I actually met. Jj arms several years ago. He signed my book and he was very gracious and yes I a even shook his hook. You've been listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast the number one show for private investigators who want to take their investigative investigative skills to the next level. Join US every Tuesday on Apple Google spotify or wherever you get your podcasts and be sure to subscribe rate and give us a five star review. Send your comments and questions to podcast at Inter Mountain P. I DOT COM. That is it for this week's episode so D- UNTIL NEXT TIME THIS IS UTAH. Private investigator. Scott Fulmer reminding you that game is afoot yeah.

JJ arms investigator Inter Inter Mountain Jj Inter Mountain P. Scott Fulmer Utah Amazon US Scott fomer Salt Lake City Michael principal CAIN Hook Apple Marlon Brando Son Christian Howard Hughes San Antonio El Paso Texas
The Downfall of Private Investigator Christopher Butler

Intermountain PI Podcast

06:15 min | 10 months ago

The Downfall of Private Investigator Christopher Butler

"The Inter Mountain. Pi podcast follows the real life exploits investigative tips and insightful advice of private investigators. Scott Fulmer the principal at Inter Inter Mountain. Pi and author of the critically acclaimed true crime. Memoir Confessions of a private eye. The names locations and other identifying details have been changed to protect protect the privacy of individuals. Both the innocent and the guilty like any profession. The private investigation industry has its share air of bad eggs and he was no exception according to the radio program this American Life. The police accused him of selling crystal meth and marijuana. WanNa seized from police evidence lockers although the state will go on to drop the charges. He eventually pled guilty to federal charges of robbery extortion and conspiracy. He was sentenced to eight years in federal prison this week. A morality tale of drugs dirty. Du is sexy. ACCE- soccer moms and Chris Butler a California. Private investigator gone bad. Yeah uh-huh broadcasting from the crossroads of the West an historic Salt Lake City. You're listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast here's your host celebrated Utah Private investigator Scott Fulmer. Welcome back to the PODCAST. I'm Scott Fulmar author of confessions of a private eye. You can find my book on Amazon and you can find me on the web at. WWW DOT inter mountain pi dot Com. You're listening to episode Number Twenty Five. The downfall of a private investigator Christopher Butler in two thousand ten Chris Butler invited journalists from Diablo magazine to accompany him. I'm on a surveillance. Ride along in the hopes that journalists would do a story about Butler's Concord California private investigation firm a firm by the way staff solely Lee. By sexy soccer moms. The company had been featured on Dr Phil. The today show and the local Bay area news. In addition a Reality Television show with lifetime was in the early planning stages speaking of planning stages. Are you still keeping track of your case. Load on a spreadsheet or worse on. The back of Manila folder wonder if so consider using track hops. It's a powerful investigation. Management Platform used by companies of all sizes and countries all around the world with features designed for managing edging every aspect of a PI agency. Track hops has the tools to streamline your operation from intake to invoice. You know one of the features. I like about track OPS. This is the ability to send invoice reminders. Let's face it clients. Don't always pay in a timely manner. Enter traps you can customize up to three separate reminders to go out on specific dates that you choose you know right now you can try track ops free for fifteen days by signing up at track ops dot com mentioned that you heard what about it on the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast and track OPS will give you ten percent off of your base. SUBSCRIPTION PRICE TRACK OPS case management. Made easy as it turns out. Peter Crooks was the bay area journalist for Seattle magazine. That coming Butler on the surveillance ride along in due time his short article would become the basis basis for Crooks two thousand fifteen book the set up a true story of dirty cops soccer moms and reality TV. You can find it on Amazon in hardback kindle. Title an audio book as well as at Barnes and noble after the ride along with the sexy soccer. MOMS crooks began receiving anonymous emails from someone. Named are Rutherford Rutherford. The email stated that the ride along was a set up it had been scripted and everyone was in on it. Everyone that is except Pete Crooks what followed next was a tale stranger than fiction to summarize. There are a lot of egos in the private investigation business. Certainly Chris Butler was no exception. He was publicity hungry and wanted so very badly to be a media celebrity in fact the scripted surveillance stings things with the sexy soccer moms. Were all about landing that reality television show however as salacious as it was it was. Rutherford's next comments. That were even more unbelievable. Favorable Butler was selling drugs and explosives with the help of Contra Costa County Narcotics Officer in the end butlers narrative. It was a story of consequences and character flaws. A cautionary tale for private investigators like you and I get your copy of the set it up by Pete Crooks and make sure whatever you do you stay on the side of the angels. You've been listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast the number one show for private investigators who wanted to take their investigative skills to the next level. Join US every Tuesday on Apple Google spotify. Or wherever ever you get your podcasts and be sure to subscribe rate and give us a five star review. Send your comments and questions to podcast at Inter Mountain P I.. Hi Dot Com. That is it for this week's episode until next TIME THIS IS UTAH private investigators. Scott Fulmer reminding you that game is afoot. I do

Inter Inter Mountain investigator Christopher Butler Scott Fulmer soccer Chris Butler Pete Crooks Rutherford Rutherford Peter Crooks Amazon Utah Scott Fulmar US Salt Lake City Reality Television Dr Phil marijuana principal Du California
How a USC Grad Turned Private Investigator

OC Talk Radio

31:33 min | 1 year ago

How a USC Grad Turned Private Investigator

"Quitting your burgers of a coffee table. If you WANNA eat a burger put it on a bar Vol your instincts to be dubbed for the new all American cheeseburger fresh juicy fiefs spastics crispy around the edges covered a gooey cheese and stacked to the ceiling with deliciousness knocked baby Dow with a frosted beer at the bar. Just like those sports God's intended but new all America cheeseburger at Buffalo Wild Wings please drink responsibly welcome to the Zandbergen report where wealth strategies and investment wisdom collide featuring your distinguished host and certified financial planner Bart zandbergen welcome to the Zandbergen in report a showcase for well strategies investment wisdom. That's essential for our evolving world. I'm your host part Zandbergen Paul. You need to be really nervous today. I was you know you as as often you bring in very you know attractive people pull here good looking people here and I thought well she must do something. She's an interior designer. She she something that's very artistic and then she tells me she does like you know investigations. I'm I'm. I'm worried here private investigation so we have with us today of very special guests. We got the ROCKFORD files today. I'm dating myself. What's what's an earlier so we have Machi Kudaka? She's with Kudaka Investigations Machi. Welcome to the show. Thank you thank you for having me your all of course. Are you know it'd before he jumps in our the really real life stories of like Sam spam go back into the forties. There was a Sam spade the private detectives that are always looking for the the what with the cops can't find or something here or is it just more mundane than that. They're all exciting and yeah the show. Today's all stories okay all right. I'm GONNA sit back and listen here. We go all right all right Mike. I feel a little bit about to who you are and I'm going to have you fill in the gap but Gudauta investigations is a full-service licence and insured private investigations firm based out of Orange County monkey has an extensive background in the private investigation and legal industry. She was the vice president of a large private investigation firm based out of San Diego and prior to career as a private investigator Makki worked as a certified paralegal where she gained the knowledge and experience as meticulous legal researcher glad it was meticulous monkey not just illegal she graduated with honors from U._S._C. With a B A in political science and a minor in East Asian Studies and Machi serves on the board and was Vice President of administrations of C.. A. L. I. California Association of licensed investigators. That's going on had no idea that deep you did a lot of people so I don't think I've ever shared with you. Paul doesn't know this but I think either in a prior life and or if I wasn't financial advisor would be either investigators F._B._i.. Agent I just love that stuff. I can't wait for your stories <hes> so why don't you tell the audience kind of how you got to be an investigator but what led you there well I consider myself a professional professional snoop. I love to dig and Research and prove people wrong or previous all right <hes> and <hes> I as stated <hes> I was a a certified paralegal and I love doing legal legal research and actually wants to become an F._B._i.. Agent but living in Orange County South Orange County <hes> I didn't want me to Virginia for six months training and then have the possibility of being shipped out all over the world so I decided to take her chance to private investigator and got my break in a large investigations permit Sandiego sea mentioned and <hes> when and did the groundwork with the field investigator investigator and I loved it and I stuck with it and <hes> almost six years I've been investigated for ten years now and <hes> it'll be six years this year that I've started my firm and just love my job. I love doing the research I love <hes> <hes> doing digging and I it's just it's not all glamorous and what you see on T._v.. <hes> especially when you're sitting in the car park car for a long time surveillance but it is exciting everyday different saying I love my job. Well you mentioned before we'll get to that later but dumpster diving. That's part of the job. I can't look like this Paul <hes> so that's you know you can find a lot about people people when you <hes> dumping their trash or when you dive in their trash <hes> as a investigators were paid professionals <hes> to find facts were fact finder so you know what you discarding and trash is all. It tells all about a person <hes> for the most part but <hes> it's a great way to get to know somebody I mean some people do <hes> discard their trash and they can shred it but you can find a lot of male or in a personal belongings drug perfectly out whatever the case may be and you can find out a lot about people when you do. You just need to get some. I don't know if you could hear it but outside <unk> outside our studio the the trash truck was backing. I thought I hope he's thrown mine away here right now. That's our next step Paul Paul Paul Dumpster diving so monkey. What are what are the types of cases that you normally work on well idea a lot of surveillance? I also do background investigations which includes social media investigations as well as criminal defense and Civil <hes> such as business litigation and family law related cases okay the Family Law and we've talked about before so those pretty pretty hairy definitely. I'm sure you deal with a lot with those type of cases or clients have those kind of clients yeah but I never uh-huh I never get to that level. I never really get to see what happens. Share so on the kind of on the background check so kind of people are hiring you for background check background. It could be large firms terms on wanting to recruit somebody an employee potential employees or could be a father curious to find out who their daughters dating <hes> it could be <hes> a woman who's going to marry somebody or vice vice versa <hes> a rich man <hes> warning to marry a woman with not very secretive passed so it could be <hes> I work with people in the private sector as well as the <hes> the the Public Corp or exceeded private companies as well as private individuals so it can be anybody okay so is there. What are the? There's got to be certain laws imitations. I know you you and I've talked about that before. So how far can you go. How far can you push without crossing the line of invasion of privacy? I guess well well now. I'm going back to the <hes> preemployment or background on that. We can we can <hes> get access to any public records so so <hes> basically juvenile records were able to obtain <hes> but we can get any civil records criminal history <hes> for employment you you're not able to ask specific questions like fell in or have you been convicted of this and that but we as long as we don't cross the line as far as invading <hes> for example we cannot run somebody's credit report without their authorization so if employer has their there <hes> the potential candidates <hes> authorization we can run the credit but we're not able to do so without prior authorization <hes> and also during surveillance for instance we can only record what the public or what the naked eye can see so for instance if I need it to do if I'm working in the insurance fraud case for example and the subject and subject to the person that we're investigating it the subject is in their backyard and they're mowing lawn John and they claim that they have back injury but there mowing lawn there right near Skateboard Cetera etc and there's a people or some sort of a small opening we cannot put our video camera into that whole does that we cannot know so whatever the naked eye can see so if you if you standing back you know fifty hundred feet away and we can see it in plain sight than we can record that but we cannot go over above and beyond to record anything that we easy all right so is this. Is this crossing the line so going up to someone's window and peaking in the drapes are open is that is that I it is too far yeah. I'm just saying what you don't do this work. I've really bad you just leave out to me but but that's definitions naked I mean right so what what are we missing. Let's say that you know you are <hes> that's private property so if you are going somebody's private Hou- private residence and you if you let's say you're in your car for instance and the curtains open and you can see through from your car that's legal but if you're stepping over the person's house or the the sidewalk or have you then that's crossing the line okay. That's that can mean concern as they come on. You guys all on T._V.. There was breaking in there always jiming the law and doing all this stuff come on the glowers thing. So you see on T._v.. Fall I promise you we do I mean we we are governed by the Bureau of Security Investigative Services <hes> in California so we do have to buy by certain laws so if we get we can do certain things and sure there are plenty plenty of investigators out there who are unethical and who do you who goes above and beyond to cross outline they they can't be penalized. They can get their license suspended. What's the rules rules on recording voice recording audio? You Have California the <hes> their party state so you have to get the person's authorization so you cannot record without their consent so <hes> if you're on the phone conversation you do have to get at their consent to record okay is that otherwise is it illegal or inadmissible. Well both both okay yeah. It could be a okay <hes> it definitely an admissible in court so audio recordings are not admissible in court anyway I thought because they're easily doctored and edited. That's true I mean same same video as well so you just need to so any investigator or every investigators say we need to keep keep the raw footage so any editing <hes> misconstrued as editing or cannot be not authentic so we have to if the if we need to cut some parts out <hes> for whatever reason if the video is two hours long and there's only two two seconds of any certain activity week insurance sure but we do always need to keep the raw footage okay but you know not every case goes to court so a lot of cases `specially for private individuals visuals for infidelity case for instance. They usually don't go to do not go to work so let's start talking about those so yeah. Let's give us a good case. We're going to talk about the Jeff Bezos case here and that was a famous bomber. He got caught. Basically you know fooling around on his wife here. It's led to this bazillion dollar divorce here right well. Actually I WANNA talk about the PA Roberts case very complicated. Yeah I so give us a good example like a really choosy example of a fidelity fidelity case okay <hes> well as really great case <hes> memorable case that I can remember as we were my my cell phone. A colleague of my we went down to San Diego. <hes> we went to this exclusive club and the client was the husband and he's suspected of his wife <hes> she was early thirty we shall they had a three year old together and he's this client husband suspected that she was cheating as well as using drugs and we see or he hired us to see if we can do or find out both to update evidence about so what what we did was <hes>. Now I love approaching subjects and be from them because that's when you can get a lot of great information so what happened was we went inside a club side note Paul. Do you remember the the group and back in the nineties called digital underground the Humpty dance so they were applying their performing the night that we went <hes> worked on infiltrated the group and you were singing with them here. Actually he grabbed my hand and say you are very beautiful. I kid you not break the digital anyway story. That's another story. That's another Saturday. So what happened was I. We always have to make sure that it's safe to approach N._B._A.. Friend this subject so of course I'm bar environment. I it's great because they're usually drinking. They're usually having fun. He wouldn't think that a pretty girl walking up to them is investigate. I mean I would think that you you disarm everybody everybody. You don't look like some big rumpled. You know <hes> Colombo kind of cop here something with the mustache exactly we can spot a mile away. Thank you for bringing that up. That's one point idea wanNA bring okay so what I do. Is I be on the subject the wife and the mother and my colleague who is a male he befriends well after after she arrived she and her girlfriend were there. They were drinking dancing. They're having fun and come to find out that she met up with a male and they're very chummy and so we had a hunch that it was her boyfriend and now after they start kissing and dirty dancing we figure we have the right guy gave it away. Yeah exactly so my Collie the male investigator he befriended the boyfriend okay and so as it turns out the boyfriend and he had a very distinct name anyway he was the drug dealer as well as the boyfriend suspicions true so we all are partying again Minnesota pick exactly so we you know we were dancing. We're having a good time. We're talking and of course I'm getting all the juicy. Gossip girl and she'll she just tell you this like just you know any hey stranger. Hey let me tell you all about creativity how come in as an investigator Bart's wheel spinning right now. I'm I'M GONNA say once you once you get the no Machi after about thirty minutes you could say any Li. Li need to know how to talk as well as ask questions so I'm very approachable so I I also liked talk and I can be from the rock so we were just talking having a good time so the subject and her girlfriend and I we all went to the restroom and when Girls Club you guys probably don't know this but we we can go into stall install together. If there's a big line oh yeah especially if it's a big handicap stall we go into a stall with Bart. I'm just kidding so are we went into the stall and <hes> and as I stated we she was by this time telling me. Where are they mad how long they been seeing each other what they do? What kind of things do you like states that through Cetera well Lo and behold she sit on stay on the toilet? She's going to the bathroom and she's going number. One and then she whips out her cocaine out of her purse so I get the money shot of her ding cocaine while Ping peeing on the radio interested and so there was a great evidence and then <hes> after she stood still while you took her picture should doing a hidden camera hidden camera camera no audio of course I cut the audio out but I did have a video recorder on a hidden camera in my purse as well as I have my phone and I was pretending like I was texting and I was recording are so I had two shots so so <hes> now we go out and then <hes> we met with the boys again and then they turn after party well by this time we're done partying quote unquote so what we did was we met up with the husband after she took off with the boyfriend and her friend to the after Party and then <hes> provided the husband with evidence that he was looking for so that case or it ought to be <hes> I mean mission complete <hes> but yeah there's a lot of <hes> there's a lot live great infidelity stories. I mean it's not like well. I've never seen this show cheaters but <HES> I it didn't go about about overboard but I mean you do have to be careful though because a lot of clients in the suspicious spouses they want to do right along with you when you're on surveillance Jason Their spouse yeah so that's not a good idea because there was a time where there you could potentially <hes> witness a confrontation and so let's say the husband or the wife sees inaction. They can easily go attack and they're you know that wouldn't be called the Jerry Springer show. That's the difference so so bart has no idea what to ask Nash. Stop careful. There's another good case. You guys interested okay so this case was out in L._A.. And I was was a little bit intimidated about this case because the person the subject so the so the wife excuse me going back the wife suspected her husband who was a former gang member and he had a teardrop tattoo on his face well she suspected of him cheating on her friend on on the whites friend and the and they're all friends so the the wife my client and the subject and the girlfriend will her boyfriend. Dan was the husband's best friend and he was in federal prison for murder so so you're working. You're trying to investigate a guy who's in a gang and there's like they're murdering people and you're going to try and find headpiece cheating or not. I wouldn't tell founded. I'd say they're check see yeah. So what happened was this is L._A.. And <hes> I was doing surveillance they met up in the street near a medical center and took one car and went up to the Hollywood sign and was able to follow them having lunch and going up to the Hollywood sign and you know hiking and kissing and holding hands et Cetera well well when they were leaving. I lost them in traffic which happens quite often due to whatever <hes> weather conditions or traffic or have you anyway. So what I did was <hes> since I didn't know where or their whereabouts I went the head and park or when I went ahead and went back to where the girls the girl that the person who they're cheating wet. They're called suspects okay so I went back to park by the suspects card. Well this is again <hes> in Los Angeles. It was a bad part of L._A.. And at the time I was driving a B._M._w.. And so my car stood out so what I did was I had parked my car and I had a dump my car and the parking parking lot and then so I am the plus this area was like I said it was kind of a sketchy neighborhood so I couldn't be seeing on foot with camera equipment so what I did was I found an old car parking street. It was a van as the black man. I can't remember clearly. I'm sorry just got in and barred at drove off yeah. She just whatever takes I car sure no problem. So what I was was <hes> I noticed that the car had parked parked there for quite a bit was very dusty dirty and <hes> just looked naked like somebody banded it. So what I did was I hit. I crawled underneath the vehicle. The van and I was waiting for them to come back so I can get the quote unquote. The money shot so your mother. No you do oh yes. She's very careful. She's always oh be careful please. She thinks yeah she thinks I'm out there. You know killing murder but yeah she gets very full. I mean it. It does get kinda sketchy sometimes but like I said I I'm pretty gutsy. I was GONNA say ballsy but I don't think you can say for sure. You can't say on the radio. I can't say the word ball absolutely can't be yeah so I was laying in the car. I was sweating bullets. I mean these we're talking gangbangers right and in mill of L._A.. East part of town or Parktown and I'm just waiting. I mean what it was. Probably I'd say twenty thirty minutes before they came back but it seemed like is five hours before they came back so what I did was. I have my camera ready. I'm shaking. I'm sweating and they finally come. There are coming <hes> the subjects car they parked their car and they're kissing their goodbyes and the suspect the female suddenly grabs him in the balls. Oh yeah remember word you can say balls but involves e. He's just a clarification here so I got the money shot again so that turn out to be a great case I submitted my report and spoke to the client and I mean of course you know these types of cases. I it doesn't WanNa come beat the live in tyrod here threat a Pulitzer prize the ball shot. That's the money shot. Oh that's a great idea who's got the best shot so that was a great case but <hes> another great case now a couple of minutes so infidelity case Ace <hes> this case the wife hired me she expecting her husband of cheating on her so I followed him from he fluence Ontario from Sacramento so we went on -Tario the volume to Irvine then to Palm Springs Yuma Arizona and eh the objective was to determine whether or not he's meeting up with his girlfriend at a hotel and sh- the wife the client didn't know which hotel he was saying anyway. Make a long story short fast forward the wife. The client asked me to approach him at kind activate to see if he would buy you pay extra to be Bait. That'd be so rich and you get paid by the mile so again expense the report so I use my charm I approached him. He was sitting in a bar watching <hes> watching sports approached <hes> befriended him. We hung out he bet we went to pool. We what our employees Louise and then <hes> but before that I would I had to do was I had to determine which hotel room he <hes> he was in so I jumped in the elevator with him when he checked into the hotel and by this time I was you know just up I had baseball cap big sunglasses process and wearing shorts and teacher and then <hes> after I determined a witch hotel room he was in. I went downstairs and I rent or I got the room across from him. So I can see WHO's coming in and out okay so fast forward so <hes> the the husband subject that he and I <hes> you know we hung out and he was interested so that that was that was a mission accomplished again and so what happened was after amend my report and my my videos and my photos and such the white the client called me said Machi you'd better get higher social media accounts off the Internet because he know exactly who you are and he's pissed yeah so that was pretty after your why not now you have a stage name. I can't tell you my stays. Don't tell him okay. We're running out of time so I WANNA make sure hey you are a female and what I would presume is a male dominated industry right so as a business owner just like. minner to how how tough is that and accomplished that you know what it's actually believe it or not one of my niche. My business is the fact that I'm female because I'm very approachable unassuming <hes> when I do wooden statement or interviews <hes> <hes> you know I'm approachable and for instance. If I'm being somebody who was <hes> you know who's a victim of a crime for instance. They're scared to talk to people talk to cops for former cops you know on the person you know be finding the interest common grounds building rapport so that works to my advantage <hes> and also the fact that I stand out because I'm a woman and people remember me so I get in the don't expect it so your disarming and in <hes>. I'm really aggressive and I don't give up <hes> so you know they know that I can get the job done so <hes> I it was tough at the beginning but once I proved to the clients who are mostly attorneys once they saw what kind of work I produce then they started calling me back and refer me outed <hes> mostly infidelity and background checks. Do you do like corporate espionage corporate investigate bug offices. I don't diva offices but I do get clients who who or potential clients who say machi. I need your help. I think somebody is somebody put a bug in my in my walls and you're listening to my conversation and they're going to bomb me etcetera etcetera and usually there's <hes> those potential real people turn out to be kind of exactly two invoices exactly all right so we're we're near the end so monkey. I have the honour of asking my guests their final question and that question what is is your alternate listen learn over your career as a private investigator okay so two minutes here okay so the ultimate lesson is as <hes> it in the acronym is Towed T. O. A._D.. Talked about sorry so to t- think outside the box one step ahead of the game a aggressive and de dig dig dig so you know you need to think outside the box to become ah good investigator because you know not everything is that squarely in a box and you need to eat step out from where you are and thank okay. What is this person going to do? Is this person cheating or is this person committed fraud. I mean it's like them. So what you need to do is need to do your research and you need to know them better than their spouses know them or their best friend on them so you need to get into a hat so it's kind of like psychology almost taste you need to do that. <hes> you always need to be one step ahead of the game and you need to eat outsmart all your all your colleagues you need to <hes> you know just think ahead and you know every investigation I do whether it's a small case his or a huge case I always background investigation and social media investigation on all my subject and suspects and their friends and their family so I do a lot of research because I'm always I always have to be in the now and more information information is ammunition right <hes> and be be aggressive and I just don't give up. You can't give up in this industry because if you won't you won't get any clients and you won't you won't complete or <hes> obtain your goals so you want steele relentless ruthless. Oh yeah the research she did on all my good thing. IS WE DO SMILE DIV DIG Usenet Dig dig dig until you can't pig anymore like I said I liked people wrong or prove a point or now. We're paid fact finder so we have to do our job and that's how he becomes accessible in this industry so great hey before we leave. How can people reach you email phone? What do you got absolutely <hes>? My website is W._W._w.. DOT KUDAKA P I dot Com. Could I guess my last name. That's K.. U. D. as in David Aka P._I.. Dot Com am I saw number is nine four nine eight eight seven four four one four eight and don't Worry Stage Name is Aka. She said Aka so there's a there is an all also known as all right Mike. He thinks this is a lot of fun. It's an honor you guys think we're the first seven years of doing a thousands of shows. We've never had a private investigator. Say ballsy. Never thank goodness. She can't say that all right. Thanks so much everyone is tune in. We look afford to be back in the studio. Next week. Cheers tune in next week for the latest edition of the Zandbergen Report Tuesdays at two PM catch up on our recent shows by visiting Bart Zandbergen Doc pod bean dot com zandbergen Bergen report is also available on Itunes iheartradio and spotify interested in being featured guest on our show or have a question. You'd like to hear his answer email podcast at Art Zandbergen dot Com bar as Zandbergen.

investigator Bart zandbergen Zandbergen Paul L._A Zandbergen Machi Kudaka Kudaka Investigations Machi Mike Zandbergen San Diego bar Vol murder Sam ROCKFORD America Orange County Paul Paul Paul
How a USC Grad Turned Private Investigator

OC Talk Radio

32:18 min | 1 year ago

How a USC Grad Turned Private Investigator

"Hi It's Jamie Progressive's employee of the month two months in a row leave a message hi Jamie. It's me Jaime. I just had a new idea for our song about the name your price tool so when it's like tell us what you want to pay the trombone goes Blah Blah Blah and you say we'll help you find coverage options to fit your budget. Then we just all do finger snaps while a choir goes savings coming at Ya savings coming out. Yes no maybe anyway see your practice tonight. I got new lyrics for the rap Break Progressive Casualty Insurance Company and Affiliates Pricing Coverage Match Limited by state law welcome to the Zandbergen report where wealth strategies and investment wisdom collide featuring your distinguished host and certified financial planner Bart zandbergen welcome to the Zandbergen the report showcase for well strategies investment wisdom. That's essential for a revolving world. I'm your host part Zandbergen Paul. You need to be really nervous today. I was you know you as as often you bring in very you know attractive people people here good looking people here and I thought well she must do something. She's an interior designer. She she something that's very artistic and then she tells me she does like investigations. I'm I'm I'm worried here private investigation so we have with us today a very special guests we got the Rockford files today or non dating my Sawyer. What's what's an earlier so we have Machi Kudaka? She's with Kudaka Investigations Monkey. Welcome to the show and give thanks for having me. They've all of course you know before he jumps in our they're really real life stories of like Sam spam go back into the forties. There was <hes> Sam Spade the private detectives that are always looking for the what the cops can't find or something here or is it just more mundane than that. They're all exciting and yeah the show. Today's all stories okay all right. I'm GONNA sit back and listen here. We go all right all right <hes> Miami feel a little bit about vote who you are and I'm going to have you fill in the Gal but Kudaka investigations is a full-service license and insured private investigations firm based out of Orange County monkey has an extensive background in the private investigation and legal industry. She was the vice president of a large private of an investigation firm based out of San Diego and prior to career as a private investigator. machi worked as a certified paralegal where she gained the knowledge and experience as meticulous legal researcher glad meticulous monkey not just illegal she graduated operated with honors from U._S._C. With the B.. A. And Political Science and a minor in East Asian Studies and Machi serves on the board and was Vice President of administrations of C. A. L. I. California Association of License Investigators. It's like going on had no idea that deep. You did a lot of people so I don't think I've ever shared with you and Paul doesn't know this but I think either in a prior life and or if I wasn't financial advisor I would be either investigators F._B._I.. Agent love that stuff part. I can't wait for your stories. <hes> so once you tell the audience kind of how you got to be an investigator but what led you there well I consider myself a professional snoop led to dig and research and pre people wrong or pre people right <hes> and <hes> I as stated <hes> I was a certified paralegal and I love doing legal research and actually wants to become an F._B._i.. Agent but living in Orange County South Orange County <hes> I didn't want to me to Virginia for six months for training and then have the possibility of being shipped out all over the world so I decided to take a chance to private investigator and got my break in a large investigations firm in San Diego you mentioned and <hes> when and did the grunt work was the field investigator and I loved it and I stuck with it and <hes> almost six years I've been investigated for ten years now and <hes> it'll be six years this year that I've started my firm and just let my job I love doing research. I live <hes> doing digging and it's just it's not all glamorous and what you see on T._v.. <hes> especially when you're sitting in the car parked car for a long time surveillance but it is exciting everyday's defraying praying. I love my job. Well you mentioned before we'll get to that later but dumpster diving. That's part of the job. I can't look like this Paul <hes> so that's you know you can find a lot about people people when you <hes> done their trash or when you dive in their trash <hes> as a investigators were paid professionals to find facts were fact finder so you know discarding trash is all it tells all about a person <hes> for the most part but <hes> it's a great way to <hes> get snow somebody I mean some people do <hes> discard their trash and they can tread it but you can find a lot of male or you know personal belongings drug paraphernalia whatever may be and you can find out a lot about people when you do drive. You just need to get so are some. I don't know if you could hear it but outsiders studio. The the trash truck was backing up. I thought I hope he's throwing mine away here right now. That's our next step Paul Paul Paul Dumpster diving so Machi <hes> what are what are the type of cases that you normally work on well idea a lot of surveillance. I also do background investigations which includes social media investigations as well as criminal defense and Civil <hes> such just business litigation and family law related cases okay yeah the Family Law and we've talked about before so those get pretty pretty Harry definitely. I'm sure you deal with a lot of with those type of cases or clients clients yet but I never ever. I never get to that level. I never really get to see what happens. Share so on the kind of on the background check so what kind of people are hiring you for background. Check background. It could be large firms on wanting to recruit somebody an employee potential employees or could be a father curious to find out who their daughters dating <hes> it could be <hes> <hes> a woman who's going to marry somebody or vice versa a rich men <hes> warning to marry a woman with not too many very secretive pass so we could be <hes> I work with people in the private sectors. Well is the <hes> the public irksome private companies as well as a private individuals so it can be anybody okay so is there. What are the there's got to be certain laws limitations? I know you you and I've talked about that before. So how far or can you go. How far can you push without crossing the line of invasion of privacy? I guess well well now. I'm going back to the <HES> preemployment or background on we can we can get access to any public records so <hes> basically juvenile records were able to obtain <hes> but we can get any civil records criminal history <hes> for employment you you're not able to ask specific questions like felon or have you been convicted did this and that <hes> but we as long as we don't cross the line as far as invading <hes> <hes> for example we cannot run somebody's credit report without authorization so employer has. There <hes> the potential candidates <hes> authorization we can run the credit but we're not able to do so without prior authorization <hes> also during surveillance for instance we can only record what the public or what the naked I can see so for instance if finding it to do if I'm working insurance fraud case for example and the subject and subject to the person that were investigating if the subject is in their backyard and their mowing John and they claim that they have back injury but they're mowing lawn there right near Skateboard Cetera etc and there's a people or some sort of a small opening we cannot put our video camera into that whole does that we cannot no so whatever <hes> the naked I can see so if you if you standing back you know fifty hundred feet away and we can see it in plain sight than we can record that but we cannot go over above and beyond to record anything that we see all right so is this crossing the line so going up to someone's window and then the drapes are open is is that I it is too far yeah. I'm just saying why you don't do this work. I've really bad you just leave out to me but <hes> but that's definitions naked I I mean right. So what what are we miss. Let's say that you know you are <hes> that's private property so if you are going somebody's private how private residence and you if you let's say you're in your car for instance and the curtains open and you can see through from your car that's legal but if you're stepping over the person's house or the sidewalk or have you done. That's crossing the line. Okay that's key that can mean concern as they come on. You guys all on T._V.. There was breaking in there always jiming the law and doing all this stuff. Come on the glowers thing so you see on T._v.. Fall I promise you we do I mean we we are governed by the Bureau Security Investigative Services <hes> in California so we do have to buy by certain laws so if we get we can do certain things and sure there are plenty of investigators out there who are nothing'll and who do you who goes above and beyond to cross outline they they can't be penalized. They can get their license suspended. What's the rules on recording voice recording audio? You Have California the Party state so you have to get the person's authorization so you cannot record without their consent. So if you're on the phone conversation you do have to get their consent to record okay is that otherwise is illegal or just inadmissible well. Where's that both both okay yeah? It could be about okay it definitely an admissible in court so audio recordings are not admissible in court anyway I thought because they're easily doctored and edited. That's true that same same video as well so you just need to so any investigator or every investigators say we need to keep the raw footage so any editing <hes> misconstrued as editing or cannot be not authentic so we have to if the if we need to cut some parts out <hes> for whatever reason if the video is two hours long there's only two two seconds of any certain activity week insurance sure but we do need always need to keep the raw footage but you know not every case goes to court so a lot of cases `specially for private individuals individuals for infidelity case for instance. They usually don't go to do not go to court so let's start talking about those so yeah. Let's give us a case. We're going to talk about the Jeff Basis case here and that was famous rumor where he got caught. Basically you know fooling around and his wife here. It's led to this bazillion dollar divorce here right well. Actually I WANNA talk about the power. Roberts cage very complicated yeah so give us a good example like a really choosy example of a fidelity infidelity case okay <hes> well really great case memorable case that I can remember as and we were my my cell phone. A colleague of my we went down to San Diego. <hes> we went to this exclusive club and the client was the husband and he's suspected of his wife <hes> she was early thirty ready shot at they had a three year old together and he's client has been suspected that she was cheating as well as using drugs and we see or he hired us to see if we can do or find out both to tip date evidence about so what we did was now. I love approaching subjects and be from them because that's when you can get a lot of great information so what happened was we went inside a club and side note Paul. Do you remember the <hes> the group and back in the nineties called digital underground the Humpty dance so they were applying. They're performing the night that we went worked on infiltrated group and you were singing with them. You're actually he grabbed my hand and say you are very beautiful. I kid you not in the digital anyway story. That's another story Saturday. So what happened was I. We always have to make sure that it's safe to approach coach and befriend this subject so of course no bar environment. It's great because they're usually ranking on their usually having fun wouldn't think that a pretty girl walking up to them is investigate. I mean I would think that you you disarm everybody everybody. You don't look like some big rumpled. You know <hes> Colombo kind of cop here something away with the mustache exactly we can spot a mile away. Thank you for bringing that up. That's one point idea wanNA bring that to okay okay so what I do is I befriended the subject the the wife and the mother and my colleague who is a male he be well after after she arrived she and her girlfriend <hes> were there. They were drinking dancing. They're having refund and come to find out that she met up with a male and they're very chummy and so we had a hunch that it was her boyfriend and now after they start kissing and dirty saying we figured that yeah we have the right guy gave it away yeah exactly so my colleague the male investigator he befriended the boyfriend okay and so as it turns out the boyfriend and he had a very distinct name anyway he it was a drug dealer as as the boyfriend suspicions true so we all are partying pick them exactly so we were dancing. We're having a good time. We're talking and of course I'm getting all the juicy we gossip girl and she just tell you this like. Just you know any hey stranger. Hey let me tell you all about creativity how to come in as an investigator birt's wheel spinning now. I'M GONNA say once you once you get to know Machi after about thirty minutes you could say any Li. Li need to know how to talk as well as ask questions so I'm very approachable so now. Now's liked talk and I can be from the rock so we were just talking having a good time so the subject and her girlfriend and I we all went to the restroom and when Girls Club you guys probably don't know this but we we can go into extol together. If there's a big line. Oh yeah especially if it's a big handicap stall we go into Stallworth Bart. I'm Outta here. I'm just kidding so are we went into the stall and <hes> and as I stated we she was by this time Tommy. Where are they mad how long they been seeing each other what they do what kind of things he likes to its etc well Lo and behold she sits on announced on the toilet? She's going to the bathroom and she's going number. One and then she whips out her cocaine purse so I get the money shot of her ding cocaine while Ping peeing on the radio you just and so there was a great evidence and then <hes> after she stood still what you took her picture should doing hidden camera hidden camera camera no audio of course I kept the audio out but I did have a video recorder on a hidden camera in my purse as well as my have my phone and I was pretending like I was texting and I was recording are so I had two shots so so now we go out and then <hes> we met with boys again and then they stern after party well by this time we're done partying quote unquote so what we did was we met up with the husband after she took off with the boyfriend and her friend today after Party and then provided the husband with evidence that he was looking for so that case out to be <hes> I mean mission complete <hes> but yeah there's a lot of <hes> there's a lot lot of great infidelity stories. I mean it's not like well. I've never seen this show cheaters but <HES> I it didn't go about that overboard but I mean you do have to be careful though because a lot of clients and the suspicious spouses they want to do right along with you when you're on surveillance chasing their spouse yeah. That's not a good idea because there was a time where there you could potentially witness a confrontation so let's say the husband or the wife sees inaction. They can easily go attack and they're you know that wouldn't be called the Jerry Springer show. That's a different so far has no idea to ask Nash. Stop careful. There's another case you guys interested okay so this case was out in L._A.. And I I was a little bit intimidated about this case because the person the subject so the white excuse me going back the wife suspected her husband who was a former gang member and he had a teardrop tattoo on his face well she suspected of him cheating on her friend on the whites friend and the and they're all friends so the the wife my client and the subject and the girlfriend will her boyfriend fan was the husband's best friend and he was in federal prison for murder so next case so you're working. You're trying to investigate a guy who's in a gang and there's like their murdering people and you're going to try and find ed piece cheating or not. I wouldn't tell founded I then they're check yeah so what happened was this is out now lay and <hes> I was doing surveillance they met up in the street near a medical center and took one car and went up to the Hollywood sign and was able to follow them having lunch and going into the Hollywood sign and you know hiking and kissing and holding hands etc well when they were leaving. I lost them in traffic which happens quite often due to whatever <hes> weather conditions or traffic or have you anyway so what I did was <hes> since I didn't know where or their whereabouts I went went ahead and park or when I went ahead and went back to where the girls the girl that the person who they're cheating wet their cost test bats okay so I went back to park by the suspects card well. This is again <hes> in Los Angeles. It was a bad part of L._A.. And at the time I was driving a B._M._w.. And so my car stood out so what I was I had park my car and I had a dump my car and the the parking lot and then so I am the plus this area was like I said it was kind of a sketchy neighborhood so and I couldn't be seeing on foot with care my equipment so what I did was found an old car parked in the street it was a van is a black man. I can remember clearly. I'm sorry in Anbar at drove off. She just whatever takes I cars sure no problem so what I it was. I noticed that the car had parked parked there for quite a bit was very dusty dirty and <hes> just looked naked like somebody banded it. So what I was I hit I crawled underneath a vehicle. The van and I was waiting and for them to come back so I can get the quote unquote my money shot. So is your mother. No you're do oh yes. She's very fearful. She's always it'll be careful please. She thinks yeah she thinks I'm out there. You know killing murder but yeah she gets very full. I mean it. It does get kinda sketchy sometimes but like I said I I'm pretty gutsy. I was GONNA say ballsy but I don't think he can say balls for sure. You can't say on the radio can't say the word ballsy absolutely can't yeah so. I was laying a neat the car I was sweating bullets. I mean these we're talking gangbangers right and in mill of L._A.. Ease part of town our town and I'm just waiting. I me what I it was. Probably I'd say twenty thirty minutes before they came back but it seemed like it's five hours before they came back so what I did was. I have my camera ready. I'm shaking. I'm sweating and they finally come. I and there are coming to subjects car. They parked their car and they're kissing their goodbyes and the suspect the female suddenly grabs him in the balls again. Oh yeah number word you can say balls but nutball Z.. It's just a clarification here so I got the money shot again so that turn out to be great case I submitted my report and spoke to the client and of course you know these type of cases I it doesn't I wanNA come beat. The are living tyrod threatening a Pulitzer prize the ball shod. That's the money show Oh that's a great idea who's got the best shots so that was great case but <hes> another great case now a couple minutes infidel case case <hes> this case the wife hired Macias expecting her husband of cheating on her so I followed him from he flew in Ontario from Sacramento so we went on -Tario the volume to Irvine then to palm springs Yuma Arizona and. And the objective was to determine whether or not he's meeting up with his girlfriend hotel and the wife. The client didn't know which hotel he was saying it anyway make long story short fast forward the wife. The client asked me to approach him at kind kind of activate to see if he would buy you get paid extra to be Bait. That'd be so rich and you get paid by the mile so what I did with again. I want my your expense events reports so I use my charm. I approached on. He was sitting in a bar watching <hes> watching sports approached <hes> befriended him. We hung out he bet we went to pool. We what our employees employees and then <hes> but before that I what I had to do I had to determine which hotel room he <hes> he was in so I jumped in the elevator with him when you check into the hotel and by this time I was you know dressed up I had baseball cap big sunglasses glasses and wearing shorts and teacher and then after I determined a witch hotel room he was in. I went downstairs and I rent or I got the room across from him. So I can see WHO's coming in and out okay so fast forward so the the has been there subject that he and I <hes> you know we hung out and he was interested so that that was that was a mission accomplished again and so what happened was after my report and my my videos and my photos and such the white the client called me that Machi you'd better get higher social media accounts off the Internet because he knew exactly who you are and he's pets so that was pretty yeah why not now you have a stage name. I can't tell you my stage. No tell him okay. We're running out of time so I WANNA make sure hey you are a female and what I would presume a male dominated industry right so as a business owner just like committed to how how tough that and accomplish that what it's actually believe it or not one of my niche. My business is the fact that I'm a female because I'm very approachable assuming <hes> when I do wooden statements or interviews who's <hes> you know I'm approachable and for instance. If I'm interviewing somebody who was <hes> you know who's a victim of a crime for instance. They're scared to talk to people talked cops or former cops on the person you know be finding interests common grounds building rapport so that works to my advantage <hes> and also the fact that I stand out because I'm a woman and people remember me so I get in the don't expect it so the your disarming and <hes> i. I'm really aggressive and I don't give up <hes> so you know they know that I can get the job done so <hes> I it. It was tough at the beginning but once I proved to the clients who are mostly Chinese once they saw kind of work I produce Dan. They started calling me back and refer me outed mostly infidelity and background checks or do you do corporate espionage corporate investigate offices. I don't diva offices but I do get clients who who or potential clients who say machi. I need your help. I think somebody is somebody put a bug in my in my walls and you're listening to my conversation and they're going to bomb me etcetera etcetera unusually. There's <hes> those potential Joel people turn out to be kind of exactly just hearing voices exactly all right so we're we're near the end so monkey. I have the honor of asking my guest their final question and that question. What does your ultimate listen learn over your career as a private investigator okay so two minutes here okay so the ultimate lesson is as <hes> in the acronym is Towed T. O. A._D.? Sorry so to t- think outside the box one step ahead of the game a aggressive and de dig dig so you know you need to think outside the box to become come a good investigator because you know not everything is fit squarely in a box and you need to step out from you know where you are and thank okay. What does this person going to do? Is this person cheating or is this personally committed fraud <hes>. You need to think like them. So what you need to do is need to do your research and you need to know them better than their spouses know them or their best friend on them so you need to get into a hat so it's kind of like psychology. Almost you need to do that. <hes> you always need to be one step ahead of the game and you need to eat outsmart. All your all your colleagues. You need to <hes> just think ahead and you know every investigation I do whether it's a small case as or it's a huge case. I always do background investigation and social media investigation on all my subject and suspects and their friends and their family so I do a lot of research because I'm always I always have to be in the now and more information information is ammunition right <hes> and be had to be aggressive and I just don't give up. You can't give up in this industry because if you do you won't you won't get any clients and you won't <hes> you want to complete or <hes> obtain your goals all that you want to relentless ruthless Oh yeah she did on oh. My good thing is we do with a SMILE DIV dig usenet dig dig until you can't on digging more like I said I liked pre people wrong or prove appoint or no. We're paid fact finder so we have to do our job and that's how he becomes accessible in this industry so great hey before we leave. How can people reach you a website email phone? What are you got absolutely <hes>? My website is W._W._w.. Dot Kudaka P._i.. Dot Com. That's my last name. That's K. U. D. as in David Aka P._i.. Dot Com am I saw number is nine four nine eight seven four four one eight and don't Worry Stage Name is Aka. She said Aka so there's a there is an also known as all right Mike. He thinks this is a lot of fun. Here's an honor you guys think I seven years of doing a thousands of shows. We've never had a private investigator. Say ballsy. Never thank goodness. She can't say that so much everyone is tuned. We'll look forward to be back in the studio. Next week. Cheers tune in next week for the latest edition of the Zandbergen Report Tuesdays at two PM catch up on our recent shows by visiting Bart Zandbergen Doc pod bean dot COM zandbergen in Bergen report is also available on Itunes Iheartradio spotify interested in being featured guest on our show or have a question. You'd like to hear his answer email podcast at part Zandbergen dot Com bar as Zandbergen C._F._p.. And LETITIA BURR AF are registered investment advisers with optimistic and registered representatives with grammercy securities INC member F._i._N._R._A. S._I._P._C. Investment Advisory Services are offered hurt by optimists eight under S._e.. Registration at farmers insurance we know every windshield collision has a unique sound beetle burt boop drone seen it covered it click for more we are underwritten by farmers truck fire insurance exchange affiliates products available in every state introducing the new buttermilk crispy chicken biscuit McDonald's. We don't need that music made with tender chicken. Let's lose the echo on a warm buttermilk.

investigator machi Zandbergen Paul Bart zandbergen Machi Kudaka L._A San Diego Sam Spade Zandbergen murder Jamie Progressive Orange County Jaime Sawyer Miami California
Insurance Industry, Private Investigator and Agent (with Jeffrey Rogers)

Filter Free Amerika

1:51:36 hr | 11 months ago

Insurance Industry, Private Investigator and Agent (with Jeffrey Rogers)

"Wale filter free. America is where bone shiny black shows liberty liberty and a Still to free America Mother Fucker EH. hello hello hello filter three America podcast listeners. Welcome back to the filter free America. podcast all right guys. I got a great podcast episode. Ready for you right here Before I talk about the guests let me talk about the My experiment. My test. That I that I had going into this episode. Okay as I've mentioned many many times the lifeblood The drive the mission statement. If you will of the filter free America podcast is at its core is Exploring humanity through conversation and testing the ongoing theory that every single person walking or rolling rolling if they don't have any functional legs or they don't have any legs at all whichever They they all have a story about them. Something that's interesting about them. No matter who it is right even the most boring most mundane personality type individual has at least one good story. Three and my goal is to try to dig that story out. Capture that story and presented to you In the form of interesting podcast content. Okay now without reminder. This was the test that I did. I was like you know. It's really easy to find interesting stories when you're talking about I don't know Drug the dealers or I don't know what else are we talked about. We've talked about people with with crazy. Medical conditions things like that. Those those stories are are pretty easy to find the right there on the surface there there. Low hanging fruit not from quality but for ease of a podcast producer Easy to get to type stories stories. Okay so I wanted to test my theory and and go to the extreme of the direction I wanted to find subject matter that on the surface if you really even if you really look at it hard. You're you're still your brain tells you this is GonNa be fucking boring right so I decided to test that right and I decided to talk to an insurance agent. Yeah right I know that sounds fucking I like what I thought of the idea. Half my brain with asleep when when the term insurance turns Asian popped in on like this no way is talking to an insurance agent going to be interesting at all right but that half my brain was wrong in the half of my brain. That does a lot of drugs. said No. What's do this? There's going to be an interesting story here. You just got to have the conversation and make it happen and boy was the drug drug-using side of my brain correct this time as it is often. The guest is episode is a is a handsome gentlemen By the name of Jeffrey Rogers. Jeffrey Free Rogers and as my intro implied already he works in the Insurance Agency. He started out in the Insurance Agency as a insurance fraud investigator and now he is what is called the commercial line producer. Right and yes. I was confused by that title to Commercial Missile Line Producer. I like what he cut. Lines of coke for a living is that what you do know and I was mistaken sadly But no he. He sells insurance now. That's what he does ramp ramp Super Super Good Guy to let me let me say that from do. I really really enjoyed having this conversation. Very interesting dude. And just just a fun guy to talk to What we cover in this episode We we started out the basics His training to get the position that he's in today. I ask him a little bit about the money. Okay how much money you can make in there. It's a lot of money and All the basics but probably the stories he has about being an insurance fraud. Rod Investigator are some of the best parts of it Super Funny and interesting stories. About what insurance companies do to investigate investigate people making claims especially ones that they know to be erroneous. Big Word What else was there Oh you also the also from his time as you know preposition selling insurance. He's got some pretty crazy stories about policies that he sold and and and issues within within the insurance company that he has to deal with including a story that had included a road rage Shooting and attempted cover-up. Yeah you got you gotTa hang in there for that story to Lots of good shit Let me give a couple of plugs for him as well to Again I mentioned his name was Jeffrey. Rogers R. O. G. E. R. S. and If you WANNA talk to him. He's with assured partners. That's the name of the company and if you want to contact him and talk to him about insurance stuff maybe you want to get a policy. I gotTA policy through Ruin My. I've actually insured my balls through you know just in case like cut a mom shaving or something But anyway just send him an email to J. Rogers at ABY HE MINNESOTA DOT com again. It's J Rogers R. O. G. E. R. S. AT A P MINNESOTA DOT com the A stands for assured partners. Or maybe Adrian Adrian Peterson. I don't know one of those two things But he specializes and contractor's liability and he covers there's all over the Midwest so if you're so inspired to contract something Yeah get insurance for real fast love you mentioned the sponsor of the podcast cast simple website dot. US simple website die us. Simple website dot U. S. regular listeners. Say It with me know what they do right right. They build you a website using the squarespace website. Builder Right now in some of you guys here. I've heard about squarespace. You're supposed to be able to do it yourself enough. What are you stupid Joey? Yeah I am sometimes and especially when it comes to technical shit so if you're like me and you want help using squarespace or you want to do it completely early for you go to simple website dot. US That's what they do. They have like a bunch of like computer masterminds locked in a closet there i. I can't confirm this but I was told this okay I heard that they went around the country and they kidnapped all the expert technical people That know how to use squarespace space kidnapped Ryan. They locked them into a basement. They chained him against the wall. And they feed him like fucking putting Shit right but what they do is they force those those Those programmers grammars to make websites right and in a force under the threat of murder and death and We've learned anything in life. It's that people do things under the threat threat of murdering death way better than any other threat right so they make the websites right so what you do is contact. The people who are holding people prisoner send them a little bit of money me and they will build you a website. They were forced those people and between their pudding meals to make you a website. Do It really really good. They do Also even if you don't want your website built from the ground up right they will just help you build a website that you're working on yourself because we have one issue here one issue there will be more than happy. You take a look at that and help you improve website that you're building on squarespace on your own already. Also if you have got it all figured out and you don't need any programmers programmers. And he's smart. People locked in basements eating pudding to help you. You just going to do completely on your own I still suggest to go Going to simple website dot. US because go there. You'll find some free tips and tricks that you can add to your already clearly. Abundant skill set of website building and That's completely free doesn't cost you any money free free free But just go to civil website dot. US simple website dot US simple website dot what you s all right Lasley before we kick this episode off. Please take time to make sure you're subscribed if you're listening to this to this podcast with the very first time. Um You like what you're hearing Already mentioned my balls and people locked in basements. So clearly you're on the right path to finding Entertainment excellent there Subscribe right subscribe subscribe. So you get alerts and reminders. Every time I drop another high quality built free America podcast episode. It's aren't there for you. Live remind on your phone do Hickey. Whatever right also if you've already subscribed good for you good for you? You're halfway there to being a fantastic an I and superior filter America podcast Listener Fan Next up you need to do to achieve that that that title is to May leave a rating and review the words rating in review. Especially if you're on I tunes especially if you're on tunes to what is it called now keeps saying I keep saying I itunes or whatever but it's all separate now right because it's it's Was He apple. PODCASTS and apple music are so Yeah go to Apple podcasts. The final two free America on Apple. PODCAST leave a five star rating five stars. It's all we accept here is just just five stars sorry save your four stars We need five stars here and leave a little review right. If you enjoy the PODCAST. PODCAST that you get for free for free the least you can do leave a little bit of a message as a I enjoy Listening to this podcast. It's it's really great because you could do that verbatim Mike you don't anymore I don't care you can totally say that exactly word for word. Now be just enough. Where you can embellish a little bit? You could be like EOS bland filter free America podcast in a in a hospital with a room full cancer patients and The minute Joy started talking All their cancer went away. It was it was amazing. His his voice is a magical Makes you subscribe something like that. You know just just turn it up a notch kind of thing a little bit of embellishment never heard anybody all right. Let's kick kickoff this episode because you don't need to hear me talk anymore What are you gonNA call this one? Well let's see we talk about him being an insurance industry and he is private investigator. What are we going to cost a private investigator for ensuring industry? There we go. There's no thought at all put into that. Just totally making that off up off off the cuff okay. So here we go. Here's the episode. Private investigator for the Insurance Industry. Would Jeffrey Rogers right here on on a filter free America podcast. Let's go ooh There no provision in your policy procedure this magnitude of life insurance. You could always use a little more. It's it's a less expensive policy. Unfortunately there there are some restrictions to me acclaimed man as a search is an operating table and those pencils mentioned scouts and those papers are not just. Statistics were compensation they're alive with drama twisted. It hopes dreams so start by telling me. How long have you been in the insurance game Well I've had two different stints and insurance. This time around has been two years side Milan's producer I focus on contractors and construction in companies My first go round insurance was from the other end. It was more of a service aspect for the insurance companies themselves. I functioned as a private investigator for Northern Author Reporting Service based in Minneapolis. I did that for a couple of years so you didn't. This isn't like you didn't move from one position to another got into that area. You're doing the investigation. Yep I I When I first met my wife I was a private investigator? I think that's the line that I used at the bar to pick her up But yeah it's it sounds like glamorous years here's investigation almost like CIA basic. Oh you'd be surprised. The tickets bill to talk myself out of You do because you're typically as a private investigator you're parked in suburban neighborhoods and more often than not especially in today's society. People are Leery of predators be sexual or whatever and they would call in. Because I mean I'm just I'm GONNA minivan and my windows are all blacked out not like tinted but actual black curtains hanging so you can't can't see in And that does look alarming during the middle of the day especially if they don't recognize the van so I would have to call in like five. AM saying I'm going to be in coon rapids Conducting adopting surveillance from six. Am until four PM today. Or if I'm in town let the cops know so when people start calling and there's a creeper in our neighborhood then they'll tell them yeah he's actually working for us because because I'm doing insurance fraud is a crime and it's not something that your typical police forces equipped to handle because the man hours needed to conduct surveillance on day to day citizens. Zain's is have you ever had an incident like we're out there filming or or doing whatever doing an investigation and the cops get called and the cops come to investigate you and not no or no because like I said I'd make my presence known to the local PD. But I have used police as a cover up when I was being followed by claiming that I was following for. Let's say Reverse investigate yeah because it's my job to not only sit on people's houses and film wondered but with they leave the house. I have to conduct surveillance on their day activities. And sometimes you can't always be so nondescript specially on like country roads you take a right go four miles. Take a left the only other car on the road and I'm going the same way. It's kind of obvious that you're being followed after so long. So I've had instances where they'd pull over and I have to just keep driving an act like I'm not there and then they'll follow me. I had a one driver that was fallen mean became erratic and speeding up on me and did he know who were some Weirdo. He thought I was following following him. Because while I was but he basically busted me for following him and he was speeding up almost tried to rear end. Me and I started driving Karadic on the highway on purpose and I got pulled over by police officer. I sped up to eighty five as I saw a cop on the side of the road and I spent up and swerving on purpose. Just just so he would pull me over in the guy would have to fly by and then I told the police officer thank you so much for pulling the over. You have no idea you to save me. He's like what are you talking about. I was like Walmart private investigator and I was following that Ford truck and he was following me and he was. I thought he was coming maybe to harm me because he noticed that I was falling in the COP. Said don't fucking doc in uses like that and let me go. I think that's a good idea what I also tried the once I tried the old Go into the car. Wash thing uh-huh to get away from somebody as well and that didn't work that no it didn't work. Has Anybody ever like knew what you were doing like these like. They knew that they were acclaimed. Or whatever in in your washing them and they figured it out the realization of who I am to them. I mean. I've interacted with people that I'm doing surveillance on in certain situations because you have to but the more more often than not when they realize who I am and what I'm doing it would be in a courtroom o'casey okay see me you know showing up as a professional witness But no if I get busted typically I would just drive only everyone busted about four or five times by people that I'm falling hauling so it's pretty infrequent but it does happen. It's part of the job right. was like when you're when you're in court and they realize you're that motherfuckers been sitting in the van. Yeah one of my house house. Long one specific one I had to get kind of intimate with I would done A. I was tasked with conducting surveillance on a work. COMP claim lady worked in a factory in the county area and she was out on work com for about six months. And They WanNa meet a Taylor while I found out that she was working moonlighting for a local Oh bowling alley and I needed to get film of her doing that job. So I posed as an appraiser for like mortgages and I brought in a computer and you know you can't just walk into a bar and start filming in everybody's GonNa be okay with that. You'RE GONNA ask questions so I had to conceal my camera. I had a little camera camera and I put it in that. Like little six pack container. That looks like a beer. Six pack thing but typically at a bar restaurant mom and mom and pop dive bar type place. It had like catch up up and mustard and silverware salt and pepper from the last three diners. Take some garbage empty cigarette packs so I turned turn ketchup sideways and laid it flat and I put my camera on top of that and I pulled up my laptop and I leaned a newspaper up against it and I just sat and pointed at the Bar and I filmed the lady doing her the job as a bartender but she was also the only one in service but she would come over and chat with me and serve me launch and we I went up there probably six or seven times and filmed or doing this job job which he wasn't supposed to be doing because she had lifting restriction of like five or ten pounds and I got her carrying cases of booze and cases of beer a couple of cases at a time which has to be forty fifty pounds and obviously she was able to totally busted. My job is a private investigator when I worked for for Northern Reporting Service essentially was to minimalized -OPAYS of claimed for insurance companies There was a few cases was is my wife cheating on me. Those are pretty few and far between Most private investigator firms don't like taking those cases when you were in this investigating the insurance stuff. You weren't like an insurance company investigator you were a similarly early a private investigator who did other stuff too. Yeah what our firm did everything for for different clients but my main focus was work. COMP cases but northern reporter service wasn't wasn't specifically in Insurance Investigation Company. That's their main focus. I'd say ninety percent of their business is that is that pretty common as far his private. Investigators go now. They're really working as more contractors for insurance more. I would think so. I mean in my four different agencies in Minnesota auto loan that that's basically all that they do but of course I mean we've all seen was that show cheaters There are those types of investigators and of course the Jessica Jones's of the world. You know fine my kid or whatever that type of shit but most been private. Investigators are servicing work comp claims whereas people get hurt at work and if there's no waiver of subrogation in place basically meaning that if you're an employee you can't sue your company because you're essentially suing yourself waiver of subrogation would do But a third party is that common with businesses. Most businesses do have something like that in place for work COMP The exception optioned. That would be like. Let's say I'm driving truck and my I get hurt on the job and you put me in this truck and you knew the brakes for bad or the tires were bald and you create an situation where either negligence title. Yeah it's called employer liability I personally couldn't sue a company for putting me in that vehicle but my wife could cause she's not in any way a contract or contracted employees with that entity. So that's of your killed. She could suing your state's name and absolutely but if I were to die work comp would pay for the data loss and probably three times my annual salary or whatever the life Life Insurance. Sharon's policy through my work would be my wife could go above and beyond that ensue in addition because of employers liability. And that's what that insurance is for. What is the AH when you're doing the investigations you're sitting in your van watching somebody? What's The creepiest thing you've ever cosmic doing? I mean there's got to be some nose picking and some ask grabbing shore invite jerk off and the mainly me boring man. I mean literally most days when they do you get to do our L. works better. It's the race. I mean when you say private investigator at you think peeping Tom. But that's not really it. Generally speaking you're in a suburban environment and I'm parked about a block may be two blocks. Sometimes I have a view of the front door but more often than not. I'm just sitting somewhere. I can see the top your road so if your car leaves can follow you okay But it's pretty boring most days. You're just sitting in a van and it could be especially in Minnesota. We have all all four seasons so in the winter. It's freezing my car can't be running that's GonNa attract attention and in the summertime. My car it's going to be hot. I have a little fan that plugs. Then but it's mostly just watching. DVD's on Blu Ray player or something like that and just hoping that you leave. So I don't have to sit here in this car all day and a lot of peeing in bottles else right just hanging out the door tactics especially nine. Wha what about Like insurance fraud would be a crime crime but have you ever got are observed them commit a crime just randomly like no purchases or did see in northeast Minneapolis. Plus I did see a liquor store gate robbed while I was on a case okay. It wasn't the guy you were follow isn't the Guy I was following your injured. You should be robbing a liquor store if you're backwards and honestly yeah. I did not know robbery until after the police showed up because I saw a guy go into a gas station or go into a liquor store and then Kinda hustle out in like ten minutes later. I saw bunch of squad cards so I I wasn't a character witness. I didn't get involved myself but I did. Witness what ended up being robbery. I'd okay I wasn't you know party do it. I've never senior break the law other than just you know obviously being able to function way better than what they're claiming they're injured like If you say you can't lift weight You know being able to you know more you know Walker supposed to be on crutches or using Walker cane people functioning at a much much higher level than what they say they can do pretty common What's what would be the most extreme as far as somebody claiming that they were couldn't do anything but then you caught them? I Dunno skydiving or some shit like that is the most the most extreme one We didn't talk about. We talked about a few things we didn't talk about this. One is a camping trip that I had to take out of nowhere. I was heading to a spot in Saint Paul and I was just going to spot. Check it make sure he was there. When got there he was loading up camper and he's carrying bins boxes all kinds of stuff unloading the truck in this case? What was the injury that he was supposed to be? Having having a risk guard on he had a he had broken his arm and he wasn't supposed to be able to use his left arm for anything and I got him carrying all all kinds of stuff. Well I called it in and I said Hey John who is my contact at Northern Reporting Service This guys loaded up a camper. Can I leave. And he's like no you gotta go where he's going. I'm going to fucking Colorado. aww Well he ended up going all the way into the superior national forest and I was literally just going there that day to a spot. Check say that it was there because he had he had said that he was out sick and they just wanted me to confirm that he was home. So this is they'd hired me just to do a check so I went there. And he's loading up a camper. Obviously he's not sick. I'm this is on a Friday and I have my suit in the back of my van. I'm supposed to be going to a wedding so I'm not prepared to go anywhere. I ended up having to fall definitely live camping and to follow this guy from Saint Paul all the way up to the superior national forest northern Minnesota is four and a half hour drive and there is no legitimate legitimate camping area there as if he went to a camp ground. I can check in and you know just go camp on the other side of the ground and maybe do spot checks. Well this is. There's no firings there's no there's no nothing. There's no organized anything so I called. John said okay. He's up at this lake. It's called Lake Wilson in the middle of nowhere. There's not a store for probably thirty miles. He says well. Guess what you're doing this weekend and I said going home he said No. So you're GONNA figure out a way to go stay up there because film do all this shit so I had to go to the local store up there which is a PA- Mida and I ended up buying Brian. A tent chairs food for the weekend company pays boy. I got reimbursed for everything. I went to a boat rental place in Beaver Bay and I had to rent a boat food truck to tow the boat and its yes and I ended up fishing. I ended up camping by myself in the middle of the woods for a full weekend and fishing and obey across filming him and his family. All they are up there for the whole weekend. Get anything I got. Yeah I got him lifting stuff. I got him catch anything where you're forcing costs. And why I stay up there and like I said I have I missed out on my friend. KAYLA's wedding and yeah is that so that. How the job is there like Fuck your personal life you pretty much I mean it. It's pretty lonely GIG WHO's forty to fifty hours a week in the van and you're never the cool thing about it. Is You get paid by the mile plus hourly and you get paid the second you turn your car on in in the morning until you get out of your car at nights I mean at some days I might work from five am until one am. Is there any limit on expenses. I'll so you could evolve like when it comes to if I'm like He's going to the Vikings game. I guess I gotTa Buy Tickets Bagging. That didn't I. Did all talk about the state fair but I I did buy food. I got to expense every day. I got and I still have the tent and I ha. I bought a new coat. I keep it to. I got to keep it. I I bought Oughta new Columbia Jacket that I made pay for his fucking cold up there in the north shore. They got the lake effect. It's got to be twenty five degrees colder up there at any point of the year than it is here Camping camping chair. I basically went and spent like four hundred and fifty bucks at permit on Camping Shit and then plus the two hundred and fifty dollars for the boat and I think it was another one hundred. I'm fifty for the truck. Only all that. Yeah they reimbursed for everything. You need to have a credit card if you're going to be a private investigator because you're going to be impromptu expenses but I think that job total of with food and everything was probably close to a thousand bucks expense back to them because they dig depending on the case do they tell you. No you can't spend over X.. Amount is there any kind of limitation in in that context desert. Well there's mandatory minimums Like if I'm going to be driving more than a hundred miles sales because mileages included in pay then I'm required to stay in a hotel So or reasonable accommodations in this instance camping because they want to be on site But I have to get a hotel and if I have to get a hotel then I get thirty five dollars a day per diem. In addition to the hotel food and things like that so adding that type of stuff is all built into the package so I got sent to cases from Minnesota to Nebraska. Both that quotas Wisconsin Iowa all over this you traveling rolling to those areas getting paid for travel getting paid for travel only so back to the camping one so like at night when you're camping and you've got your t are you set up down right his center. How close are you? I was on the other side of the lake in a bay but I could see where they were adding their fire. They're on like a point on and I could see him. You know these zoom only only works so well in the dark but I would basically film in the morning as they were getting up which sounds creepy because instead of it is. There's a two people to do what you do is it's insurance investigators and like fucking in creepers so I called it random guy. `Paparazzi Larry was basically. Because that's that's what it felt. What like I'm taking pictures and excited about getting footage of people that I could give a shit less about right? Yeah Holy Shit. That was the GIG Assume you can't tell me Specific names or anything. But have you ever had to investigate somebody of of prominence or fame and all not really know Couple of business owners That were had filed claims against their own work comp in general now that I'm on the other side of insurance most business owners if you have fifty fifty or less people exclude themselves more. Calm Sir not subject to this type of stuff but there was a few contractors that did There was a roofer up in roofing siding contractor. He's not famous person but he had a really big fucking house very few famous roofers. Big That's about it. Yeah but the the one that I can think of that was the business owner. He had fallen off a roof and was supposed to be in a neck brace and he was not supposed to be able to lift more than five or ten pounds and I ended up. This is another oddly enough. I ended up fishing to catch him because he was up in Strawberry Lake. Minnesota if you have any idea where that is Detroit lakes. This is about three hours. North East of here are north west of here. And it's about another fifteen twenty miles past that so like I said before in most cases I'd be parked on the side of the road in a suburban area. Are you pretty inconspicuous Typical private investigator vans are GONNA be white silver or Tan because of the most common vehicles on the road so that's we're you're mandated to drive Even with that is that vehicle provided to you by my own okay. What do they say to you for? The cost of the day reimburse me for payments While I was working there yeah I had to pay for the vehicle and finance it myself but they would reimburse me I think it was up to three of the van paid off. If we stopped working you'd have to pay the the difference right okay but basically the mileage covered. The insurance and debate reimbursement thing was three sixty five three eighty five a month for the payments on the vehicle so so basically it was free up until I left but You can't do that up in the in the northern woods because there's no suburbs there's no communities you can't but at this guy lived on. He lived on a lake called Strawberry Lake and they did evers or so. I ended up staying at the resort and I was there for two weeks straight and every we day I would just go fish in his bay or the adjacent bay to where he lived on the lake and while he was supposed to be at home resting and unable to move he was actually carrying seventy five pound. Bundles shingles up onto his roof and roofing his own house is so I got him busted pretty well. He ended up going. He ended up not getting anything thing from work. COMP and I think they threaten them with jail time for For Fraud Okay. I don't know if he went to jail or not but to go to Port Bellon went to court to and he actually that was one of the ones is it busted me because on the last day they wanted me to spot check the front of his house and is dry was probably a third of a mile long so I get out of my van and go walk up on his driveway and here. He comes screaming at me in a golf cart. And Doron get outta there and just high tail that out of there and you just not communicate with him or did you walk to where I could on illegal road. I didn't talk to him at all. Aw just disposed to spot check him. Say Walk you're only allowed to go like ten or fifteen feet onto somebody's private property Or you can be on public land wherever you WANNA be in filming So so I was in the adjacent property and I walked where I could see where that wasn't on his property to get a view of his house and he must've saw me or heard me and he comes screaming at me in and the golf cart but luckily I was able to scoot out of there before he caught me did he. Did he know that you were an investigator at that time. I don't think so okay. But he's in court. He knew that I was a trespasser. Asser recognized me in court. Yeah okay so then. He tweeted about the video until he got the Corden. He's not I had hours of him. I'd out because I was just sitting there. I got the world's where they had the shitty aluminum boat and it was mid July. It'd be ninety five degrees out there for some reason with my shirt off and I'm in this aluminum boat out. So the suns beating down but also reflecting backup me. I'd never been so lobster sunburn in my life. You can get you a workman's comp claim way investigating anyone's going I suppose I got the world world's were sunburned but I'm sitting there up there for like. I said two weeks fishing for almost every single day in his bay and I got hours and hours and hours hours of footage. I'm doing stuff. So what is the the most common reaction I to to like when they're sitting in court and then there's this video of them just totally blow in the case of the water. They just kind of shrinking their seat. That well yeah a little bit but I would say the woman. The bartender had a look of like violation in Ed Disgust. That was acting with food and I chat people. I'm pretty talkative person. I chat people. Fuck Fuck Talker fucked up. No but she she was she was hurt. It was Y- She looked like I like I just kicked her cat or something. I don't know she was. She was upset and I haven't been back to that bowling alley since all right. That's crazy. People dropped afterguard man. That's they don't realize you know how many people can be watching them things like that they do it. It's not a conscious thing. If it's not something that you that you're being alerted learned to look for somebody looking at your washing you. People are just oblivious. Most of the time and most bartenders try to be nice to their patrons because they like regulars and that's how you get tipsy no right exactly. That's pretty chatty with me and I'm the only one in the did you tipper was your tips reimbursed. Yes Nice did you tip for good at least twenty percent. Yeah and then I did see her after the case was done before the court thing happened my buddies this is back in two thousand. I want to say six two two thousand five and bar poker was pretty big back and they did a bar poker night there and I went up there and she was hanging out and sitting there bullshit weather for like an hour and a half just hanging out. I wasn't after after the fact after the fact but this is before court so she still didn't know who I was GONNA say. Oh it was just weird trying to you know further this like like alternative person that I had created because I wasn't an appraiser or she's asked me to go house work. You didn't look at any nice houses lately and Blah Blah. Oh Yeah I forgot all about that. Lie had to tell you all she's got like create an alternate so that's a degree of acting and everything else role playing in the whole thing's weird they all shed What kind of I guess? We'll look at the attitude as two different jobs so as in the investigation part. What kind of experience did you need to get that job if any did you learn you win or how did how did you get that job? I I kind of fell into that trap. It was a little bit of nepotism. Would think my one of my best friends growing up as a kid named Andy Andy Kennard and I grew up in his house. He grew up in mind and his dad was the I don't know if he owns the business now but back then he was a partner honor and I was just looking to try something different. He asked me if I thought I could do this. And he put me on training with some of the season guys for a couple of weeks and I had a bit of a Knack Act for it and I just went out on my own and started doing it for him. It was just like a family connection thing. I did have to get licensed. You do have to pass. It's a pretty pretty difficult test A private investigator license license. You have to be a you have to pass a BCA background check. And there's a very in depth raper's out there. There's a background check. There's all kinds of different different licensing. There's a big thick book. It's probably I don't know twelve hundred pages of just what you the do's and don'ts more than we're talking twelve years ago when it comes to get licensed but I studied for about three weeks and then I failed the test. The first time passed the second time. Okay is there any kind of rules. I was like as far as what you when. You're doing an investigation where you have to turn the camera off like for something. Well you can't just sit there and film Generally early speaking If there's no activity you can only take like ten second videos so I would do like when I pull up. Phone taps like they can listen to the phone tap for so long. As if you're not the crime should they got turning off at least that's what they lead us to believe in the movie in the movie one of my buddies Who I trained Ju Jitsu with is? He's an undercover cop and sometimes at the gym He'll be doing extra her like the way cops were overtime. They'll listen to like inmate phone calls and I'll just be sitting there listening to him on his phone but yeah if new of reduced who strikes as an inmate obviously lowered and cars for extra work they like people who are in jail on the phone. Yeah that's how they listened to the phone calls have cops cops. Yeah Com off duty cop so be his from five thirty to six thirty Monday through Friday. There's kids class and he's got kids that are in the class and while while his kids are learning Jujitsu he'll be sitting there Just listening to phone calls as crazy. How went off duty cops? That's how they work overtime. No listen to I mean that's one of the ways you can moonlight security and do other things too but one of the things that they do is listen to make phone calls. Yeah but they're the laws. The OISEAUX Lotto works is an. I asked him about this because I was interested He said you have a minute and a half to listen on any given wiretap. If there's no criminal activity being talked about in the NAFTA tune out for two minutes and then they can tap back in so you would see that in some movies like I think. Casino is looking They he would have the wives chat chat for like a minute bills. Either one say movie yeah same pretty much And then yeah and then they would talk business for thirty seconds and then get the gals goes back on. That's that's that's a legit thing but it's inmates have reduced rates so burnt comes to private investigator. If there's no activity I can't just be sitting there filming your house. You have to be doing something. Okay Gotcha So it wasn't really any kind of threat what about Pay For for that job for the investigating. Let's get into job. What were you making on your your expenses and all that? I guess it was mileage. So mileage is an industry standard. It's a state regulated thing. I think it's fifty eight cents a mile. No I saw and like I said if you're traveling more than one hundred miles you do get paid for those miles. But then you're also not round tripping that so if I have to go one hundred forty miles to where I'm going. That's what I'm getting that day. Plus plus an hourly and I mean when I started I think it was fifteen or sixteen bucks an hour plus mileage but then by the time I left it was significantly more than that grave it was producing coming up with good footage. I think you're awarded based on you know your production cash So what about on the investigation side of of the stories. You told me one about the the footage and the bar. Do you have any other stories specifically about either weird or interesting investigations. That you've done. Yeah I got to. I mean I was telling you a little bit about the earlier. We added track and follow somebody in a very public setting and it was super awkward. I was following a guy from Saint Cloud. I didn't know what he was GONNA do. I never know what they're gonNA do. I show up and six. AM usually when I get there sometimes five am and I sit there and then the lights come on and take snap of that or if they come out and get the mail or do whatever they do. This guy was. This was at the end of the summer and he ended up going from Saint Cloud the state fair so I had to follow him. And that's a long way to fall somebody to were talking to our thirty five minutes. Plus when you get into the denser traffic it's pretty tough off detail. Somebody in finding parking finding parking has the hardest part but luckily we chose able to get there followed them all the way to the state fair and in this guy had supposedly back in knack restrictions wasn't supposed to be twisting turning Bending things like that. It's very common. Tom And I don't know if he had whiplash or whatever the case may be I I never really know. Let me guess you jumped on the roller coaster. First thing first thing but yes he definitely did make related to make his way into the mid way. If you're hiding from the insurance are trying to scam the insurance. Why would you go to the Great Minnesota get together? We're we're including an insurance investigator so oblivious you saying they just they don't care they don't be surprised at how often you can be followed. And then there's hundreds of investigators out there working every single day And you would never notice that you're being followed. Because what are we trained to look for. I mean we're talking ten years ago. We're looking for caprice classics. We're looking for what was the other was the Ford Ford Ltd the LTD's the ad but no anymore now we're looking for SUV's than the Dodge chargers anything to with the cops are driving now but we're trained to look for those specific things but you're never gonNA think anything of a white or silver or Tan minivan. That's falling you. Because how many soccer and I. I had a soccer mom sticker on my back window. I didn't have kids at the time. But you try to look look you know innocuous and blend in so you'd never noticed that that type of stuff going on and you even if you feel like you are being followed like I would get to know these people that I'm following because I wouldn't just be out there following them for one day it'd be out there following them for a couple of weeks so if they were going to the gym I would just let them go and I would just be a mile behind go to the gym but in places like this. I didn't know where he was going. Then you have to follow closer but on the highway. How often do you really look in your view mirror? And if you're not seeing that Ford Ltd eighty if you're not seeing that caprice classic you're not you don't care about the the Tan van right just goes in you always try to fall on a straightaway straightaway. You try to follow about a quarter mile behind you try to keep two or three cars behind air between you. They're never going to notice that you're following and people are oblivious even worse today except on their fucking cell phones. Yeah everybody's distracted beyond anyway. You don't even have to hide from anymore. What was I going to ask? I don't know I forgot. Well let's talk about what you're doing now and you're essentially just an insurance agent right. Yep Shaima commercial lines producer. That's a lofty fifty title for sales guy. Basically my job is to interact with my vertical which is contractors construction companies and I do a lot of different vendors. Vendors are right a few school buses things like that But my day to day sometimes I go into the Office for a couple of hours and I might reach out via email or make some phone calls halls and try to schedule a meeting to introduce myself in our process of how we approach the insurance marketplace on your behalf or find out what value add services. Your current agent is implementing in your program. And you'd be surprised. Most people aren't getting anything in return investment for their for their insurance Basically there's two ways you can pay an agent. You can either have commissions that are built into the premiums that you pay which is the most traditional way or you can have have commissions pulled out and pay your agent flat fee Too little a little less common but as a business owner. It might be something that you'd be interested it in. Here's why is because certain carriers Be At your EMC or Cincinnati or travelers Acuity any of the major commercial insurance lines Berkeley They pay different rates for commission. So your agent might keep you with a company specifically only because they get twenty percent from these guys whereas if they shopped and save you five percent and put it over here they be cutting their own throats or a good way to look at it in a way that I like to do it is to remove that conflict of interest that way when I'm servicing my clients. I remove that and that way. I don't have to cut my own throat. I'd rather just put a percentage based on what what you're paying into a fee that way it doesn't really matter who your carrier is right. That's the way to go about it and But my day is going to association meetings Playing Golf with business owners bind people lunch again. All these are expenses for you or these. I mean we do get an allotted amount of expense events. We have an expense account that I can use but a lot of times I try to make friends. These people hang out with them so it's all by bodies a beer or you know it's it's not a big deal. But yeah if it's a big thing like if I'm GonNa go pay two hundred and fifty bucks. Russell played a golf event. Yeah the you know the company's picking up that to pay that. So how did you get. How long in between doing the investigation work which was mostly working for insurance companies to doing this job? How long of a gap between There's there's about. Nine years was a private investigator and then I got married and I had kids and I didn't couldn't be gone as much it's like I said you're on the road I mean I could be Nebraska. I almost no notice I could be in my home and blamed at the time and now tomorrow morning thing I have to be in Fargo and I won't see it for two weeks. That life isn't very conducive to being a parent and be very person. So I changed jobs. I started working for At the time it was allied interstate as a bill collector for the US Department of Education. And I did that for about seven years and then I transferred to each EMC which is the same contract United States student loan debt and I maintain their for another two years and then what happened is presidential will and legislation changed the ability for third party to collect on federal that so the commission structure just plummeted. I went from being like a hundred and eighty eighty thousand dollars a year employees which is hell salary for collector to collecting the same dollar amount but being paid like seventy grand so visit a change. One one yeah way more than half and I my best friend Match Neider who I trained Jitsu with WHO got me started training told me that I would kill late in this field. I have a background in sales from before too and I went and took the steps to go get licensed which I went to Kaplan University. which is it's it's like a forty hour program that's twenty hours per line Typical agents can have education requirement. There is you have to be you. You have to get a certification from you can do it. You can do it online. You can do it at home but you do have to have the M- the minimum hours required. It's forty hours Will I mean you don't have to have like got to have a college degree. No College degree now and the training. I don't think anybody in the class had one. Maybe they go But not also stands to the washout shot rate to. Because I'd say about. I'm pretty sure it's something like seventy percent of people who attempt to become an insurance agent. Wash out in the first two years because said difficulty of training or is that It's it's such a vast industry. There's so many different avenues to know about. It's not insurance has so many different loopholes. Why live things won't get paid why they don't get paid why they should get paid wire premiums the way that they are why? There's there's so many different avenues you there's work. COMP there's here's auto forty different ways that you can write auto. There's hundreds of different class codes on what type of employees you have and you can't specify you can't physically can't know all of you need to find a niche focused and something that you have a background. I worked construction and I know my way around Hammer. I know the footfalls. The trip slips and falls I understand the hazards so I talked to a blue collar guy and we can connect on a level and I can explain to them what we can do to improve. What's going on how we can showcase what you're already doing in the best light and I understand how to to sell that to someone of that ilk? 'cause I just I had that but if you don't have some sort of specific training in some other area you can't walk into a bank because I mean banks have to buy insurance to doctors have to buy insurance medical but in home living assisted living Everything needs everything needs insurance. And if you don't have some expertise in what you're doing and from from working in a work comps investigation claim especially with manufacturing contractors which was mainly were these injuries and claims come from because they're high risk confinements. I I know how claims happen. I know how the people that are finding the claims react. I know how the back end works because I worked in that area so I understand stand it and I can explain it to a business owner. We can come to common ground and we can see value in each other. So that's why I've been pretty successful with what I'm doing but for what I was talking about. But there's people that that that don't come in and they'd go to these classes and they don't have a degree to agree would help definitely makes you more well-spoken more more well rounded you might understand business and finance and marketing which is all part of what I do But it's really your your agents. Job is to create relationships. I the relationship with the carriers need to create relationships with prospects and I need to merge those two things for mutual benefit and it has a lot to do with with the product itself. Because everybody everybody needs to have the insurance they're going to get it regardless so then it just becomes a point of you selling yourself really at that point. Do they want to deal with you or the twelve weather guys who are trying or gals that are trying to abso same day and you can buy. There's all kinds of different loopholes for insurance like you can have a million dollar building. I've used a million dollars because it's a nice round on number. He can get their head around one of my favorite numbers but you can ensure that building for eight hundred thousand in just eighty percent co-insurance but then if you have an actual loss that that building let's say the whole thing burns down. You don't have a million dollars of insurance. You're already going to be two hundred out of pocket to replace that building because you have a co-insurance clause so it's it's my job to understand my clients risk tolerance like if you actually have this loss. How much can you afford to pay out of pocket? Would you rather be paying more in premium Liam or you're paying more than a deductible in the event of a loss and having that conversation is really what drives the industry and some people aren't comfortable having that conversation in they typically will wash out. Are you talking about the agents of cells me uncomfortable so keep staying on that on that part right there How often when you're when you're dealing with a with a client do they misunderstand you know where the risk is at and in whatever there is there that you're trying to sell them insurance for they don't understand the actual values is that does that happen? A lot are you doing a lot of education. oftentimes in the intro meetings yet I mean we talk a a little bit about Our approach to it. But I'll be honest with you. Most insurance guys just have a buddy from high school that did it. And that's the only thing that they know. They trust their body. They go drinking on the weekends that they go golfing or he chips in you know. Help their kid when they needed a fundraiser. That's these really. It's all relationship drew here and so trying to have this intent. Is I saw an intangible product right. So it's really the main thing is to just be present and then a question answer it. And that's the other thing too is like me. As an agent I have two carriers emission insurance. Because if I lie to you I can can get sued for up to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars for giving you bad advice. And that's you know my licenses on the line every single day and if anybody ever tried to sue you not yet it happens all the time around around the deductible for that on a my pocket would be twenty five thousand dollars even kick in so I need th. That's why you're GONNA see a lot of agents that refused to answer questions or say all get back to you. You're going to get a lot of that because they don't either don't know or be are afraid to get this one. Make sure they know what they think they know. Confirm it and all absolutely so my job. Bob Is really just a look at your current policy and then ask questions about it because there's no such thing as a boilerplate policy it could be Jeff's roofing company and Joey's Redfin Company and the the way you have everything structured could be apples and oranges to what I have and everybody that wants this bid sale. I want an apples to apples opinion. If I come in and you show me a rotten apple I'm not gonNA show you another another one where you know. I don't really care about the price that you're paying. That doesn't matter to me. I'm sure at the end of the day it matters to you but if I sell you insurance and then you have a claim that you're not covered for that can fall back. Lack on Meyer sponsor ability. And I'm not going to set you up to have shitty shitty policy. That's that's where the nuts and bolts of it is I feel like I sidetrack you a little bit on the on on the training part and I know we covered like the forty hours of training on that as far as sort of become a insurance agent in Minnesota In you can be licensed once your license percents than any state in the union you can basically just pay a fee to be licensed in other states so basically you just have to go through whatever your states regulation so in Minnesota so the the training is is is pretty much universal to universal but you pay a fee like. Let's say I'm licensed in forty seven states right now but in Minnesota there's twenty hours a minimum training per line. There's four lines available to any insurance agent Perspective agent There's property and casualty that's PNC so that's going to be everything from your buildings and autos casualty. Those liabilities Properties is private and business property Even though I even though I focus on on commercial insurance I'm still licensed. I could sell your car insurance if you want to. I don't want to do with that I don't WanNa be your bill collector But I could. And then there's life in health and then there's other signal a there's other like add ons you can get like four one K.. And you can be. Se seven certified and things like that But for basic insurance agents most of them are licensed for two or four lines. I focus on property and casualty. Because it's it's really where most of the claims come from and it's where most the premium comes from and I don't want to be involved with the reason you hate your boss because almost everybody hates the boss cuisine health insurance has gone to shit. Shit I most people don't like their agent and that's we're seeing a lot of changes in that that's probably the most common meeting that's accepted right now as we look at your health insurance insurance which could create opportunity but it also creates a lot of headache. And I'd rather stay away from it but through licensing you have to do your twenty hours per line and and then there's a test per line to the test is one hundred and forty four questions and you have to have an eighty percent pass rate income. It there is no to be you have to be There is no. There's no grading. It's just pass fail so if you if your agent tells you that they got ninety three three percent or ninety nine percent on their tests Fulla Shit. Because they don't know it's passer fail you just have to do better than eighty otherwise you don't pass is this. Is this like an open book thing as us us. The the the state testing facilities now are all done online. You basically log into a computer Atta approved facility. I went to the one in Eden Prairie and they take everything everything on your pockets. You can't even have your. Id on you every you're completely tap you're allowed to have a pencil and a piece of paper And then you're at a computer so if you WANNA while you're in narrow when you're going to training there's all kinds of acronyms that they teach you that help you learn things like WC Shavers and the big effect not GonNa go into into what those mean. But they're like wind hail fire and things like that they teach these acronyms because they supposedly help you They didn't I I didn't remember them by the time I got there. But they teach you them and the classes aren't really teaching you how to be an insurance agent. They're teaching you how to pass this test So you go in and you get licensed in sometimes your company would pay for this. I paid out of pocket The class was like five hundred bucks. The test was a hundred and fifty. And then when you have two hundred for your license and then you have to continue to pay for continuing education as you progress every two years you have to have twenty four hours Unless you how many ever. How many years every two years every two years every two years you have to have twenty four hours of continuing education other professional licenses are similar for real estate and mortgage brokers things people professional license they have to maintain CPA's have to maintain. Continuing Education isn't insurance law and rules. It's almost fluid now right because it changes every yeah it changes all the time all the time not only with new products or new things that need to be insured and to understand but lea changes I guess claims drive the market. So good instance of what's going on right now especially in transportation. Asian Is distracted driving's. This everybody knows Minnesota's got the no cell phone rule. I don't remember to call it specifically but you can get a distracted driving ticket. It's like one hundred bucks if you Because they basically say if you're texting and driving it's almost as bad as you being drunk driving Well now commercial insurance carriers are we are looking to remove you and disqualify you from being on a commercial insurance policy if you get that ticket because it's just like if you get a d. Dob and I remember my last was working for delivery company and it was like something like fifty thousand dollar fine if I was to be caught even touching my like. We couldn't even touch our phones this before the the hands free law. Yeah as laws one so there I had the word in my head before I started talking about it. But it's not in effect yet yet but it will be very soon so your bus drivers your truckers. You're meaning those people have to communicate you see. I don't know how many times I see a trucker on the road of the headset. So if Your Hands Hands Free Bluetooth you're okay but uber drivers and they all have those things mounted on there. You can't have that anymore. It's gotta be below the DASH so in those people are going to be removed from commercial. Marshall you can't have the the window mounted anymore it's gotta be below the Dash Line. It's gotta be below eye level. No Shit see that'd be less. That's more dangerous if I have to look down to see my gps versus you know catching it in my line of sight as I'm looking at the windshield. Yeah but I've you'd be surprised if people drive on the road that are just sitting there watching youtube videos or what I've seen. It just blows my mind. Hindsight Lutton porn on their you doing to What's the conversation right now? Going on with within the industry about Self driving cars. Is there a lot of talk about at the entrance parameters of that. It's so hard to ensure WHO's at fault right at? The manufacturer is the last mechanic that worked on the vehicle is is it the company itself is. I don't know how they're going to insure it. That's one of the hot topics the other thing. That's probably probably the biggest hot topic especially in my vertical on because it's becoming more prevalent in different states is marijuana in the contractors working Right now it's the the state that you were your businesses located in That is the governing factor in Minnesota is the most stringent state when it comes to drug testing policies. He's and it's in favor of the employees which is weird so in favour? Well let's say that if I want if you want to come work for me and I don't have a drug testing policy in place and you fall off a roof and again using contractors for ease off the roof and I say I wanNA test smoke weed. They definitely do. If you fall off the roof and get hurt and I want to drug test you could say your high. It's your fault you felt. They're not my problem if if I didn't test you in Minnesota if my policy wasn't to test you before you got hired I can't test you after the accident either okay and even if if I do test you if I do have a policy that make you pee in a cup and you pass Before you hired and then you fail after you get hired and you have a claim. I can't fire are you because I'm required to give you a at your own expense To go to treatment and then you'd have to follow a subsequent testing and I can test you for up to six six months but even if you pop hot again I still can't fire you. Let's say you're a medical marijuana patient which now we have that here in Minnesota You're basically automatically GONNA fail because you're a card carrying member that says hey I have this issue. PTSD CROHN's disease. Whatever the case may be and a medical marijuana payment patient? Well I can't fire you because you're GONNA pop hot and if I try to fire you because you're Maram Medical Marijuana user then you consume me because you're considered a protected classes citizen being that you're disabled. So that's all coming from and Minnesota now glorious future that we smokers are a protected class. Let's say let's say I'm a major contractor a general contractor and I'm doing work and other states like Colorado and it's legal. They're well you can smoke not only medically but recreationally over there and if you get hurt on the job they still they have different laws over there like they could fire you and they don't have to provide you treatment or none of that but because your Home Office brick and mortar is here any employee under my banner has to follow my difficult rules. Oh Oh love. That sucks for them. Yeah so it's all about job description And people of their their lawsuits stemming from from the job description and people that are already in this position that go out and get their medical marijuana card are essentially getting a medical marijuana card and writing themselves out of a job because in the job description if it says safety sentence sensitive which means if you can put yourself at risk or others at risk. You're automatically disqualified from that position if you're a medical marijuana person and that's the only way around all matt law in Minnesota Right now so to get insured to ride around in your Tesla on autopilot. Smoking weed is really really difficult. The I don't know where that would come from. That's interesting I hadn't thought about that but we're GONNA have to because there's there's already some trucks oxen in California that are one hundred percent automated. I don't know what their routes are if they're on close roads but somebody's going to have to be at fault as the camera company. That's filming it. A specific technology that makes it the shot as technology advances. There's all these new the products are gonNA come out and everything is going to need insurance over. We get teleportation machines. They're going to need to be insured. You know there's going to be speaking of technology that's where the claims are coming from right now as cyber and you'd be shocked to find out that what do you mean cyber claims of the most frequent claims and insurance in the world right now cyber security not on people like getting hacked like target but Cyber Insurance isn't just your computer. Your firewall it could be betty's list password urge. She got sitting on her desk sometimes by takes a snap and then access it from somewhere else sells credit card information proprietary information. That's where all the claim your you're ensuring the risk of loss related to identity theft or anything digital but it also it's not just digital could be your file cabinet like if you have If you're an old school mom and pop shop. I worked for a company called American pressure. They deal and Pressure washers parts cleaners all things to do with with high-powered pressure. They sell everything but the way that they do. Their storage system in their filing system is very archaic. They have rooms. That are the size of this house that are filled with different file cabinets. And every single client's got little three by five note cards of everything they've ever bought. So let's say they have order files on Are they have filed our orders on file and they have old credit cards or any type of information. If I came in I swiped a bunch of those. That's considered a cyber risk to because it's data Even though it's not in the computer it's still bad so it could be passwords. Could be your your visa. Swipe machine it could be someone stealing your cell phone and getting a hold of a bunch of numbers and exploiting. That could be anything. It doesn't have to be it can be physical. It doesn't have to be intangible like you know me using malware ransomware so if you open up an email that says you know by this order and you send thirty thousand dollars to the wrong company. 'cause you got a directive live from what looked like your boss to make a purchase or it doesn't have to be that it can be anything so what is the average like like a large like say like a target or something something or what kind of policy are they are. They carrying like. How much protection do they need for? Things like identity theft or issues like that elite billions and coverage dealing with an average day that hundreds of millions of dollars in transactions every single day and. It happened twice in the last two years where their their target red cards with chip sentimental things got hacked. People were stealing money from directly from their bank account and because that's target product product that they use to give you a five percent discount at their store but it still contains your bank information. I mean my my wife's target card got hacked I mean and they're completely allows all on them right here completely reliable but I mean insurance companies paid for that I mean they probably paid a massive deductible. which is I would say? Ten percent of whatever the actual loss was but yeah and and then because of that claim their premiums go up and because they're not a monopolistic they're not the only one that bought that program anybody else that had that type of insurance their premiums went up. That's all insurances is a transfer of risk transferring Risk of one party too many. So so let's say like for example we have hailstorms here every summer right Your House didn't get hit but four blocks that way they got smoked. Your insurance go up whether or not you get a new roof or not. Because you're in that grid right. It's likely that you have state farm along with seventeen percent and the people that live over there or if you have allstate or whatever because when it changes like that doesn't just go within the company within all the company was in the region. Yeah right okay. Calculable calculable and measurable and because they're using that that history to determine what risk factors are and. It's absolutely they all read the same numbers out of hats. Hats and auto is the highest in worst What's the word that I'm looking for the the return? The profit and loss us on auto insurance is the worst it's ever been Debt ree loss ratio is the worst. It's ever been companies insurance companies right out policy. Let's say again million dollars. Give a million dollar property policy our work COMP Halsey and you're paying a million dollars in premium. They're assuming that throughout the year you're gonNA and a half five hundred thousand dollars in claims so you're basically they're looking for a fifty percent return on their investment. So if you do better than that you can get discounts and credits. Let's but if you do worse than that your premiums are going to go up Same thing with auto. So let's say you're paying a million dollars in auto right now for premiums. It's one hundred and eleven percent percent. Loss ratio is the national average. So in every hundred Miller every million dollars that they're bringing in they're paying out one hundred and eleven million dollars. Wow that's why auto premiums keep going up. It's the hardest this market and all of commercial insurance what is specifically about about the auto insurance. What is affecting that that change? Why is it is is it the texting and driving get the fuck out of texting and driving and it's also some states legally I mean I? I'd rather smoke in fly than drink and drive personally. I'm doing you in the silver October thing but people that smoke or especially in states where it's legal now there's more accidents and they're coming out with the Breathalyzer Four. We'd it's going to be released in January so I mean they're cracking down on that. That's that's the main factor. It's more people are intoxicated on the road. And everybody's texting thing in driving. I don't I don't think I've ever seen a fifteen year. Old Kid a cell phone in their hand in Asia or younger. You can't even have a conversation with him anymore. They're just living in their right. I'm Oh I'm sure I'm sure the answer is going to be. It's very less than what you're talking about. Distracted driving or whatever things like that but it is or anything about Cost vehicles because you know nowadays like a modern vehicle A lot more electronics. A lot more things like if you're in an accident A lot more expensive stuff to repair in it. Because they're you're just so more high tech does that as much of a factor or can be because there's different ways that you can. You can write your insurance your policy based on. Let's say that you drive a BMW and it's seventy grand a nice car You if you drive a policy in your car is actual cash value. You'RE GONNA be paying lesson premium then if you're paying based on replacement cost because the moment you drive a brand new car off the lot and drops ten percent values our talking in about sixty sixty three thousand dollars versus seventy thousand dollar car. Replacement costs what it's GonNa cost to give you the exact same thing you're gonna be paying more in premium or if it's agreed value. Let's say we agree that this car is worth fifty thousand dollars and that will pay if it's total right so there's three different ways that you can write rated based on agreed value replacement costs or actual cash value so most people's personal belongings as let's say you are a clothing connoisseur. In every every single piece of clothing was bought it. You know fine tailoring and there'd be a thousand dollar suits in your fifty of them upstairs with your homeowner's policy is written on actual On actual cash value. They're gonNA give you a cost per pound on what your clothing is worth per pound per pound really they don't care what if it silk or if it's cotton or if it's it's linen or they don't care but if it's written on agreed value yes we agree that you have seventy five thousand dollars or replacement cost even even better because prices have gone up textiles things like that for replacement cost is it depends so it depends on how you're at your policy and that's the things that you have to talk about business. Owners is your building because he gave a hundred thousand dollars or one hundred year old building which a lot of these older buildings and like. I say any and no outs out. State cities have Older construction these buildings. You can't write them on our replacement costs because hey they don't make things that way anymore. They need to be there beyond an agreed value. Or they need to be on a An actual cash value. And you have to caution people against actual cash value because if it cost. This building is four million dollars but we can put it back up in three point two. That's what you're GONNA get right. So that's the conversation when I'm talking about risk tolerance those the conversations that really agents need to be having with their business owners versus Sure Yeah my buildings insured for two million. Yeah but how's how's it worded this no to policies they're same okay Asking for Front How hard is it to to defraud and insurance company if Your House Burns down and you're like oh I had like you know a bunch of if you know very valuable paintings or whatever that got burned up and you can prove around so if you have receipts for things thanks? It's a great way to prove it but if they were burned up in the house if you don't have a fire safe for me very difficult to prove if you have for homeowners Um jewelry and guns and things like that they're all set limits. So you might have fifty guns here. You're only going to get two thousand or two thousand five hundred to two fifty two okay. I guess it's close but if you have if you have fifty two guns here you're there's a set amount that's in your homeowner's policy that's going to say on most standard policies that are special form. which is the I'm assuming ever decent form It's probably GonNa pay twenty five hundred dollars for those guns all of them real but if you have receipts it's and you have Personal property written on a separate line for your property which you can do and it's not expensive to do Or photos and you can prove that these things exist and I would typically what safe deposit boxes or for. They're not really for cash. And that's not what therefore therefore images receipts and things that you keep off site at a bank Then you'd have a better claim but otherwise you're going to get wait. What areas of insurance is fraud the most frequent flint and easiest for the for the person committing the fraud to get away with insurance fraud? Easiest way to get away with it That's probably subject. That's pretty subjective. I would think a monetary I thought the energy or energy injury is the most. Yeah probably the most common right. They come up with the most astronomical claims like. Let's say I'm a twenty year old person. Listen and I've been in the workforce for two years and I'm permanently disabled whether or not you are not going to claim that you're permanently disabled and let's say that my life expectancy would have generated seven hundred fifty thousand dollars. That's the claim that I'm putting in then the insurance companies going to everything that they can to disprove your claim which is where a private investigator would come in. Because they'd rather pay them twenty five hundred bucks a week or whatever it is Maybe even ten thousand dollars a week for two three weeks to go get footage abuse doing what you're doing. So they can disprove reduce that so but yeah I would say that the work comp is probably the most common or a death claim. we see several death claims every single year especially in Highway heavy construction. A lot of guys like flag holders seem author the slow down sign. Apparently people aren't reading those. We'll get mowed down olot really. Yeah that happens a lot. It's one of the most common ways people die. No Shit an excavation in companies if they are digging decent holes in their working multiple. I mean not saying this is common but it does happen. Happen if you're digging A big hole or putting digging several holes and you're not properly marking. You're leaving for the day. Pedestrians might wander her into a job site and fall into holes. That happens all the time. steel riggers directors. Things like that falling from heights. That happens quite a bit to also. Then you have to deal with. What was this person making? What Sir projected lifespan But honestly a lot of times. It's cheaper to kill him because if they're going to be disabled not only paying the he painted suffering but you're also paying the Mongolian treatments and how does an insurance company. How do they determine the value? You will be human life and are all human. Life's equal in value absolutely not based on previous. I mean it's all it's all drawn on from from prior cases. I mean I'll all court proceedings liquid stock about the five million dollar hot coffee at McDonald's donalds Roe versus if they did that today you might get twenty grand. The lawsuits draw the Martin drive drive. The market wants. Precedence has been set. They're gonNA follow suit until something has gone driven that price down like we used to see if they re sing with your example. Because you know we'll now there's caution heart and all the cops and they're not going to be sued because alive. Oh because bill has been minimized by them putting the cautions that were on their prior. Yeah okay now I get what you're saying. It's the same same injury it's it's B but but let let's slip and falls like a friend's mom that slipped and fell and Bluer knee out at a restaurant and she ended up suing for like a couple of hundred thousand dollars because they didn't have that caution. What floor out? Well you can still have that. Same injury might come in. That sign might be there. But there's policies that are now in place the this is common for like meaning stores and restaurants. It's just called medpay It's usually like ten thousand or twenty five thousand dollar kitty that they have built into their policy. They'll just pay that in. There won't be a claim it all right so they figure the cost of just settling Ling is less than the cost of of fighting the claim absolutely but they see the potential of being a bigger reward or more medical treatments whatever general liabilities driven by payroll all in your exposure to the public So let's say if gas station the of all kinds of exposure to the public and you're required to keep and maintain proper walkways especially in the winter here in Minnesota Slips and falls happen all the time but if I have like a standalone delivery delivery only pizza hut my general abilities far less so the MED pay there will be different it just based it's all calculated based on previous claims the past experiences this is what drives the market. There's they're not learning from they're not anticipating they're learning from what's happened adapting that way so I guess what I'm asking as far as the value of human life if if a say somebody walking by a construction site construction site a steel beam falls and crushes and kills somebody If if crushes and kills a homeless man who has no prospects no prospects like that versus it falls unlike the CEO of a bank. WHO's making multi million dollars a year is the payout going to be the same or is it going to be different based on there? I think it's based I can't say for sure but my estimate of how I perceive that to go. It's based on what they were making what they have the potential to the potential earnings. They'll do with age like if you know if you're if you're an eighty year old man walking down the street and you get hit by a steel girder and kills you. You might have been. You've already outlived the life expectancy of a male payouts GONNA be significantly less than if your five year old child Vicky v by that same beam. So I mean it's it's all calculated calculable but I guess I don't really know I it would really have to be based on how good your attorney was too because if that happened you're going to not only sue the the building that was being worked on but there's probably in any erection of a building this probably we ten or fifteen maybe twenty different contractors that all certificates of insurance through operate on that building for the electricity and there's the tenants into the building they all be listed as certified insurance. Let's say if you're working in a hotel they have a starbucks they have a gift shop They have a dry cleaner. 'cause a Lotta Hotel tell have those. And then there's the maintenance people there's the service people and they're putting a pool back. And they have an excavation company. They have Uh landscaper they have An interior designer and engineer and architect every single one of those companies could be named in a lawsuit notion because they're all have insurance on that property depending on where and when that happened so anybody. That's involved can be listed and typically it trickles down to the lowest rung the Lowest Tier contractor. So even if they had nothing to do with it almost all certify certificates of insurance flow down on the big major. VC's are typically the highest protected and they have the most insurance and they have the most money but they pass the buck down and down and down and down and you might get the guy. The scaffolding company that might be the company that has the lowest stake in it and their insurance policy might only a million dollars and that might be the most you can get so it's all based based on that I want to end on on on doing some of the Claim stories that you got but one question asked about the when you're doing the investigation work about. What was the profit potential doing that? But where you're at now with it. Are you an average insurance agent. I mean there's no. Is there any specialty to what you're doing or anything. I just trying to figure out what the jobs how valuable the job is. I work with some people all in my office. That are millionaires. Okay I work with Asians that are millionaire. Yes Holy Shit Well in insurance income is is residual or So as long as you maintain your clients whereas all the recycling that policy yeah cut every T- well again it's either fee-based or it's commission based so if it's commission based you're paid monthly if it's fee based paid when they sign and they cut a check but let's say I have twenty clients and they're all twenty thousand dollars in revenue apiece. That's four hundred grand The company obviously makes a nice chunk off the top and then your agent makes typically somewhere between twenty and forty percent depending on your contract with take over of what the not the premium. What's a twenty thousand dollar premium over? Twenty Thousand Dollar Revenue Account is probably somebody. That's paying two hundred thousand one dollars in premium so typically about ten percent if we're talking commission based only So we have some guys that have been in our office that have been doing for sixty years and and they have books of business. That are two three million dollars in revenue and they make you know thirty forty percent of that and they can make a million bucks a year. There's guys like that There's guys in my position who have a few hundred thousand dollars in their book I still draw salary. which are he's not going to disclose it draw salary in addition nation to commission but eventually I will move to a soul solely commission based operation we also can get paid for referral? You can get paid for our agency. assured partners is the fifth largest brokerage in the country. So we are always our business. Model is to acquire other successful agents as well as producing in our own clients from within but if I was to say refer Joey's Commercial Insurance Agency and we bought your agency. I could get up to one hundred and twenty five thousand dollars for acquiring your agency and that would be a one time thing. But there's all kinds of different ways to make money in industry in with contractors especially the deal with anything civil or a federal job. They're required to have certain bonds in place in those are all paid out. A percentage typically quickly one time things. But I do a lot of bonding work because I had people working on all eons field. I'd working at target field. I had people working and they required quired have meal multimillion dollar bonds While their projects are going on in need a percentage of that so I do very well not as well as I did as a collector yet but I will get there. I'm come up and coming. So ideally is to get into insurance as soon as possible and your career Ya but against your stack in those returns but again seventy percent of people that try I fail in the other one. I mean health. Insurance is different It's based on the life. So let's say if you have a if you write insurance for a ten person group That might be four thousand dollars a year in revenue Depending on what lines they offer for if they just do basic health if they offered dental vision any ancillary lines short-term disability four K. that type of stuff 401k's typically one percent scent of every dollar that goes into four. Okay comes to the agent and that's a residual thing so we have some people that specialize in that and they have multi million dollar clients. That it You know the all they do is restructure and benchmark 401K's and help people save and finance. So just depends. I mean but some people. There's people within our within my company I don't work with at other. Locations was those like I think one hundred and forty two in the US but there's people that have twenty thirty million dollar books that are making five ten million dollars a year. Doing what I do. All the show If a couple more questions we'll go to those stories what If is if it only one area of insurance to to sell to be an agent for is there one. It's more profitable for the agent than any other. Yeah four one KS. Probably the no-one looks at it. They set it and forget it because nobody wants to mess with it so you need to have an SEC. Seven license for that But that's probably the most lucrative if you were going to be an agent If you want to focus on one niche thing but again you would probably probably WANNA financing degree to go along with them. How does that? I don't understand the connection between insurance in 401K. I guess I don't understand that well. Four one K.. Is An an answer Larry coverage that most. It's an insurance that your work pays for you. It's it's it's a giant trust fund. Basically that's spread spread out over you know usually groups of twenty five or more but there's some companies out there like three am would be the biggest wail and Minnesota that I can think of or were they. Have you know twenty five thousand employees and every single one of them gets drops in their bucket and we're talking probably about billions of dollars in funds that one percent is getting paid eight to one person who's that agent every single year. Okay at a little bit. It was more looked at as like a an investment type thing. It is if somebody's gotTA manage that risk because they awesome okay since going to manage that risk because if you're playing in the stock market which is basically what it is there's risks involved in. There's always the transfer arrest and that's where the insurance comes in. And I don't. I don't specialize in that area. I just know that it's very lucrative. That's not me what about Mike Insurance for like special one off events like sporting events like the super bowl was here. Something like that. Yeah somebody has to sell that or or insurance in one at the Golf Tournament and somebody wins a car. Those are all Lloyd's of London coverage. Okay typically the premiums on those are pretty low. Let's say we're giving giving away a Maserati three hundred thousand dollar car the premium for that. You'd probably end up paying thirty grand further insurance on that And it would just be a one day one off thing but you basically paying ten percent of that vehicle and if somebody wanted then they would pay it out through you. Excess lines your standard markets and carriers wooden ensure that type of risk. It's too volatile so loads of London. They do all that kind of especially stuff. I always hear hear them like a whenever I heard about what Michael Jackson has legs insured. Yeah Boy Jalen but yeah all that type of stuff they do. What's the value of a company like that other multibillion dollar while the risk payout on those in the clauses that prevent those claims from being paid are pretty stringent? But what people will and try to ensure anything I mean you can you can buy insurance for just about anything except crime or Or not knowing in crime if I own McDonald's and my employee embezzled fifty grand. There's coverage for up to fifty grand for employee dishonesty. But I mean you. You can't knowingly that that would be fraud right. Yeah so that's about the only thing that you can't unknown peril is the only thing you can't insure Gotcha. All right what's what's in the The podcast talking about a few of the I guess scams of people try to make false claims and I know we want to save the the shooting one for last but for start with the With the bird was lady. Yeah well it was a family owned business. And they're they have Turkey farms and they were trying to add a new location and ten thousand birds and they were really trying to push this through They'd call bike every half hour so to find out if the paperwork had been processed and finally got everything put in place for them and then the next day they called and filed a claim. I'm saying that all ten thousand of their birds were dead and then through investigation. We found out that the birds were dead three days before they even call this to try to ensure him. So how averts die. I think that they all froze. Okay yeah they all out but you can't. That would be a good example of insurance fraud on a lot of times people. I will try to you. See this in movies. Most typically like the spouse kills the husband or the wife kills the the husband kills the wife of right after they put a large endowment in their insurance or up their life insurance. That happens a lot. But that's what at least in movies that happens a lot but this is an instance where it really happened So so so again asking for a friend. What's what's the biggest gap of time if you were going to commit a fraud before you when you get the policy versus trying to collect on a a more convenient to claim seems the harder and deeper the carrier is going to investigate And they do have become claims claims adjusters but they're really claim deniers. They're going out like I mean everyday example you see is we were talking about earlier Like hail some guys will go up in their roof with a ball pain hammer and make a bunch of notches because they have a year or so left on their insurance before they before it expires off the bye out of pocket to get a new one. And and then they'll try to put a claim they'll ding their windows or you know stuff like that because the deductible might be five hundred thousand but the new roof would be like thirty. So that's a pretty a common thing that happened and they actually teach claims adjusters four roof specifically what a Ball Ping hammered. Ding looks like versus So they can suss those out. Okay okay so I gotta figure out a scam before native replace the roof maggots and bodies that are in that contractor world that that are selling those roofs. I hear a lot of commercials on the radio about the scams of specifically roofing and insurance. Were anytime after. There's a storm and I get the phone calls to like just random ones to my cell phone okay. You know we're in the area inspecting is that is that a big thing. As far as homeowners insurance now the biggest type scam is these companies trying trying to come in and and click the homeowners or convinced them to scam What happens is you need to have ten hail hits in a square which is is a ten by ten foot area? Three your roof to be purchased or that section or if we purchased so in the event there are there's weather tracking and storm watchers. All kinds of different APPS. You can have on your phone that track up to five years of hail damage. I have some buddies that are in this world that work in that. So they'll go out and blanket areas. But YOU'RE GONNA see store anytime there's a hailstorm all star you're going to have knocks at the door And it's usually people from out of town just came in and they're trying to sell a bunch of they'll stay here for a week so roofs and then like two months later they'll come back and do it but once they can get you to commit to paying the deductible. The rest of the work doesn't matter because if they if they get the deductible in the insurance pays for the first portion they're off they're going to do the whole thing rather regardless of the insurance pays for it and then they'll put leans. That's the scam comes in is they can put leans on your house where you can't sell it without them making money and basically they're working themselves into debt but in the event of a transaction or tidal change they will be paid out through the court system. That's the scam Gotcha in another question. I mean we think of as An akkas relative to where your ad in the country of the world. If you're in Florida you know hurricane insurance type stuff is big here but here in Minnesota we have pretty extreme wintertime weather. You deal with a lot of like Damage to buildings or flooding is the most common like frozen pipes and stuff I I write an implement dealer down in Minnesota and they had a five hundred thousand dollar flood basically they sell like case. I H farm farm combines factors things like that and their lot was flood in their building was completely destroyed and that's pretty common but like flood insurances ince's very very very difficult especially in a non flood area. Like if you're a homeowner you can buy flood insurance but let's say if we know we get a forecast based on tomorrow we're going to get thirty six inches of rain. I can't call my insurance and by a flood policy and put it in place tonight. You have to have flood insurance in place for more than thirty days as before a claim will pay out there. It's gotta be thirty days Is that is that true. Across the board with all natural disaster related things no because a lot of things like a landslides lightning strikes which may cause fire wind and hail tornadoes. Those are all common payrolls which are going to be covered but flood. Is the one anomaly in flood. Insurance is very cheap. I do recommend homeowners. Get it typically. You can get a flood insurance policy. All SEAFORD hundred hundred twenty bucks for the year and by flood insurance. It's not just like a creek behind your house overflows and gets A. It's a pipe bust it could be well. We're ability could be covered under other areas. But yeah a lot of times like let's say the city's pipe bursts and floods into your yard on your on a downgrade. It wouldn't be your home. Your utility at homeowners insurance in the city's not gonNA cover you would need flood insurance for that but the city wouldn't pay absolutely not and that's exactly who would happen down in in alturas. The city's the city's pipe bursts and flawed their land and ruined their building. They had two feet of water in their building and ruined it. They have have no liability whatsoever in the city had no liability to it at all. Is that unique to that city years. That's pretty commonplace across the board. No Shit yeah so anytime I am. The city fucks up on like infrastructure related stuff. I mean like the bridge collapse that had to be it all has to do within when the work was done There's the right and we're all pretty pretty familiar with the with the term. That's a statue of limitations. But there's also the right to ally ever there's also the right to repose and that's typically a ten year period generally speaking for any damage donner work being performed. There's a seven year in your statue of limitations but then there's also the tenure writer oppose So like a good example. That would be the thirty five W bridge collapse. was done twenty five years prior to it happening so there was no buddy held liable to pay. Those claims damages their desks to those people. There was no insurance in place. I was all picked up by the cities and the taxpayers. Holy Show Here's another question I thought of is was What do you what do you think about the the The push to have law enforcement officers privately insure themselves to create their own Professional insurance so if they Wrongly shoots somebody wrongly injure. Somebody is that anything that you're picking up like their own defense costs and things like incident. Differing it to the to the tax payers. That's something that the insurance agencies are talking about right now as I mean it would be a union employees so I mean it would be up to that I I would. Personally I'd be for it. I think that would generate a lot of accountability when it when it comes. I'm pretty pro cop in my every every day. I haven't had a lot of bad run INS with him personally but then again I love but you know I mean I'm bald white guy but you know I have mixed kids my wife Black and you know I don't have any hate my heart either but I still pretty pro. They have they have a job to do. And there's a lot of shitty people out there and sometimes you react or on way but I definitely think that like especially for this. Most common or most current lady wasn't Texas. That was playing video games of their kid again. The COP didn't announce himself and just fired into their. I think he says but it was like like five seconds or less or something like that. I opened fire. Yeah I didn't see the video but yeah I think that person we shouldn't have to the taxpayers shouldn't have to foot that bill back defense gos- any of that. No I completely agree. I think that could be a whole new racket. I didn't hear the COPS. How does that work? Can you tell me about how to set up right now. Like when You know we've had had multiple ones here in the twin cities were Cops are found. Liable You know for wrongly killing somebody hurting somebody. And there's been multimillions of dollars speed out the different victims here and just our city I think that's still a municipality responsibility being that they're they can't cities can't buy an insurance. I guess this is my masking buying insurance. Like protect them for if they're cops fuck up is that. I don't think that's available. I don't know we'll just come straight city funds and I would think so. Yeah Okay Gotcha To more of your your stories here W- do the the kind of the. What was the good story? We actually Kinda save somebody in the in the in the Nicot time. Well as far as evaluation of the a little bit of order earlier replacement costs at actual cash value and agreed value We picked up a new client about three well two years ago and one of the things that we talked about was their building. Evaluation hadn't been done. They've been in operation. And since late sixties they had insurance agent forever and luckily for some guys like me most agents are kicking down retirement store that the majority most agents that meet at functions are in their late sixties or late fifties early sixties and a few of the guys that are officer like that too so they said these are bonds you create friendships ships in relationships and they last for a long time they should. If you're doing your job right right Well W- his agent and retired so create an opening and we came in and we talked about his building in this property. And you know he's had like two million dollars on his policy and we said well. Hey If this thing burn down today what do you think it would cost to pay. And he said I don't know so we brought in independent loss control people and we came up with a building valuation of four million dollars. And so you just tell me about about that in independence. We'll say it again. Lost Control lost control. We've we we have our own claims managers and our loss control agents but for special cases especially with older buildings We bring in specialty people and one of them's ILC's independent loss control. And they just go Florida floor do evaluation of the value. Oh you haven't they not only assess the value of the building but they also assess any risks involved with building on and then what it would cost to replace so you have to imagine since the sixties there's been all kinds of innovations be it from Bathroom stalls you got the bars in the handles and the handicapped things Sprinkler systems security systems. Even even when boils down to rebuilding your parking lot. If you have a building that was built in the seventies you may only have one handicapped space or not at all But if you're GonNa Redo that building today you'd have to be up with today's code and it would have to be built with materials and things that are all up today's code and a Lotta Times. It's more expensive. Not only for the Labor involved because Labor is more expensive than it was forty years ago but the materials are more expensive as well so we added what's called Ordinance in law to his to his policy which that means if you don't have ordinance in Law Let's say you're buildings. Were three hundred grand. It's GONNA cost three hundred grand to replace it as is but you. You can't legally build this building the way it was built before because all these new amenities need to be here. And that stuff's GonNa cost an extra sixty grand if you don't have ordinance unlock coverage that sixty grand auto pocket. Okay so if you add that in there and typically it's only a couple hundred bucks for an annual policy to be added to it that's a big fly in a lot of Commercial Properties as ordinance and laws ause. You know it's not there and it should be But in this instance his building property was vastly more more valuable than what he had ensured for so we increased his limits by almost double and it was roughly four million dollars in three months later. Fire and everything burned down. In this case he would of paid two million dollars out of pocket if he wanted to reopen his business in this instance also he didn't op and I made him sign for this. He didn't opt for business interruption than I am business income with extra expense Now what that is. Well let's say I have a furniture store just just easy and I sell furniture out of my location and my building burns down all my inventory. which would be covered under property in the building burns down but now I have to go find a new place to open operate while main places being restored so I can still continue to make money if you business income with extra expense and not only pays is the retail value for the property that you lost but it also make up for whatever dollars that you would have made in sales and operating costs and we're all while this is taking place in a lot of small businesses manufacturing places that have fires? They lose their good employees because if if they're not a business owner and they don't have a you know six eight months of savings what are they gonNA do. They're going to go find another job. While they're places getting rebuild and you lose people so business is income with extra expenses. One of the most important lines that you need to have that allows them to pay employees building or whatever it allows them to pay their payroll. Roll dollars pay their health insurance pay all their expenses and collect the money that they would have made if they were operating as per usual as if nothing happened. So let's say if I've been selling pulling twenty thousand dollars in Furniture Week and now I'm shut down for eight months. I'm going to get that eighty grand a month in addition cash value. Oh you back to me that I would have been making had able to operate. Well not only that but pay for a new location for me to open a satellite until my buildings restored so in the example Apple. Did you gave the the story. How much did you end up saving him? After that fire well we ended up. We ended up getting him. His full four million dollars paid out and they built the building up brand new beautiful facility ability but in this instance he did not opt for that business income with extra expense and ultimately Up Selling off half of their property. They're still operating on a smaller large scale but they had because he and I made him sign off on and I said. Are you sure you don't want this because if this happens you're not gonNA have the money to pay your people and you're not going to continue to get your income. And he said No. I don't want it. I don't need it but you know. He got his building back and then they what they lost in operating costs. They sold off in pieces of property that were newly rebuilt and they're still operating fine but they ended up taking a pretty big step back. He's going to sign it this time though he's got Kinda now. So what's with this wild crazy story. That still going through its process right even resolved yet. This is an active claim and that's happening One of the contractors that we ensure And this is a weird thing because we're not really sure who's going to be at fault here and WHO's GonNa end up paying being or how much is going to be pay scale like new insurance ground right. It's GonNa. You're setting the precedent for future games as you might be There's a contractor Who who works It's an all over the road contractor. There were multiple locations and they do different sites each day at one of their employees On their way home traveling to their residents residents from a job site in a company vehicle was driving and was cut off and engaged into a verbal battle and road rage swerving back and fourth incident with a pedestrian and ended up brandishing. A gun which are not allowed to carry In any contractor vehicle. You're not a lot. We use it with a pedestrian or somebody in a vehicle another commuter COMMUNICA pedestrians around word and ended up pulling a firearm out from under his vehicle. Michael and shot through his through his driver's side window into the adjacent again in the company vehicle in the company vehicle shot into another commuters car. Hit the driver in the jaw. And they swerved and crashed into a pylon or hit into something and the guy ended up going going home and this happened on a Friday night and by Monday the under his own dime the employees had replaced The the broken window and basically tried to cover this up and through the reports being that he was in a company vehicle because the guy he shot did notice just the name of the company plastered on the. That was one of the biggest giveaways that I saw. I don't know if you saw the El Camino movie. Did you say okay. Well I'm not going to spoil spoiling. There's a similar situation where he's driving around in a company vehicle and it's a gal heart is going to be tracked down so so he gets found out and the company ends up helping. Bring this guy to justice but he had replaced the vehicle and was just acting as if nothing happened so I get a call. And that's the investigation education on this that had been done by by law enforcement that point and then it had been done but the company the contractor company client of ours ended up turning this guy in over the authorities on the after he was identified and they found out they where he went and got the the the window replaced and like I said he paid for out of his pocket and he was trying to cover it up but they ended up turning him in and I get a call from. CFO seven in the morning. You know telling me this crazy story and you know I got a I. That's not. That's something that I'm still younger person. I I'm not really sure you know how you're supposed to handle that. So roundtable that with our senior leadership and we got attorneys involved. Then we're trying to figure out if they're going to be liable because he wasn't on the clock when he did this he was on his way home and he you know he's but he's in a company truck so And we also have added to their fleet since then A new program called Telematics which is something you can put in a commercial vehicle? It's similar alert. Low Jack in that it has the capability but then it also monitors any radic stops starts Run time now. There's all kinds of crazy Z.. Monitoring that they have in their view us something like that too like they. They know everything like if you leave the bulkhead door open in the cargo area. Yeah so we've we've implemented that in there Karen. We ended up getting the carrier to pick up the cost for which is crazy But yeah that's that's the most recent one that I had to get the CFO Couple couple four weeks ago. Can you tell me is the guy who was shot as he alive is he did. He did live but again. We're looking at a claim. Based on that is what's his quality life it can be and who's going to. How do you evaluate not only the physical ramifications of you know getting in better physical therapy and it's going to go into it but now he's probably GonNa have all kinds of pain and suffering from behind that from now being disfigured person and what's the dollar amount bat and determined all the shows? Yeah wow that was. That was my first or second week of September that we'll have to bring you back on him and find out what the resolution wasn't how things changed so any any parting thought on insurance and he dispel any myths sore. Or give anybody some some good advice and and and as far as insurance goes from a business owner perspective I would say pick your broker create an RFP which is a request for proposal No the services that you're getting from your broker If it's something as simple as you like how quickly they are able to issue certifications ends or or get your auto. ID cards then. You're not getting any value for your dollar. Um That's pretty much the main thing that here. We have no complaints while we have it. What are they doing and for you because your agent should be able to pick up Safety training costs for you. They should be able to come out and help you online. Enroll oh you're people Directly so it's not a headache that you should have if you're a smaller company and you don't have an HR department which most mom and pop shops and with fifty employees or less don't have the funds to pay for an HR person where you getting that outside advice We have all kinds of programs programs that are we implement to work fluidly with what you guys are doing. I feel like an infomercial now but you should be getting a lot more then. Just a a binder in. There's just you know talk to your age about what they can be doing. Make sure that they have all the markets that you would want for your specific Yousef Industry because having to agents compete for your business is doing you a great disservice because whether you know it or not It's not just an email that gets sent sent off to a carrier with a brief explanation of your business We sit down with the underwriters. And we get to know them we showcase who our clients are in the best light and if you have two different agents that are trying to go to the same market. It doesn't matter who you want in there the first one who got there is the only one that that market's going to talk to. And they might NAPPI telling the best story about your Your Business And they might not be showcasing you in the best light So make sure that your agent takes the time to you know. Get out with you get to know your walk the walk your walk in your life that way when they're explaining what your business is all about getting you the best return consider the service versus just the cost also though the boss. Yeah thank you for the conversation. Thank you Yeah AH.

investigator Minnesota America Jeffrey Free Rogers business owner COP J Rogers R. O. G. E. R. S. squarespace producer Producer Rod Investigator Golf Minneapolis Midwest apple
6 Private Investigator Tips to Prevent Fraud in Business

Intermountain PI Podcast

08:40 min | 1 year ago

6 Private Investigator Tips to Prevent Fraud in Business

"The Inter Mountain. Pi podcast follows the real life exploits investigative tips and insightful advice of private investigators Scott Fulmer the principal at Inter Inter Mountain. Pi and author of the critically acclaimed true crime. Memoir Confessions of a private eye. The names locations and other identifying details have been changed to protect protect the privacy of individuals. The innocent and the guilty years ago. I worked for a guy who's form of case. Management was writing notes on the back of Manila folders. In fact he wants told a go. Do surveillance on that lady. You know the one with the red car. He became visibly deeply upset when I can remember who he was talking about now. I know we're not splitting the atom here but being a private investigator is complicated. No two cases alike therefore you need a case management platform. That's flexible and that grows with your business with this mine. I'll be right back with a special offer from our new sponsor. Answer you Old broadcasting from the crossroads of the West in historic Salt Lake City. You're listening to the Inter Inter Mountain. Pi podcast here's your host celebrated Utah Private investigator Scott Fulmer. Welcome back to the PODCAST. I'm Scott fulmer author of confessions of private eye. You can find my book on Amazon and you can find me on the web at. WWW dot inter mountain pi dot dot Com. You're listening to episode number. Eighteen six private investigator tips to prevent fraud in business. I am pleased to announce that the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast is now sponsored by track ops a powerful investigation management platform used by companies of all sizes and in in countries all around the world with each designed for managing every aspect of a PI agency. Trek up says the tools streamline your operation from intake to invoice voice. How do I know because I use track ops? And it's made all the difference in my business so right now I have a special offer for you. Try Track OPS. Free for fifteen days right now you can go and sign up at track OPS DOT COM and by the way if you mention this ad if you mentioned that you heard about traps on the Inter Mountain Pi podcast. You'RE GONNA get an additional ten percent off on your base. Subscription price track OPS. His case management made easy. Let's talk about six private investigator tips to prevent fraud in business and I I'd like to consider a few statistics when it comes to theft in small business. For example apple employees are responsible for about fifty eight percent of the time shoplifters account for about thirty five percent and other words employees are more likely to steal deal from you than customers. In fact a recent study suggested that seventy five percent of employees have stolen from their employer. At least once men are more likely likely steal than women however it takes about two years before a fraud is even detected and whether your employees a high school graduate or a college graduate doesn't seem to matter. They both account for about thirty five percent of thefts in the workplace on the other hand employees with graduate degrees only account for eleven percent of thefts but they typically steel you'll five times more and that's primarily because they are in a higher position with Fiduciary Trust by these statistics come from the Association of Certified Fight Fraud Examiners. This begs the question. Why me why do employees steal lots of reasons really? I mean greed for starters then there's a financial financial problem that they may be having an unexpected bills and of course addictions such as drugs gambling and alcohol can be factor and sometimes they steal just because house of opportunity for example due to weak financial controls or bad cash management procedures in the final analysis. Your employees can be your greatest this asset or your greatest source of risk with this in mind. Consider these six private investigator tips to prevent fraud in business. Now there's a hundred other tip Sikorsky's of course these Six I think important number one pre employment background check and background check looks at criminal history sex offender status credit credit report driving records education previous jobs and references and background. Check can cost anywhere from thirty dollars to three hundred or even three thousand. It just depends on what you WANNA check and it's not gonNA stop someone from stealing but it may stop you from hiring a bad risk number two accounting and bookkeeping another key point. Don't allow the same employees to do accounts receivable and accounts payable in fact. Don't allow the same employees to do the accounting and bookkeeping. Furthermore employees who handle company finances shouldn't operate in isolation. Make sure you institute. A regular unplanned audited by Third Party additionally additionally make sure the same employee doesn't open the mail and post the checks again these tasks should be done by two different employees. Finally keep track of who your vendors yes and employees our employees often issue checks to fake vendor counts or fake employees and then redirect the money to their own accounts number three security pretty cameras equally important. Today's advanced security cameras. They're they're digital or four K. They have low light capabilities and they back up to the cloud. As a matter of fact you can even log in and watch them from your home in your pajamas. Make sure your employees and your customers are aware of the security cameras. Not only may that serve as a deterrent but it also will the provide tangible proof of a crime number. Four keep employee records up to date. He'll thank me later on this one. Make sure you have a current photo phone number home home address and vehicle information on your employees in the event that you need to conduct a workers. Compensation claim investigation is current information is going to be absolutely critical. Oh number five when it comes to theft be wary of employees for example. Be Wary of a hardworking employee. That never takes vacation not to mention employees at come in early you stay late or appear to be living beyond their means especially if they've been with you a long time. Unfortunately it's always the last people you'd suspect and finally number six with Workers Chris. COMP claims be wary of employees finally be wary of employees filing fraudulent workers comp claims especially if they were injured on a Friday afternoon soon or a Monday morning. These claims are often involved in outdoor sports on the weekends and they may try to claim a sports injury as occurring at work other employees have part time labor intensive businesses on the side like putting roofs on the house or building decks and still others are often getting ready to retire or leave for another job also get this statistically typically the newer the employee the more likely the claim is fraudulent. These are all red flags. It may indicate worker's comp fraud and you probably thinking that's why I have insurance so I don't have to worry about these things but if you want to keep your insurance costs down and have a safe workplace and maintain your company productivity. You need to be proactive. PROACTIV you've been listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast the number one show for private investigators. Who wanted to take their investigative skills gills to the next level? Join US every Tuesday on Apple Google spotify or wherever you get your podcasts and be sure to subscribe rate and give us. It's a five star review. Send your comments and questions to podcast at Inter Mountain P. I DOT COM. That is it for this week's episode until next time this is Utah private investigator. Scott fulmer reminding you. The game is afoot

investigator Inter Inter Mountain Inter Mountain fraud Scott Fulmer Inter Mountain P. theft Utah apple Salt Lake City US principal Amazon PROACTIV Sikorsky Third Party cloud Association of Certified Fiduciary Trust
Cold Case Private Investigator Catherine Townsend

Intermountain PI Podcast

36:55 min | 11 months ago

Cold Case Private Investigator Catherine Townsend

"The Inter Mountain. Pi podcast follows the real life exploits investigative tips and insightful advice of private investigators Scott Fulmer the principal at Inter Inter Mountain. Pi and author of the critically acclaimed true crime. Memoir Confessions of a private eye. The names locations and other identifying details have been changed to protect protect the privacy of individuals. Both the innocent and the guilty she grew up in Pine Bluff Arkansas a town the UK the independent called the most dangerous little city in America. And it's no wonder after Detroit. Pine Bluff has more violent crime per capita than any other their city in the US in fact she described it as quote a town so rough that are pit bull got stolen this quote. I don't know why I think that's so funny. Today they have talking with Katherine Townsend. She's a writer. Licensed private investigator and she hosts the smash hit iheartradio. COLD-CASE PODCAST Helen in gone she's petite and pretty but don't make the mistake of underestimating her. She smart tenacious has nerves of steel. In addition she's the only private investigator. I know that started out as a sex columnist uh-huh in English broadcasting from the crossroads of the West based in historic Salt Lake City. You're listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi podcasts. Here's your host celebrated Utah private investigator. Scott fulmer welcome back to the PODCAST. I'm Scott Fulmer author of confessions of a private eye. You can find my book on Amazon and you can find me on the web at. WWW DOT dot inter mountain p. I DOT COM. You're listening to episode number. Twenty two cold-case private investigator Catherine Townsend. Oft- I started in the private investigation business back when we used eight millimeter video cassette tapes. Eventually we moved on to providing clients at DVD. I hope you're still not doing that. You know with track OPS. Your clients can stream and download video twenty four seven from their home or office in their pajamas the Inter Mountain. Pi The I pod cast in fact is sponsored by track OPS. It's a powerful investigation. Management Platform used by companies of all sizes and in countries all around the world with features designed for managing every aspect of the PI agency. Track OPS has the tools to streamline your operation from intake to invoice so stop spending money any on DVD's and give your clients instant access to their videos and photographs. I use track OPS and I love it right now you can try track ups free for fifteen days days by signing up at traps dot com and mentioned that you heard it on the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast and you'll get ten percent off of your base. Subscription price track track. OPS case management made easy. I have a theory that all great private investigators are also good writers Katharine. Townsend is no exception her. Our work has appeared in several publications including the Atlantic the daily beast L. The Independent. The New York Post G. Q. Marie-claire Cosmo Oh and the Huffington Post. As a matter of fact. She wrote a two thousand Thirteen Daily Mail article about Piper Kerman the inspiration behind the hit netflix series. Orange Orange is the new black. She's also a writer and correspondent for investigation. Discovery's crime feed website. However I learned about Catherine when I read her article chasing chasing crooks in my Jimmy Choos by the way check out the show notes for links for this article and several others and finally I listened to her popular Iheartradio cold-case case podcast? Helen gone in season one. She returned to the Arkansas ozarks to try to solve the two thousand four coal case murder of twenty two year old College College Student Rebecca Gould Season Two of the podcast. Helen gone is about a similar coal case involving Janey Ward and a third season is coming up around the corner. You can find it on Itunes or wherever you get your podcasts. A native of Arkansas Catherine started her career at New York magazine and moved to London to create create a very popular dating column for The Independent newspaper but her biggest passion has always been solving mysteries after moving back to La. She completed the required three years and six thousand investigative hours got her. Pi License and started the Townsend Detective Agency with this in mind. It's my pleasure to welcome Katharine Townsend to the PODCAST Katherine. How are you doing today? I'm doing great. Thank you now. You originally got your private investigators license in California. Is that correct correct. I did it was kind of a strange story. Basically I started out in journalism. I've been journalist for a long time. That's my background and and I worked for New York magazine and then moved to London actually started writing a dating column and it became pretty popular kind of like a younger version of sex in the the city. But I always had this real passion for solving mysteries and I always wanted to go back to investigative journalism as it turns out going from writing a sex column into doing investigate journalist. Some people thought it was a strange transition. Although as many women will tell you. I'm sure you know dating detective work. I have a lot in common. It's all about human human psychology so a lot of the skillset did transfer but anyway yes. I moved to Los Angeles and I went to private investigators school all and then I started working with private investigator there in California. Of course it's three years and six thousand hours to get your license so just in the process of getting the experience row license. I learned a lot about detective work so that when later on jumping ahead of myself later on switchback the investigative journalism side the P. Experience really helped me a lot. That was going to be my question. How do we go from six columnist to private eye but So I've been in the business for about thirty years. And I have known the people from all different kinds of walks of life that have become private. Investigators including claims adjusters. People in real estate even knew a guy that was a DJ and the radio that it WAS PART-TIME DJ part time private eye so being a writer or journalist I think that probably in the long term really helped you as a private investigator brisket or what do you think I definitely think it did And I also think that look the more experience you have talking as many people as you can. I feel like it makes you better at your job so I mean I've lived in all over the world. I've traveled a lot. I've talked to people from all walks of life both in social situations. You know whether it be a first date or going out to interview abuse someone for an article and that's one of the cool things about being a journalist is getting to sort of have a window and all these different worlds and that helps investigations because then you really learn how to relate it to people of all kinds and I love that one of my favorite parts of the job will yeah. It's really about building rapport. I mean that's how you get information. I'm very non-judgmental. Naturally I am very curious and I find that a lot of times I will share information with people kind of virtual strangers and when you make them comfortable oh by sharing something about yourself bay then tend to share back so catherine the very first time I heard of you was your amazing article which I love I even love the title chasing. Take my Jimmy Choos so tell me a bit about that article where it was published in kind of what led to that. If you don't mind I knew someone who worked at the daily beast and I had an idea for an article for them and I do a lot of doing a lot of freelance writing at the time. And so I just pitch this idea and Yeah and they they ran the story basically it. I was just sort of A. It was an explanation of what it's like to be a private investigator and it was kind of the lessons. I've learned about people and about investigations in some of the fallacies in you know things that people think they'll see a movie or they'll see magnum. Pi and think everyone drives around in Ferraris which unfortunately is not true. Hope not but it was. It followed US around following Telling the story of myself and my partner guy was working with at the time as we sort of we surveillance and it was a very complicated Saran words because it was a New York City and it was involved cabs crashing a very expensive. You know five hundred dollar plate dinner involved multiple outfit changes going down in the subway. Way I mean just basically everything that could go wrong did and we had to really think on our and it also sort of brought home half of the job we do is kind like meticulous preparation and then really I think half of it is being able to totally wing it. After you've done that preparation and inevitably something goes horribly wrong in the field and you have to wing in real back in and we did and we were successful and we got the client the information. It was just kind of walked. Everyone through with that was like it was a very well written article. I really enjoyed it and I would recommend it to folks. I'M GONNA put the link to that article in a couple of other things Your website and some of your other articles in the show notes for the podcast cast. Now I know you no longer take private clients because you're you're fairly busy but if people have a question and they can still reach out to you is Oh yeah absolutely i. I really welcome that and I don't mind I'm not saying I'm not saying I would never take a client again but I just I tend to not be into the kind of matrimonial stuff anymore I didn't really I didn't love that and and I learned a lot enjoyed it but I you know I'm kind of doing other stuff. Now I'm dealing with murders unsolved murders. Now Yeah Yeah. Well It's matrimony will work domestic work as you say is. It's pretty hairy work. Yeah and it's I don't know about you but I always feel it's weird. I mean I definitely I love helping people and a love getting information and finding answers but I've found often. I would try to talk people out of doing surveillance to be honest with you. Nine on times out of ten I would try to talk about it because I would say. Well why do you. Why do you want this? And they would say you know what have suspicions in telling me why they had the suspicions. I'd say we'll well. We'll see found a pair of underwear in his glove compartment. Do you really need surveillance. Denote I mean because you already know what's going on and I don't like taking people's money to give him an answer they could arguet. I do think that there is a time and place for it. I've done some with like custody cases where someone's using drugs and they're not supposed to be in child custody is involved or there's some or you know there have been some cases where people are like. Look I know that this person is probably cheating. But they're telling me I'm crazy and just need to know I just need that closure I just need you need the answer so there is a place for it. I just It taught me a lot. I'm just kind of moved on to other stuff now. Now you're based out of New York City is at right mainly family. I mean I travel all the time. I'm probably spending. I probably spend most of my time in New York right now and I spend I spend a lot of time in Los Angeles to still. It's probably about half and half the hopefully it'll be half and half the winner half will be in. La That's my ultimate goal rather number changes there so it's good. WEATHERMAN has the most boring job. But you know an easy boring Nice Nice job because It's nice although I'll tell you these fires or something else I mean that's a whole nother podcast. But it's just it's very scary right now. What's going on yeah? They've had a lot of rain into before that so they have had some weird weather. I bring that up because I'm from Texas originally and I can tell you don't sound like you're from New York or la no. I'm Arkansas. Well that kind of brings us to the PODCAST. Now you are the Creator and host of the podcast. Helen gone which I believe is on iheartradio. Correct as okay and of course you can get it wherever you get your podcasts. And I'm GONNA include The link and everything in the show notes for folks in one. Listen to it. It's a fantastic antastic podcasts. It is you completed season two. It is a primarily about two specific coal cases out of Arkansas. Tell me a little bit about how the idea came to be. How'd you? How'd you come up with a title? And how how difficult was this to kind of put together. Basically what happened. Was this I as I mentioned a transition back in the investigative journalism side and I was doing a lot of true crime and then I started working a lot with different true crime channels including investigation negation discovery. And so I would pitch these ideas to editors originally as a TV show and everybody would love the idea but inevitably they would say a combination of things. I'd say we can't do it because there's no closure there's no answer. The audience likes to walk away with an answer at the end of the hour. And I'm like well. I'm sure the family would too. So there's no answer always that way. It's definitely really not but also because no one had been arrested or charged to make a TV show about it. I mean you notice when you watch dateline or something. Normally there's a conclusion at the end. Not just is because people enjoy hearing that but because it makes it legally much less risky and that was kind of disheartening for me because I grew up like watching Woodward and Bernstein and wanting to basically all the president's men I wanted to go out there and find the story that nobody had yet and something that hadn't been adjudicated so back to the case so so a lot. A lot of people told me I was crazy to try to pursue it because it was in the middle of nowhere and so much time had passed and no one had been arrested charged basically Rebecca Gould. The victim was a very good friend of my well. My sister was basically really good friends with Rebecca sister. This season one right. This is season one started season. One you didn't know that we're going to be other seasons did you. Or no no. I just knew that I like I was. I was really fascinated with Rebecca's case I would hear about every time my dad and my sister live in the ozarks. Still the Arkansas ozarks in this really remote area and so I would go home for Christmas thanksgiving or whatever and we're kind of crime family so we talk about it and every time I go home I would get a different answer about what what people thought happen. And I've talked to people about it and I got really really fascinated with the case and I started thinking wolf. Everybody thinks they know who solved it. Then why hasn't been Salt Lake. What's going on? And then when I started asking some law enforcement around there and by the way I've worked with lots of enforcement on many different cases throughout the years you know they kinda dissuaded me from pursuing further which of course made me just more determined as has more questions as I'm pitching the show to different people some producers. who were you know? I've known for a while too and we try to work with some of the things together. As has it happened that they brought up the idea of doing it as a podcast and I thought it was a great idea because for me it was. We can do it in a way that some kind of it's just less risk we won't have cameras in people's faces can really take the time necessary to investigate So we just kind of went for it. We didn't really know we're doing. I mean in all honesty. We just kind of went for it. They were very professional with the sound mixing. And all that and I know what I'm doing with investigations but in terms of how was all going to come together. We didn't know the conclusion before the beginning we had. We literally literally had no idea if everyone was going to shut the door in our face. No idea as it happened. They didn't but it did take a lot more time than I thought. I mean I thought I was going to be there for we. We've we've budgeted and planned for two weeks and as it turned out I was there for six months and I had to basically tell my dad. I'm like dad moving into your house like I'm Gonna be staying a while just Kinda you know that's what we had to do. It took a lot of time and it taught me so much about how about the dynamics of small towns and just really how much time it takes to get to know people and you have to go through a friend of a friend. Even even family members sometimes don't necessarily want to talk about it because they just been through so much emotionally and it's hard to like keep going through it if you feel like you're not GonNa get any resolution so taught me an enormous amount where people have been interviewed a million million times By the police or the state police by other media and You know in some regards. You're probably tired of talking about. I wish would just go away but again you're talking about closure what's what specifically is once you just give us a little explanation nation of what happened to Rebecca September. Two thousand four Rebecca was she was. She started school. She was a college student. She'd started school in Fayetteville. AFL North West Arkansas. But she still had friends who live near the town of a Melbourne and guy in and mountain view. These towns are all right next to each other mountain views or my dad lives in any way she was back visiting some friends for the weekend and she was staying with her boyfriend at the time. And what happened. When was she on that Monday morning? She was supposed to drive back to school. She was supposed to pick her sister up and drive back to school with her but she never showed up and when she never showed up they went looking for for They found her phone her all her belongings her clothes her her car. All that was at the boyfriend's house and there was blood in there but she was nowhere to be found and he was at work the entire day and then he went out with some friends the night that she went missing so there are a lot of questions ends about where everyone was on that day. What was going on what was going on her life and like the days before this happened? It was an unusual case too because there were kind one of three theories that people I mean there were hundreds of theories. But they're kinda three theories one was that it could have been some sort of drug deal gone bad because it was a rumor that the police were very focused on a local guy. He knew her. WHO's a drug dealer? That was their focus and then there was the theory that it could have been a girl fight fight gone wrong sheet one of Rebecca's friends so Rebecca had dated a guy in high school all through high school. Who was still we spoke spoke to the podcast? He's still had very strong feelings for her. He was still in love with their basically but he was with a different girl. Jennifer Rebecca's friend in so Jennifer. A lot of people had sort of mentioned and her someone who was really tough and had been a lot of fights and they were afraid of. And so you know you you do thank could it have been some sort of a jealousy love triangle angle and that was the other theory and then of course. There's the boyfriend. The police cleared him right away. which is very unusual to They cleared him immediately even before the forensic evidence was bad because they said he had an airtight alibi that he had been at work all day. Gone out with friends at night. So that's that's where we started. We just started by figuring out who all these people are what their relationship was each other. I don't want to give spoilers away because I want to listen to the podcast. And it's it's pretty cool well it's episodic so it's over the course of several different episodes. You talked to law enforcement. You talked to medical people talk to neighbors and friends and suspects and everybody. Everybody and I think he did a really good job at it. We're not GONNA do any spoilers but it seems to me that I think you kind of got in the direction of where the police should be so we will. I think so strongly strongly believe that and by the way like one of the things that makes it our podcast kind of maddening. For some people is the fact that I I don't WanNa say it's disorganized but it's certainly it's not it's not super produced and that's because you're carrying a real time murder investigation and you're hearing US knock on people's doors his WHO and we're not sure if there are they helping the killer do they know the killer or they really helping us. I mean it was it was it was pretty crazy. And that's why it's you know it. It was a real time murder investigation. So you're hearing it as it happened almost real time when people are changing have changed your testimonies and said one thing earlier and they're saying something different to you so yeah it's it's interesting. I enjoyed it. So is that what led to. What prompted season to to come out? Yeah I mean I was very sorry I was blown away. Millions of people. Listen to it. So many people heard stories so many people got in touch with information and and it wasn't just we did so much media. We did a local radio show and things like that and it really did. Bring up new information Kind of sidebar. One of the things that really inspired me to keep going wing when I got really dissuaded early in the investigation. Was I read the book. Vulgar favors by Maureen orth the fanfare journalists. And it's about the Andrew Cunanan investigation and murdered younger. Saatchi others right in any way. She does absolutely riveting. She does a great sort of profile of Psychopath narcissist whatever. You WanNa call him but the the fascinating part to me was the fact that when she started working on that case I mean everybody had been the FBI local local law enforcement people from all over the nation. Every journalist in the world had covered the story and she found a piece of information that ended up being crucial just by being really methodical retracing retracing the steps going to the place where one of the victims and Andrew went and she found this check in. Anyway it's a long story but basically she. He found a piece of information. No one else did and that kind of made me think okay. This is what it's about. It's about just being methodical. Following the steps figuring out who victim was what was going on in her life. And maybe maybe you can find something known US confine. Well that's good that's good advice for investigators after who are are looking into coal cases. Because you know some of these things the second season obviously it was a murder that was thirty years old and sometimes it's hard to see the force because of the trees you know you need fresh eyes to kind of start over and re evaluate with everything. Oh absolutely I mean I'll tell you it's funny. You said that because the second season it was a mysterious death was a sixteen year old. Who to cut a long story short name was Janey Ward? She fell off of a step at a high school party. And it was a short step lesson ten inches high and somehow ended up with a broken neck. Or what they thought was broken neck She was injured. They've been some friends made the decision to load her into a pickup truck and drive her into town and so there was so much going on with the case and it wasn't just it was what happened to her but it was is also a story about the people who were perceived to be in power in the town and her family and her father. Your late father father literally for thirty years never gave up trying to find answers. He made all these tapes of his investigation. And things he was hearing it was. It was heartbreaking. It really it really affected affected. Everyone I mean it really did push. Her clothes. Were wet as well which was really odd. It was very odd. There's so many things and another thing what I was. I was thinking of on that case case sometimes it seems really not things that don't occur to other people because they assume they've already been done. I find that a lot Another sidebar in background Ron Investigations and often. It'll be really really powerful people and someone will come along and say how did no one know that. This guy didn't go to Harvard and didn't do this and that and he's a CEO and you're you're like as people get higher up or whatever it's almost like people check them less not more And with a really old investigation sometimes the really basic questions. I don't get asked 'cause you're assuming that's been done. You assume that if someone says someone has an alibi you know okay. They must have surveillance footage. They've interviewed all the witnesses. So you really do have to go back. You literally have to go back to the day it happened. You have to go back. Start at zero and just go from. There never assume anything else has been done. If you didn't do it again. Excellent advice and I think one one of the main things that Kind of theory I have is that it's the routine that it can be a real a real killer in an investigation. Because I don't I don't care if you're a special forces or kindergarten teacher or or you're a secret service agent protecting the president. At some point everything becomes routine. And you kind of go through the motions motions and that's where you can miss things so we'll make sense. I mean if you think about and that's another thing that I think I I'm pretty good at I S I mess up every day. I mean it's human to air and I err often and I don't have a problem you know admit what I don't know and also oh I know what I don't know and also completely come clean and say look like I mess up every day. I think it is hard for law enforcement. Because they're in these jobs where it's just it's sort of like sometimes doctors with malpractice suits. It's almost like they can't admit that there's a human error anything near involvement. Of course there is of course there is we all have it and I feel like the culture should be much more accepting accepting of a policeman who says someone did on my on Rebecca's case he was like I was a young officer and I'm sure mistakes that crime scene and it should be okay to say that and and they should be able to reevaluate those things instead of just. Don't ever tell anyone that no I agree. Yeah no I agree and it's kind of like I said it's kind of a routine I mean. There's certain statistics bear things out. I mean if a husbands if the wife is killed typically the husband is is your best suspect aspect the younger a child that's murdered it's typically the mother that did it and so I think Law Enforcement Often gravitates to these axioms. If you will but in most cases bear out but Sometimes it's you know it's not the Butler rider or sometimes People don't know what they're on blind spots are I know in Rebecca's case my opinion This investigator definitely when he was interviewing people kiss background is military. So he's very used to doing. Is I believe one type of investigation. You know kind kind of like the foam going full metal jacket on people and being kind of a drill sergeant and he didn't really I don't believe he has the skill set to be able to be good cop. You know when he you know. Hey it's okay. Hey you can tell me. And some people need that if they're trying to something if you're trying to get information out of someone you've got to know how to approach that person and I don't. I don't believe he did not. I think I'd take too much more but I don't think he did or just don't let your ego get in the way I mean there was a guy I remember. I was trying to get information. Someone this is going back a few years with my male partner at the time and you could just tell. This guy wouldn't couldn't tell anything this guy either didn't like women or didn't like me something about my look. He was not digging. I Dunno if I looked like an ex girlfriend or there was often so and I I had no problem. I'm like listen man. You should take this one because this you know you're just you just have to not have an echo about those things sometimes and no win. You know calling someone else like it's okay. I don't I don't really care gets credit or whatever I just want somebody to just the right person to be arrested for this on. The bottom line is getting the information if it takes you for takes a male male partner or whoever. You're from a small town in Arkansas how small town politics and gossip. How did that affect both of these? As a cases these seasons was interesting. I mean see. I think that they're the small town goes. I mean I think it's everywhere and I feel like it's more of a function not necessarily if it being in the south but of it being kind of that small town mentality because I mean I don't know if you're familiar with for example the Long Island serial killer case There are a lot of the similar dynamics because it's a small long island is a small town and there was. The police force is a very closed environment and there might have been mistakes made and all that kind of stuff. It played a big role. I feel like I've worked with law enforcement a lot in the past and like I said I mean most of the time sometimes they're very helpful and you get a really good cooperation going on Sometimes it's of benign sort of like okay. You do your job you mind but then unfortunately there's some of the time where it's you know it's antagonistic and I you know I don't like that but sometimes you just Kinda have to deal with it. I mean I had one investigator. Tell me on the kate literally telling me and it was. He said it twice so funny. He's like I'm not trying to. We'll be patronizing but investigations are grownup stuff. And I couldn't believe he said that to me in two thousand one approach man it was really bad eighteen but then he made a point to say it again in person just in case I missed it. And he's like I said on the phone. You know investigations are grownup stuff. And maybe you should mind your business and I was like. I can't actually believe you're saying this to me right now. Just kind of sat there like like whatever what part of that I think is Law Enforcement has not always had a great relationship with private investigators and to be honest. A lot of that may be the private have investigators industry they're fall and then you're you're dealing with the south and law enforcement in the south can Sometimes I'm from Texas. It can sometimes be a good old boy network were well. I think I mean to be honest with you what I was. I was just annoyed by the fact Forgetting everything about gender or anything else. I'm asking questions that are totally legitimate. Okay and it really irritated me that especially when I'm when I'm asking questions being very patronising. And then he said something about her being a high ariss victim and he was saying all these really weird things and the bottom line is when people tell you to stop asking questions. That's when you know you have to ask more questions you know Woodward and Bernstein unseen wouldn't be like Oh okay all right yeah. We'll stop looking into that. Nobody deal out there. No big deal. That's just so ridiculous and it's just yeah that's not gonNa work for me. That point decided we were going to. We were at cross purposes and I was just going to go on and demand best Another way sometimes. That's what you have to do so season two which involves rainy ward. was there three. I think there was three. Autopsies was at correct. It was crazy. MC none of the medical examiners are none of the people that that did did conducted them agreed with the with the others. It was it was really tragic case because first of all there's so much we don't know so I don't Wanna I don't WanNa say we know everything. The hard part about it was often when there's sort of a theory about you know people in power if there's some sort of a conspiracy theory there are threads threads of truth in it right like sure. The people in power are treated differently. People with money and a good liar are treated differently in the criminal justice system. The cops cops often do look the other you know. There's certain things are true. In this case though again you have to go back to the facts of the case and the facts of the case were the first autopsy was done There were the first of all the you know. Clearly she D- tragic at the fact that there was there was no hospital. They drove her in the back of this pickup truck to the you know the bank parking lot. Her parents get get to the morgue and they're told right away they say well. which funeral home do they didn't even ask? If it's the parents wanted an autopsy which right away I mean. I'm sorry I've got my daughter. I would be so suspicious right away and I think anyone would the father. Ron had insists on an autopsy. Okay and then the unfortunately the first medical examiner To do the autopsy made some pretty serious mistakes in terminology and other things as it emerged. It was very controversial. Figure in Arkansas. And he you know. It's been alleged that he bought a lot of cases and he. You know he had to resign me. There's there's all kinds of material online but basically it's it's doing things like ruling certain things a suicide when people have been shot in the back and there were a lot of messed up cases so right away way your best chance at getting evidence is compromised and that makes things really hard. It's really hard to go back then and and figure it out. The second autopsy was done on after. Jane's parents contacted someone years later by a prominent forensic pathologist unfortunately later Iran. It you know. His work was criticized too so it just got really complicated and by the time the third autopsy was done with a cat scan. It was very comprehensive but again so much times passed by then. Dan sure you know. So it's it's it's heartbreaking so heartbreaking these parents in every time that the body got dug up they had to go through this again. It's just it was very sad. I'm speaking speaking with Katharine. Townsend private investigator also host of the iheartradio podcast. Helen gone by the way. How did you come up with that title the title? So I didn't one of the producers. Did I liked it. Because it was kind of a southern and colloquial and also because I really loved the movie romancing the stone and they use that expression to mean that you're a long way from where he started out in your hair when he goes you. Are Helen gone from Cartagena. Like I'll let me so. What did you learn Catherine? Did you learn about investigating cold cases from doing these two seasons of Helen Gone. I learned to be careful when you go in the woods lot. No I learned the learned was never give up because I do believe certainly Rebecca's case is still ongoing and I you know without saying too much a strongly believe we now l. have a very good idea of what happened and the person who we focused on was completely different from the person that the police were initially did. I feel like we did make a difference in in her her father. We gave him some answers. Unfortunately that person's not in jail yet but I'm working on it and I think never give up. Never underestimate the power power of information. I mean people people have information. They have information they don't know they have and that was really a big thing spending so much time there we were able to really talk to people people who may have seen something and not understood the significance of it and several people said and you know again. This won't happen in every case they called the police and the police may be hadn't taken down that information so we were able to compile a lot of information yet. I mean that was that was really it. Just don't give up keep going and be careful flipped out in the woods because you'll probably never have reception. Oh an always learn how to jump a car and take jumper cables with you everywhere. Learn that too so aged vice. Yes whether it's a fascinating podcast and this brings me to a couple of my final questions willoughby a season three. I think there will be a season. Three we're looking at cases. One one of the great things that's happened as a result of this is that probably hundreds of people have gotten in touch and asked in told me their stories and said that they needed help. Help the cold cases and I wish I could do them all you know. It's it's it's shocking. How many there are and how low the murder clearance rate is in this country and we're currently looking for cases for season three and also figuring out the right place and the right time because we do things on a really small budget so it has to be somewhere near where I live or can drive to or have to sort of have to move somewhere for a few months so we've got plenty in Utah? So if he ended up coming here let me know. And we'll have your house keeping the garage. You can live in my wife and eye spare bedroom. I guess or telling it'll just be the Hampton Inn. I promise I'll murder in your town crash on your couch. That's that's about what our budget is. Kevin I appreciate your time if other investigators want want to reach out to you for whatever reason. How can they get a hold of you so they can email me at Catherine C. H. E. R. I N. E. AT HAT love detective dot com or they can Yeah that's probably the best way you can email me and you know reach out also on social media that's also my INSTAGRAM and my twitter. My if you text me direct message may give me a little time because sometimes to be honest I get overwhelmed and hide from social media for a little while and I have to like take take take some time off but I do read them and we'll get back to you so excellent I will include all that information in the show notes for folks that want to reach out to for whatever reason but I appreciate your time. Is there anything else you wanted to add. No I really really appreciate it. I really I love working with other investigators. There's and learning from their experience. I think it's a really good thing to do. Because he is. Don't get who we don't network that much there. Aren't that many opportunities. So it's a good thing to do private investigator Catherine town. It's been a pleasure speaking to you. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you you've been listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast the number one show for private investigators who wanted to take their investigative skills to the next level. Join US every Tuesday on Apple Google spotify or wherever you get your podcasts and be sure to subscribe rate and give us a five star review. Send your comments and questions to podcast at Inter mountain to Pi Dot Com. That is it for this week's episode until next time this says Utah private investigator. Scott Fulmer reminding you the game is afoot. What you too

investigator Helen Gone Jennifer Rebecca Arkansas murder Inter Mountain Katharine Townsend US Scott Fulmer New York magazine writer Catherine Utah Rebecca Gould Salt Lake City Detroit Amazon US Los Angeles
Connecticut Private Investigator John Hoda The PI Coach

Intermountain PI Podcast

44:46 min | 11 months ago

Connecticut Private Investigator John Hoda The PI Coach

"The Inter Mountain. Pi podcast follows the real life exploits investigative tips and insightful advice of private investigators Scott Fulmer the principal at Inter Inter Mountain. Pi and author of the critically acclaimed true crime. Memoir Confessions of a private eye. The names locations and other identifying details have been changed to protect protect the privacy of individuals the innocent and the guilty. He's been a police officer and an insurance fraud. Investigator gator but for the last twenty. Two years of his life. He's been a successful private investigator not to mention an author of numerous books both fiction and nonfiction. Now he's slowly turning the business over to his son as he focuses on coaching and mentoring other private investigators Connecticut private investigator get her John. Hoda is the Pi Coach in your uh-huh broadcasting from the crossroads of the West in historic eggs Salt Lake City. You're listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast here's your host celebrated Utah Private investigator Scott Fulmer. Welcome welcome back to the PODCAST. I'm Scott Fulmer author of confessions of a private eye. You can find my book on Amazon and you can find me on the web at. WWW DOT inter mountain pi dot Com. You're listening to Episode Number Twenty Four Connecticut private investigator John Hoda the Pi coach the Inter Mountain Pi. PODCAST is brought to you by track OPS. A powerful investigation management platform used by companies of all sizes in countries all around the world with features designed for managing every aspect of the PI agency. Track hops has the tools to streamline in your operation from intake to invoice right. Now you can try track ops for free for fifteen days by signing up at traps dot com mentioned that you heard about it on the Inter Mountain. NPR podcast and track OPS will also give you ten percent off your base. SUBSCRIPTION PRICE TRACK OPS is case management made easy John a Hoda graduated nineteen seventy five with a BS in criminology from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He is a former police officer and insurance fraud. Awed investigator however for the last twenty two years he's operated a successful private investigation business and many of his cases have made the headlines of the The Philadelphia Inquirer and the new haven register. John has said on the boards of both the National Association of Legal Investigators and the Connecticut Association Asian of license at private investigators. He is a certified legal investigator and a certified fraud examiner. He has written numerous articles for Pi magazine and other publications and he is a frequent guest blogger and webinar. Presenter on Investigative Interviewing John is also the host of and this is how I I found him. He's the host of the popular podcast. My favorite detective stories and to clarify. He describes it as a quote podcasts for listeners. Who Want to be inspired informed informed and entertained by great detective stories close quote new episodes out every Tuesday private investigators are interviewed about how they got into the business and the type type of work they do and every episode ends with a guest talking about some of their favourite cases? You can find it on itunes or on his website at www dot. John Hoda Dot Com at H. O.. DA or wherever. You get your podcasts. He has also written a numerous books. Aside from the podcast he has written for for exceptional nonfiction books and each book addresses a specific facet of improving your private investigation business. I had a rocket your private investigation business. This second OUTTA market your private investigation business in less than five hours a week. Third how to launch your private investigation business and fourth out a boost your private investigation business. Make one thousand dollars every working day and these books are designed specifically to assist you and finally John Created the DVD the ultimate guide to taking statements. Now he focuses on the business side of private investigation and coaches. Pi's and others interested in the field and how to survive and thrive at www dot the PI coach dot com. Welcome John How are you doing today. Fantastic ask Scott how about yourself. I'm doing really good. It's a pleasure to have you on the PODCAST and I wanted to tell people how we actually met. You called me to be part of your podcasts gas. which is my favorite detective stories? Yes but it was also to talk about your book. Oh Yeah Yeah and that was the topic of our conversation. That day and I found are really good read and I really enjoyed it a great deal and I thought hey. Let's have Scott on the podcast and let's talk a little bit more about guy behind the Penn.. I appreciate you coming on the PODCAST. ODD CAST and you're in new haven. Connecticut is at Koran. Whispered a few days ago and I think that you have kind of stepped back from kind of a more or fulltime focus on Your Business Zak. Yeah desolate about what you're doing now and how you you've made some changes. I think you brought your son into the business. Yeah and and This was something that was not on the radar scope twenty two years ago when I started twenty two years ago my thirty seven year old son was fifteen and a sophomore in high school and it wasn't until a few years into the business that once in a while. A second operative on a surveillance was needed and my son was more than willing to fill. Oh the breach and work as a second car and then off and on during the years when he was in college and doing other types of work he would help us out on different Different Work than I did. Ah during the course of the last twenty some years and more recently and maybe five years ago. He'd been a director of operations for surveillance company down in Westchester Mr County New York and was doing a wonderful job there until the company merged with another company doing very similar work and they had already had an operations manager energy yourself. He was without a job and had a lot of good skill sets. And I thought this was not part of my original plan. Twenty some years ago two to form a legacy company and to have my company bear my name and to Then ended with in my son taking it over so it was really a wonderful experience to be able to hook up with him again and say listen you know. Let's let's talk about how we can make make this happen. Let's do a gradual buyout. And over time I will slowly reduce my Activity in the business. You'll take on more activity. The business will form it more in your vision than in mine and We just make it happen and To tell you the truth it was it was just wonderful absolutely wonderful. I can't begin to tell you how. How nicest experience has been over the last Several years we added also boy boy Kalma Llama boys also thirty seven years old That was in our cub scout. Pack and are boy scout troop he was an eagle scout and he just took to this kind of work like a duck to water and now we're training him in some of the other Parts of the work that we do I think within a short period of time I will still be the license holder of the company. I still will be the the The managing member of the LLC a still end on the books and bill payment but for the most part field investigations and talking with the customers and generating new business will fall on his shoulders. And I'm really pleased as punch to be able to do that. Not Everybody has a chance to Turn their a business over to a family member maybe a century ago when you know people were craftsmen Ordina guild. They could they could do that sort of thing. You know the blacksmiths kid was the black next it next blacksmith. Or whatever I'm excited about the chance to To have my son Keep the legacy of the company happy about that. Well what a great legacy. That is so wonderful to be able to do that you have. I don't know much about your personal and you just have one son. You have a son and daughter. My daughter is out on the West Coast She's in Near Los Angeles and she is in the wellness field. She is a doctor of traditional Chinese medicine a licensed acupuncturist. I A licensed masseuse a yoga teacher and she has been trained by the masters Taiwan to do tea ceremonies. So Oh she's She's very much in that world. which out there in LA is well? That's that's kind of what it's like in those zip codes. Yeah she's in the right place for that stuff absolutely so And visit her every so often who who doesn't like being near Venice California and the beach on a Nice Sunny Day. You know so another never changes which is really nice. Yes I asked her one day. We were out visiting her. I said what's the forecast today. And she says I don't know it just it. It's just that every day it doesn't suck. I gotTa tell you though he wasn't a total stranger to my business either maw. Gosh I don't know maybe fifteen years ago. When she was sixteen years old she helped me produce a the DVD the ultimate guide taking statements? She was my camera person. She handled the clapboard for the scene changes. She had the soundboard on her lap and she was listening to the audio and she was my. She was my onsite producer for the two days that we did the filming for that. DVD and She did a great job. She was really helpful with me. So it's a family affair. They're also in the DVD. The one person interview on the street actually happens to be in my home and that Nice Lady and the DVD is my My wife so yeah it is truly a family it really is tell us about that the DVD the ultimate guide to taking statements is still available. Yeah I have it for sale Through my website the a website has a cute name to it in the Department of what happened. I borrowed that from an Israeli calligrapher by the name of Avenue. Sapir go onto one of his training. Classes in scan the scientific content analysis technique for the laboratory of scientific interrogation he coined that phrase days. I am not from the Massad. I am not from the Israeli police I am promote. So he said has it. Yeah I am from the Department of what happened and I just wrote that down and I never forgot it and it be a good marketer. I swiped it so so that is my claim to fame the department of what happened and I do it with a DVD. I sell actually three there from the from the website. And it's based based upon a lifelong or an adult long love of investigative interviewing ever since college. I always wanted to get better and better and better at interviewing doing and I always knew that there was something better out there and it wasn't until I discovered a cognitive interviewing that I actually started putting all that stuff together and trained trained my own investigators in how to take statements how to do Field interviews and thought that the The DVD was next step in doing so well and taking statements. Events Is A is certainly. There's there's an art to it. That's for sure I don't want to back up a little bit and talk about your podcast. which is called my favorite detective stories? Stories sure I had the pleasure to be on the podcast which was wonderful. It's organized in I also subscribe to it. Tell us a little bit about. What was the genesis of it? How did you come up with the idea? And then tell everyone about those folks that are not familiar with it. Tell them about the format and you know exactly what you do. Because all there's a lot of there's several private investigator podcast out there. And fortunately they're all very unique. Everyone's got a different niche. And you do well so tell us a little bit about that. Well in this in this situation I I did not want to start a podcast as part of my authors platform which I can get into a little bit later on until I had something genuine to talk about an and had I mean a lot of people will Start a podcast with the idea that it has to serve a purpose but when they don't have any genuine content ten and they're not genuine in it either it is. You can hear it immediately and you know it's very Forest or artificial so I had to think about that long and hard and I said if I'm going to talk to people. What is it that I want to talk to them about? And and secondly what would be interesting to listeners about during our conversations and it what came to me was the fact that when you get a couple old coppers or a couple investigators together at a conference or meeting and their Swapping stories you. It's one of the most interesting things and then people sitting nearby or at Bar will come over and now they have an audience and it's just one good story after the next and send nee- slap or some of them are. Oh my God. I can't believe that in and only tell you about this one. Let me tell you about that one and before you know it. It's three hours later and I said to myself no now. That's what I WANNA do. I want to find investigators to route. Were that can tell me their favorite detective stories. It was real simple. I I gotTa Tell You I just this contacted people and said to them look. My listenership are aspiring investigators. People that want to get into the business people that are on the business but are hungry to learn from other investigators and from their cases. So I that was the immediate hook and the hook to the guests was you can impart some great information to my listeners. Just by talking about some of your cases and that's what we did and as you can hear. I'm kind of bobbing on. Now you know in my in my podcast on the listener just like the listener Sner is and it's you know several questions that I ask every single investigator but because our life experience and their work experience so different each time it was fresh was novela. It was different and Oh my God the stories that they would tell me. We're just out of this world and I found that to be so rewarding I had no problem in lining up guests asked. I think I maybe had one or two people bag off and made it was more because shyness not wanting to be on the air than it was to tell me about their stores so honestly honestly it was just a a wonderful blast amusing. A Blue Yeti microphone on high use skype like you use audio pro to do my intros and out throws or I'm sorry not audio Amadeus Bro and one of the first things I learned early was to get a good post post production editor somebody that will remove the gaffes and the and the coughs and Mike Kitty Cat meowing in the background and all that fun stuff and it was the best money I ever invested because for me to sit there and try and display tape. Now forget it just. It didn't work Mike. Mike Computer would become a Frisbee very quickly. So and that's how I I went about doing the the whole production and then every week we would put it out there. It would appear It would be reside on my a website all things investigative at John Hoda Dot Com. Tom Has now. We have seventy five podcasts up there and I'm scheduled out until mid January one thing though I had to take a pivot. I guess maybe about about two months ago and the reason I had a pivot was the podcast was was a blast for me and it was a lot of fun for my guess but I wasn't really seeing a direct relationship. Asian ship between anything. Any sales are related to my books are related to my business. Although it did help with a brand and branding and it did give me some. Some gravitas gave me some influencers status within our industry and really wasn't serving the purpose that I needed to do so I had to. I had the bifurcated the podcast now. On alternating weeks I interview private investigators but not necessarily about their stories anymore but or about their business formation and how they created their businesses and and what challenges they had during doing that. How did they overcome some of the the obstacles in their way in? How did they become successful? I want the podcast to be more geared towards investigators that would be interested in hearing about it from a business standpoint to go along with my consultancy. I do coaching. So the other part is that on alternating leaks. I then started reaching out to crime fiction writers about their favorite authors themselves who they like to read and what their fictional characters were so I might have a crime fiction writer like say David Swinson tell me about his character Frankie Mar and and then then he told me about his favorite author and who his favourite detective fictional detectives were and and that would speak more to the MIC fiction writing and my and and and fiction writers and also the people that might be interested in my fiction books which I have a couple in on. I'm still working on a series so to me the bifurcation and also had to make sense in other words had to be genuine. I had to be really interested in talking to my guests. I do. I love it. And it works out very nicely for me. So alternating alternating leaks and talking to Pe- is on the other weeks. I'm talking to crime fiction writers and just enjoying myself immensely doing so. And that's the thing as as long as you're enjoying doing and yet I can see Kim continuing to do it for as long as he liked to. And as long as people comment on it and say hey you re they really like what you're saying you know what you're doing that's juice I a drink up. You know I enjoy well as you mentioned. You're up to episode number seventy five. I get it on overcast. That's what I used to my pod catcher. Each episode is about an hour some a little bit less than a little bit more it just depends I guess. Yeah it's on Tuesdays comes out every Tuesday I believe. Yeah I ah yes I I try to schedule recordings on Friday afternoons at either two or four eastern time but then Couple of week couple. Three weeks later. they air on Wednesday on Tuesdays. And then I also broadcast out to my social media. I put it out on linked in facebook twitter and my email list which is growing which is important for for an author to have an email list. And I'm going to after the first of the year. I promise I'm going to start doing something with instagram. So where can people find your podcast on on Tunes Google Apple at Google play apple boob blueberry modify any of the Most of the pod catchers you can do it on on or they can just get it through my website. John Dot Com and subscribe to it in every week it shows up in their inbox in the form of an in mail email. Yeah and nets. John Hoda H. O.. D. A. DOT COM right. And I'd say it's a wonderful podcasts. You know you mentioned How needs to be fun? And you wanted to be able to kind of talked about the business aspect of it which is really good and I think I had mentioned to you when we talk Year or two ago that when I started out in the business it was before email it was you know a lot of. That's that's a lot of stuff. We were using cassettes for our two to record video but I got no help. I really get no help at all. And so everything. I will a lot of what I learned. I learned by making mistakes. And that's one lose that I do this. PODCAST is to help people who are already in the industry and help people that are that are interested in becoming a private investigator so they can learn a little bit about the the nuances of the business And and the things that you need to know. I do like the fact that you talk to people about that on your podcast Casson. I think it's helpful. It's kind of a way of mentoring and kind of giving back which I really like. Yeah and that was the genesis of my books too. I had four books produced back. Yeah last April April of Nineteen How to watch private investigation business on ninety days to liftoff how to market your investigation business? Yes less than five hours a week. Really how to boost your private investigation business. A thousand dollars every working day and in the fourth book was a complete series stories of the other three called how to rock your private investigation business the complete series and that has been getting a lot of traction to I had it advertised on. Pi Magazine Dean One of our Favorite insurance agents that appeared all the conferences has the books out there on his table. Top to give to his favourite clients appliance. So I'm getting some traction from that as well and and that is giving back to as well Let's face it Scott. Both of you and I learned from the School of hard knocks Neither one of US came came into this with an MBA or any kind of a business background per se and Our successes came as a result of just getting back up again after we got knocked back down and kept going and what I'm trying to say to these people and in my different books is that let me be the one that gets knocked down. You learned from my mistakes and then that way you have a smoother straighter path. And that's what it's about for me so did Did these four books come first or did the. Pi Coach come first. Verster was it kind of simultaneously no What came first with the book? I wanted the books to be out there. I want them to be the basis of the bedrock Our Foundation of my coaching. That would be like the playbook for everybody to to read off of When when we did the coaching the coaching came in late? Summer and September number where I worked out the bugs with my website. Very happy that I built it myself and put in a A scheduler through cutie and an added a Talk Payment Format as well through stripe and pay PAL and credit cards and it allowed persons to secure a free half hour consultation with me and after we talk if they wanted to go further they could book various periods of time. You know at different costs and and that has been going along very nicely. I've got Several clients now and and I'm starting to build up my afternoons with coaching clients. Which I'm really really happy about and I'm just so excited. That with some of the people that I did coach September they. They helped me work the bugs out of my system and I gave them free coaching in exchange for testimonials and those testimonials are on the website. I'm just so happy. I did that for those guys. We're talking the. Pi Coach Dot Com. Which is where you are offering Coaching services for those in the private investigation industry. Tell us a little bit. What about specifically what type of services you offer and you know how you can help people services to help them with whatever they need to have done as it relates to towards their business some investigators who just they don't know who they're taught target audiences? They don't know how to price their products or services. Some lack financial literacy the and simple things is building a budget Using quick books where they actually can use the system to help them forecast a budget or cash slow looking at their websites to see if they're marketing copy is reaching the audience that they want a target. Are they being a A Master of on early being essentially generalist that they really are shot. Gunning across several verticals business to business business to consumer professional professional hybrid. Whatever it just seems like you know do they have? They have to know who they're they're talking to who their target audiences and how to give a compelling message to them to be able oh to convert a leads into prospects prospects into clients and then how to do when furrows and testimonials and that type of thing and how to build a business that you can scale Alan replicate and then one of the things. I'm going to be coaching some people there. Shortly on how to get their endgame together in other words how do they structure their business now so that they can sell it and remove their equity out of the business that they worked so hard for so many years. So it's sort of like succession planning and that's something that I'm looking forward to right now. It's a one on one but I'm looking to do group. Coaching say I have five or six people that are starting at brand spanking him. Then I'll have a twelve week course just for them to walk them through all the steps that they need to do to launch a business those people that just want to concentrate on marketing marketing alone. Another twelve week course where we do that. high-end the N.. Gods are in Gaza have a business but just can't seem to break through to the next level. How can we help boost their business? I'm hoping also to do an eight hour pre-conference class to piggyback before or after a major conference or at the request a private investigation association or to who come together at a central location where a group of private investigators can come together for a one day class. And you hear my kitty cat in the background. Hurt your cat. So Oh yeah. So that's that's one of the ultimate goals is to be able to to present a class eight hour pre-conference class were an eight hour day class where I would have been Airport Hotel where people can come from Joining States and be able to work for eight hours so that that would be something that I'm looking at and in twenty twenty it's going to be The one page marketing plan. That's what I'm hoping to to do. My first full length eight hour day EST n take people from the very beginning a blank sheet of paper and at the end of the day they will have a one page marketing plan that fits their specific needs. It's not a one-size-fits-all it's for their specific needs so that they can implement when they get out there the next day we're talking to private investigator. John a Hoda out of Connecticut and his website the Pi coach Dot Com. The coaching is done over. The telephone is too emails the Webinar. How do you the one on one stuff? How do that the way it works is I will do a Either a skype or what's called clean feed. It's a a link where We do record the session and immediately after the recorded session. The client gets the after action report from me and an in that after action. The report talks about what we accomplished during the session. What their action steps are going to be and time and date of our next session? They also so we'll get a copy in dropbox where they can go to the wave file and we listen to the the coaching session. So they have that always for austerity and it's in a dropbox sets Just their them not me. Nobody else can take a look at it and they can always refer to it. So if they're out in a on a boring surveillance and say pocatello Idaho. I've been there. Yes you have that they can really listen to the to the things that were discussed during the conversation And I'll be honest with you. It's it's less than me. You know coming down off the mountain with the tablets and it's more of them really trying to discern for themselves what is it they want to do. And how do they want to go about it. I can preach but it doesn't really work as much as people having the moment themselves. And then wanting to take action action on what they see it being their next step. So it's a little bit. It's a little tricky to navigate that because some people can become passive and expect me to have to do all the heavy lifting during the session and in reality. It's more about them getting clarity over what they WANNA do and how they want to go about. Doing that is a needed service For many reasons there are different. Licensing Sinzig is you know a different lesson requirements in all in most of the states in the US including some that have no licensing requirements. And you have people come from all different kinds of walks alive. I mean I've I've known people that were librarians at became private investigators or or I knew a guy that was a disc jockey. Radio Announcer folks in the claims industry law enforcement horsemen. They may have the experience of doing the investigating and research. But they don't always have the experience in what you're giving them which is building a business making making a budget marketing. You know having a marketing action plan and and Finding your niche knowing what you WanNa do so those to you for doing that. That's awesome and you know part of it came from me having to overcome my own insistence on being the consummate investigator. I placed so much emphasis on on investigative craft and field craft and teaching my investigators. How to do that that I let slide? The other parts of owning a business you know and I forgot that I was a business person providing investigative services and once I shifted my brain from being an investigator to being a business person providing investigative services in that shift that mindset set shift. That's when I began to seek out other ways to go about the business part of it and let me tell you it's not always the most exciting stuff especially but It's stuff that will keep you in business. It's the stuff that will keep you on your cash flowing keep you out of trouble with the IRS and allow you to maybe behalf something not only at the end of the year but at the end of the career. So that's that's kind of what I learned as you did the hard way we had to make our way in in this world and we didn't have any real mentors on the business side of it. Oh yeah there might have been some Small Businesses Association Administration Free Coaches at the Chamber of Commerce Commerce. But in reality no one really could talk to private investigators about the private investigative business and I felt that this would be an opportunity for me to give back to an industry. That's been so good to excellent and you have been you've run a successful private investigation business. The last twenty two years on WanNa talk about your books and your writing but before we go there. That'll be the last thing we discuss. Some of your cases have made headlines in in the new haven register and the Philadelphia Philadelphia Inquirer her anything Exciting you WANNA BE WANNA share with us well The biggest cases in the Philadelphia Inquirer were back when I was an insurance fraud investigator working for the Insurance Crime Prevention Institute in my book. Mugshots which is a free download from John. HOULT DOT COM. I titled One Short Story Rico. Outstanding for racketeering influence corruption and in that case Myself along with a postal inspector. US Attorney we took down a personal injury law firm to lawyers five doctors idiots that already had a license to steal will lost because they were caught stealing and two hundred eighty. Six people are engaged in Fictitious staged accents on why and Yeah that was twenty six month investigation largest stone shirts fraud case in Pennsylvania history. I had another gentleman actually not far from where I live. He was a cottage mill insurance claims for his his family and himself under a very unique scam where they He would take out multiple health policies. That would pay for so many dollars a day in the hospital and then it just so seemed that his family spent a lot of time in hospital for these quote unquote accident. so He'd he'd have all these policies that would pay. AM seventy five dollars a day and multiply that by one hundred policies and you get the idea was making yet and none of them have pro-rata provisions in in them and they all paid for a daily rate for being hospitalized and he just figured out a way to capitalize on that when they arrested him and did a search warrant he had filing I linked cabinets in his house. Like a business. Full of this For full of all the claims activity involving his mother himself his wife couple neighbors. I think even possibly absolutely it was it was amazing and that was another Philadelphia headline in in Connecticut. The headline cases had to do more with criminal defense work and it was something something that I would not have even considered when I got into being a Pi Twenty. Two years ago I had a company called Independent Special Investigations Doing Insurance Fraud Iran work and it was because some other national companies eight my launch and I could no longer continue to sustain a profit doing insurance insurance fraud investigation as a company I then had to become a generalist in is a generalist. I took on defense work. I have to give a lot of Kudos to brandon apparent for his book. Uncovering reasonable doubt component method that. That book is My Bible at sits in my briefcase with me when I do criminal defense work. I went to his forty hour. Our class taught me how to do criminal defense investigation on how to uncover uncover reasonable doubt and it was there that in back in. Oh eight I believe had my first I murder acquittal and then a few more murder acquittals came after that then a wrongful conviction exoneration and a couple other quibbles bobbing a teacher accused used of sexual assault of Of special needs students and It just seemed like I was catching all these cases right in new haven. I didn't I have to go further than twenty miles from my home. For those cases I've worked on some innocence. Project cases are that have resulted in person being let out of jail after many years for crime time that the DNA and other evidence says they had nothing to do with Enda. And it's been a lot of a lot of fun working on those cases not very Nov Very high paying. I I like to call them instead of Pro Bono. I call them low bono case. Yeah but when you're helping people that in those types of situations Uh maybe they had a really bad lawyer. I had a poor attorney or the you know the poor. Let's face it. We've got a great criminal justice system system in our country but the the poor get hosed. Oh yeah absolutely. And and with ninety percent of the cases being played out suddenly beyond a reasonable doubt become slightly the higher than probable cause sometimes even just a preponderance of the evidence. Yes system couldn't handle it if everything went to trial but Still Yeah that's I understand where you're coming from and I still have a couple of those. Even though I'm slowly fading into the sunset I still have a federal case. I'm working on where we were able to get the the the gentlemen Outta jail now. He is suing the municipality. It's police chief and detectives for the nine years that he spent in jail and he was innocent innocent of the charges. I haven't wrongful conviction. Exoneration case where sort of tied in with the innocence project there to guide. It's been in jail for twenty two years for her A crime that he didn't commit and then I have another one where I'm working on habeas or an appellate case That's going to be going to trial next week so I promised all three of those gentlemen once out of jail the other two are still incarcerated that I would Work their cases until Until there was no more to be done on the cases so I'll accent. Yeah so those are some of my yeah headline cases. I I've had a lot of other ones like I talk about them in the book. Mugshots which is also titled My a favorite Detective Stories and and it's a free download from my website. John Hoult Dot Com. Hey I I wanted to spend the last shifting focus to your writing. I did want to mention and before we go to your fiction I wanted to mention your non fiction books. How to market your private investigation business in less than five hours a week? How To rock at your private investigation business snus had a boost your private investigation business into orbit make a thousand dollars every working day and then had a launch your private investigation business ninety days to lift off all of these? I books are on Amazon Amazon or ingram spark or You you can get them through your favorite online retailer both in e book but I would suggest the hardcover are not hard covered the soft cover because you can write in it you can highlight it. You can keep it handy as opposed to maybe being on kindle where you might read it once and you know not really in in in digest all the information not to say that the book is in good. It's just that I think the soft covers would be a little bit better. You got the books you have the website the Pi coach Dot Com right in finally. Let's talk about your fiction writing. I've noticed one thing about private. Investigators that over the years is that they loved. Well we're always writing a report. We're always writing. So that's one thing but I've noticed so many of them are into not only nonfiction books but it seems Samir's more that are actually writing fiction these days Tell us about Odessa on the Delaware and and your other books that you have and when did you start in writing back in two thousand ten that My son and I were at a Philadelphia phillies baseball game and he bought a program and in the program there was an advertisement for fantasy baseball baseball camp and that is a camp that takes place a week prior to the opening of spring training for most Major League ball clubs. It's a place where players can come Four war anywhere from the age of thirty until they can't feel the ground ball and they can go and rub shoulders with their heroes of yesteryear. It's like old home week. It's like alumni week for the baseball this ball team and your stars of yesteryear are your coaches and you divvy up into baseball teams and you play baseball at the Spring Training Facility wearing a full uniform arm and getting to be out in the sunshine in my case it was clearwater. Florida with the Philadelphia Phillies Man. Went so you you did go. You know I live by myself and I got to write it off as a research because what I did with fantasy baseball was I had this idea. Kicking around in my head for it had to be twenty year of a little league coach that Uh had a magical pitch that he threw the little league and you know during batting practice and then by some mysterious stroke of luck he gets into the major leagues. But I didn't know what that was. Well it was fantasy camp. He went to fantasy camp and he was discovered a fantasy camp. So I had the beginning the middle and the end and I said to my son. I can't believe this. I finally got the middle little I can. I can put a story together. I just want start rambling about this story. And he says dad what are you talking about. You've never said anything about this. I said well it's been in my head for twenty years he says. But you can't right. I said Oh wait a minute. I've written for magazine written for trade journals. I've written thousands of reports for clients. I can learn how to write this to what I did was I did what any intelligent person would do. They would get a dummies book on the subject and I got how to write fiction for Dummies and that book guided me through my first novel which was published in in Just before opening day twenty thirteen and I was titled Fantasy Baseball. It's about a second chance and that exercise going through that writing writing process so energized me that I wanted to become a fiction writer and then shortly after that I wrote mugshots my favorite detective stories which is more of a creative nonfiction. This more short stories too right. Yes short stories in Virginia and then from some of the characters that were in fantasy baseball. I said what if what if these people had had some sort of interaction in law enforcement. And what have you. And that's when Odessa was born Odessa on the Delaware where is a about a Russian gang enforcer in Philadelphia that wants to take over the entire mob scene in Philly and a homeless vet. Unwittingly has the evidence events of this man's This murderous rampage but doesn't know he has it doesn't realize he's next on a list and FBI agent. Marcia shake comes in and tries tries to investigate this case where I introduce Marsh O'Shea and that was that debuted this year actually November within this past year November of eighteen and. It is now the beginning. Because I introduce Marcia Gay I will have a three book series out involving Marsha the the first one is called clearwater blue's already a rough draft is already done today. I'm working on Detroit wheels and the third book I haven't named yet but it's going to be a three three book trilogy involving Marsha and then I take a breather from the Marsh O'Shea series and I'm hoping to write historical fiction based upon the the Events that happened in case on to to Marine battalions that were under siege for two months back in January of nineteen sixty eight by the two north Vietnamese crack. Regiments and that's what I hope to To right next that will involve some of the characters from fantasy baseball volgin in sort of a prequel fashion. Yeah so it's really a I just had a lot of ideas from writing. I belong to a writer screw and I attend writers conferences. Tis I attended international thriller. Writers Association Conference this year in New York City. I went to mystery. Writers Association Conference in Dallas. Just is two weeks ago. I went down to Crime Khan and law in New Orleans to see what the whole true crime world was about. I was down there with James Nanos and UNCALL- Cousteau Ham. Pi Magazine looking to do something in that sphere as well so it was a motte of excitement for me this year with conferences. This is an end this past two weeks ago. I was a judge for the shameless awards. Rashes Private Eye Writers Association Award Judge Short Stories Stories. I was a debut novelist and I was also a panelist Kinda unique because for twenty two years. I've self identified as a hard boiled private detective in here I am John Clot Hoda author and it was just Kinda unique and different to be in that Wearing wearing that hat during this time period that's chapter to chapter two of John Johnny. The Hoda you serve in Vietnam or no okay. So how did you come up with the. I'm familiar with the case on what I didn't serve. I'm too young for that. But how did you come up with that. That idea to To historical fiction a two of my characters from fantasy baseball happened to be on that those hills during January of nineteen sixty eight and I've and that's how they met and then I thought well. Jeez I'd like to write about that. I mean sector research it I am to learn more about it. I have to get it so that it would be of interest interest readers that might WanNa follow some fictional characters during a time period that You know as gone by but probably one of the most besides maybe the battle of way with one of the most Known set piece battles in the Vietnam War because it wasn't many set piece battles year Drang Valley I think that was the one with Knock Gibson abson. Yeah Hal more general more than one seventh cavalry who who was actually the same unit of that was custard. Unit was decimated by the you know sitting bull and the the at that time. Yeah coincidentally that's the same unit. I was with the Gulf wars custer's last stand and he drank I so you know. I hope we have better luck this time around. I've been speaking with the PI coach. Private investigator. John a Hoda out of new Haven Connecticut. John if anyone wants to get a hold of you how can they reach you. What's the best way to reach you John at John Hoult to dot com or John at the Pi coach Dot Com? You know I'm not a big twitter twitter person and and after we off the Air I want you to tell me about your twitter strategy. You seem to be pretty good at it and I don't know sleep. That's IT and let's see. I'm on facebook as John. Hoda Johnny Hodi thank post My podcast there. I post Some of my blogs there. That's how they can can reach me. I'm also on Amazon at author central for the Book and the Department of what happened for the DVD. All right all right and I will include For our listeners. I will include links to all of that in our show notes. Thank you Scott Shape. I appreciate your time. Thank you very much. You've been listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast awed cast the number one show for private investigators who wanted to take their investigative skills to the next level. Join US every Tuesday on Apple Google spotify or or wherever you get your podcasts and be sure to subscribe rate and give us a five star review. Send your comments and questions to podcast at Inter Mountain. MPI DOT COM. And that is it for this week's episode until next TIME THIS IS UTAH private investigators. Scott fulmer reminding you. The game is a foot

investigator John Hoda H. O Dot Com John Hoda Dot Com writer John Hoda Inter Mountain John US baseball Pi magazine Scott Fulmer Connecticut Connecticut Utah Amazon Scott John Hoda Dot Com facebook
Coming Soon: Conviction

Conviction

02:29 min | 1 year ago

Coming Soon: Conviction

"So let him. Go down for something. He didn't do. No. Why? In the South Bronx. There are people fighting every day. I know my son was innocent. And I couldn't prove it. I didn't know how to finding a police force that wants to lock them up and a Justice system and wants to break them down you have people pleading guilty every day in that courthouse. The things that they did not do not fight the people of the South Bronx at a big disadvantage, but they do have one secret weapon and tell me what's her name. I am private investigator manual Gomez. What do you do? Now. I see myself as as a punishment for the weekend as see myself as a bringer of Justice for the good. Protect the week. My name's sake cannot go. I'm the host of conviction a new podcast from Gimblett media prefers sees involves private eye manual Gomez. Is he hunts for information? So I can't booking from one corner of the city from walk to school yards. A basketball court to another social corner Swiss people would gather near day with the music was trying to sell the biggest case of his life. And then I had a realization that this is huge. This is way bigger than what I thought it was any was big when again involved, but any realize it was going to be a nightmare gargantuan nightmare that is affecting an entire community and entire police. Precinct long the way you run into some trouble turns out when you're going head to head with people in power to watch your back. It's like walking a tight rope. You can't slip because if you slip all hell breaks loose. On conviction of follow Manny as he battles the system and battles his own demons as he tried to take down the people who took him down. So it's payback. Oh, yeah. It's payback. Big time. Conviction. Given media story of crime revenge Justice injustice, big egos, tough guys fast cards can hear the first season of conviction on February fourth scribe now wherever you listen.

Gomez South Bronx Manny Gimblett media investigator
Hell and Gone Trailer

Hell and Gone

02:07 min | 2 years ago

Hell and Gone Trailer

"They. New evidence or additional evidence. Thousand four in tiny town. A young woman named Rebecca gold was brutally murdered. She never got to be. She was going to be because they took her. Later, you know, the dying which you know she's supposed to head the Melbourne last that I heard. Nearly fifteen years later. Her killer is still on beliefs. Suspects work everywhere. So we have already talked to the killer. It's just really surreal out in walking around. So much horridness scare. Around her. I'm left in about three days so obsessed at this point, I'm thinking I'm just gonna stay. I left Arkansas became an investigator, and now I'm coming back with my team to finally get Justice for beca. Two guys out there, yell. Do. It's a small town. I know someone has a secret that will break this case wide open. Not everybody wants to talk for once this case salt. Back to the day that they've ever bombing. I'm not stopping until someone starts talking. I always thought it had made news saying done. He'd done finally find out who killed Rebecca gold. I'm Katherine towns and this is Helen gone. Somebody asked me this during a picture that and I said, no spend the rest of my life trying to forget about this coming this Tober from school, if humans and how stuff works.

Rebecca gold Melbourne Helen investigator Arkansas Tober fifteen years three days
Episode 34: Paranormal Investigator Lydia Eustice

Cryptic Chronicles

1:12:35 hr | 3 months ago

Episode 34: Paranormal Investigator Lydia Eustice

"Welcome to cryptic chronicles a podcast dedicated to exploring all of the mystery surrounding this ineffable universe. We call home. Today on the show. I'm going to interview. A paranormal investigator named Lydia eustis. WHO's actually part of a whole paranormal? Investigating team called the path of salts or a path of souls paranormal and we're going to go into detail about everything. Her team does when they're conducting these paranormal investigations as well as some of their cases and anything scary that they may have encountered. One thing to note about this episode is the audio quality is kind of off when I talk I'm using a new program to record when I have guest and I figured it out yet, but there's like a weird reverb thing when I talk sometimes and sorry, there's nothing I can do about it. NEXT TIME I won't have it I'll try and figure out how to avoid that, but for this episode. That's in there. If you happen to be a audio editor, though and you WanNa hit me up and tell me how to remove it. I Would Club the re upload this episode to have perfect audio quality. But. Let's get started, shall we? I'm your host Tim Hacker and you're listening to cryptic chronicles. All, right! So. We're live. Thank you for joining me today? Lydia use this from the path of souls. Paranormal team founded in nineteen, ninety, nine by when Nita. Aragon and includes John and Melinda. Ivy Mark trues Hilo and Frankie Mardi my pronouncing those names correctly. Close enough you pay. The organization is dedicated to the study of paranormal research and adhere to a professional code of ethics and standards and scientifically based research and their in indepth research has made many fascinating discoveries. Welcome so. Can you tell me what exactly brought your team together? And can you just give me a basic overview of what you do? Yes of course while we are eight paranormal investigation team as that's already been said and we do help people who are experiencing any kind of paranormal phenomena on whether they're either you know. Interested in it or curious about it or if they're having issues. Or afraid for that matter we do like to come in and investigate and find out if we would say, their property is truly haunted or not. So, that's what we do, we also. Do you know whatever research we can Find out if there's been any type of history of the building and whatnot. And we came together originally Juanita she was the founder of the team. She's that created the team and she had her own team She actually took me under her wing because I wanted to be a part of a team you know I was inspired. On while these paranormal shows that come on TV and whatnot. I was watching a bunch of 'em. One time I was going on like a marathon and I got curious, so I decided to look it up with how to become part of a team, so I emailed. several teams here locally in New Mexico. And she's one that responded and she kinda of welcomed me with open arms and brought me on her team. So that's how I. became a part of capitals. And we also brought on a Mercurio. who was the next one to come on? And at that point She decided she was ready to retire, and she was going to go hand in hand the team over to me so I am now the team leader Pat pixels than I brought on a John Melinda Ivy and also brought on Frankie Mart so now. We are team and I. Keep Her there I call her my mentor now, because anytime I need any type of advice or or whatnot when it comes to the paranormal. She's always there to answer any of my questions. US what kind of. Like what kind of Investigation. There's several different types of equipment, and there's more technology coming out on every single day. It seems, but the basics basically I use a full spectrum. Camera me personally and use a voice recorder. and I also have done things have ems devices which they measure electromagnetic fields. So. There's any type of entity. In the room, then it will spike, and it will let us know the higher the number. Then you know the more. You know validity. We can give it and My One of my team members mark. He has several different devices, actually some that are called periscopes they light up with static anytime. Something's near it or around it. You know they'll light up in I. think those are my favorite out of what he has, and I, also am using be using night-vision video camera as well so there's so many I mean. I can go on and on. Your team ever catch. As a matter of fact to es we captured a couple of things at this one small location. Here New Mexico. I brought on a guest investigator he He had a camera set in one of the rooms in this little building. and. We caught a shadowed figure and yeah, it was pretty quite interesting and another fill another video in the same room at the same angle. Actually you see some like like anomaly type thing manifesting itself like on the other side of the same exact screens, two different videos, two different periods of time, but none of us were in that room, and it's an enclosed room. There's only one door one way in one way out, so that was pretty interesting as well. Yeah! That's kind of creepy. So I understand that one of estimators daters is when Nita. She comes from a long line of healers. So what exactly drew her to begin the team and start the team? Do you know? Did she give you any stories about her? Experiences. While she's always been connected to the paranormal She is what you would call a psychic medium as well you know. She feels different energies, and she's had experiences pretty much her whole life so I'm not exactly one hundred percent positive as to what you know drove her to starts the team. I can't recall. might have told me once before, but I can't say for sure but but yeah, she's actually She's a very. She's very sensitive, so she's like a genuine. Yes. As fascinating, do you have any like spiritual connections to the paranormal at all? Not Sensitive by any means. I don't actually feel things. I don't see things i. don't hear things you know unless it's like in real time, not sensitive like I can't really walk into a building and say yes. I definitely feel the change of energy. There are some places that I have been where I did feel something different and very strange in October. I can say wow, yeah, I know, but it's very rare that it happens to me her. So I I pretty much just go off of our equipment and what we get with our devices. Basket it seems. To be. Yeah. Yeah, it seems like it would be I mean sometimes I get a little jealous. You know wishing I was. But at the same time I'm grateful that I'm not. Ever had any investigations where you felt like you might be in danger. No I have not I have not encountered anything, malevolence, nothing, dangerous, or demonic or anything like that. We do tell her clients though if they do feel like they're being malevolently attacked. So at low, let us know immediately. I will bring somebody into spiritually. Cleanse Place but I have not run into anything like that so far. That's good. Yeah definitely. Have you ever heard of the paranormal investigator garage to Ari? Not. As famous, Indian investigator and By all appearances basically died from paranormal. Oh Wow got really into it. And he started doing all kinds, investigations and whatnot, and in his career he investigate over. I think six thousand cases, and he traveled across the world like the most darkest and frightening places, all surrounded by her horrifying paranormal lore, and after investigating a possessed young girl. was found strangled to death in his bathroom. Wow. and. We'll. He wasn't found strangled to death. He was actually alive at the time when they found him, but he died on the way to hospital, I think. But the doctors could not find any physical evidence of him being strangled. Wow, so it's almost like I guess. He brought something home with him and killed him. That's one of the most fascinating cases I. The paranormal investigator straightened picking off more than they can chew and ending up dying from it. Yeah. Definitely interesting. Yeah his name is Greg terrarium. Anyway. You've never had any horrifying experiences like that, but have you ever herb? What's the ratio? Do think between when you go to investigations and they turn out to be somebody being paranoid to legitimate huntings. Well, it happens actually a lot. I'd say I would say like maybe sixty forty on, but that's that's plus my head when it comes to that because. I'm a skeptic on some things you know and I do believe that electricity has a lot to do with the way people think, and depending on how much electricity have in their homes, and and you know if they're. It can affect you know the mentality, and it can definitely make somebody paranoid so I. Do you know debunk you know quite a bit of experiences with that, but at the same time. I also believe you know that. What people experience in their own homes is completely different than you know what we will experience as an investigator coming into their home. You know so just because you know. We go in somebody's home and you know they are freaking out paranoid, or whatever like? We can automatically assume know what I mean. We don't always get either, so it's really hard to say whether or not. They really are having these experiences or not i. knew we try our best to validate it, but you know sometimes we just can't so. So have you ever? Seen it goes. On, I can't really say for certain that I have You know there's. A moment that I question I can't really say for sure because you know I. I work corrective lenses and whatnot so like. I don't believe that I actually saw anything I era. have seen anything ever heard things. Things have happened, but I've never actually seen. A spirits. What about spiritual activity? Like stuffing around. Yes about absolately have witnessed some interesting things happening by themselves. Can. You elaborate, that's. A of course well I'd have to say the first one that I encounter whereas we stayed at Saint James Hotel, and that's located here in Cimarron Mexico. It's an old wild west town. very historical voided kids in their. Jesse James. There's been a lot of wild west visitors to this hotel. And it was I stay at the hotel and We heard footsteps walking around bed in the middle of a nap. And specialized very creepy, and we were the only guests in the hotel at the time. there were other guests checked in, but not until later in the nights, so that was quite interesting. That was the first time you know You know unexplained footsteps I. I've ever experienced that. the only thing that happened over there was my camera got knocked off the mantle, and the batteries popped out of it and everything like it was thrown on the floor by some unknown force, so that was also a interesting experience. and. Don. LE, how no I was. GonNa say that the other crazy experience that I had I want to mention was the legal tender here Lamy New Mexico We had some poker chips drone just across the room. And Yes while it the first time if it happens, it was just me and one of my team. Members We were actually in transition from one piece into to another so from one room to another we were taking a break. I went by this table. I grabbed my flashlight and we went back to our base table. And we heard some some noise from across the room, and both men and looked at each other wondering what was that? So we turn the light on, and we noticed that there was a poker chip on floor. So we tried recreating it, but we couldn recreate the exact sound that we heard. So. We turn the lights back off and We stayed listening for a little while, and then all of a sudden we heard another one and sure enough, which on go there, and there was another poker chip just thrown on the floor by some unknown for. So whatever spirit this was enjoyed playing with poker chips that not in the traditional way, the play poker chip obviously. was probably just try. Yes. Definitely, not to mention the second time we went the investigation number two at Saint Place. I decided to take my own poker chips. We spread across all the tables in the entire place just to see if anything were to happen and sure enough. We got a total of three poker chips your on that night. Oh. Yeah? Yeah is NEAT. So do you ever have like we're? In situations where you like, get your electric's to work, right? Yes, our, it actually happened at the same place. I was trying to show my team members something on my phone and all of a sudden. My phone just went crazy. Like. A malfunctioned for the first time, and I never seen my phone do anything. I couldn't even turn it off like he had to help me. Turn my phone off. I could not turn my phone off England's very strange but there have been independence's where you know. Our cameras would stop working. I'll just turn off or the battery will just die or whatever you I'd say. That's definitely something messing with us. you know because it happens? So when I've made a couple. Go stuff or like dot forms or even mentioning like demons and things of that nature I have come across situations where files would just wouldn't even open. And I've also come across situations where. Like it's not like they would be deleted, but they would be corrupted somehow. Like the video or not video the voice recording file. and. Luckily. I always keep like three or four copies, even export in email myself side copies, because like I've always come across like weird stupid crap when it comes to electrtonics and stuff. So it hasn't really messed with any of my episodes, but I have come across. We're anomalous stuff, but it's only when I'm talking about. Things of that nature. Wow something demonic. Or just like anything that that you know like if I'm talking about slender man, or or haunting cursed objects or demonic entities or just supernatural entities in general. Yeah. That's happened to me. Wow, that's interesting. Which isn't a scary thing. It's just like what the hell. Something's messing with my electronics. Trying to get your attention probably. Or trying to stop me from saint stuff. That's more like just. I got that's. That's true, too. Yeah, very well could be. So when you're on these paranormal investigations, how do you stay calm? It's easy. Actually you know especially if it's quiet, you know you go in. It's quiet a at first of course because you know. Everybody's quiet in the room and they're starting to ask questions and starting to talk spirits and whatnot and. when something actually happens, that's when it gets a little challenging to stay calm because. You automatically get this adrenaline rush, and you just get like the cited and like you know when the poker chip thing happened to us, the legal tender for example I was like falling asleep. I was yawning I was getting so tired and then all of a sudden this poker chip. No incident happens in. It just woke me right up. And you know gave me a little bit of excitement. I mean I was. Scared me a little bit. You know I mean having you not get. Time to time so. Activated. Point. Yes, absolutely absolutely. Yeah I was just amazed. so stuff like that happens, and of course not definitely causes excitement, but it can't be the type of person as a paranormal investigator. Just run out of a building or something crazy like that. You know you have to start. Day, they're exactly. Do. Yeah so you but for the most part you know it's. It's usually real easy to stay calm. I don't know if I take on. So what kind of challenges are hurdles? Does your team face when going on paranormal investigations? And how do you overcome them? Current, it nothing too big I mean probably the biggest challenge is. You know for me for example would be you know trying to get permission to get into certain buildings I mean that can be a little challenging. You know you have to pretend charge, and then sometimes you have to go through hoops to get a hold of somebody to allow you to come in and investigate, and sometimes they will say no. Sorry, not at this time you known taking rejections a little difficult always. What as far as the team goes, and like all of us, you know I mean it's Kinda like probably getting our schedules together because a lot of times, you know if there's an investigation that pops up and there's only certain days, or or you know that it's available, say or whatever? You know it's hard to get everybody together. You know for the investigations so sometimes you just stuck with just one person, or maybe there's just no real new, or or whatever I won't go personally on an investigation by myself because I think that's crazy. Yeah but that's pretty much the only challenge I think other than that. It's pretty smooth I would say. Nine can. You might remember me from such places as Blocked Nets because on Loch ness monster. Uptick chronicles is sponsored by Blueberry. Appeal interested in making your own podcast just could've BLUEBERRIES DOT com. or I GOING TO CRYPTIC CHRONICLES DOT com. Click on the sponsor link. On the home. By going through cryptic chronicles, you will not only be helping to support the show, but you'll also have the best podcasting host on the market. There's no contracts and you can cancel anytime. You have twenty four hour tech support syndication with your own our as sp as well as a Plethora Edward goodies that only professional podcasters view. There's no third-party sites logging. Never leave your own lipset. You remain in control. To. Produce Their podcast. Right? Your blog posts and then publish. Twenty nine thousand plug ins pick. By going to cryptic. To have. Free at the best podcasts statistics as well as one month three of the best podcast hosting, so go through our sponsor blueberry today. And if you can visit Loch Ness. I am very hungry. So one time when I was doing investigation I actually did I used that done a couple and I've gone all by myself. And it was at this gestation. Where do supposedly killed and there's a haunting whatever I didn't see anything at all. The I was taking pictures with my phone. And when I was leaving I felt like it was. Down the street, so there's cars parked all the way down the street. You know like next to the sidewalk. And I as I was walking down I. would here like this like thump from car to car to car? And I don't know if it was just me being scared, or it could have been anything you know, but it seemed real to me. Does probably the scariest one that thing that happened to me on one of my investigations, but I actually got when I was looking at all my pictures I got this really weird image in one of the pictures of this apparition. That looks like it's wearing like a gas mask. Bizarre, I can link it to you. Only get in the show notes. But. Other than that nothing really scary happened to me on my own investigations. That was bizarre. Yes. Yeah, that sounds like it. It's interesting. What was What brought you? What was the calling that brought you to paranormal? Well, I, am always been into ghosts. You know I've always been a big fan of of scary things like. was brought up with you. Know Horror Movies, and you know blood and Gore and and. You know being kids. We would get bored in the playground and just make up stories about boxes. We will find on the field you know and. So I've always been into stuff like that There was the scary stories on the dark you know. A. Always always. Fun For me. and I was really getting into watching the paranormal TV shows that were I think they were first starting out. At the time they were getting big and. Becoming a thing like ghost, hunters and ghost adventures and some of the originals. And you know I was? All of a sudden, just inspired and I thought you know what I'm not GonNa Watch. Just watch this on TV anymore. I'm actually going to go and do it myself. So. I like on. Youtube and you know to find out what how do I do this and sure enough I got instruction to contact the paranormal local teams in the area. And you know see what you can do, and that's exactly what I did I emailed a lot of different teams. I was finally recruited into one of them, and I've been doing it professionally ever since Shenley Spider. Pretty much. Yeah, because I was like. Wow, they're out there. You know going into haunted places in. They're looking for ghosts than they're. They're catching utility in its. You know awesome and. See I wanted to do it to. HEADS AWESOME IT S. it's interesting because most people who who like get into your field of work. They usually have some sort of like strange spiritual experience of some sort. Yeah. That's true. That's true or you know some kind of a sensitive connection, or you know whatever the case may be Maybe they've grown up in a haunted house, but who knows what the case may be but. Not For me for me, it was just you know more. Wanting to? Communicate with. The other realm I guess you can say you know wanting to. Talk to ghosts like I mean. It's not a normal thing. Person there would just be I. WanNa talk to goes just doesn't happen. And Anytime I. Tell people to it. Sometimes you get the response of while you're crazy. I would never do that, you know. Right now like wow, how cool! I WanNa go I'm like okay well, you know. Let's see what I can find. It on normally army people. Yeah pretty much. You know an I'm pretty proud of it. I mean I. don't go out there and announced to the world, but every time it comes up. You know I'm happy to talk about it. You know Mike of Course. Yes, let's talk about this one here. It now I talk about it. You know I it's just. It's fun and helping people at another thing that I found he coming. You know professional colonel muscular. You get to help people who are afraid in their own home. He had to go in. And you know repeatedly sometimes. We have to tell them like you have control over your own home. You can't speak out against them and say stop doing this. Stop scaring me because you have controlling your own home and the living definitely has more control over the dead. So no I don't like my clients to say. I'm scared from like I. Understand, you're scared, but you don't have to. Be You know so I? Enjoy helping people in the process for sure. What were some of your successful cases where you really helped people? well, there was one case where we were helping a family. We went in for to investigate Sion's Saying evidence came out on both occasions. We have these devices that they have like rampants and they're basically like It's like an antenna and every time you touch the antenna, it makes a noise like an alarm on, but you have to touch the antenna. It won't just go off by itself, so we have several of those you know across the floor and we got activity both investigations on Manella meters and The lady she was. fear she had anxiety. She had depression and whatnot and I. Even invited one of my. Colleagues. He's a psychic medium on to the investigation to also help her, because he's also very religious. And he gave her some religious advice and whatnot to and We ended up going into cleansing so we script their walls and we did you know I don't personally do the cleansings, but I know people who do so I brought somebody into cleanse the Hong and I told him. If you have any more issues you know, feel free to give won't get a hold of me. It ain't all we'll come back and we'll do these cleansings as many times as we have to just make you. Comfortable in your own home in I never got a call for them again. so I I, guess. Everything ended up paying for them smiling assumption that I can really make. Lost contact with them completely, so yeah. Who did the cleansings coming from your team? Yeah, I am actually There's another team here locally called paranormal. New Mexico and it's kind of a compilation of all kinds of different local teams from our area, so like baffles paranormal, and like other teams here locally are part of the larger paranormal Mexico. Team and there are people that I met from that team that you know do cleansings in a psychic medium work, and so on so forth so I try to bring them along when I can. That's how to. Yeah to conduct that, so that helps. Maybe in the future, we. Oh yeah, definitely all mentioned in it to the director. It'd be fantastic and. Absolutely. Do you have anyone on your team though that can do cleansing. Are On my team specifically. No, but very close with others. so I do I. Am I do participate in in investigations with another team as well also one of their team. Members have my own team. Of course in there is There is a sensitive on that team on all say on my other team that she also does cleansings as well so I mean I know. Several people specifically on my team, but yeah I do know several people who do them. What exactly? Entails cleansing like what do they do? I think it just depends on, you know. Mostly. It's kind of like a magical thing. You know I mean they like their their into wicca. And nineteen candles that they'll set up candles and they'll set up. You know stones and crystals, and indulge you know do chance and prayers like no chanted prayers and stuff like that and She had a clean walls and it was it was quite interesting, because it was the only actual cleansing that I was like really you know apart of xybernaut her on, and it was quite interesting. Why brought her on on? She was actually getting images. Of this investigation that we were working on Shula, she posted something on facebook. End It correlated with the investigation. We were working on, so I mentioned. I was like what we do, have a case and you know. I can't exactly recall What was that? She saw though, but she did know that there was somebody in trouble. And, so I rock her onto the second investigation, and then when the? Study we WANNA cleansing then I said Okay we'll you conduct cleansings as well? So why don't I you know? Have you do the cleansing and she's? She agreed to it. She was perfectly fine with it so. Yes. Yes, that's the one big thing that I can't leave out. Is the sage that's probably one of the most important parts of cleansing the staging. Definitely. What did you tell them that? They can do on their side to assist in cleansing? the clients talking to them. Yeah talking to whatever entity it is bothering them. Tell late explaining to them. take over this. No, tell them you're not welcome here I. Know You're bothering me. Stop scaring me. You know you are not welcome If there's any enter negative energy, please go away. You know we don't want negative energy in my home and so that's what I you know. Advise the client to do personally to try to help it out. And of course I told them if I were you. Go to some metaphysical store. Maybe that you have in the area by yourself, some sage open all the doors and windows. Go around your house every single corner. Because I do it to. My home is well I H. my homie once in a while oil and that's how I do it so I advise the same thing that I do basically. So from what I know, what are the main things that you can do to cleanse your home of negative energy or negative spirits is to clean it. is that true to just keep it clean, yes, and. I would say that's a big part. Yeah, like she had a scrubbing the walls. You know I mean. That's part of cleaning home. You know I mean It it helps. I the definitely helps. Because of course you know it's going to help mentality well. I mean having a dirty home. Is You know it's not very healthy like? and. so yeah to clean the home definitely helps many you know. Some people have issues, and and the cantor or whatnot, so I'd say the best they can try to do is to sage them. You know in that case. Does, it seems like negative. Really attracted to dirty places. You think so yeah I guess they can be. It can be I mean. There are instances where negative energies also attract themselves to clean places to But. that. That's interesting. I mean I have to look that up a little more You see research on that part that's more like a colts, then mainstream paranormal investigation, but yeah. Yeah because. Divine beings are higher beings or more positive beings, according to court lower can't really enter area. That's like dirty and filthier has negative energy in it, whereas a negative being thrives in it, and as even attracted to it and more even if they find people there in that negative space, though try and entice those people to do to create more negative energy. I see yeah, the Mona make sense that definitely makes sense. I can see that happening. So during the Klenge. Clean your clean, your house and sage everything. Pray you know all that good stuff. That would probably be the best way to think. Yes yeah, that would be the best way 'cause like I said. A clean home also helps with mentality as well with the mental health. Department definitely psychology plays a huge factor in paranoid. Because a lot of the time, it's just in people's heads Very True Nature. And their own psychic nature's that they're not really aware of or happen spontaneously similar to poltergeist activity being inspired by young children. Yes. That is very true. Hi there. Thanks for listening to craft a chronicle. The show sponsored by Blueberry, and if you're interested in starting your own on, ask. US Orleans will leave and give your podcast a shout out. GO TO KRYPTON CHRONICLES PODCASTS DOT COM and click on the blueberry link on the homepage on the by doing so you'll be helping the show blueberry is. For, items was all cast hubs. You won't have to worry about expensive contracts are. In fact, you won't have to leave your own website. You'll have your own are assess, eat and no third-party sites. Try it for months free by going cryptococcal cryptic chronicle. Also if you're a fan of cryptic content, these support the show on Patriot on by giving just dollar a month. You can release this US posting more content frequently you'll also have access to bonus at three episodes of the show and the disparate channel and the channel to keep cryptic chronicles content us on twitter instagram, Tumbler and of course basem give the facebook page of life and joined. The crypto chronicles group I love to hear from you. Thanks for supporting the show unless Dr. Mike Long. Hello, dear listener, have you ever had a paranormal experience a spiritual or esoteric experience? Have you ever seen a Ufo or something that you could not explain? Have you ever witnessed novelist activity that defies reality? Have you ever experienced unexplained mysteries of existence? If you have your own tail and would like to have a shared on the podcast, then call one, eight, hundred, seven, five, seven, six, zero, four nine, and read the message of your experience. If that's what cryptic chronicles is all about. About, then it will be shared on the show. Just make sure you've thought about what you will say. Ahead of time and give a clear and concise account also make sure to leave your name where you're from or any information that will assist in making a clear picture of to portray to listeners, cryptic chronicles once again. Call One, eight, hundred, seven, five, seven, six, zero, four nine. That's one, eight, hundred, seven, five, seven, six, zero, four nine. We look forward to hearing from you. So Often misunderstand about paranormal. Investigation. Probably that You know. Things always happen when you go on a paranormal investigation because things don't always happen. You know especially if you conduct tours in a public place. In what now like you had to tell? People like the see now. You won't always catch something I mean sometimes you know you don't catch anything at all. Sometimes you catch a lot, you just. It's a lot like fishing. How my mentor would put it. You know kids hit or miss. You just never know what's going to happen. So. You can't automatically assume that he's going to go on a paranormal station that you're gonNA catch paranormal activity. Your. Especially if the entity has no interest in showing itself interacting with. Exactly exactly and you know sometimes people can have the attachments themselves you know versus building, having the attachments darned moving. Yes. Yes, because that happens quite often to you know people have attachment you know especially if they're suffering from mental illness or whatever the case may be that also happens so. you know when that happens? You have a kernel team. Go into your house and they're not gonNA. Get anything because it's connected to the person in the house. Yeah! Yes probably a lot of the handle. Yes definitely. There's something ask is slipping my mind though. Oh yeah so. Is there anybody on your team that has experiences of actually seeing. These entities are seeing spirits on investigations that you've gone on. no far as I know my team members haven't actually seen anything they've had EDP's. They've captured. Noses. and poltergeist activity meaning. things flying across the room, but I. Don't think any of them have actually ever seen. Entity is. What are some? Yes. Yes, as a matter of fact, one of my team members I guess that's what got him into the paranormal as he working at an undisclosed location. And he set his is. I guess it was phone down you know in a certain location and to record. Nobody was in there, and while he was gone, he played back whenever he recorded and heard screams. Like loud. Screams, but not streams Ghana Leica. Whipping sound was going along with those screams. What's so yeah leg? You'd hear like the wit, and they need here the screen and just several times of that and. That was pretty eerie listening to. That's a psychic imprint, but. He. Has So. That's something that might team member experience in. That's what got him into paranormal field so That's crazy. So I've had some experiences were up in recording episodes podcast episodes on my own, and like I'm editing them, you know listening to it and whatnot and I've had some some weird stuff. Really, just going through the recording, just editing, yeah! Interesting okay. I don't really want to get into that though. It sounds intriguing. Yes, scary stuff just intrigues me. It usually doesn't frighten me, yeah. So. What are some like Av piece that you've heard? Well Let's see here I caught a really good one actually To stay at the drew Grand Hotel in Drummer Zona. several years back. and. I read all about it in this book What is it those stories of the West or something like that or I'd have to find the book on Anyway and I was doing a spirit box session and Yeah and We're box. Be Squeezed Am FM radio that that you know it. It has frequencies new. We switched to like the fastest frequency in it flushes through all the station so incredibly fast that you can't really make out any actual radio stations so of anything actually does come through it ran. You know we take that as a actual spirit so we had I had that on and I was asking questions. I said I hear that there's a little boy whose who likes to play on this war, and just maybe a couple of second factor I sent that I heard a little boys voice. Come through it saying me. Without in real time, that wasn't necessarily. He was real time, but it was still very neat and. Number that forever? Yes? Yeah definitely and We were the legal tender, another really good one that came out loud and clear We were in one of the rooms, and we were just talking talking amongst ourselves. I think we were kind of doing AP session in there? Just you know kind of talking casually and all of a sudden you hear sort of an older woman's voice, saying chair. And the funny thing about that was there. There was an old antique wheelchair sitting in the corner about room. so I think that whatever was that came through. was connected to that Antique wheelchair, so that was an interesting EDP. Stirs. Definitely but yeah, those are just a couple of so many I mean I love going through my review? Because everytime I catch something I have to listen to it over and over again just to make sure that I'm not you know. Just, like hearing, somebody else talk, or or or what, but that it's an actual vp so. Sphere Cox like. Form of these they can be really creepy to certain people like. I'm very familiar with spirit boxes, but I also know people who dislike straight up won't be around or listen to them because it just disturbs some. Yeah, they are a little annoying. You know I mean you can't do one for too long unless you're getting response after response because it will give you a headache. And you're also sometimes you get like extremely scary responsive. Yeah yes, that's true, too. But. They're fun to US though that's for sure. Welcome to the Chamber of mysteries. I am in new business. God death and Guide through the underworld, recently the goddess. Pointed out. That the scales of Justice have. An imbalance. This is not good and can bring chaos to the multi yours but you. Dear. Mortal may help averting his cosmic disaster by supporting cryptic chronicles. In doing so you will gain re episode of the Podcast as well as bonus, content, bowl, need or patriots. In spreading brief banking and higher knowledge, the forces of garments are kept at bay. Simply subscribe to Broncos Ball at. Post Dot Com. And by pledging a single dollar a month you can help keep a populous and the void and Ross guy carry it soaring probably rue the universe. This. Don't forget to tell them about I tunes and spreading the show. Right. Odd! Mortal help broaden the scope of listeners for the podcast by leaving good review on itunes and share every episode. For any cryptic chronicles content as much as you can spreading it across all the consciousness of humanity. Help Darker. By supporting Krypton chronicles. And assist. Goddess of the Scales and I'd a numerous God of death and bringing balance to the planes of existence. Farewell Mortal. You think that these entities and talking to VP's our ashes. One time, human spirits, or are they possibly other entities pretending to be human? I think you could be a mixture of both. I mean you've got your two types of residual. You have your intelligent, but then you also have the malevolence. You know so that's why it's always good to be very careful when conducting something like that, because you always have to close it, you know Does come out of it is. It's hard to tell, but otherwise they never. Exactly exactly. Because people have brought home stuff with them a lot of times that they did not wanna bring home with them. Yes, that is very true. How do you? How do you usually closed session like that? Well this simple. Just saying, thank you. You know I mean we go into every investigation with respect as I point that out. You know we're not. Provoking anything or anyone, we don't to disrespect anybody or anything in any way whatsoever, because the chances of getting something malevolent or higher by doing that. And you're just asking. Exactly and so we're going with respects you know and then at the very end will say simply will thank you so much for communicating with us. Thank you for listening to us into your talking to us. And Goodbye, you know just closing it off, just saying goodbye and thank you have a nice day. To do any visualizations with it at all. On the Kelso. Wolf. I'm a big time reader and I just like destroy books so I've read books on. Paranormal investigation and stuff like that and one of the books I read I. Don't remember which one it was actually it must have been a while ago, but the person talked about how in order to like do things on the plane that they exist on. Day You need a good way to have influenced. There is to visualize so like you can actually visualize the door closing, or you can visualize locking the building out like away from you. Things of that nature, and that has certainly seemed to help a lot of paranormal investigators. That's actually not an idea I haven't tried that when it comes to opening or closing, but I mean i. have tried that when it comes to protection. Somebody actually. Trained me to protect myself that way. but yeah had never actually tried it in the opening or the closing of the investigations, so I'm willing to try. Though that sounds pretty, you know pretty solid. Jeopardize your lies ation. The has a pretty big influence in. The spirit world, the astral plane, the ether. Whatever you WANNA. Call it. It almost seems just as real there as it is as you visualize it in your head. Just fast yeah I definitely. Can't hurt. Or there anytime you were trying to do a closing at didn't work. No I can't say there was. Ever a time I. mean you know there's those times when when you know? You're ending a an investigation, but it doesn't mean that the activity is GonNa. Stop you know what I mean so, Yup? We can't like. I can't really compare that but no I've never actually. You know. Try to close something, but it didn't clothing I've never actually had that type of experience. How does it go strictly or the spirit? Linger if they're not closed or if they decide to follow or anything of that nature, is it psychological, or is it emotional, or is it just instinct and feelings? How how do you know if something's not going right? it would probably be a mixture of all of it. You know 'cause I mean. Like. I said I haven't had enough. You know experience with anything malevolence to actually know for sure. You know something that we're trying to stop. From happening I haven't had much of that experience What I did experience this last case that we had we were staging the home and we heard, and we have. The door cracked open the front door, and as we were ending the staging, we heard this odd screen like a child scream. It sounded like it was right outside the front door. It was really odd, but it was a scream. And we went outside. It was raining that night and this is an apartment building, so we looked you know. We went down the stairs. We looked right. We looked left. We went in the back. We looked right we. We looked all over. The place was really late at night. And for a child to be out at that time night. In the rain screaming. It just made absolutely no sense to us. But we figured that whatever it was. That were staging left. So. That was probably the only time you know We've dealt with something but. I can't say that. We've actually dealt with something. That didn't WanNa go away. Yeah. Never came across. That was like. formidable or possibly even dangerous. No I have not yet I mean if I do I'm definitely going to proceed with caution, but I have not dealt with anything like that yet, You know. We just go as far as claims you know. people are afraid we'll just we'll help them as best we can. I even know priest who works in the paranormal field is well. You know if they prefer to bring him in to do a blessing. Then that's what we'll do as well but we've never never had anything persistent I guess so to speak. I have. Yeah, that's interesting. He works with the wicked people. No no, that's completely separate. Different yet. No, he's companies different. He he does he's. He's on the religious aspect of it. Also I mean you know if you have clan whose whose Catholic for example, and they want you know, and they prefer to have a priest coming to do a blessing. Then that's what we do, but you know if they're if they're not really affiliated with any type of religion, and they're okay was just bringing, you know. a wicked wicked in to. Do you know their magic? Then that's what we do as well so I mean we give our clients the options it's. Like. Sorry. No I'm I'm done like entities don't like if a priest came in and entity didn't subscribe to Christianity when it was alive. The priests cleansing won't work, is that. Have you found that to be true or not? I don't have enough evidence to say that's true or not true 'cause. I haven't had any any case like that yet, I mean. I've offered it and you know but that's as far as I've gone really so like a native. American spirit. Maybe! Haunting area of land and somebody builds a house there, and then brings in a priest to cleanse it after paranormal activity starts dea native American Spirit, probably just GonNa Laugh. Right? Yeah, now that that's that makes sense. That's completely reasonable, which is why there's options know why, am in so like it you know if the client wants a cleansing, and they want the weakened type of cleansing with the sage, in that the rose or sage, the Campbell's and whatnot. Then we'll bring them in. I, tell them if you want to go further and do different type of cleansing. We can do that, too. You know and they can go with a with the priest like so I guess it just depends on what we're dealing with, and we don't really know until it actually happens. Sure a lot of people here westlb the priest over the weekend. Yeah Yeah. Definitely. So. What makes you feel inspired to continue research into paranormal investigation? Well still intrigued by it. You know nonetheless I still enjoy the thought of you know. Going out and looking for ghosts I mean even the history of some places I'm intrigued with. You know just walking into a building that I. Know is at least a hundred years old I'm just like astounded by it I love. The feeling of history and an almost the walls can talk they. Would you know I just love that and. You know I gotta say that. We have more to be afraid of the living. Then we do. I feel like they have a role in influencing us. Though yes, yes, definitely definitely but you know I've been interested in it my whole life and there's no reason to stop you know no reason. Tony I still traveling and going places that are you know really old and historical and haunted, and talking with whatever entities might reside there? You know it's just it's always been intriguing to me. And housing people worse. Helping people spend tastic, but what is the scariest background story to a place that you've investigated Well I went to the myrtle Asian this last November. And speaks for itself I mean back in the day were when they were. You know slavery and. And such There's definitely some horror thick stories to that place, but it was just an amazing place. Unfortunately, I didn't have any experiences for say surprisingly. But it was still just beautiful. and I really really want to go back and best to do that place again because it was just absolutely gorgeous but yeah, I mean the history of of shooting. There's history slavery there's history of. Of you know hangings and you name it. It got some pretty horrific stories. But it's such a gorgeous place. The haunted wet I'm sorry, the Haunted Mirror. Yes. Yes. I definitely saw that mirror. In the Mirror but it was a pretty interesting. Mir I mean it was. It's a beautiful mirror. You know definitely gorgeous. And but yeah, it was pretty much estimator in is. There weren't children's and prince on the other side. No I didn't see anything like that. I saw pictures at the gift shop had a people taking pictures in the mirror and stuff and some weird things that they would catch behind them and whatnot, but. That's pretty much it. I didn't get anything off of the mirror itself. NEW VP said. A well I have not finished going through it unfortunately, but so far yes, as soon as we were leaving our room for the first time we're going out to dinner. We walked out of the room. There was a gentleman. Talking can't really make out what he's saying, but it sounded like he's like conversating like almost with himself was very interesting in that lasted for at least a couple of minutes. Received as I got back. I don't know. I don't know. Yeah definitely and there's history of the Butler haunting that Reynolds those butler, or also General Bradford's room so he was one of the owners one of the original owners of the plantation. And so could have been him as well I. Don't know excite. The Legend of Clarence Pretty Sad. Frontmen yes, yes, that is very sad story but I'm very curious to see if she's going to pop up in any of my recording. Right is the one who trump castle mirror. Apparently. After she poisoned. Yeah. There is a weird picture that I got though and might be her I'm not sure it's hard to tell because the face is completely distorted, but it's a woman. in the middle of like this courtyard area there's lots of tables and chairs, and what is the middle of the night and nobody was out. but the face was distorted. She's wearing a black dress and looked like she was looking. Right at me like as I was taking the pictures. Turban classical ray, whereas a turban or to hide her mutilated air. Right yeah, and I can't tell it's that distorted, but I can definitely tell that she's wearing a black dress and just standing there like you do see something standing there very weird. Creepy. Yeah. Yeah I love the Myrtle plantation. I've actually covered before on the show. How cruel? Love legends of cursed objects and stuff like that. That's awesome. You've been watching ghost adventures quarantine. I don't really. Watch TV at. Okay and I'm familiar with go shows and whatnot, but to be honest. I have I've never seen a single episode of any of. I. Don't blame you I. Don't blame you, I don't blame you at all but I gotta say I been to the Haunted Museum that Guy Taunted. Museum in Las, Vegas Nevada just went actually early March and. quite. we were in one of the rooms and from my memory from what I can recall I was You know. I was to other people. I was with my husband and my niece. They were the back of the room. I was standing in front of the room and they had US watching a TV screen. And I was watching the TV screen I felt myself feeling faint like I wanted to pass out like I was trying with everything inside of me to not pass out decided not want to be. Quote Unquote that person if you know what I. was. Looking right at us to and I I would look at the camera that looked back at the Monitor. Our. I don't know I was doing my breathing exercises I could feel. My heart starts to race and go faster and faster and faster. I can feel my pulse in my hands. My hands started getting clamming like really clammy Mestre, getting shaky so I like bent my knees much as I could you know an and just worked on my breathing in just hoped that they would let us added that room like real soon finally they let us out you know. And I went to my people and I was like oh my gosh I almost fainted. I can't believe it will turn Dow that when they filmed where when the first episode they aired. It a couple of weeks ago. That was where he started the investigation. Because there's a history of women fainting in that specific, room. Wow. Full Stop. Yes whatever it was that that makes women faint in that room was affecting me and I. Don't feel things you know. I I don't I don't normally you know. CEO, I have to step out for just a minute like I'm not that person you know. So for something like that to happen to me, I was just hoping and hoping that I didn't have to go to the tour guide and say you know tonight tonight. Step out, or you know whatever the case may be I. Don't want to be that person. So I made it fairly, but I made it. Past. No, I didn't, but there's a lot of artifacts at that place, and you could feel the change in energy from just walking into the verse room that the. Energy. I I guess I. Mean You know not in general but it? It did happen to me there it did. So it's it's really odd. The energy has to be that strong for me to feel and I guess I. Guess you know. Yeah, I feel like everybody can feel energy. There's just a lot of people are just closed off to it. So did you see? The box there. Yeah yes, I, did see it. I was hesitant to go in the room because they told us you WANNA room. That's fine just near. Stand here inside, and we'll come. Get you when we're done. So I was one of last people in there because I was thinking about it thinking about it and. In so I went in, and I looked at it and I thought it was neat. Your anything. I didn't I didn't feel anything in that room. No especially compared to what I felt in the beginning of the tour, but but it wasn't a neat object, though and apparently he opens it in this like many series that he films so and curious to see what happens. Demons are really nasty. Yeah I've seen some videos on, you know. On them and they're not a good thing to mess with I would not mess with something like. The scariest thing about me is just how much they haunt you in your dreams. Oh, Jeez. The I can't even imagine. I mean wow, yes, seriously, but I actually do know about the the lore and deer, Colt ways that the rabbi trapped the demon inside the cabinet inside the box and I. Don't know if they know this stuff. But once it was opened, and all that stuff was moved around with and messed with that demon was pretty much. Let go. Allow and I didn't order. Put it back in the box. You would need a rabbi that has many many years of experience in Esoteric Lore and Are you familiar with Hebrew mythology at all or Hebrew? So terrorism not so much. Okay. There's something called the Kabbalah. Have you heard of Kabbalah? It sounds familiar yes. So the cabal is the Hebrew version of mysticism like their occult. Lori? And in order to trap it back in the box. You would need a rabbi who is an expert in Kabbalah and able to use all the rituals and spiritual stuff necessary to put the demon in the box. So while that box right now may still be scary and have some paranormal activity to it. It has only become an anchor. The demon doesn't necessarily have to be around it. It's just an anchor for it into the physical world now whereas it used. It used to be a prison. Right. When they opened that thing up, they really messed up. At least the. Knowledge Yeah No, I wouldn't disagree with that at all. I mean like I said from videos that I've seen on them and whatnot I. I would not mess with something like that, i. mean it's yields for a reason you know. So I would just leave it alone and dump touch it. I know. But people are going to do what they're gonNA do. But it looks like for coming to an end. Thank you for joining me. Thank you I hope that you had a good time and that we can get you and other members of your team or your associate team members to come back and get a big group observation. Going that'd be great. Yes definitely would be I would show to bring anybody along. The more the merrier. We can make a whole series of episodes about it if you want and. Do you have your website setup yet? Not yet, not yet I'll be working on that pretty soon here. been busy with review I mean. We've had mustache after investigation. It's Nixon pretty crazy, but when things settled down a little bit. Then I'm definitely going to get going on that so okay. Just let me know and I'll. Attached to a link to it on the post for the the episode. Okay, that sounds good. Yeah, for now though listeners make sure you go, check out the path of souls, paranormal facebook page like follow, and further explore with them into the ineffable mysteries of paranormal investigation and I hope we can have you and all your friends on again. Definitely, it was my pleasure. Thank you I'll talk to you soon. Bye Bye. All right those lydia used from path of souls. Paranormal was a pleasure to talk to her and I can't wait to meet her team paranormal investigators. They all seem pretty pretty fascinating. Especially, her mentor, who sadly couldn't make the interview today. But I'm sure that we'll see them all soon enough. You know the drill cryptic chronicles is available on I tunes. Stitcher, pod being any podcast. You got the time. Please leave us a review. It would really help out the show and. Like my patrons. Mark Lane. You're the man Ngo Ellen Always Awesome Kenny. You know you're my homie Kenny. LEANNA WATTS PAUL Thank you Stephanie Wilkie and of course Gonzalez. I'm your host Tim Hacker. And Desert Wise. On Saturday, no life is worth living for cannot be true to our nature. ME. Move.

investigator US New Mexico facebook Nita VP Lydia eustis team leader Frankie Mardi Tim Hacker audio editor Mercurio. Juanita Jesse James John Melinda Ivy Tony I England
DeOrr Kunz /// Part 2 /// 306

True Crime Garage

1:21:19 hr | 1 year ago

DeOrr Kunz /// Part 2 /// 306

"Welcome to true crab garage wherever you are. Whatever you are doing. Thank you for listening. I'm your host Nick. And with me as always is the captain, and we are happy to entertain you while you pretend to be busy at work. We'll sat boss man. You need those TPS reports right on your desk. I'll get them to yet to be seen as good to see you. Thanks for listening. Thanks for telling frame. Today. We are sipping on the great return by hardy wood park craft brewery. This is a fantastic IP that is Hoppy piney, and a little sweet ABC, seven point five percent. I wanted to feature the great return with come quads and grapefruit because that's my favorite, but I don't think you can get that anymore. So today sipping on the great return, IP garage, grade four and a five bottlecaps less toast. Some friends captain, I up sheers to Lindsay and parts on known Lindsay is thanking us for putting all the older episodes up on the Stitcher app. She started listening to t c g a year ago and she's getting caught up on the Stitcher at the big. We like to, to Laura in Katy, Texas next. We have Lauren in Iwo beach Hawaii, and we have a MandA sending us. Cheers from sin city next. Big big. Cheers. Thank you, too. Ashley in Toronto, Ashley follows the show on Instagram and last, but not least a long distance tink of the glass, to Katie mcquaid, and glass. Lasko Scotland thinking, so thanks everybody for the cold beers. And the kind words if you want to help us out with next week she'll go to true cramp garage dot com and click on the donate button, and give us a little minute cake because we're a little bit behind these beer donations, and that is enough of the B's. Okay. Everybody gathered around grab a chair grab a beer. Let's talk some true crime. Before we dive too much further into this missing child case, we want to take this opportunity to listen to an interview conducted with Liam, high county sheriff Lyn Bauer men, and this is from east, Idaho news dot com. Let's go back to the beginning, the cut give us a timeline as to when the family arrived in what preceded while the family from what I understand that we learned her name, Vesta, Gatien arrived, the evening prior to July tenth sometime fairly close to dark on Thursday, July ninth, and then they want to went to town and letter and pardon returning. They supposedly thought they were turning their child over to their grandfather, the child, great grandfather, they went down to the creek, which is right next to the camp ground and within ten to fifteen minutes, they go up. To find their child to show him some fish in the stream and he's nowhere to be found. And grandfathers soons. He's gone down to them because he was within their line of sight, and wasn't too far from the camp ground. They started their initial search and eventually called nine one, one when they realized they couldn't find the child. Where was Mr. red wand? This. He was in the same general proximity. The creek is just over the Bank. He's downstream their upstream. They're all within probably hundred hundred and fifty feet of each other very close proximity very close. So they call nine one one you guys arrive in begin searching. Correct. And at this point were were their vehicle searched the tents ibis. Everything out there was probably served. We did a I think a very thorough investigation. We, we took to initial track dogs in one of being mine, and one being salmon police department, they're trained to search for people who are lost. They were given a cent. They went from the campground up to the reservoir. And then back to the camp ground, and we, we searched everywhere, a small child could easily hide or climbing. Two or fallen to nothing. And we found absolutely nothing. Talk a little bit about the CRA Maine's that were dumped into because the dogs were getting. Unbeknownst as while we were doing our grid. Search someone came in and wanted to deposit pre Maine's of a loved one at that site. And I'm assuming it's a favorite site of their loved one and without thinking they deposit, these criminals, not realizing they were in the middle of a crime scene, and what it would do. Within a couple of days. Our dogs or telling us, we need to spend more time up at the reservoir. And so we dove it for two or three more days and put side scan sonar, and then we found out from one of our BLM Rangers that they stopped this individual coming out, and we're informed that they had deposited some remains in the reservoir it. He d- or bid in the reservoir is body would have been recovered by. Oh, we believe so, yeah, we really believe. This store, did the family go down to the, the store, there and lead, or, and was there any surveillance, captured of his voice Valence video, I don't believe they have a surveillance. But we have a receipt that we've documented that they purchaser certain items they were on the receipt. Time was stamped on the receipt. And so we believe, you know, that's where they went. It was out Friday that, yes, it was okay. But did they stop any other places on their way up to lead or? Diesel fuel any surveillance video at that gas station. Okay. I'd be surprised if there's a camera anywheres in let. Yeah. He's a real small community. Okay. So as far as the private investigator told us a few days ago that the Jessica said that there was an older gentleman that may have been staring at Dior. Have you heard anything about that, just the report, I don't know that we come firmed, who that individual is? But, you know, if we had to go look for everybody that stared at, at you personally or anybody for any type of crime, you know, it'd be pretty difficult undertaking to, to check those stories out. But, you know. Yes, we have heard that information how much of the area up, there was searched it was. I mean you guys searched for two three weeks didn't you before you officially? Scaled-back -absolutely. Almost almost three mile. No side. Absolutely none. Do you believe it was an abduction? You know, personally, I think an induction is one of the least likely events primarily the information we have is Grandpa's watching the child. He tells me he looks away momentarily when he looks back. He's gone. He's assumed he's gone over the Bank, right? Were ramp sitting he's within twenty to thirty yards of the only roadway into the campground, and absolutely. No one was seeing that lower campground coming or going. And when my personnel went in nobody was seen leaving. So I think it's I mean I can't completely rule it out. But it's one of the least likely things that occurred. Can you say about Mr. raid one? Does point is still cooperating. You know, I'm not getting any feeling that he's not being truthful. I think he's been very truthful, and I appreciate his help. He's come up to the area on a on a second occasion with me and until we find piece of evidence or locate anything that tells me otherwise, I think he's being very truthful. How about the parents and the grandfather, you know, I think all three of those three of been very cooperative. They've given us everything we've asked for, and so I feel real good about the parents, and, and the grandfather also. FBI is they would it be correct to say they've taken over I guess they're working with you. They're working with us. We've given them lots of items to, to analyze behaviorally, and we've given them some physical evidence. I can't go into those details, but we're basically trying to cover all of our bases and we're looking for any clue whatsoever that might help us resolve this and you said, Bonnevilles also assisted the very much very much. So can you say about how? Isaac ended up on the trip. I hate to go into too many details. I mean, obviously, there's a relationship between him and, and grandpa, you know. You know, I mean they're they're friends, but prior to that trip, he had never met mom and dad. The family sister vehicles and cars with searched which, which it sounds like in any case it that would be standard operating procedure. You'll even though we searched him that night you know, you always second-guessed did we miss something could he been in another compartment? Did we not search everything? So everything's been searched least a couple times, if, if not more department, it heavily, it's a lot of manpower hours of sure a little bit of frustration trying to find this kid. Oh, it's definitely been a challenge. We've got some fabulous volunteers are search and rescue is second to none. And they've been overwhelmed by this. We've had some issues on on stress that we've had to deal with and our offices might chief deputy has spent endless hours up there. He's climbed literally up to the top of some of the peaks up there. He's walked into some of the old dens of some of the animals that live in those areas in he's been frantically searching for a clue. And, and it's been overwhelming. I mean there's been days. I've been the only patrolman on the road because all my personnel are up there working at the scene. Ruled out a while. I guess his anything nothing. Another. Absolutely nothing has been ruled. There could have been some interference from all predator, at some sometime in the scenario union partly through, you know, we had bears moves running literally through camps, or Chee, while we're searching, absolutely wolf. Kids nearby. Well, some old ones we haven't found any any fresh Dan's but just over the top of the divide, there is a position, Ryan, we've understood, they've had some issues over, there was some wills and they've taken out some of the some of the wolves in order to eliminate the problem. So where do you guys go from here? Well, we wait until we get our report from the FBI that's going to be critical and we're still asking the public to help us, if they have any information to identify tuna a half year old with blonde hair. I'm not sure that's a positive. Thing for our office because every two and a half year old blonde. Hair looks just like Dior. And so I'm asking the public, if they know the family, and they didn't have a two and a half year old prior to this time period. That's, that's one I want to look at closely, but if, if it's somebody, they don't know to contact their local law enforcement and have them follow up for us, because it's just so ver whelming for our small office. She's been bombarded with with absolutely absolutely. What are your thoughts about the? Investigator, I guess that's just the families to on their own. Yep. Totally you kudos to them for, you know, looking for more help, I can only do so much and maybe he can turn up something that we've missed. But I think, you know, he permanently merrily thinks it's an abduction. And, and I think that's very remote. It is far as the light attached. You couldn't say much about. Yeah. They've all all four have taken voluntarily taken polygraphs, and right now that those have been turned over to the F B I along with the statements, and I would prefer to have them. Look at the reports and look at the evaluations on the pot to make sure we're looking at everything correctly and that we didn't miss anything point. Would you feel comfortable saying something criminal happened? No. No, not at all. Interview was taken from August of two thousand fifteen. So now at the time line of this interview, we're talking about about a month after the or went missing. Yeah. And there are three really big takeaways that I have from that ten minute interview right to from the sheriff, and one from the interviewer, and I just kinda throw these out there and we'll talk about them as we go the two from the share for this one. He says, look, we talked about the possibilities yesterday animal attack of duck tion, or some type of involvement resulting in the accidental or intentional death of Dior by either a family member or friend. And I think the way that their wording that is to suggest that family member or friend, there were three family members up there with the boy and one friend of the family up there with the boy so can't rule anything out. But that what really hits the home run there in that interview is that statement toward the. End of the interview where the sheriff says, if anyone knows the family. He says, I can't I'm not going to tell you to look for a two year old blonde boy, because almost all of them look like Dior. Right. I want to talk to a family member or anyone that knows the family that can say that they did not have this boy or young boy with them prior to going on this campaign trip. That's why I want to talk to. And then the one thing that stands out for me from zero. Right. So, but to unpack that just to be clear, you're saying that the sheriff is saying, hey, look, I want proof that, that boy was there. Right. Okay. Right. And then the one thing that, that stands out for me from the interviewer is, there are multiple questions multiple times, where the interviewer tries to steer the questions and steer the sheriff in the direction of Isaac Ren walled, the, the friend, the friend that is up. Then and I think that is for a number of reasons. One at the time being about a month or less than a month after the disappearance. The first thing that really people started calling into question when the news of the story broke, especially online, was a lot of people were very suspicious of this guy is it, and I think one rightfully so because immediately what you see is, which one of these things is not like the other. Well, Isaac is the one thing that is not like the other he's the friend, everybody else's a family member of this little boy, and he's a, he's a little odd. Let's put it that way, and he's also it seems to me a little bit on the slow side. So, you know what's weird about him in well, not necessarily about him more, so about this whole story and cast of characters to me is going into this when I first got involved and. And you both been aware of this case for for a long time. And it's been a while that we wanted to cover it never been able to dive into it as much as I have this week. Yeah. And I'm I'm going to agree with you and thousands and thousands of other people out there that say this is it guy. There's something off with him. He's weird he's odd. And, and you also have Jessica and vernal who both say this guy's a little odd. We didn't know him. He's a little weird villa. Grandfather says that, you know, but the, the funny thing to me is after spending a longtime reviewing this case in reviewing these four adults because that's where my suspicion lies within this pack of four dolts. Okay. I find all four of them to be odd. So so if we're going to say that is, is off or weird or comes off weird, right? I really think all four of them are, are strange birds doesn't seem like he's operating with a lower Hugh to you. Yes. Diminished intelligence or something like that. A little slower. Yes. I think so in it's pretty I you know, those are things that you hate to say and hate to throw out there, but I think that's what most people's conclusion would be watching an interview with him or speaking with him in person. Right. And but also the cops at this point and later, they say sky is cooperative. He's cooperating with us. And we believe he's telling the truth. And what's interesting, too, in that interview is, we have the sheriff saying, basically that all four of these people all four of these adults are cooperating all four of them are answering our questions. The grandfather the father, the mother, they have given us everything we've asked for we do have a little more from regarding Isaac, where we have the sheriff saying he even came up to the site. With me on a second. The second time to go over everything while on there's a lot of speculation about is is line. So when this story broke there was a couple of things that happened immediately was the parents were at the forefront. They were very up front and center, they were they had the spotlight on them. Everybody knew their names, everybody knew that it was their son who was missing. That was just part of the news. Breaking what did not occur immediately, was the release of the grandfather's name or the release of Isaac's, name, the friend of the family. And so, I think in a way that could have started some type of suspicion about them or or, or Isaac, right? But the, the interesting thing here too, is when his name was released is, is repeatedly identified as a sex offender with an extensive criminal history in online, forums and on social media for a while. Really? And that's very troubling because again, which one of these things is not like the other Isaac is just a friend of old Grandpa's. Yep. And he's not he's not a parent of this little boy, and oh, is a little odd. And now online, people are identifying him as a sex offender with an extensive criminal history, online forms, and on social media one flicky flicky. So the police did address this situation, the sheriff did address the situation. And their answer is very confusing to me, but I have to throw it out there because it may help clear some things up. Okay. So the Idaho state their, their response to this was to say that Isaac was at one time charged with felony rape. And this occurred in two thousand and six but the charge was amended down to misdemeanor domestic battery the sheriff went on to say that he meaning Isaac does have a criminal record. However, the police reports are not consistent with his record. And I'm not sure why that was his exact state his exact statement. He does go on to say that wise. It does that mean. Well, he does go on to say that Isaac is not a sex offender. Isaac is not a registered sex offender, and I'm with you. He does have a criminal record. This is a statement. He does have a criminal record. However, the police reports are not. Insistent with his record. I'm not sure what that means. I'm not sure why I did a little big ING in the best, I could come up with here is rumor. But from what I found as far as rumor goes, is that this charge that he was originally charged with is in some relation to his ex wife and they may have been married at the time. And it was reduced to a domestic issue. What I'm getting at is where he says the police reports are not consistent with his record. I'm wondering if the sheriff, this is just all inferences here. So take it with a grain of salt. I'm wondering if by this time and I'm feeling very confident that by this time the sheriff had personally reviewed the police reports from those charges, and he's reviewing it and going the charge doesn't really line up with the complaint. Right. And so I see why it was then amended to a much lesser charge because either Isaac than plead guilty to something or they were able to prove the lesser charge. Because like I said, maybe the sheriff reviewing the report says this complaint doesn't match up with what he ends up getting charged with. Let's hear it clip of interview with Isaac. So the garage listeners can get a feel for this individual. They're all on. We're going group. Yeah. So in did you look back? Did you actually see them all with you as a group at some point at some point before? We all grew before we as we started to leave the camp. Remember all being to get right? Bob wasn't Bob was advocating listing the can't okay the to the very first spot when you were showing them be remembered it was just a holding deal was the senior Dior holding dealer because if he's having trouble walking he probably would have had been carried at some point. Right. Right. Everyone was holding him if you if you down there. I don't like over. I can't answer that. I don't really you know, remember everything far are thought baby de or was still behind us, and I was showing Jessica, like when I wanted to show them the fissionable like I went down there and show, Jessica, where the fishing alone is a nice seem that, you know, g your and his dad were right. Behind me or just, just behind stagers, taking Ovadia catch out. And at what point did you dealer senior just split up? They went somewhere else. In new somewhere said, right? You can down the creek closer to the campground in left them up there. Yeah. And so it was like. Five ten I showed him must have been five. Ten minutes okay during did. Then I walk I walked towards Canada and I went to another Fishman fish now gender fishing for a while. That's when I noticed balls of their on regime, walk, impatient. Back and forth. I asked him what was going on? He said viewers missing those like what? So. Distance there on the visa that Bob was like pacing on the ridge. What do you mean? The ridge really high banks, the very off of. Vang. So it's hard to even see over the Bank of the house, Steve, the banks are. So you notice you said you noticed Bob pacing. What did he look like he was he stressed? He don't he was kinda stripped, your word about something. So and so that's what made you think to ask him. What was right? And he said, there will be or mission. In your reaction was we're where you go, very char help from look, help look for him to then what chopped up to convey and started. And I talked to. Move. It more about word would might were you might being started looking in pampers, and everything for we lived in a camper, we. We. Told around airy underneath veal falls. We went up in the hills. I one of the head of their to whether reservoirs went up there and look around. I'm wants to run out by myself flooded out half an hour an hour low couldn't turn. Find your I couldn't find him. So it was Jessica in D, or just because boyfriend if you say the time where they at the campsite with told you dealer was missing. When when he was pacing the Bank, and you walked up where they at the campsite before one, I would down there to talk up there to talk to ball. No, they were out looking for do you see them? They right. They were. So you and Bob, search immediate area, we involve searched in media immediate area, right there, remove it his mom came in. I don't know. She was out in the verse condemned. She came back account. I talk to her low, but I said what he's missing did. She seemed set you. She seemed pretty upset. I couldn't really look at it in the face or anything she hadn't been able to do that for found on mobile for what reason. Do you. So did you ever have the impression before law enforcement or did you ever have thought that maybe he was someone taped took him? Did you ever think that or was that something that came about? When he just going to be found I thought maybe he got lost your somewhere sat down. Okay. That's what my impression of or, you know, the or the just fiance, even where he went did. He was he in the truck or did he was he on foot? He was on foot for a while. And then he was also in the trade on the trip came to go down by the cattle. Go. Look on there, too. Okay. But you stay busy busy looking off the of the hills all over. Yeah. Was dealer senior. Did he get was he angry that he get aggressive? With of did he say like you know you he was here, last was there frustration. There was a little bit. But he didn't seem to get you angry. So, so DR did he ever appear frustrated or anything that your that he tell Bob at the time he I left him here with you? Did he ever say anything like that? Remember them did vernal dealer just because boyfriend or fiancee's he left the campground it. He leaves the camp ground in his truck to go. Call nine one one Dino far as I know he left the camp out on trips vote for your by the cattle part, but other than that, I don't know if they left to go come or they caller from there was one of their cell phones. I don't I don't know of was Bob continuing look to could he get up and down the hills. Very easy Mahar Trump because you had the auction machine to so. So was there. Shovel involved at any point anybody shovel. Check out the Stitcher app. Download it for free and you can listen to all of our old episodes there. And if you wanna hear are very good are very much loved show off the record sign up for Stitcher premium. Yeah it's easy. Go to true crime garage dot com and click on the off the record link and while you're there sign up on our mailing list, because this week we're going to send out a special promo code to mailing list people only so that true crime army gets fifteen percent of everything in the store this week, but you have to be signed up on that mailing list to get it. Sign up today. All right. So little to do so much time. Wait reverse that verse that years. Cheers, man, we got a lot to get to here in like you said, or not like you said, just a little bit of time to do it. I do wanna know quotes from. Willie wonka. Oh, yeah. Yeah. That's here with it. He says a couple things backwards and says to reverse it. So I do want to point out here that at some point, the leam high county sheriff's department, they announce that all four of the adults that were up on that campsite with little baby Dior at some point, they announce that all four of them are considered to be persons of interest, so Isaac who you just heard there. The grandfather, as well as both the parents in you heard in that clip to the reporter kept referring to dwarf father as Dior several times in there, and that's why I wanted to point out early in this case that sometimes you might hear him referred to as that. We've been calling him vernal to keep it. Nice tidy so we'll continue to do so right now we wanna get into the whole shovel thing, Gallus go ahead and get into the shovel thing. Because. That's the last question that was asked. Yes. So apparently, this is according to Jessica, that there was a shovel that she said had, like some mud on it like it was recently used in this is this shovel incident takes place once law enforcement are on the scene. Once they are searching for Dior, and she's, she says that she tells though tells law enforcement about this shovel pointed out to him says it looked shovel looks like it was recently used now, also at this time, she's already telling law enforcement that Isaac is a bit odd, and that they don't really know anything about this guy. So somehow they connect this shovel to him or they want to talk to him about the shovel. She says that they take is it away from the group. They talked to him for, for a while, and they are going to look and examine look at an examined the shovel. She. He says something about a hair being on blonde hair at blond hair, and she, she says this could have been one of the yours hairs. She points it out to the law enforcement and then reaches to grab it, and it blows away in the wind when it's gone gone forever. And so I guess once they're done talking to Isaac. He comes back to the group and knows that they were talking about the shovel, and Jessica says is then begins rubbing the shovel or touching the show shovel something to that effect, which she found to be incredibly weird on August twelfth two thousand and fifteen private investigator Frank Vilbert joins the search. The way that this is explained how this comes about is that Frank Vilbert is a friend of the family, somehow and he offers his expertise into helping the family. This relationship does not seem to go very well at all. No. And it seems unravel and fall apart fairly quickly love private. Investigators all of them seem to have a low of cocky, swagger, like they're gonna come in and they, they know what's best. Well, Mr. Ville is a retired US Marshall. So he has a good amount of experience and he's offering his help. And as we said, this seems to fall apart very quickly at some point, he withdrawals himself from assisting, the parents of Dior. Yeah. And he even issues them a statement regarding such now and within that statement, here's some interesting words that he uses quote, my stipulation was that both of you would be absolutely truthful. This is him talking to the parents of the your in my professional opinion. Both of you. Lied and misrepresented. The true facts that could possibly solve the mystery of you're missing son. What we have here is the investigator is stating these individuals. He does not think that they have been truthful with him. Right. And thus hindering his investigation. He starting to be suspicious that they know more. Why would they not want to be truthful with this man? That's trying to help them out. Yeah. If you're hearing inconsistencies in stories we're going to go. Hey, what's, why are you lying? There's also some other angles here and one of them being the reward money. Now, this is reported many different ways. So I'll just kinda give you the whole of it. And you can decide exactly what was going on. It was reported that at one point. They were offering five thousand maybe even ten thousand dollars for information regarding the missing boy, and I believe this would have been coming from, like crime stoppers or something in the general area, the community coming together and trying to help this family at some point private investigator. Frank Ville says, you know what we need to increase this amount? Yeah, this might not be enough money to, to draw somebody out that could really know, something so I- knowing that. You don't have even the funds to pay me to help you and that you don't have the means to build. This reward yourself. I will offer up some of my own money. I'm already giving you my time rea-. So I'll offer up some of my own money, let's increase this reward to twenty thousand dollars and make this a national case and make it you know, let's get some substantial reward money here to try to draw out some possible information. Some leads onto where your son could be. His statement says that they were not on board with that, that the parents of Dior were not on board with increasing the reward amount, right? Which on one hand makes it look pretty fishy. But on the other hand, they might not be wanting to, you know, they're already asking this guy of his time in his effort in his energy, and maybe think this is a simpler case. It should be solved quickly. And we should finance quickly. And we don't want to put up your own money. We, we've already asked enough of you. I think you go to the ends of the earth to find your child. Right. But it goes back to, you know, the mothers crying, too much the mother's, not crying enough. It's hard to put yourself in their shoes. And to know how you would react me or you. I would think we both go. Yes. Offer more money, you know, you're, you're willing to do that for me. What a great person. I like the Cutty chip for me. This is one of the most suspicious behaviors of any of them of any of the behaviors throughout this entire case. I think that it would be bizarre to not allow this man to offer further help and assistance to try to probably to find your son. We haven't we have the father. We heard his own words, we will find you. We will find you. We will not stop looking. So to me, this is this is a very suspicious. Behavior by the parents, now, we do need to keep in mind. We are not privy to conversations that occurred on the phone or within closed doors meetings between this investigator and the family. Right. So we keep that in mind. But again, I find this to be very strange, and I haven't heard their rebuttal of the have one on this snitch away Shen, so should we get into Frank villes theory as to what he thinks may have happened here? Yeah. Because we got so many things to kind of go through in the order is the proper order to do them is not very clear to me at this moment. So let's just wrap up Frank Vilbert. So he gives this very pub. He, he gives a letter to the family explaining why he's no longer going to be working their case. At some point, he says, you know, I have a theory, and I've poured through some of their information, I don't have any. Evidence to back, this theory up. I just have suspicion. And what he says, is he believes that one the mother, Jessica knows exactly where her son, is or knows what happened to Dior and to he cites that she at one time has given away custody of her two other children that she has. Yeah, there was a an old marriage that no longer existed. And at some point, she gave over full custody, basically an adoption process to her ex husband. Yeah. They make it seem like it's a Dopp shin process, quote unquote, but she still had visitation. She still saw her kids. So that's very unclear. Yeah, that, that is her rebuttal, I am still involved with them. I still see those yet. It was simply look the, the dad was involved. And he had quite a bit of money and he could provide a better life for them. And she wasn't working. So that's her rebuttal. Yes. And then we do have in January of two thousand and sixteen. Remember, we mentioned that the sheriff's department at one point named all four adults as persons of interest in this case publicly well in two thousand sixteen they now elevate the parents to the status of suspect yet, but they're also going to get another private investigator, involved yet and this occurs before they're named suspects. Okay. So November twenty third of two thousand fifteen K, I see Texas. This is a private investigative firm. They joined the case. And on January ninth, there's a fundraiser held to pay for K. I see Texas, but just seven days later, K, I see Texas says Dior is no. Longer alive. Then we have January twenty fifth where the parents are named by law enforcement as suspects and the following day. Vernal coons hires attorney on may second Philip Klein. He's one of the investigators with I Texas says Jessica Mitchell knows where the toddler's body is in the next day, the Kuhn's family fires K. I see Texas. They are told that the Kuhn's family will sue k I see Tex. Well, this is a lot to impact, because you have this team searching for answers, and they're now saying that the mother knows where the sun is, and that the son is dead. And where's their evidence for this? So they're brought into this case, cold, we should say that they're brought in with no assumptions and they're going to go in there with phase. One of their investigation is to interview all four of those adults that were up at the campsite and it's through the course of these interviews. Now mind you I don't think that they ever spoke with Isaac directly. They spoke with the grandfather in the two parents, and what their findings were is that they were being told different stories. That we have the parents telling the record states from K. I see Texas that they were told five different stories by both parents who were interviewed separately, and they questioned some of the statements that they received regarding the grandfather. Now what they do state regarding Isaac is that they again, I don't think they spoke with him directly. Their statement is that he spoke with law enforcement on four different occasions. In gave the same story, every time I have a couple problems with this Philip Klein and I don't know if you've seen some of the statements that he's given about this one. He claims we came in cold, we knew nothing and then the next statement is we came up with three theories, they're three theories were the same as the sheriff's theories. Yes, they after speaking with the sheriff's department, though. Those were the theories that they were going to investigate right? Which if you're gonna end cold get don't ask for theories. You also don't ponder. Okay. Here's the situation. Now, let's sit around and think about theories because that what you're doing is you're creating a theory. And now you have to follow that down the rabbit hole until you get to the end. Right. If you're coming in cold, you come up with note, the you'd let evidence drek, you, two theories, and then you go down those rabbit holes. And yes, they interviewed these people three out of the four, where's your due diligence there? And then on the other hand, yes, there's parts of their stories that don't light up. They don't go through and tell you which ones don't line up. And if you watch some of these interviews some of the things that don't line up as the parents say. Well, we told Graham Paul to watch our son. We went walking up there. Then they ask grandpa were you told to watch the sun, I guess, so that's what they told me. I can't really remember. So is that one of the things that is not lining up because if, if that if there's ten of those that don't line up is, is it miscommunication? Or is it a lie? Well, so just to clarify, this is according to k I see Texas to their official statement is that they came into the case cold in November of two thousand fifteen okay? They said that they did not review read or correspond with any agency or media group until after phase one was established in the investigation, this phase included, but was not limited to interviews with family, friends relatives, witnesses and site. Location information post completion of phase one. It was after these interviews that it was determined that they needed to follow up. An examined the three theories that, that we discussed so it is their official statement that they did come in cold, that they it wasn't until interviews in all that was conducted that they arrived at the same three theories that the sheriff's department did that needed to be investigated at the time. Right. But again, if you look at the statements that they have released they make tons of Trigana claims, like we know that the son is dead. We know the mother knows where the sun is just she won't tell us, these are huge claims that you're not backing up with any evidence. So you're just putting this out to the public, you're just putting this out to the media, and you're not giving us the reason why look, if you wanna make a statement like that I have I have no problem. And if they're pieces of shit, they're pieces of shit, and let's figure out what happened in this kid what I have a problem with is you. Making statements and then and not coming up with not releasing any evidence to, to backup your, your statements and these are damning statements that's why they're being sued and then they also do stuff like, well, we raised twenty nine thousand dollars for their there. Weren't going to be charged hourly rates. It was just going, you know, they're going to raise this money just through fundraisers, through fundraisers, and it, they make a big deal about how well out of the twenty nine thousand dollars raise twenty thousand we used. We don't really know where the other nine thousand is right? Okay. What you have two parents that are not working that are spending their time searching, and you have, you know all that stuff going on. And there's a lot of times in these cases where. Some of that money goes to the family. But again, it's one of those saints we're going to throw some shade. We used twenty thousand dollars, there's nine thousand missing. Oh, that makes these parents guilty. Well, I see what you're saying, but I don't think that, that look, I don't wanna get into trying to determine what the intentions are of. K icy Texas. Right. If this were me in the situation, I would do exactly as they did with that statement that you just said, because. Okay. Keep this in mind, they agreed to take on the case. This was based off of through fundraisers, that was with the general public, so me, I would feel that I an explanation to the general public that came together to raise all this money to hire me. And now I'm accusing the parents. So I read my, my problem with that though is if you're in private investigator, if you're a team of private investigators. And you know that sometimes the money is used for things like that, to pay rent and cause life goes on. Your kids missing the life is going on. You would know this doesn't matter. That's not my obligation here. What I'm what I'm saying that people need to be more concerned with the truth, and what they're trying to do. And this is all the true at the not the statements they're making is, we, we can throw shade. And then we don't have to back that up with shit other than don't. Talking about any other statement, other than just the money right now. No, I look, look, the money I get. But what I'm saying is, if you're a private investigator, if you raise money before, and the money goes to towards your expenses, but it also sometimes goes to paying the, the, the parents, rent that, that month, you know that that's a possibility. So don't just put it out there with we spent twenty some thousand and we don't know whether this other money is so looked down upon the the parents. And that's what I'm saying. That's irresponsible they could've made. I don't think it's responsible at all. I understand that you feel the need to tell the public where the money went yet, that's, that's if I were in the situation that would be my only obligation is that I need to tell you where the money that you people put together your hard earned money that you put together for this investigation. I'm going to tell you exactly where it went in my statement. It is twenty nine thousand two hundred one dollars was raised for the investigation of which twenty thousand was used for investigators in travel and hotels, only investigators hourly costed, all other costs have been donated to the Klein foundation that is funded by K ic-, Texas in the stock holders of K ic-. Right. This is where they're saying, we have no idea what happened to the nine thousand two hundred one dollars. These these other monies given. This is where the Kuhn's family can come forward and say, we had to pay our rent. Right. We've out of they're the ones that have that's their obligation to the public. Okay. I agree there as a as a businessman as myself I only took a percentage of the money, raised, I only need to answer for that. Okay. And I don't think that there, but what, what, what they did in the statements that they released if you read the statement that they released I am reading the statement that they. Release. It's constantly less. Throw a little shade give you know, evidence tobacco are statement, and then move onto the next one throw more shade don't back it up with any evidence and maybe they don't have to release that to the public. But I think when you're when you're sitting there, making these bold statements, why do you think that? Why do you think that the, the kid is dead? Why do you think that the mother knows where the kid is at, you know what, what led you to that just lies or inconsistencies? And that, that's my problem with the statement. I agree with that. I do. I don't think that all of this was handled in the best most professional manner, but also keep in mind if they do have any evidence that led them to those conclusions. The public is not the right place for that to end up the the proper place for that is to turn that evidence over to law enforcement now. Right. But you could also make the statement of simply like the, the last private investigator, we think that they're being they're not being cooperative or they're not telling the truth, and we're backing away from this, and we're giving all the information that we've collected to the thirties. But to me, the statement was, we're going to throw as much against these parents as we can and to publicly Shane them. Well, here's one part, that is left out of some of those documentaries in some internet coverage of this case. And this is. From K, I C, Texas when they are talking about all the searches that they conducted through their course of their investigation. Okay. This is actually listed as their secondary. Search and this is very interesting information one, they say that investigators searched by permission in the nine hundred block of ADA, Idaho falls, Idaho, which is the former residents of vernal coons, Jessica Mitchell. Yeah. Both have been evicted for not paying rent and left in the apartment furniture and clothing. In such the landlord had cleaned out the apartment moved all the articles to a near dumpster to near the dumpster for removal, as the property had been declared abandoned by the landlord. Right. Investigators were given permission to search the abandoned waste by the landlord during the search. We will report investigators found the following one four matchbox cars described previ-. Ously by the parents is missing. And they did not know where they were to a Cam o- child's jacket similar to being described by both parents is being worn on the day of the event and suggested to be missing with the child three a credit card used by family by family friend with seemingly purchases of items, unknown to investigators in testimony for an insurance tracking device box and instruction package. All evidence was turned over to the leam high county sheriff's office for further testing with the US DOJ and FBI. All right. There's some things back that Cam owed jacket will strange could have multiple jackets. Right. The matchbox cards, but I should care less about. I don't think there's much there. These, I think the, the, the reason why they call these into question is because they are saying that these cars were described previously by the parents is missing. Right. Didn't know where they were. What's with this credit card? So I don't know what's up with this credit card, because here they with, that they need to be vague. Right. They can't tell us what the purchases were in when they took place. But what they are saying is this card was used by a family friend with purchases of items unknown to investigators throughout the course of testimony, given by likely the parents, right? And what what the hell's in insurance tracking device box. I don't know some kind of tracking device with instructions. Yeah. Yeah. That's no. That's, that's very strange. Maybe maybe somebody could add that to the blog and less know what, what the hell that is. But yeah, I think the key, the, the big thing they're the big thing that you call into question. There is the cammo jacket. The one that we've always heard all along that is described to be similar or the same as what the boy was wearing when he was last seen by his parents. Right. Well, no look, I think that's something. But again, there's kids that like Cam on they have multiple came. Oh jackets, and I get that. But it's just like the money situation. Right. I as an investigator, my only obligation is to tell you what I found and what I'm using your money for. I am not preventing the Kuhn's family or the parents of ever coming forward in, in giving rebuttal or adding to that information saying, we, we had to use the money for rent. We had no choice. Yeah. He had two or three cammo jackets. We were. Unaware that, that was in the trash, right? I mean this, this one's this so tough. I mean, this case, one cute boy, I mean, if you watch any of the footage of him, I mean he's. He's kind of a goofball. There's, there's a scene where he's saying, momma, love you. And she say I love you back, and he'd won't stop saying I love you. And you'd think it's just this accident at the they turned their back and he goes missing and, and they're going to find him. And it's you know, it's tragedy, but it's an accident or or there's an animal that took this poor kid away. But it's almost like you can live with that. That's the that's an accident and those things happen in strat at the tragedy. But then when you go all these, we have multiple private investigators ruling out that an animal took this kid away or that he walked off on his own. We have this sheriff saying the same thing, the sheriff is saying, look, the likelihood of this kid, be an -ducted out. There doesn't make any sense. We have pride. Investigators saying the same thing. Then we have I witnesses that can't put this kid in that area. Out of the four people, they're, they're saying that there's, there's a kid there. But three of the people were family members so off they covering up for each other, and they did they take advantage of this neighborhood friend, quote, unquote. That's a little odd that we can he'll be one of our witnesses and the boys never there. And other than him, we have nobody outside the family saying that the boy was even there. And then you have one private investigator, go, hey, you fools or lying to me. I'm out the door next private investor. Get her comes in. Hey, you fools lying to me? I'm out the door. And then it comes back to this idea to with the sheriff saying, we exhausted every option of it, be an accident of it being an accident. And the parents, not coming clean about it. And that's where brings you to this statement from Jessica, where she says. Hey look, I was offered immunity. I was offered immunity, but a had to show them the body of my child, and I can't do that. Well, we're when we talk about, you know, we were getting into throwing shade. And, and here's the thing I want to want us to keep in mind that all along the way. In my opinion. Jessica was showing throwing shade at these unknown unnamed individuals. This, this deity man with the boy at the at the store, this creepy guy that was staring at my boy at the store, right all along the way throwing shade at these unnamed individuals or named in individuals. Look at our look at the family friend, he ought. He was weird. He's, he's still is weird whatever. Yeah. But they even threw shade at the grandfather. Yeah, you're right. She does she's like, if maybe something happened with my grandfather, maybe he did something. Yeah. So the thing I want everybody to keep in mind here, I think this is. A statement to to to throw this out to the public so where it's going to look like, oh well, I must be innocent. I must be innocent, if I tell all of you that I was offered immunity, and then I had to produce Ida show them where the body was. So why would I not be innocent if I could just show them where the body was, then I'm not getting charged with anything. So that's, that's that's as much evidence, as you need that. I'm absolutely innocent what she fails to tell you. Well, as I believe this is just my belief I can't back this up because the sheriff's department and law enforcement agencies have not confirmed that they've ever offered her immunity, right? That I could find. No, they're silent about. There's no comment, but I want you to I want, I'm going to give you a direct statement from Lyn Bauer men who we heard from earlier he's the, the Lymm high county sheriff. Yeah, let's. Go through this statement. His. Inlets REBA tween, the lines here. Okay. He says, I e leads with this, this is midway through a whole long conversation, but he says they could not meaning the parents, they could not pass the section. This is in regards to the polygraph on, do you know where Dior coons is at this time. And do you know what happened to him? They could not pass those two parts on the polygraph, captain, and I both agreed before the recording of this. It's, it's stated publicly that they didn't pass polygraph test, you and I are just going to throw that out. We're going to toss that out completely because we understand how difficult that is to polygraph. Parents of a dead child or missing child who may be actually innocent. So let's just toss that in the trash can and go onto this statement regarding I think this is in direct regards to her statement, about immunity. Well, I'm back to real quick on that. It's one because if a parent feels guilty about their child dying or going missing. They will fail that portion and also, if they are to emotional, they will fail portions of the test. That's why and most cases I like lie detectors. And these cases I do not so his statement in January two thousand sixteen says we've given them. Meaning both parents. Yeah. Too many opportunities to tell us what happened if it was an accident, there's been no interest in going that direction. So that tells me there's only one other possibility. It has to be a homicide. I disagree with the end of that statement that it has to be a homicide, Brian. I think that that's a very likely possibility. But when I apply this statement to Jessica statement about me being offered immunity and I have to show them the body, the discussion that you and I had earlier is there's a couple of problems with that, that doesn't mean that she's innocent, because one if I'm Jessica, and I show you where the body is if there in fact is one. What if the evidence on that body does not suggest or backup my statement of what accident occurred with that? Boy, right. What if they go well, we found this or that now we know this is a homicide. This was not an exit right now. She's in trouble because I would bet you that immunity. If in fact, she was offered that was stipulated by being an accident that she completely truthful, and lead them to the body. Right. Because why would they give them immunity, if they think they're guilty of killing? Here's the other, let's go back to the first private investigator. He had some thoughts and theories that maybe the child was given away. Yeah. Well there in lies another problem if you offer me immunity, and I have to lead you to the body. There is no body, the boys alive, bright and elsewhere. There's a lot of speculation that the boy's father is not his real father. Other an an and censor speculation of that in, in the last private investigator brings this point up as well. But let's to DNA text to a DNA test to clear this up. And so we can move on within investigation. I do wanna point out one other thing that they thought brought Jessica into suspicion was the lack of photos. Apparently, she was very diligent about always taking photos of little Dior, and posting them online, and on social media, and they note that on the camping trip. Now be it. It's a short trip from the time they show up to, to the time that he goes missing. It's what twenty four hours, less than twenty four hours. They do know hey, what you didn't take any pictures of your boy, during this time you posting pictures. So that, that's one thing of interest continuing on with more statements from K. I see Texas they state that they don't have any evidence other than the testimony of the four adults at the campsite, the indicates that DR Kuhn's the minor child was on the mountain. And they say we believe that the parents through family members and through friends in social media. Have begun. A miss information operation on behalf of the parents. To mislead the media mislead law enforcement and mislead. Investigators with K I see Texas as well as the general public stating. We now have due to the testimony of all witnesses, including store employees, clerks beer, distribution, drives fuel handlers and credible witnesses. They have given credible testimony that we cannot find any person that saw the child, go up to the mountain either the day of the event or the evening before we therefore are now moving our timeline of the event back to five pm of the day before the nine one one call was made. All right. So now that we've heard from pretty much everybody with what's your thoughts on this? Here's the weird thing for me is that I don't necessarily agree with either the sheriff's department or K. I see Texas where both persons have decided to both agencies have decide. Added to back up their time line. And look for people to talk to the day before before they even went to the campsite, right? And my reasoning behind this is a couple of things. We, yes we only have the four adults saying that Dior was ever even there. But the problem with that is if in fact, he never was there, then all four these people have to be involved in some form or fashion. Right. I don't see a situation where all four of them are involved, especially when we see that they all kind of start turning on one another a little bit. Right. But all private investigators. And the law enforcement believe the, the family friend. Right. And that's the thing. You can't believe the family friend and then say he was never there that day. That's, that's where your problem is. Because if you believe Isaac statements and Isaac has said every time Dior was there he was. At the campsite. So where I'm going with this is is a couple of things. Okay. So I think that Dior did go up to the campsite with them where everything starts to fall apart is the next morning when they wake up the next morning, right? That's when the story start getting wonky between the grandfather the, the father and the mother, right? Then we have Isaac who he can't recall certain things, and he seems a little confused about some things. He's guessing sometimes. Yeah. But everybody stating, he's given the same story four different times. And they believe him to be truthful. So we have the parents who at some point say, you know what it could have been. This is a guy that did something to my child. We have the mother who said it could have been my grandfather did something to this child. The grandfather starts to say you know what, I starting to not think I know what happened up there. I think the problem for the grandfather and or Isaac to be responsible for what happened to your is that the time line is too small the window of time of opportunity to do something to this. Boy is too small bright. The body of one's done even physically fit ones carrying around oxygen. Right. He's carrying around oxygen. I don't know what would lead me to believe here's the problem. If the grandfather did something wrong, then you have to believe the parents story. Right. Right. If Isaac did something wrong, you have to believe the parents story, and both their story say we left we went into town. We came back, where they're short period of time and then in a window of ten to fifteen minutes. Our boy goes missing well that only gives the grandfather and or Isaac ten to fifteen minutes to. To kill and in and get rid of the body. It just it doesn't work out, because you have to believe somebody's story along the way, somebody is telling the truth. And I think the person telling the truth is Isaac, and regarding the grandfather, I believe that he's just a little confused. I think he's a little old, right? Because of his age because he he falls asleep often. He might not really know what happened. I personally think, and I have no idea what actually happened to Dior, but where I have a big problem is day, two of the camping trip as soon as they wake up that morning, the story start to fall apart Dior parents cannot tell you exactly what time they left. They give different reasons for why they left to begin with. And at some point their stories do start to meet in the middle, but that might be because they're going, well, wait a second. You said you wanted his hand for female products. Right. He saying you went into town for gas. Yeah. You. A win in town for both. And they also claim they stopped at four or five places. We have nobody along the way that says that they saw the child with either parent or both parents and the problem here is we have the mother saying, oh, we interacted with this person, and they can confirm that they sold your. Nope. They couldn't oh, and then the father said, don't even know if they could confirm that they saw her. The father says we were the boy stayed out in the in the, you know, near the truck with me, and we spoke to this person, and they can confirm that me and Dior were there. Right. That person says. Nope. I never saw the boy. So what is it? They can't tell you what they had for breakfast, who cook breakfast. They can't tell you if the boy went into the stores if he stayed out with his dad what they went into town for my thought is something happened to this boy, either, after they went to bed the first night of camping or they got rid of him somewhere when they went into town. And I think when they got back, we had a short period of time and we had two guys two other guys that could be easily tricked. I think that there's a good chance that Dior was never there. Once they return to the campsite. And I think we have is and Bob, who both can't fully recall, the exact minutes and movements of what was going on. Right. And I think that whatever, happened, it happened. And they, they got rid of a mouse where now he could be alive. They could have handed them off to somebody else. Right. And just came back and said, you know what we're going to say that we lost the boy, and now we got these other guys that can't really confirm what was going on that day. That, that's just that's where I'm kinda left and I know this not any brilliant thoughts, or any brilliant evidence, added to any of those thoughts. But it's just when you really start looking at everybody stories you have. To believe somebody if not if that boy never went up on that mountain than all four. These people are involved in some form and fashion. And I also want to add some things regarding Isaac. Year, one year after the disappearance of this little boy, he is asked in an interview, do you think that the parents did something to him, and he says? No, I don't think that I don't know them very well. But I don't think that they would do anything like that. And that struck me as so interesting where you have all these people turning on one another. They even turned on Isaac. Yeah. And guess what? I think that the investigators really thought Isaac could be their guy very early on right there talking to him. They interview 'em four times. I he has the most reason to be truthful, and say, Dior was never there, because he was looked at by the family or talked about by the family as a possible suspect. Right. So why what does he have to gain from saying the boy was there that day, the only thing he has to gain from saying the boy was there that day is suspicion upon himself? Yeah. I think. Investigators wanting to roll back the time period all the way to five o'clock. I don't know if that. Is is right. But a but again it's possible because. About this way. You have a short period of time that you're going to go to the camp, ground, or you have to set up people are setting up tents we're going to sleep over here in the blazer and, and you're going to be in there. And, and you could you could probably pretend a little bit that you have. Oh, we're going to put him down for a nap. He's are a sleeping, right? And the family friend. He's a little off. So he might let his imagination run wild a little bit, and go, yeah. While yeah, the kid was there. I saw him in the back seat, you know who knows what he saw? Right. I don't know if we should go all the way back. But we don't know what happened. Once everybody fell asleep to the parents leave. But I'm also with you on the idea that why did you go into town? This doesn't make much sense and also like most women no, there cycles. So most women would know hey I, I might be on my period soon. Maybe I should be prepared. Right. So, I think between that and the other excuse of well we had to get gas. You gotta get gas for. You knew that you were going to go into this, this place to, to camp out for the night. Normally if you're running, I guess, go, we'll let me stop here in town, and then we'll go out there. So I kind of feel the same to, maybe what happened that night or what happened and this time period and. It's, it's very odd to me that you have two people that can't recall even how long there were gone for like, the, you know, the grandfather and the family friend, they can't recall. So who knows how long it was? And it's like was it two hours was at three hours was four hours. We don't know. And but I think they would be able to track their phones though. And that's what makes me. Believe that maybe they can't prove that they went further out than they claim that they did. Maybe that's why they're putting their time period back to the day before they left, but this is a difficult one and it's very sad and. And it's like. I, I guess there's a party that, that wants to believe the parents are horrible pieces of shit, but within consistencies nothing ever lining up. And it's, it's one thing if one five investigator doesn't like you but to and then law enforcement turns on you and it seemed like everybody keeps turning on them. And those people just don't turn on the parents of a missing child for no reason. Yeah. And less that boy was objected in, in a very tiny short window of time with four adults up there who sold nothing with one way in one way out. Nothing else makes sense to me. The parents are the only two that had an opportunity to get rid of the boy or the body. Right. But I can't get over that statement of the search dogs with the scent did not pick up a scent of that, boy, I can't get over that again, though, that lead you to if you believe he was never there than all four of these individuals are in on this, and the, the opportune time to get rid of this boy is when they go back into town, and it doesn't necessarily mean that they dumped a body, they could have hit a body or they could handed the boy off to somebody at some point. Right. The other thing that I call into question here is you are taking care of your grandfather. He requires a caregiver. He is on oxygen twenty four seven I'm not leaving my two year old boy, who's described as a real go-getter who moves quick with. My elderly oxygen. Needing grandfather alone that makes no sense just doesn't lineup. So regardless of why they claim that they went into town, maybe he needed fuel because they were running something off of the car when it was turned on. Maybe she did need these products that I don't so much. Call into question I call into question. A lot of the behaviors and the, the, the statements that just don't line up before we wrap up captain, we should very much include that, yes. The Kuhn's family did carry through and follow through with their lawsuit regarding K. I see Texas. Yeah. And just this month as of may two thousand nineteen a court dismissed the case. And before we wrap up today, we have a little recommended reading for you. Check out the book, the Lazarus files a cold case investigation on February twenty fourth nineteen eighty six a twenty nine year old newlywed was murdered in Los Angeles. The shocking truth about who killed her would not emerge until two thousand and nine DNA match led the LAPD to arrest one of their own. Detectives check out this book, and you can find all of our recommendations at true crime, garage dot com. Click on the recommended page and make sure while you're there, you sign up on the mailing list, so you can get the promo code. We're giving us special promo code to mailing list members only for fifteen percent off everything in the garage store. We're having a little bit of a grudge sale. That's right. And we will see all of you right here, back in the garage next week until then be good behind don't lit.

Jessica Mitchell Isaac Investigator investigator Texas Dior Bob Dior Bank Idaho Kuhn Frank Vilbert hardy wood park FBI Frank Ville ABC US
NASA ScienceCast 296: Shining Laser Light on Earths Forests

NASA ScienceCasts

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

NASA ScienceCast 296: Shining Laser Light on Earths Forests

"Training laser light on earth sports presented by science at nasa the international national space station or i assess is sporting a new light fixture the global ecosystem dynamics investigation or djeddai will being down laser light on earth from orbiting laboratory to reveal more about our environment in men in how it is changing nasa's jet i sense laser pulses and a tree canopies imprecise only measures the light reflected back the timing it intensity of light bounces back to jeopardize telescope will reveal the height in density of trees and vegetation and the vertical arrangement of the leaves and branches with any overall canopy doctoroff the bio jetta principal investigator at the university of maryland says this instrument will map forests in high resolution in three dimensions revolutionizing the way researchers monitor them forested areas are an important part of our planet not only do forests provided a habitat for many species end a source of raw materials heels for human news such as paper and lumber they also play a key role in earth's carbon cycle deforestation enforced degradation in addition to other types of forests disturbances such fires in insect outbreaks leader increases in atmosphere carbon dioxide forestry growth sucks that carmen back down into trees and soils knowing how forests grow and change over time can allow us to better understand the contribution and that forced me to earth carbon cycle and help people better manage this important resource djeddai is the first base born instrument designed specifically to perform sustained mapping of the spatial distribution of the carbon content content a forest the buying notes one of the most portly quantified components of the carbon cycle is the net balance between force disturbance in regrowth jet i will help scientists fill in those missing piece by revealing the vertical structure of the forest information we really can't get with sufficient accuracy any other way djeddai will provide scientists with insights into the amount of carbon stored in forest when combined current in historical record's of changes captured by earth orbiting satellites such as lance at this information will enhance the ability of researchers to identify changes happening across our planet researchers also will incorporate jeopardize his observations along with those of the eagles stress instrument on the station with daddy from other current and future earth observing sensors these data will address important questions about relationships between for structure function composition opposition in changes in carbon content combining all of these datta will allow researchers to gain an unprecedented understanding of ecosystem dynamics in the role plants and trees play in earth's global carbon cycle these

nasa principal investigator lance eagles university of maryland
Florida Private Investigators Mark and Wendy Murnan

Intermountain PI Podcast

33:21 min | 9 months ago

Florida Private Investigators Mark and Wendy Murnan

"The Inter Mountain. Pi podcast follows the real life exploits investigative tips and insightful advice of private investigators Scott Fulmer the principal at Inter Inter Mountain. Pi and author of the critically acclaimed true crime. Memoir Confessions of a private eye. The names locations and other identifying details have been changed to protect protect the privacy of individuals. Both the innocent and the guilty mark jokingly says his job involves sitting in a car drinking drinking coffee and asking stupid questions as it turns out it requires a lot more than that along with his wife. Windy they own complete legal investigations in Florida. But you probably recognize them from their youtube channel. Investigators in cars drinking coffee. They produce these short videos about the private investigation industry plus videos of them drinking coffee obviously but even celebrating Cinco de Mayo and dressing up as pirates really who broadcasting from the crossroads of the West in historic Doric Salt Lake City. You're listening to the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast here's your host celebrated Utah Private investigator Scott Fulmer. Welcome welcome back to the PODCAST. I'M SCOTT FULMER UTAH. Private investigator and I am also author of confessions of private eye about my thirty years in the private of investigation business. You can find my book on Amazon and you can find me on the web at. WWW DOT inter mountain p. I dot Com before I began this episode. So they wanted to tell you about another podcast out there. It's a private investigator podcasts. That is very well done and I recommended highly. It is piano perspectives by Matthew. Spare and I hope I'm pronouncing his last name correctly. It comes out every Monday. And it's available. Wherever you get your podcasts asks you listening today to Episode Number Twenty Nine Florida private investigators mark and Wendy Mun? Mark is a veteran of the US air force worse not to mention a former staff investigator for the federal public defender in Florida. Southern District of Florida. He has over thirty five years investigated experience in the the public and private sectors and he's assisted attorneys in a variety of cases for example securities and wire fraud drug trafficking as well as murder or sexual battery and even gang related crimes and finally mark is past President of the Florida Association of license. Investigators Additionally Wendy is also a private investigator and a certified paralegal. She has over forty years experience in the legal community and she worked for the nationally renowned. Attorney Robert M Montgomery Jr.. She assisted Montgomery in numerous high profile cases including Kimberly Brig Alice Verses David Acer. Dd Ask if you don't remember this case. It was the one where the Florida dentist actually infected five patients with AIDS to as a result of her experience. She's really really great at complex background. Investigations and asset investigations as well as making sense out of complex litigation. Speaking of making sense of thanks track OPS can help you. It's a new year. It's a new time to make some new. Changes track. OPS is a powerful investigation management platform. As a matter of fact it's used by companies of All sizes and countries all around the world with features designed for managing every aspect of a PI agency. Track OPS as a tool to streamline your business from intake to invoice you can get track ups free right now for fifteen days by signing up attracts dot com and in fact mentioned that you heard about it on the Inter Mountain. Pi podcast and you'll get an additional ten percents off your base. Subscription price simply put traps is case management. Made Easy today. We will speak with him. anansie about the National Association of legal investigators. Nellie as well as Mark Certification as a certified legal investigator a C L I with this in mind. Let's get to know Florida private investigators mark and Wendy Brunen. Hey guys how're you doing. Grey Sky Dan. Now you probably know the Nance from their videos. Investigators in cars drinking coffee which I really enjoy especially the one where you mark had the mustaches dressed up as magnum. Pi that was good an uncanny resemblance almost like a mirror. Almost yeah now we know why your wife life hangs around you right. The first time I've speaking with a youtube celebrity. How'd you come up with the idea? Investigators in cars drinking coffee but we work with a consultant. Because we're business. Were always looking for new business ideas that we wanted to kind of expand our brand so to speak and windy and I have a really good rapport with each other. We kind of play off each other very well. We thought well let's do a video together. We both love Jerry Seinfeld. And so he's got this series. The netflix series. I it is Comedians Comedians in cars getting coffee and when people ask me what I do for a living I tell them I drive around drink coffee and ask stupid questions. So that's really the job description. It's a it's a great gift so we kind of kicked around the idea of investigators and Kinda trying to come up with some names for but investigators in cars drinking coffee really kind of blended how did 'cause chiming in there with Chai. And so that was really kind of the impetus for the seat for it and then it just kind of grew from there and Wendy. Wendy did Did mark after talking into it or were you on board right away. I have my doubts that we actually have a lot of fun doing it and we started out live. Yeah we started to do these guys live. facebook live so that was some of the early ones. They were fine they are clients or they would show often. They were watching it doing it. So it was a little nerve wracking but now that we we're not alive. I like Petr. We'll they're enjoyable and like I said one are those marquis dressed as magnum Pi. Wendy why didn't you dress up as Higgins. I thought that would have been really good point. He does not know who higgins is is. She's not a magnum Pi. Higgins is now a woman. Isn't it in the new series. Yeah Yeah Yeah. We don't watch much network network. TV drew so. I have this dance okay. That's good yeah so you read those. When you were younger? I read all of them. I love down. Yeah yeah I read. The hardy boys read Nancy drew. It was kind of inevitable we meet and become detectives and drive around drinking coffee asking stupid questions. Great Southern Detective Agency. Yeah years ago when we started with the Great Southern Detective Detectives at one time or affect. Is your topic on investigators in cars drinking coffee. Run the gamut from I mean everything from flying with a firearm to proving in cohabitation you do actually drink coffee in many of these videos I noticed so yeah you are being realistic honey. Come up with topics I mean. Is this just kind of roll it around around one week and decide. This is what you're gonNA discuss. Yeah honestly and we don't script. I think it's pretty obvious anybody wasn't there not scripted. We try retry doing a script. One in our consultant told us you got to get rid of the hostage video tape terrible get back in the cars off. Continue please so there unscripted but we do come up with a topic. I think the last one we did was the process servers and private investigators. What's the difference in? I've I've been thinking through these things done articles on him in the past and I thought well that'd be an interesting topic that she and I kinda spin off of so we will discuss a topic. Maybe sometimes just twenty minutes in advance because as you know you're setting aside time to run a podcast. We're trying to fit these videos in to our schedules so we actually have to leave. Leave the office go. Parks plays get a cup of coffee kind of worked while we're GonNa talk about and then just just kind of do a riff off of that. They come weekly weekly and and You know the pretty informal I enjoy him. I'm actually going to include your youtube channel as well as your contact information in the show notes so if folks have not seen these videos you know they only last a few minutes and they provide pertinent information. And the other thing I was GonNa say is that I think it's an excellent use of Youtube. You know the Social Shaw media a platform for private investigators. I think a lot of people get a youtube channel and don't know what to do with it so I think it's a great use of it we've gave it some serious. I thought on doing that Again I started just doing a couple of impromptu videos I enjoyed it a we sat down with a consultant because after all Scott is you know we're we're all on the business of being in business and Rawal looking for some niche to to fill where we can expand on our natural giftedness communicate a message edge brand ourselves as business owners and so this kind of work for us. It probably isn't something for everybody but I think everybody can utilize social media to build either business just in a way. That's that's appropriate for that well and you're building your brand which is something that you said before. It's very important to do so. Let's move on. I wanted to talk about about the Certified legal investigator or Cli professional designation. Before I do so well let me say that That Cli designation is a professional professional certification program that is administered by Nelly the National Association of Legal Investigators. So let's first talk about. Nellie what is Nellie and National National Association of legal investigators formed in nineteen sixty seven. It's really a networking group for originally in the founding days staff investigators that worked for plaintiff personal injury firms probably got him out in Utah. I see him everywhere. We go the big billboards one. Eight hundred hurt Kala lawyer. You're maybe a may be worth of compensation but that group of investigators began. I think there were thirty. Thirty five of them they met. And they had a little small conference mm-hmm seducing training and that was the seed of it they formed officially in nineteen sixty seven and they rolled out the designation certified legal investigator in in nineteen seventy eight. I believe and it's always concentrated primarily on plaintiff personal injury injury cases so you got the first manual. I believe I have look at how to take photographs. How to on measure the you know the radius of a dare well or whatever all things by the which? I'm terrible at math. That's why I became a private investigator cow. There you go a phobia but what was interesting. Is it really emphasizes. This is a strong interviewing skills because most of the cases that we work on both in criminal defense which has the other component of Natalie now more from plaintiff personal injury into the criminal defense steel because the disciplines are really related locating witnesses establishing liability through interviews of witnesses. Pretty much the same skill set you have in Criminal Criminal Defense Investigations. So the two of them really kind of melted. And that's where Wendy and I really played off of each other's strengths. You're a paralegal in a personal injury firm. And what are you. What kind of cases did you guys to man? We did the gamut not. Yeah big little cases slip and fall class action cases. Does she worked at the tobacco. The first Big Tobacco case the the dentist who gave aides to his patients here in south Florida it large dock in cases. Yeah Yeah that was her. That was a real specialty stores. Through one of the strengths of the National Association. Legal investigators is because as you know. Scott Your Your Business doesn't stay in UTAH. Aw traveling goes all over the country. Sometimes all over the world and the biggest thing you need is skilled investigators who can do what you need done somewhere else correct correct. Yeah so I've got access because I'm a certified legal investigator were members of. Nellie Wendy I if we have a case I just did a case up in Charleston located a witness this up there who would not pick up the phone. I contacted another member of Nellie an Charleston because I know that that investigator has the same skill set to go oh find the witness Elicit conversation elicited a recorded statement which which can help our case. Private investigators are not created equal. And if you you have An interview or you need some video or surveillance or you need some documentation from somewhere else in the country or the world you WanNa make sure that the individual that you hire hire will be dependable and is going to conduct the interview. Or what have you in the with the same time of tenacity and experience that you have personally minor standing is. There's not a lot of seal is in the. US is that true. I think there's under one hundred there was a rigorous I mean I actually studied read read the manuals tested and it was a day long examination. Oral there was a written a ren tasks Orel testing. You really had to know your stuff. It wasn't limited to just what you wanted to do. At the at that time I think it was doing a lot of criminal so did requires some knowledge of establishing liability damages. Those things that were related to legal investigations and I think if there is a distinction to be made between what we would call. I'm using air quotes. Legal investigator and private investigator is legal. Investigators are typically retained by attorneys and law firms. I don't market to the general public. We do very very little work from people who fight us in the phone book. I'm sorry who find us. How you just aged yourself there buddy couple decades investigators in the elevations? There aren't there but we all of our comes from or through attorneys. That's where we get the most bang for the buck and that's what we sponsor responser attorney events. We work with them. But that's what we all of our business just an aside then You said you sponsor attorney events. What other ways have you found that are successful for for you guys to market to attorneys publicized sponsoring the events we actually do? I do Presentations in law firms. I put together together a presentation on a specific topic. The last one we did was how to find the hard to find defendant how to find the hardline windass integrating social media skills investigative. Your skills and then I submitted to the Florida Bar for Cla credit. What will do that? As scheduled with some of our law firm clients he lists and will cater. A lunch will come in heading out command. We'll do the presentation for about an hour. They'll have lodge we'll get we'll get a lot of face time with attorneys and paralegals law firm and that has been I think the the biggest bang for the buck because we've got the whole show to ourselves credits every year too. So yeah so we get one for. I usually throw an ethics component. So that's like point five ethics. They need ten to fifteen hours a year of ethics training. And I throw that in there. It costs them nothing. Nothing we come to their office and we get their full attention for a whole hour. And so that's been a that's been I think one of the one of my favorite things to do. Yeah but it takes some planning. You have to put presentation together. You have to submit it to the Florida Bar. Then you had to get off with the law firms and I'm just about to start the cycle again. Say What we I found the marketing. We did an email ladder at one pot that email blast but really. It's just like any other business. It's a personal relationship business and you have to get places where you're actually talking to the lawyers. You know they get to know you. You need to know them get to give them some of your literature your Chaz Skis or whatever just putting your name on a sponsor she is not GonNa get you busy. It's it's face to face. That's the marketing. Yeah and don't miss any words in your In your literature because attorneys are anal retentive about grammar it so back to the Certified Legal Investigative Program. I know that you mentioned how obtaining is rather rigorous process to begin with you you have to have. I believe five years experience already in in criminal defense or legal investigations before you can even apply and again there is a test and all disinformation is available on the Nollie website. And again I will include that information in the show notes. Tell me how this has helped your business being a Cli. Hi First of all. Let's give me some great connections and I would say the first and foremost benefit I received is is connected winning I both receive are the connections as we have now. He has a wonderful group. It's a very tight group. It isn't really large but it's everywhere they're wonderful people and the level of competence patents that we found in alley I think is our is our what we liked best about. I know if I call us in Tennessee in Utah in California. I'm going to get a really competent professional investigation. I can also call other. CLI'S IF I run into a problem they might know somebody who knows somebody somebody and so all of it is referral. So the the first and foremost thing would be the referrals that we get from what we've got some vacations from Nelly referrals. But I think when you're in business for yourself any credential you have. I'm not a Cli. But I'm a certified nationally certified paralegal which was a two day exam any panache so you can put pasture name. When you're in business for yourself is a-plus yes because mark encourage meet again and I'm so glad I did because attorneys? They're paranoid and they WANNA know you know when they see those letters. They're impressed they. It gives them some a comfort level with you not. Yeah Take US important too when you're marketing any two attorneys. What we found is this is that they're not just where you walk in introduce yourself because they are trusting not they're trusting their entrusting you with their reputation with their client and before they're going to hire they're not gonNA look? They're not gonNA do a Google search to find investigator they're going to go to their list. Serves an ask for an investigator. We just received an assignment today. A federal a federal court appointment An attorney who went to a list serve of other federal criminal defense offense lawyers asked for an investigator in the West Palm Beach area and our name came up by two or three different attorneys. That is the ultimate refer and so she called all does and we're we're anticipating assignment but it didn't happen because she google you know criminal defense investigator in West Palm Beach Right. And that's something that takes time to get to that point where you you have provided it's really great services to other clients other attorneys for them to be able to refer you and that just Kinda will work well in the future as it just you'll be able to continually get referrals in as you do a good job with your experience Mark as a Cli a certified legal investigator and then windy your experience as a paralegal. Ugo that really in my mind is like the perfect synthesis. It provides a great perspective at three hundred sixty degree perspective on on any kind of file that you work has been your experience. Oh Yeah and when he's particular skill set she has an intuition. I've heard this from other other. Investigators leaders of both female investigators and Mary investigators who work with their spouse. Women have an intuition Scott that you and I would kill the half. Oh yeah and I don't think that's why I think women are perfectly suited for the field. Wendy is right now. She's developing the skills. She does a lot of Criminal Defense Work in the mitigation negation to death penalty cases right now that when he has taken full complete charge of because she's able to because she's so well organized her skills as a paralegal Organization skills are superlative. And she's able to gather all the records maintain a meticulous time line interview. The witnesses assemble will all of that information. And that's oftentimes the only difference with what's going to save a man individual charged with first degree moment it's only GonNa Taste for the death. Penalty is Wendy's investigation Wendy as a certified paralegal. How is that help you when you reach out to clients when you're dealing with your with attorney clients which will I think you know? I think it's it's just credibility that's all credibility and because they have paralegals in their office they understand what you know the value. Most of them and So I I think it's credibility and you know I am a licensed private investigator too so I think they see the balls together. I think they feel the same way. That's a really good mix but you know mark strong points you know. He's been investigators entire life. And you know you you know he can. You know he's out on the in the field more and on the street doing interviews and you know he does record witness statements in just talking to people. Oh that's fairly his strong point where me. I'm more on. The paper researcher detail person so between the two of us we can really get the whole job down if you know what I mean. It is very interesting this guy we just we just went and did an interview. Wendy identified a a a coach for our client whose facing facing the death penalty l. e. g. found a high school. Coach tracked him down. Got Some information form. And then she and I went together to do the interview and the gentleman who medicine at the door. It was initially reluctant to speak to US but having Wendy. They're having a couple. There lowered his. I think lowered his resistance and they try to trust you. Married Couples Show America. What what a man and a woman show together at the at someone store I think there is more of a comfort level and we've also found out on a lot of sex abuse cases that we've done over the years people people talk to us when we both show up at the door? The kind of drops their guard down a little bit on on sensitive cases well especially because Mark you look like an FBI agent so probably intimidating badge at the federal uh-huh public defender. It was bigger than the FBI. Vange those it was three times bigger. Yeah they get pretty small. There's nothing here here. You get a free but anyway we had fun with that well again. I think I think everything you said especially about there. There's something thing about Having a couple there or even female investigators can often be viewed as less intimidating. You know by a subject which is often often to their detriment especially because the female investigators you know. They know what they're doing but I guess can be treated sometimes in a way that they're less of a threat when A eventually becomes too late so we listened to listen to Miss Townsend. The interview that you did I think Katharine Townsend. Yeah couple of weeks ago. I was Out really really enjoyed that one of the things that she brought attention to. Is that particularly. If you're a woman investigator you can be. You can be not taken seriously seriously. You're and I. That's what I picked up from her and how she how she so graciously handled that and she just she just continued working on the case despite Some very serious antagonism from law enforcement officers who were essentially disrespecting her encounter experience. No No Never I can't. I'm not saying I never had it anywhere offer for many years through but Yeah so it I mean most people have been very gracious. The woman a woman me he in particular. I haven't nurturing side of me so you know that's where I think the plus comes in and we're interviewing someone they said that Out again well this is kind of a perfect segue into my one of my last questions. You guys were business partners. But you're also married is that Is that correct back to each other. You're not you're not living in San or anything. No twenty-five years married we're just. Yeah we're we're we're supposed to go on our twentieth wedding anniversary instead. We both of our sons and the dog granddaughter got married so we didn't go anywhere so at the weddings. Yeah but twenty twenty five years. Here's vary and how has that and not specifically the marriage but Well I guess that to Wendy working with your husband how is that. How was that challenging? I mean Are you sure you get tired of him. All the time are sometimes. Yeah well. Although he has a good sense of humor he laughs a lot. Yeah we laugh a lot and we have fun you just I have to learn to respect each other's boundaries and In the beginning. Our Egos really clashed. Both you know this you know big ego so and You know someone has to be the leader and so I had to figure out that you know someone has a leadership there has to be a captain and I didn't real- I well. I would have loved it but when I realized he gets all the agonists face to you know data east talks all the lawyers. When there's a problem he's GonNa talk to him so I'm happy to do you know? Take a back seat when the heck with that comes so I think for me. The biggest class you know is the you know letting him have his stardom when he needs it and so you know getting his attention oh my gosh that's frustrating because he's very. Add and you know. I might Khazei. Hello Hello I'm talking to you. Went wins a good time to have a you know I would say that would be the other thing but otherwise you know I I enjoy very much well in like you mentioned earlier. Mark more of a field guy out in the street you prefer more the research aspect of it so again again. A perfect combination. I think complementing each other there was always our ambition to when our ambition to get to work together. Yeah but she was always threatening to quit her job and I didn't take her seriously until the one day she did. I've been out. I've been out for a couple years on my own and she She called me up one day said well I quit was ever okay again. She's going this time. She's got me from her cell phone in the car and I thought ought to myself while she really means that this. Yeah so I had to go to work then you were already Mark already working Were you already self employed to that point yeah. I left the federal public defender in October. Two thousand one and when he came to work when I set up set up office start developing the clients out of AH systems just got real busy from the start because we knew so many lawyers and she came to work with me and actually she quit her job in July of two thousand three two the two months off while I set up the office did everything and then she kind of walked in September first and turnkey operation so she took Komo vacation while I set up the office and everything but that must've those jobs she had before the end very stressful but Yeah we enjoyed it. And I think it's we've gone through ups and downs. He had a large staff at one point and then the downturn really hit us and we close except our office moved our office at home in two thousand early two thousand eleven and I thought we were out of business but we weren't and so you know nine years later mark nine years later here we are still working together and we use subcontractors now our life has gotten a little bit simpler more profitable again we wrote through those things thanks we. We've we've done all these things together as a couple and business you have that common interest. So you know your goals together You're sharing the the profits here. That's the Nice thing to do. And when you're starting out it's hard to see the future Really is there particularly if you're new to the profession or you're you're looking into here into wonderful profession but it's like any other profession it's it. It requires a lot of diligence. There are lots of disappointments in. There's some there's some great satisfaction as well but it isn't you know you're not a banker. No and it's it's it's not enough to be a good private investigator together. You have to be a business person as well that's that's one of the areas where I think a lot of people have issues with especially perhaps those who come from law enforcement. And when you know you've you've worked for twenty twenty five years You don't have to worry about a paycheck and then suddenly you've got to find clients and you have to pay half the payroll or you have to you. You know you're doing everything. Basically and Scott. I really admire what you've done. You've you've utilized social media you've developed a podcast and I know well how much work that is to that you take time out of your schedule. You're not getting paid for this but it's a you have a commitment to your business And we love working with people like that. People blue had similar visions similar commitment levels so I applaud you and and your efforts here. This podcast is a huge benefit to people who are not just. It's not just new people but experienced people like me to see what other people are doing. So it's a great forum and we're we're very very grateful for the opportunity to spend some time with you sir. Thank you my pleasure and I appreciate your time. Thank you very much. I want to become a youtube celebrity. Like you guys have to get me a Hawaiian wind shirt and a fake moustache. Moustache helps wouldn't stayed on while the other problem. These cheap wigs cheap weeks okay. So you have a WIG issues to. You've been listening to Florida private. Investigators Mark and Windy Merman on the Inter Mountain. NPR podcast guys. I'm GonNa give you the last word any final thoughts. Well I I we're very grateful to have the opportunity to work together. We this profession has been very very good to us about personally professionally afforded us the opportunity to work together Something we'd always hope to do and it's taken US places we never would've gone to otherwise we met some wonderful friends. We sent some tremendous experiences. Great disappointments as well but to. I think we still we still find a lot of satisfaction in the work that we provide to the justice system and it is not like TV. I mean it's not like TV but there is drama. I mean people all are interesting. It doesn't matter who they are and every day is interesting. I am never bored is like TNT. We know draw bill. I exciting times for the people who makes up. The drama makes up for Monday different from Tuesday every once in a while you catch. The Bad Guy Debra acas people are different. They're so interesting you really are now forty years. We've all been almost forty years while you are still interested in. Yeah I know it's crazy. Thank you guys have a great weekend. Thanks Scott you've been listening to the into surmounted. Pi podcast the number one show for private investigators who wanted to take their investigative skills to the next level. Join US every Tuesday on Apple Google spotify spotify or wherever you get your podcasts and be sure to subscribe rate and give us a five star review. Send your comments and questions to podcast at Inter Mountain P. I DOT COM. That is it for this week's episode of the Inter Mountain. Bi podcast make sure you check out matthew spares PODCAST CAST PI perspectives. If you enjoy this podcast I know you will enjoy his comes out on Mondays. And it's available wherever you get your podcasts. UNTIL UNTIL NEXT TIME THIS IS UTAH. Private investigator. Scott fulmer reminding you. The game is afoot uh

investigator Nellie Wendy UTAH Scott Fulmer attorney Mark youtube Inter Mountain Florida US consultant National Association of Legal Amazon Inter Inter Mountain Wendy Mun Matthew Cinco de Mayo
237: Seeking The Paranormal (Members Trailer)

The Confessionals

04:54 min | 4 months ago

237: Seeking The Paranormal (Members Trailer)

"Hey everybody this is the trailer for this week's member episode. We have Richard Coming on the show and Richard is somebody who is actually really scared of the paranormal into his adult life. But then he decided to start pursuing it and seeking it out and he actually became a paranormal investigator. He comes on to share some of his experiences right out the gate from when he first started doing investigations he shares some pictures of things that he caught on camera on the website and he gets into the thick of it on this episode. We even talk about things that happened to him as a kid that probably led to him being scared of the paranormal. In the first place. If you want to hear this episode in all the previous member episodes all the future member episodes go the confessionals PODCAST DOT COM hit. The joined button and become a member today. Now let's get to Richard Right now. I didn't really know what I was doing at this time because I I'm doing. It had very little equipment and not very good equipment and unless you actually weeks physically experience something or see something. Sometimes you don't know that you actually caught. The first thing we experienced that was physical was in what they call the civil war room. Which was the big open area? That has a bunch of Pillars and their space roughly twenty five feet apart and my daughter and I were walking through there. Something flew horizontally across the room and struck her in the leg and you can hear the floor answer hits her in the leg and you can see her jerk and move one hits her and I asked her what happened and she says something Shannon and we you know scanned around the room there was no one in there and we went down with the light and found about a half dollar size piece of tile and it was a piece of roof tower floor tile. I couldn't really tell the places deteriorating. So there's you know. Stop playing all over all over the floor. But this had launched itself somehow crossed groom with with pre gets forced and struck her in the leg and then we went through a couple of different wars and I think it was on the third floor. We're in what's called the Award which is violent men's war which was an area where they had I guess. Violent prisoners are are people who had mental disorders or whatever that were violent and we were in a room at the very end of a hallway. And there's nothing but doors for patient rooms and most of those doors are open and it's pitch black in there except for where there's an exit tiny red lightning so when you're walking down the hall all you have to your right or left are black holes where the doors are and we were getting ready to leave because we had heard the last people that were in that Paul Lee. We heard door shut at the other end as I turned the walk out. I've felt something. Snag my sleeve like if you just pinched your sleeve and then pulled it back like somebody who's trying to get your attention and I looked around and I wanted to do with see. Okay bizzare spiderweb. Is there something you know close to me? That might have done this. And there was nothing there out in the middle of the room basically. There's absolutely nothing that could have snagged mice sleeve

investigator Richard Right Shannon Paul Lee twenty five feet
Meditation: The Practice of RAIN (2019-02-06)

Tara Brach

20:07 min | 1 year ago

Meditation: The Practice of RAIN (2019-02-06)

"The following meditation is led by Tara Brock to access more of my meditations or join my Email list, please. Visit Tara Brock dot com. Mississippi meditation using the acronym rain recognize allow investigate nurture. Bringing mindfulness and compassion to an area of difficulty in our life. So invite you to begin by paying attention to the movement of the breath. And sense in the possibility of relaxing with the breath. You might send the embrasse being like an balloon. That's fading. Just filling yourself receiving? Healing pronoun life. The out breath releasing letting go. Has you read you might sense that there are areas in your body that are wanting to let go that naturally can release right now. Perhaps letting go on the shoulders. Softening the hands. Relaxing the belly. Relaxing, the heart. Continuing to relax with the movement of the breath. The mind drifts with. And you notice that. Just relaxing open. Your census be awake? Gently landing resting again with the breath. From this week full presence that you can scan your life now and sense, if there's a place of difficulty. That's bringing up challenging emotions. Maybe an illness or something going on in a relationship conflict, an addictive behavior something going on at work. That is triggering feelings of fear are hurt. Our shame sadness. Bringing to mind situation that in some way rings up reactive emotion. That you'd like to find more balance in the midst. It won't serve. So well to bring up a situation that feels like it evocation trauma. So picking something that where there's a charged reaction, but not something that feels overwhelming. And let yourself bring to mind the situation that really exemplifies where this gets triggered. Might be a situation with somebody else. We're seeing what their face looks like in the words. They're speaking right at the moment where you get triggered. Are might be a situation where you're alone. But in some way, behaving in an addictive way that is upsetting to sensing the Ramiro in. But like watching a movie to the frame where you feel most emotionally reactive. Allowing yourself to freeze the frame. Sense. What's triggering you? And we begin rain. The are of rain is to recognize by recognizing whatever's most predominant that's going on inside you. Might be feeling anger. Are hurt. Maybe feel totally frozen with some sort of stuck in tension. Unable to do anything. L two things -iety just naming fruit yourself, whatever it is. You're most aware of. And recognized goes with allow the air rain, which is just to let it be there. Now. With the Lao. We we pause and we make space for what's here. Allow doesn't mean you like it. It means that you're acknowledging that this is the life of the moment. You're letting it be there. By allowing. You're able to then begin to deepen your attention. The I of rain is investigate. You might begin by asking what most wants attention. What's the most difficult part of this? With investigate. You're feeling into your body. Feeling into the place of failure. Shame our judgment dislike or fear. It can sometimes help to ask yourself. What am I believing when this is happening? Am I believing that somebody feels like that? I'm not special. Do I feel are believed that I'm not understood that I'm invisible. That I'm a failure. That I'm unlovable. Sense. If there's a belief. Going on. I believe that. I'm disrespected. But most important common to the body and sense, how whatever you're believing. It's felt in the body. Pay attention to your throat. Your heart. Your belly? What emotion might be there? What's the felt sense? Feeling of clench our rawness aching squeezed. You can investigate more fully if you assume the facial expression of what you're feeling. Don't be inhibited. Go ahead and just let your face take on the expression of whatever as really being triggered. And you can even change your body posture. You may end up feeling like you're gonna raise her hunt your shoulders, maybe our hands wanna come into this whatever it is. But allow your body and your face to express what might be going on inside too. That's the part of investigating and fully contacting experience. What do you notice? Where'd you feel most vulnerable in your body? Where does Wallner ability live right now. And if that vulnerable place in you could communicate. What would it wants you to know? Maybe there's words maybe there's a stronger feeling hard image. The investigate begins to move towards nurturing. When you ask that vulnerable place. How do you want me to be with you? You might ask. What is this place? Most need right now. What is it most need? Does it want to trust something to feel something in particular to know something? Asking investigating and begin to sense. Now, the possibility of responding. To this place inside you from the most loving and wise part of you. And as a way of getting in touch with that you might take a few full breasts and maybe find yourself adjusting your posture little. Even assuming the facial expression that most allows you to inhabit your high south. Are what some people call their future self who were really evolving into the most awake and heart. Stay in contact with the vulnerability listening feeling. What is this place? Mostly. Calling on your wisdom and your love now since you can offer. To this vulnerability, you can nurture this vulnerability by offering what's needed you might begin by sensing where it lives in your body and gently bringing a hand perhaps your harder belly. As if you're most lies and loving part of your being could offer a tender touch. Letting energy start flowing into the place of owner ability. If you haven't done this before if you put your hand on your heart and very the touch until it feels tender that's the beginning of a radical shift where we start to. Regard with compassion. Our inner life. What words are message? Does this part most need to hear? Can you offer that? It might be something as simple as. I'm sorry. And I love you. Care about the suffering. Are not leaving. You belong here. Part of this live. The feels difficult to offer compassion from your own high. So you might in vote garn vite some being that represents compassion and love. Just call on that be could be. A person teacher healer that you know, someone living or dead are relative. Child. Could be the Buddha Jesus. Great mother. Could be love and the wisdom that fell six universe. And let it flow through your hands. Flow into your heart and into where the phone Revilla day laughs. Romi says don't turn away keep your gaze on the bandage place. That's where the light enters you. Explore what it means to really let in love. But in healing. Being the holder and the held. We follow rain recognize allow investigator nurture with what's called after the rain some moments of resting in the heart space and presence. That's here. Relax, and let it fill you. Can just dissolve into it. Beware of the quality of presence. That's here. What's it like? What's the sense of your own be fool? You are right now. How is this shifted from when you began the meditation? Sensing the heart space. That's here. Interesting. This is more the truth for you are than any story. You could ever tell about yourself. Cresting and resting in. The president said is your true home?

Tara Brock Mississippi Ramiro investigator Wallner president Romi