20 Episode results for "Central Park"

Throwback Ep 76: The Central Park 5We Are Free

Toure Show

1:49:19 hr | 5 months ago

Throwback Ep 76: The Central Park 5We Are Free

"What would you do if you had to figure out how to photograph something in deep space that nobody knows is really there this question and more get answered on? T. Mystery the new podcast from Atlassian hosted by filmmaker Gabriella cow birthweight. T- mystery looks past the front page headlines and into the untold stories of teams behind groundbreaking moments each episode examines. How the extraordinary chemistry of these teams made the impossible. Possible download team mystery for free wherever you listen to podcasts and learn more at Atlassian dot com slash team mystery. How does it feel to not get an apology? Does that bother you? That bothers me and that's a slap in the face that adds insult to injury? Because here you are saying we're GonNa pay you some money so that you can go away. Be Quiet and sit over there and go on the beach might times but if you're gonNA do that then. Qb quiet also right if you're going to pay US then don't have Linda fasting still coming out talking. She's very loud very loud. Yeah what do you want to happen to Linda Fairstein? It's above me now. The story of the Central Park five is one of the most important stories in modern American life. It exposes how little black life matters in America in nineteen eighty nine in New York City. Five black and Brown. Teenagers were arrested for a crime. They did not commit the vicious rape and brutal beating of a white female jogger. In New York City's most famous park. They were fourteen fifteen sixteen years old but because they were young. Black and brown mails from the hood. Few people believe their innocence. There was no physical evidence linking them to the crime and the confessions were a mess of contradictions because they were coerced by investigators who lied to them. Threaten them and in some cases beat them but all five were convicted. Yusef Salaam Raymond Santana Corey wise. Kevin Richardson and Anton McRae were sent away. Most did around seven years but Corrie wise did twelve. Those who got out found a cold world that looked them as rapists scum. They lost family. They were family members. Who wouldn't believe them and wouldn't talk to them. They struggled to find work. They remained institutionalize feeling more comfortable in smaller rooms. That were the size of cells and fearing that chaos could break out at any time they were lost until the man who actually committed the crime stepped up and admitted that he did it alone from there. They had a ten year slog pressing a lawsuit against New York City which fought the suit with everything they had until a new mayor. The current Mayor Bill de Blasio said. No WE'RE GONNA pay them. They at forty one million dollars as a group but they never got an apology from the city or admission of wrongdoing by anyone and nothing has happened that would prevent all of this from happening to another group of black boys again today but as of right now the central park five have Eva du Vernay standing beside them. Eva has done whatever does and directed an incredible. Four part series about their story is powerful and heartbreaking and must watch TV. She's incredible. I wrote a long piece about the Central Park Five. A few years ago for Playboy magazine called how the Central Park five still haunt America. And I got to know them. So I called Dr Yusef Salaam and Raymond Santana and I flew to Atlanta and we sat down and had this epic conversation. It's doctor Yusef Salaam and Raymond Santana from the Central Park. Five on tour. Aco Use of. Where are you now in your life? Now that aver an oprah. These people are standing behind. You got paid from the city. The world thinks you didn't do it. Where are you now in life? Oh Man I would say I am ten levels ready for the whole world and ready to live even fuller in net experience you know ready to give ready to share Ready to almost take back everything that was taken from me and I know that that's not possible but living in the space of now being present you know I always tell. People live full empty but being able to really for real do that. You know the ideas dreams hopes to aspirations that I once had that. Were just like what if sore someday aisles? You know what I'm saying It's a great fill in to know that you don't have to ask permission to live with before we had to ask permission to go to the bathroom. If you can imagine you know that whole reality is. It's just beautiful to know that you're not crazy you know that you don't have to raise your hand Sorry cannot use the restroom and everybody's looking at you like what? Just go to the bathroom. You know what I'm saying is just one example. But I mean it's a beautiful space to be in and to realize that you are actually the hero of your story you know. And the fact that it's magnified times five is even a better blessing. You don't because each one of us have our own so to speak specialists and uniqueness that we bring to the story that makes it an even more special story you get out of prison and it was a good ten years that before you were vacated and exonerated yes so you're moving through the world go and. I didn't do this and nobody's really. I mean some black people with you but a lot of people are not believing this is true. This is true so this is just a total alternate reality for you. This is this is a tectonic shift. You know as we were leading up to May thirty first twenty nineteen. I was telling folks that we are about to be hit with a meteorite. The whole globe is about to be hit with meteorite of astronomic proportions. I mean the fact that this story is going to be rippling around the world. One hundred ninety plus countries you know. We've we've still. I mean I know it's just like what to a week. We're going to two weeks almost in but it feels so good to open up your social media or to bump into folks on the street you know we were in La the other day. And I'm just walking down the block because I'm like. Oh let's go to the mall. You want to buy some stuff. I'm talking to my wife and somebody in their car said you salon and I looked and I said they talking to me. I said to my wife. I said he's talking to me. She said yes. I thought it was camouflage shades. Right I said well. Maybe it's somebody that I met before. No this is somebody who's seen the film seeing these recent interviews. And they're they're like. Oh shucks that's one of the guys welcome back from there and you hear people whispering in a great way right so it used to be that there was the guy from central park jogger case you know now it's like Oh that's that's a guy from the film the that's the real guy you know. Oh my goodness I would love to take a photo with him. You know and of course walk a little faster than my wife and she slowing she saying. Oh yeah he'll let you take a picture. He's cool he's approachable. You know because it's that risk that restoration that that you know What is it? The psycho social component that we all needed to feel as of A needed member of society. That's there You know so now you. You're not walking around like worthless. You're walking around like you can get. You can contribute. You can participate. You have value. You have worth a tremendous thing. Raymond how are You Raymond? How are you feeling you know just now the world sees you were right? You shouldn't have been incarcerated. They were wrong. You were right. How do you feel To Echo for use of is it's a blessing and I'm happy for it but there's a there's another part of me that When I watched a film stirred all these emotions right I was hurt Especially when you see episode four I e C Corey's episode because here we were trying to move on with our lives and we're like the system didn't break us right when you see Corey story in almost broke him right. And so there's a pain that goes out for that and so in that contributes to other side where I become like well put my gloves back on and let's beat their ass for another twelve rounds because I'm set incredible hulk style. Yeah I'm upset. And and and they. This is what this is the way they. This is the way they made us right. They and they gave us prison and it indoctrinated a fight in us that you just can't turn that off right. This is our these thirty years. It's been about and now even though we one is still like. I want you to get up. Don't go down so easy. Get back up so I hitched a couple more times than I haven't guided fully out right. We always like our first interview fibers. Did together it was real defensive like we all sitting there like in the guys laugh smile. You guys wanted were like Nah like we were still serious. You still have a lot of anger and yet hain that you're dealing with definitely definitely definitely and that's just on surface. I want the internal stuff that that we take back home with us. There are significant others like well. What's I mean is it is it. Fear is it anger. Is it anxiety? Is it shame what's deeper down in you is? Is Aggression Right Being voiced always you know likely to trigger. Yeah easy to trigger. The right. Words can trigger a response And not be able to see it as clearly as let's say my lady right she's like. Hey why are you talking like that? And I'm like you're right. I gotTA catch myself like she might trigger you. Yeah like she can say something. And it'll trigger response. But she knows where it comes from right so she knows that car. Okay Ray Bring me back in a few right right and that takes us you know talking earlier. It takes a special caliber of person to deal with a person who's been broken by the system. You know all of the negative things that they put in us and we took all of those negative things. And we've been able to you know been did so to speak like alchemists into something else but at the same time we have to consciously be aware at those moments that we have to bend it. You know because if we're not conscious it's like there may be times where something may happen and just like that your back in Prison and Oh snap okay. Cool and there was going on about the form on me. You know what I'm saying. Argh him up like this and then I got an exit the room so they don't get caught. I mean just that whole. That's something that will never never go away but one of the things that's most important I think to. Is You know when I look at some of the things that I've been taught I'm always very conscious of they. Don't get emotional because as soon as you get emotional you get blinded and when you get blinded you you you will go kamikaze. Yeah and not worry about the moment it's just about. I gotta get this thing out so to speak but what are realizing it. So I say that because there's been moments where we all have our growth and development stages that we're trying to help ourselves with because nobody came to us and said. Hey I'm going to help you re acclimating to society you see and so we're doing it ourselves. We're looking at ourselves putting the mirror in front of ourselves and saying. Oh shucks I got a problem with time but what do I have a problem with Tom? My CPA time like in my colored people's time or oh. I've got a problem with time because I was made do time so therefore I hate time. I'M NOT GONNA follow time but everybody else follows time you see them saying and so then you have to figure out how to you may merge yourself into this ability to still be productive right and so you say okay. Why get there early? I mean there's all sorts of ways you're still institutionalized hell you absolutely I mean for me right. I moved to Georgia and I got this Big House. But now when let me rewind a little bit in the documentary you see right? I stayed in my father's in my father's house in the room with the size of a cell. Yeah right and so. That's why I felt the most comfortable with the door close and so Naro prefer in a room. The size of the size of a cell. Right so heartbreaking. No I mean that is so real comfort level the comfort level. She'd been used to. Yeah and so then. What I did was that came down to Georgia. I bought this Big House. And then now the house became a cell right so this is where my solitude and my comfort was that but then. I still find myself. Stay in my bedroom with the door. Close right 'cause I got my my daughter's running around my lady her daughters running around and I said Yeah I can have the whole house. I mean I just need this this race right so so now just. I just exchanged that small room for biggest sale. Yeah it's crazy. I was talking to somebody and they were talking about how you know. They don't even sleep on the bed. They sleep so like if a bit was in his room And that was the entrance and there were no windows here right. They would sleep here. They will have their pillow and their comfort there and it was while because I immediately recognized why you know what I'm saying it's a safety measurement If you got in that far this you come in to try to do something to me. you know and and just wanted to visas wildlife. New York as well. You know just to kind of talk about something from that perspective. Because when I used to get on the trains it was distinct Zaidi that I would immediately realize that if somebody is that close to me. I am about to be harmed in. I didn't like that because it was the uncertainty of that whole thing about prison is going down. You know you go in there and you have this indelible scar on You. Wear not only are you are you. Are you labelled a rapist? But you are a star in that particular world. You're known and very very much so everybody knows who you are. You hiding in plain sight but not really because everybody already knows and so here you are outside and you have to deal with that that very real thing so you may feel like mad shoot. I could walk to one hundred and Sixteenth Street from one hundred Tenth Street but man. Nama get an uber or a walk. But I'm not gonNA take the train died just about watching this film. Was it like for you card? Yeah even though like Eva was was was an open book to us like I read the script. We was onset right actor. Plays you sit with you. Yeah we spoke mean. Freddie spoke on the phone several times I met Marquees and we did the same thing. Everything was an open book. And you feel like I got a handle on it. It's fine until you sit there and you start watching some of these scenes and this is acted. This isn't even like this isn't even a final product. This is just all right. Let's do it again. Yeah and then it was hard it was I mean. Even there's a scene that lean use of winter the set one time in the scene where the Giovane who plays and Sean? He does seem with Michael. K Right my k Williams who plays are Antoine's dat where he sick and he's on the bed and I watched one take and I couldn't watch it. No more broke me knowing bobby knowing that type of person bobby was and then to see these that scene. It was so real that I was like I can't even watch. And I think that was the important part you look at these these portrayals of this truth that happened right and we get the opportunity to share and discuss how it happened and then you have the actors doing it. And there'd be there may be moments as well. Wherever may you know when they say cut? Eva May whisper into the era of one of the actors actresses. And something happened. They'd literally step into this next level of that role and I'm I remember Watching this scene where. My Mom's character ingenue is walking back to the building after getting out of the car. Right and somebody asks her So what do you think about you know? Donald Trump wanting your son dead the death penalty again. Yeah she was like why yeah. I saw her do that seen a few times. The part that tripped me out was then one day one time she came over to her and whispered in her ear inn engine. A look that Andrzej new and I swear I was looking at my mom She she embodied whatever and I mean we call it. We call a great activa part of it also is the the ability to tap into our own historical. Dna right into the reference that we already have. If you're able to know that that stream runs through then you can. You can remember so to speak on Mike. Okon drill level what it meant to have a child taken from you in slavery And how painful that was because this stuff is still going on. And so now if according to these new The new administration's Laws and things like that. I mean there's probably a little bit past that but you saw where people were saying. Hey I'm coming to America to seek refuge and asylum and help and so forth and so on because the land of opportunity. This is the place that you know. They welcome everyone with open arms and being stopped at the border right and I'm not just being stopped at the border but now my children are being ripped from their separated from me. You know you think about that and you say to yourself how do you how do you describe to a people who are looking at this being heartbroken? What that means we can. We can relate to it because being separated for families even for those initial interrogation hours Which was a day or two that changed us that forever crippled our sense of trust in the police department in a judicial system that that the very real thing that people say as they get older you know when the cops come behind if they ever get pulled over by the side of the road or if the cops have their lights flashing behind them and they actually are just passing you to go to go help someone else. You are like Umberto di. Oh Yeah. That's sudden fear that overcomes you we already know what that is you know and one of the great things about like this film is that it gives the whole world of very real description on a on a on a high level and on a low level right of what. It's like to be a black person in America So when they see us about five but it's about the families absolutely and then it's about America right And so for us you know one of the Mo- more more powerful things that I experienced especially when we I watched it as a group was. I didn't know everybody's story right imagined that their story was like mine. You were friends with Corey for you did not know yes. Raymond and Tron and having a four. Yeah and you did not know the other four at all at all who met each other in prison they made. It seem like we just said. Hey May tomorrow remember tomorrow? We got the preschool. Go hang out. That wasn't even Banak that I mean. Come on but the public. The public thought that of course they looked at the expectation of black. Criminality is so great that the notion of Oh a big group of them went into the part just beat up people like sure. I'll buy that but see that's the same thing as the slave codes as well right and so therefore this is the toughest of they want to erase. Of course they WANNA know. Come on this is this is a new world. You know we don't criminalize you. If there's more you WANNA corner talking about politics or The punt pontificating about the potassium theorem or something. Like you know like that's what we could be doing right. We could literally be like on some deep level stuff. I don't matter and they're looking at us like oh shown them gain bank because I D- Yeah. What's your favorite part of the film The end when everybody as as When everybody unites in front of the towers that part like once it gets to the raise part for me it becomes an emotional moment but a happy moment you know because we get to relive the exoneration we get to relive a standing together unified and put my hands up. That's important so that becomes more from me because you know why to. I mean I'm the same. I'm the same in terms of the the best part of the film because that feel good moment that we continue to experience like Raymond. I've gone on the speaking circuit and shared in front of audience many many times and we've also expressed how when when we're doing that. It's a therapy Right don't tell the folks in audience don't send me no bills therapy and it's a feel good moment that needs to happen because we were seen as pariahs. We were seen as discovered earth. You know we still carry around those letters. That people wrote US hate mail that they wanted to kill us. You know I think that looking at those those like especially the ending of this film. As many times as we want becomes therapy all could relive as much as we merging. We morphs from the actor into the real person. And you see that they're still paying. This is this curtains of stuff going on. But these guys made it there. There's there's joy as well in there I think that that is a powerful meet as a very powerful experience. Also to to see Corey I swear when I when I was watching ending seen as a matter of fact this was before the before I actually saw the ending scene. I was watching a One of the trailers in what I was watching a trailer there was this scene where jarrow drone was walking across the street. And I swore that was cory I mean he had his walk down. He had his headphones on. I was and then it was like one of those moments. Where you double-take. Oh shucks. That's the real. He's great home. My goodness the Corey I met. Yes when I interviewed him. Several years ago seemed much more broken than perhaps any actor could get to if he hadn't done thirteen years. Yeah still super institutionalized bidder broken Ju- just he could smile radiates pain and that's what people that's why people love Corey. People Love Corey because they they know that like he doesn't even he never has to explain himself ever again in life right right. He can do no wrong right that. That's how lovable he is to the world right and for me in particular always been very sorry that. I asked him to come now. The way the scene happened. Did you ask them to cover? They told her no. It happened in a way. The scene brings it to life will happen. What happened was he was at that. Same Chicken Store Right Kentucky Kennedy Fried Chicken. He was there I saw him. I said he polo we about to go to the park. Come all go hang out in the park. You know. And it was so beautiful though because the rapping on the glass became a different kind of. Hey come come with us. It became like this thing. That is now a nightmare. Right The beauty of him in the last moments of the series. Saying what? If I didn't go that messed up? You know what I'm saying and of course because I'm the one that said. Hey come on. Let's go hang onto park aside from the fact that and this is the part. This is a part of the story. That's not in the series. Corey went into the park and left almost immediately after he got in the park while and so he was one of the most probably WISESA bus right. Corey wise like storm. Reid says get it curry while I know he was the most wise as a bus. That's it man. This is crazy audit here. I don't even WANNA be. The deer coordinate headlights as a witness to see was gone. I'm gone his name wasn't on the list and that's why because he loved but for him to still like he's still. I came home and we were still hanging out. Hey Matt come on. Let's go hang chew down mosquito with me. That's how I roll. You know what I'm saying and then next thing you know the police like hey what's your name on like. I'm you Salaam. They look at the sheet on. This is one of the guys we've been looking for. Say what's your name. I'm cory wives. They look at the sheet. I exaggerate sometimes and I go like the flip. The she'll look at life is A. Hey you're not you're not on the list but you WanNa go downtown with your buddy. You'll be right back. And so those moments of truth and also of questioning like you know you say to yourself. How do you have those kinds of conversations with your children and tell them he be careful you hang out with? Don't be careful about what's going on and stuff like that. Now you put this in front of them and they have a real idea of being able to choose. Well shoot if I go left. This may happen if I go right. This may happen. I could still be friends when you still be cool if I if I go this way. I don't have to go today. I could still be cool. I I've done a lot of reading about this. I've talked to all you guys before It seems extremely accurate to my understanding. Is it is. It is the piece very accurate much so we are. We are very much so this piece. This piece gives life into an new life into our story when I talk in front of audiences. You know I'm there. I got a suit and tie on. I'm looking polished I see the disconnect because they're looking at me and I'm giving them wisdom in and drop in some stuff on them but they're they're the disconnect. Is Dan this guy's not he's he's he's he's the essential yeah he got a pseudo. He's the exception now. I'm not wearing a suit because I'm thinking that the suit is GonNa stop the cops from attacking me right. I'm not I mean we all know right. Unfortunately we had that experience through social media. We're not going to mention it. But you know everybody that we saw hanging from trees out of the out of out of the totality of those individuals hanging from trees. There was perhaps half of them that had suits on You see what I'm saying and so the reality is that a pseudo not going to change the perception. Another person's ideas about you deal. He said the worst person the worst place to be the worst. I forget how he said it but he's sick he's talking about the worst thought is to be in the thoughts of of a white person in a negative way Because they're already shaping your reality just like what I'll even knowing without knowing you know. I wondered you're stepmother. was threatening in the film. Yeah I'm going to tell you that you're dealing drugs. Yeah several did she violate you? Go on a percent three-leg you're very accurate. I'm your stepmother parole officer. He's dealing drugs taken back knowing that with send you back here knowing that will send me back. I mean I remember. Why would she do that? I remember hearing on the phone right. her my dad would get into arguments over me right. You know he got. He's bringing girls to the house you know. He's disrespectful stuff like that Then I got a girlfriend in still was a problem with me. Bring the girlfriend to the house so they begins these little cat. You know Lou arguments and stuff like that and one day I heard on the phone and she was just so upset. How MMG onto argument about me and I heard say you know what she's on the phone he's saying I'm GonNa call his Peo- and tell her that he will here. You know selling drugs and so I heard it. I went downstairs. I confronted my dad about it. He said don't worry about it. She's not going to do nothing. So maybe like we are so late I heard it again and said more more than once and so I went to him again and he said the same thing. She's not going to do nothing she's he's just talking until one day. I came home and my dad came downstairs and he was like listen. You know I went upstairs and she was sitting on the couch talking. Your appeal and I got arrested that night that night so and he still with any still with us. I mean he's been. He's still be with her. He's been with her since nineteen ninety. So he's been with her. You know all this. Yeah that's that's a relationship solidify. Yeah but you know what I appreciate about that. Because I didn't know that as I was watching the series when they see us was always also like a play on a seeing ourselves for the first time. I've seen each other for the first time and I found that truth to be so powerful that that could have been hidden. Oh No these guys had a beautiful nucleus around them outside of the world but to tell that part of the truth was important. It was very important because I feel like she could have said woman. Just keep this you know. But Abe is Abe is abe is genius. She's a genius man mazing piece but it can't tell everything it can't de part there amongst other parts is her also showing the black experience the Brown experience in America yet. How that dynamic happen because we talked before about your extended family you lost. They all did not believe in your innocence around. That bond was completely broken right kind of percent. I mean we're here. Was that okay. My you know my uncle's 'cause I came from a big family. My Mom's five six brothers. My Dad had three and no I wanted to put a bill money from me to get out and so here it was that my family thought I was guilty but and then now if somebody in my household who thinks that I'm guilty like this close. This is how closely has gotten to me. This is how this is this. Is the dangers real right. I mean who knows what she can. She could've lied on me and said Oh. He grabbed me or he touched. And that's that's right that's crazy and she's still in your family to this day. To this day she still with them and I mean we don't have a relationship. We don't speak nothing like that. She lives in New York. I'm in Georgia. When she comes to the premier she did come to the permit. Oh she did. She came to the premier the audacity though I mean but she got lucky because they show episode one in two so she didn't get to see you know. Yeah I would have been great to see. Three data sat right behind. Edges watched was really good. Yeah let's see three see so at home. So so what yeah I mean. Abe is brilliant. She's a genius. But you can't show everything what is missing not as a critique but you know this is a thirty plus year story we cannot show everything so. I'll tell you I'll tell you what was brilliant and this is this is just me thinking about it. Just right now was brilliant is that we did the documentary. The Central Park Five. Ken Burns documentary documents and it was a. It was a brilliant piece of work it was knocked out of the park it was beyond our wildest dreams gave us off voices back right and then can just do the ball in the air lobbed. Who Won't catch it next and it just moved that Raymond played was so masterful right. Hey this will be because we always thought about them. It'd be cool to have a feature or some type of reenactment of this story and that chess move was brilliant and here we are now and I think that we wouldn't chess moves so when he when he tweeted you tweet only four or five years ago you tweet at Uva fifteen butter Selma. Yeah because of Selma because Osama and and what did you tweet so before you said what's missing and for me is the next chapter. I feel is missing. I mean I I get it. Put it in there but the whole civil suit and that's what I was. That's where I was going to get to. Yes yes yes. That is leftover. Yeah that is left. That is that you get out. And then we're an and it was. I mean that was a that we talked about. When you guys talk to me. There was a ten year process at the New York. City government was purposely slowing the lawsuit to screw you to make you maybe WanNa go away and finally bill de Blasio was like no. I'm going to pay them beer even even that. That was a brilliant move to the two with lay. Had Photo right himself as a baby and he had like the Afro and the photo it was. It was such a brilliant thing. I think you said something like Dante could have been me like that I mean there was a lot of it being bill de Blasios bringing it home bringing it full circle. You know there's moments that happened in my in my very real experience That I'm not. I'm not sad. Did make it into this particular version and the reason why is because like for me. Almost all of my prison time was spiritual there was the there was a there. Was something sacred going on that. I've recognized that allowed me to even dream any magin woman. Life is going to be like when I get. Outta here you know. I didn't have to be like always on the defense although I was always on the defense 'cause I'm imprison but I had I had moments in time where I can read a book. I could listen to classical music. I listen to jazz. I listen to hip hop I can act like. I'm in front of a crowd. Rocking the crowd like the hip hop artists. That I wanted to be. You know there was moments when those things happen. You know and I think that that part too in a in a in a different retelling of this story Would be bureau. We'll be brute beautiful embroiled as well because it also gives the viewer the the the message that you should never give up. Hope that when you're walking through how you keep on going that you have to take this lemon and make lemonade and not. Just say your man. I got lemons over here to interview and one second but I wanNA give a shout out to longtime supporter of the show. Saks underwear. Who wants you to check out their canon ball swim shorts which comes with their patented ballpark power. The whole thing with saks underwear is it. Looks great you put it on and you forget about it because they take care of you. They keep everything together. You just want underwear. That looks good and you forget about. It doesn't ride up. It doesn't make shave. It doesn't get any weirdness and Sachs's got the ballpark pouch. That takes care of you and they have that in the swim shorts and the underwear. That's why it's my favorite underwear. That's why it's all that I wear. They sent me a bunch of payers. And it's all I've been wearing for months now. It's super comfortable. It's Super Fun. It's lightweight it just feels good and they sent me the cannonball swim shorts to they look really good. I've been playing tennis in there too and one shorts that are like short with the underwear. It's just fantastic stuff guys just checkout saks underwear shop from anywhere on their site. Get five dollars off when you use the Promo Code. Toray T. U. R. e. At checkout so go to saks underwear dot com. That's S. A. X. X. with two XS dot com use the Promo Code Toray at checkout and get five dollars off a pair of the greatest underwear you'll ever wear. I want to talk about The settlement The group got forty one million. Yeah Corey because he spent much longer got twelve million and the other four of you got seven million each accurate accurate. How has the money before the before? The attorney fees. Yeah how much percent is the attorney of third third third third up there. I mean it was easier for the attorneys to negotiate fees than it was to get out settlement. So you've got like four million something like that something like that okay. So how has it changed your life? I mean it made it works and it made a great rock and take care of my family. I can move. I can provide solitude saving But it made it worse because people became like all right. You're the guy who got forty million dollars. Not The five billion dollars. Yeah you became the forty million dollar man and so the request become outrageous and we in a way. We may not have known how to deal with that too because it may have started out with one hand. And you're like oh I got a dollar in my pocket no problem but it then becomes a thousand. Listen can you Can you loan me money to get a car? Yeah I mean the the. The request becomes so ridiculous. It even goes as far as college. I'm trying to get. I'm trying to get back in the game and I'm sitting there like really excellent after all I've been through really but that's the part that's while I think this is the same for you. It is but I was lost on people which is why you know. I'm I'm I'm very happy when folks say oh. He has ten children because now yes before you had six talk I got more. Yeah yes so before the blend was you know my children that I had with my ex wife who's mentioned in the film and her children my my wife. My current wife's children That became the Brady Bunch. When we got together we went instantly to Brady. What IS THE AGE range? Who's how the oldest to the youngest oldest twenty-three youngest three three boys six or seven girls? How many live in the House with you right now? It's always about five. It's always about five because we have Like four daughters are in New York And the eldest son lives by himself in the Atlanta area as well and so the others you know they live with us and stuff like that here balances the I have one but I have to deliver me. Yeah because my girl she has made it worse for you too. I mean yes and no I mean it is that idea like this is what I was. GonNa say before folks make the mistake of thinking that we won the we won the lottery. Yeah they're not thinking that all these guys one pain and suffering everything that was taken from them. We're trying to pay back then thinking that they're not thinking that Oh shucks. They didn't pay their parents anything. They didn't give sisters and brothers a dime meaning. The city didn't give the families who were also broken and messed up by this. Who Lost Jobs? Who were vilified? They didn't give them anything right and so they're thinking. I'm just one person accent. He got it without realizing. We should never be axed. It's actually disrespectful to acts a person who's been through what we've been through for anything You know Because at the end of the day you know We the struggle to put our lives. Back is so profound that I've even going as far as to say you know we need laws enacted where anybody who's been wronged by the criminal justice system and I'm GONNA call it the criminal justice system this one last time because I always call it. The criminal system of injustice. Anybody who's been wronged by them. They shouldn't have to pay taxes but when I go grocery shopping when they go in Texas on the tax settlement but now you also have to participate in the market right source. Those things is like these individuals were owned by us. They shouldn't have to pay tax with the other thing that you didn't get because you've got you've gotta check. You did not get an apology. You're GONNA probably no. Individual was held accountable. Known change was made. This could happen again. Today you're how does it feel to not get an apology? Does that bother? You got bothers me and that's a slap in the face that adds insult to injury because who you are saying we're GonNa pay you some money so that you can go away. Be Quiet and sit over there and going to beach and SIP monetize. But if you're GonNa do that then you'll be quiet. Also right if you're GONNA pay US then don't have the first thing still coming out talking junk. She's very loud very yeah. What do you want to Happen Linda? Fairstein it's above me. Now do you want to see her disbarred? Sold what do you how do you want what I what I want folks to understand? Is that Linda Fairstein. Donald Trump Elizabeth Lettera They all represent ideas. Those are the ideas of what America is supposed to be right and so people want the American dream but just like Malcolm exit. You know we woke up to the American nightmare You know the end of the day. You have a system in place where just like. The founding documents of this country through the Thirteenth Amendment says there slavery's abolished except for the punishment of a crime. You got to step back and say that sounds kind of strange. Hold up there talking about our ancestors. They're talking. They're saying that we can bring back a very disgusting practice for the punishment of crime in who who are those subjects though subject so black and Brown people so as we look at the makeup of the Prison Industrial Complex today we see that overwhelmingly black and Brown is black and Brown full. Yes what do you want to happen to stand today? She deserves the pay for crimes. And whoever the the public sees fit is what they're going carry out all I'm GonNa do is grab my popcorn. Sit in front of the TV. I'm going watch. I may laugh at certain things I might say. That's bad but it is what they bring. This silly thing is they brought this on themselves. It's one thing to say. I did my job but this is completely different thing. When you know that there are obvious no I think so. I've been you know what she does. She know what that that she should not have been pushing? She didn't have the evidence that she shouldn't have been one hundred thousand percent as as a as a professional as as the head of the sex problems unit you ought to leader and once that DNA evidence comes back and there's no match hair samples footprints handprints blood saliva everything. You are close. Take everything and once it comes back. And there's no match you as a prosecutor had a duty to say you know what? Let me take a step back and reevaluate even come back to us and say these statements don't match the DNA imagine events. We're all over the place. Yeah what what's missing here. You didn't tell us something. There was none of that now. This isn't this isn't this isn't a What's the Word Neophyte? She's Undo Right. She's not brand new and I say that on purpose right right. This is a seasoned person who's risen up a ladder a chain of success just like the detectives in our case. They were the elite of the police department. You cannot be a part of this elite department of New York City unless you had at least twenty years on the job and so are mentioned because when folks say or they were just doing their job they they're not making the connection between experience. The experience of this person is lying so you think these people the interrogators letter Fairstein. They kinda new all new prevail. I don't think they've rape that girl but they didn't sell things that she believes that you did. Some enough incentive. That truth is the truth that they have always stood by right however the Indus if I got beat up by someone now they say witness identification is faulty and audit stuff. But there are things that you remember that night I had on. What looks like a white outfit. I had sky blue jacket sky blue jeans and I had art written all down my legs. You know people did back in the days ahead. Aren't I still have these parents at home? Just gotTa return for my attorney's office you know so. I got artwork written down my legs. I'm six two almost going on six three only grew another inch or so and so I'm visible. I'm is I got a flat top. I'm like that guy did it. It's easy to pick me out of a crowd right when those individuals that got assaulted. Pick the people who assaulted them. The bikers the jogger not the not the Central Park Jogger but the other joggers pick people out of lineups. Those individuals went to jail for those for those crimes. They admitted they said I did that. They said you know what okay you called me. I did it. They never became known as the Central Park. Five and so Equal disservice to the public watching this vicariously through the media is they're reading information as saying. Oh they said well the reason why they didn't do it. Maybe they didn't do the rape was because there was beaten up other people like the notion that the system is infallible has to be maintained We do not go. After people unless they are actual culprits but the system says innocent until proven guilty. Except if you are black or brown person right well part of your legal problem. Was that in the station house in the precinct. You admitted things that you didn't do this. Why did you admit to doing things that you did not do? Because of the pressure the pressure of season veteran detectives and a fourteen year old kid. And when you look at that dynamic the playing field unlevel there's no d. busy doing good back hop Did they hit you? They they Rushing like they was gonna hit me you know like they put the family. I mean it wasn't just one incident. It was two or three incidents where the interaction with the police was like. What the Fuck you looking at right in the fourth year kid you own. Should it be put my head down? And they're lied to you and then they lie and this is going but this is fifteen to thirty hours. You'RE INTERROGATED FOR FIFTY HOURS. Fifteen now over for fifteen to thirty hours of interrogation no food. No food no drink just constant pounding meaning mean and the Demento of you know the good cop bad cop did they tell you what to say. Yes they did. What they did was once they got me to a state of me Brim broken right. And for instance. He says hard against says. Listen Ray. This woman lost a lot of blow. She's GonNa make it. She has all these injuries around her head on her face and something had to be used of rock a brake pipe. Something so at that moment. He's giving me options. Yeah right and figuring out a lie I say a brick because I'm not even thinking about it was their voice in your head saying I didn't use a brick. I didn't see anybody wasn't me saying it's me saying a break but not me using them bring you down. You know like a straight up split brain I mean what do you mean literally like you just said the only way I can describe it in. That reality is that you bring your your broken to a degree of. I need this to stop the pressure. The pressure you know there's a scene becomes that much greg. This is seen in series where This too seems like this. One is when Entrance character up and he's still handcuffed to the chair. Yeah and he's like pulling the chair saying I didn't do this. I didn't do this. Modern do this you know and of course that interact with is a scene. I think your character. He's handcuffed to a chair as well and he he's like nothing is really being stated about that. But if you watch you start saying to yourself. What if he needed to just which he can't? What if he needed to you? Know what if the officer is a debt? Close Jimenez spitting in his face and he needs to wipe his face off. He can't get right. And so this restriction is part of the re tecnique getting in your face and making you uncomfortable making us feel like we are going to kill you. All of that stuff is part of the techniques. The what technique throwing me read technique the retail. They take this this this. This stuff comes with a disclaimer. That says be careful. Who use this tactic on because it will cause innocent people to confess to crimes? They didn't commit because people always say well how. How could a person confessed to a crime? You didn't commit. They've never been they've never been in that process. What happened to you with me? In the in the I kept saying they over and over again asked me tell me what happened in the park and I would. I would exhaustively describe everything from start to finish to me hop into turnstile. That was the only crime committed that night and they would have thought totally the few times they would say. Hold on where did you get the jogger? What job what are you talking about? You know and up to a point where it was like. Don't even worry about it. I don't know if this is in the in the series but there was a part where they said very in the truth. They said you don't even have to tell us nothing. We got your hands on on the joggers. We got your clothes on. The job is close. But you had to be like what are about. I didn't touch what I said and I'm thinking I'm thinking did touch something like I'm on. I'm mission impossible now. I'm thinking mission impossible that I touched something did. They grabbed my fingerprints and put like my fingerprints. Get on. 'cause I'm thinking they're telling me the truth you see them making lobby and they don't they never read the Miranda. There's a moment you sign a Miranda. Kerr signed him around a car. There's a moment when they come back into the room and they say to me. How old are you again and I said I'm I told you guys I was fifteen and had like. Aw Man. Here's Sinus ran the card and is Bluey and like in your Miranda ring. Meet me at the end of the day even if they read me my rights. I wouldn't have known that information before like we need to explain anything. No I never confession. That is not true. That's true you did not. I did not why. Why did you not so part of that part of the brilliance of the scene in when they see us is how it happened right? Eva gave a visual life to that description. Your mom mom in now. My mom wasn't walking around free said saying but my mom was like you do not have my permission to speak to my son all along. They're telling her we're not speaking to use on they were they. Were trying to break me. There were in going through. I was being interrogated. How Long I. I don't even remember because you know in a room where we don't have any windows. Where is that draft color on? The Wall could also corey getting beat up in the next room. You could hear get a year him. Getting beat up knowing. How Cory is a strong. And he you see has strengthened. The film but Corey is not strong in his spirit. Corey was a guy who if you had to go to war not his battle. He's going to war on your side. Tough guy tough guy not not to be a tough guy not a bully but not a bully but let you beat my Frendo yet right. I'm not gonNA be like Oh. Let me take out my camera phone snapchat this so when so when you hear Corey getting beat up yell out I m. What did you terrify? What'd you hear? I heard him specifically say okay. Okay I'll tell you and I'm like I don't know what's going on. They're coming into my room in there looking at me and telling me that. I'm next so part of part of this is this is Part of the reason. I think why I never made a written videotape confession. Because they will working on him. They were beating him up. They were breaking heme into submission and then by the time they came back to me. You see them San that. That process was stopped installed by my mom. Okay that's how deep dive parties. Okay so the background to that scene is all of that other stuff even that you would have gotten it if your mom was not hanging around the. I truly believe that I truly believe. I think that there's a beauty in life that I didn't make written videotape of written statement on Videotape Confession. Because I think that it it it it shows how messed up. This whole thing is two things one. Is You have four. False confessions the other. Is You have one who never made a false confession. The other dynamic is one of the four who made a false confession wasn't a suspect and he made more than one he made more than one. You made more than one statement. He made multiple statement. You made multi Zaydan physically co workers. I mean is is crazy when you think about all of that stuff so the culpability is in the system making the mistake of saying. We have to solve this crime and saw the quickly. Yes but hey we could do it even better. We can appease the fears of the public by rounding up like. It's more sexy for it to be a group. Yeah right it doesn't look like a group but we're going we're GONNA make it a group that you're gonNA keep the fear. The public fears there but arrested at the same time. They brought in many people who've gone into the park past. It just whittled down to the five of you but it could have been no. It was more. It didn't whittled down yet initially like there's the famous photo of the of everybody. The courtroom table black and white photo. It was a central park. Seven it was seven defendants and then when I trial happened. One of them had already gotten was able to get out of the trials Michael Briscoe and then they split the trials in half and it was. It was day the system they said because that part of that part right the prosecutor where the prosecutor says we have to find the right mix right. That's what they were doing. So because Eva portrays it as your attorney said we. WanNa separate but you're saying no system is the year but he's also seen it to where he says he tells her he Entrance lawyer tells Lettera good job on getting the trial separated. You know what I'm saying like you know. Don't act like he's doing us a favor. We know what she's doing and just about getting the right. Mix Right to say okay. We these three to trial. And then these two can go after. And then Stephen Lopez was gonna go last. 'cause he's another one who never made any statements. His father stopped it so they had no evidence on him either and even even in his story. You know we've always told Steve like he could be a part he could have. He could have sued with us because even in his story when we when the first trial happened and we lost he got so friend. We will all frightened. But he got so frightened because of the the Whispering of what these this conviction means. Oh these these cases. I'm sorry these charges. If they being charged as adults they carry three and a third to ten years per charge and so if they charged us as adults we would have gotten six thousand two thirds twenty years. Some of US. That would have been a minimum. That'd be known in so he's like let me just cop out some that didn't do any cop so I could be home in a year. He WanNA doing three years. Yeah to robbery charge so many. There's so many people who would say I would never tell the cops. I did something that I didn't do. I would never tell the cops. He did something that he I knew. He didn't do But they have never been in your shoes. That's right. So what do they not understand? Is the experience you had that? Experience is what is going to teach them. I mean film people get pulled over and you get pulled over by police officer and you get angry or you get afraid. Do they experience right if you had interaction with the before? You know what to expect. You might get both so. Here's my license registration. GimMe my ticket and keep it moving right or person who never had. That might be like. Oh I'm afraid am I gonNA die? Today is due to experience. Yeah they haven't experienced. What's it like to be an interrogation room for fifteen to thirty hours and the cops are just constantly pounded argue? You know what I'm saying if you're an adult they're physically. Put the hands on your bed if you're child then all psychological society that's keeping the stop it. Continuously keeps going on for hours and hours and hours and at the end of the day. All you wanted to stop so in my case I knew I was lying but I just want the pressure to stop. You can figure that shit out laid on them like I don't care right now I wanna go home. I just WANNA go home. I want this to stop did they. They could promise you can go home if you say. Yeah Yeah I mean there's I mean you see the scene in a in a in a in a series where detective heart again you know. He shows me the pitcher coverages and he says do you know him and I say no. And he says well. This is Kevin Richardson. You see scratching this that came from the woman. We know he going to jail. But I want you to go to jail so I need your help on this and at that point I'll notice do I don't care I'm GONNA lie. 'cause you want the pressure to stop you can figure it out later on but right now we're GonNa end this and that's how it becomes and then you get the promise of if you help me can help you right. I don't know these guys never seen him before. Right if I guess like I said in the cameras dot if he would have gave me a hundred names I would have had one hundred people at the crime scene right but he did and and I think I think the part that was. Kinda lucky for us is that they didn't have all the facts. Right stuff was coming in as they was working on us. So here was that he gave me the options right because they probably knew that somebody had pipe so it was a rock of brick pipe. And then I said it was a break and that break winds up making the cover of Newsday during the trial. This is the brick. That was crazy. Yeah this is how. It went Corey Confession. He sits there and he's telling you something about you. Know what happened to the Java? And then they give him a photo they give him a photo of the jagged so now he actually conceded the injuries that she sustained and then he starts to make up a lie to coincide with the injuries in that photo and even the DA says listen corey. Don't learn to lie because you wanted to please me tell me the truth so at that moment you know he's lying to you. That's why you're checking them. Yeah in a videotaped statement but people. Just look at that as a piece in there with Korea's like somebody was slice in a row. Yeah tonight just license Salarzai. Yeah Yeah Right. So it's physically. If you watch those those tapes you can't see the leading right and so when you talk to guys like Saul Casting. Whose confession expert. That's what they see. They can there and analyze tapes and go look. She's leading him. She's giving him the information right on tape. But the general public not aware of that. They're not that savvy. They don't catch it or you. Here is that yeah. We did a historic knowledge. When you hear US talk about his mom was in the precinct and that helped him And Your Dad and your family was not there for you in the same way. Do you blame your dad. Do you hold onto some anger or some questions damn. Why couldn't you just been there for me like I needed you? I was fifteen. Well I can't I. Don't blame him because he was also naive. Never had no you know has them. He doesn't have a criminal. History never had no dealings with the COPS. He worked at the same job for forty four years. I mean they told him we were going to receive disappearance tickets and family court right. We were charged with misdemeanors and so his mind was like okay. Let my grandmother stay. Take him home. I'll deal with him when I get home and You know she just had a language problem like she. She couldn't carry a conversation in English so they had to keep every couple of lines until it just became frustrated when he was like you know what just take her out the room and that's what they did. They got her out the room and it was able to work on me so I didn't. I wasn't upset Adam because you know he was misled. Also he was misled. And that's your mother. My Mom's have at the moment at that time she was sick and then years later she passed away when I was in prison. You know from cancer so you know and they separate was living in the Bronx and I was living in Harlem with him. What did you? What did you do in the park that night. Hang out with friends. Be a follower really originally. We was going over to the Schaumburg because there was some nice girls over there that we wanted to see right and And so that's really what it was like. I came from Arcade from East Spanish Harlem and so I have friends in the projects. Close next door to them and really. That's what it was about. Let's go over to Schaumburg. Let's go see them girls. That's over there and you see me in the film the when all that was right right and and let's go over there and so we went to the Schaumburg and we USA hang out. Does this tall towers. And then there's a duplex and allowed girls that live in duplex so we will go to the duplex on this night. We came around towards the towers and they was all outside but I didn't know them but there was mutual friends. This is horrible. Sure you know. And that's how we wind up standing out in front of the Schaumburg so you were not or were you part of the bikers. Come through Ratu seat at different jogger. Yeah got got little nothing major but a little bit like you were not no because what happened. Was that when we answer that. I didn't see that when we entered the park there was we got to this hill and guys were on the hill and a squad car came and they flash their lights at everybody and back then kids just ran right right. That was the thing. Oh let's go. Hey Mike Scott it and during that time of a scattering and I'm trying to find the guys that I came with. That's when that stuff took place saw him bike. You saw I did see that. What did you see what I saw was that they were just riding through and it was crazy because in my mind when I look back at it I think. The fear level of the bikers was so heightened that they were like. We're just GONNA run. We're GONNA WE'RE JUST GONNA go fast and go through and not people down. We just GONNA do that. You know so like me in the in the scene. I'm kind of like. Oh what they're doing you know because that's really what happened. You know they. They're description. Approached the group with fear right because as Glenn that then led the group to be like. You're disrespecting no no no that's not what I'm saying. I don't know what was happening in the front of the group. Okay would I saw where I was at towards the towards the rear? Was that they were. We gotta go through this and run anybody over. Oh they had already been getting whatever. I don't know what that we gotTa Get. Outta here because what? What did you didn't see crime non-issue crime what she described. I think she was one of the people that was in the witness. Stand even in the film the series she says Oh they were making these animal noise and they try to like that drawing stuff you know so I might see in my mind. I'm like oh she just almost ramey over. Let me get out of her way. You know 'cause I'm still fifteen and I'm hanging out just I'm not thinking. Oh people are bugging the doing some crazy stuff. I'm just like Oh this is hanging out in the park with freeze over there so on and the next thing you know you start seeing other stuff like I saw the bum getting beat up over and I remember with my vantage point. I was looking and I kept saying to myself Dan. This is crazy and I literally either. I looked to my left or right and there was somebody sitting down eating food from the group craziest seen in the World Guy. Getting beat up over here. I'm standing maybe a hundred feet away in a guy sitting down near me eating food and I said Yeah we get their food from not like a one in some. It was shocking. Where'd you get that food from? And he's got it from. The bottom. Now is disgusted because Mer homeless people get food out of trash can not like not like. I'm GonNa take this bag and rapid nicely. You know if you finish your meal. You're just like shocking. The Burke say so. I was disgusted by that. I couldn't believe that I was like this nasty. But the wild part two is as the scenes continued. Like you know some of the guys throwing rocks at cars. You know Witnessing those things was just so mind boggling. Like you're watching these things unfold and like I said Corey at some point. I don't know when he's like I'm out of here. He leaves but I stayed and so I have my memory of seeing different. Things is there to my to my advantage. I didn't do anything to anybody you know and if I did there would have been like. I remember. That guy was six two six two white outfit worn hair very you know. Who Do you know who said wild thing that I don't want to why I don't know about that? I mean they have they have meat in the series saying it but it wasn't wilding rights like all the while out tone. Loc- yeah no no no because we didn't. I didn't to Tom Lowe. Okay we was more of a natural. He's talking about the way that we say. Yeah we're like. Wow Wow now yeah not wilding. Yeah while in like yeah and they could be. It could be applied to anything now. If you're talking he's wiling he sound crazy. Sure that's what it was is not. They went to the police and the prosecutors went fasting and they put a a meaning to it while being means black and Hispanic kids rampage. That's not what I meant. Beating raping pillaging phillies. Anybody see yeah. That's what that's what that's what they said but that was never the case And it could you know I mean it could have been told to the detectives and and they they misinterpreted and then he just gave it their own meaning and that was I mean you use the word evil to talk about Linda. Fairstein and how she was approaching the events of that evening. Why Use the word evil? Because that's what her spirit was. And maybe still is. You know I went to We we screened dissenter book. Five in Martha's vineyard the Ken Burns piece A few years ago we screened the central. Martha's Vineyard drove up there with my family and my wife was like. Oh there's a cop following us like this is on the island not thinking of anything of it. I'm like oh I'm at Radio Shack and all of a sudden this same cop pops up and then I'm like over here in that same cop pops up and so we screen film and we're before before we screened it. One of the convenors says to me you know. We got a call from Linda Fairstein camp. That said. Don't show the film but we're showing film like that makes us want to show the film even more you know. I mean Ken Burns doesn't make trash. You know what I don't I don't understand this. You know they show the film and this must have been the people's first time really getting a real taste for what happened in this case. I mean the People's energy was so vibrant. I thought I was in a room filled with people from Holland from Brooklyn from the Bronx from Queens. It was like a New York vibe and it was angry it was like I can't believe this. As a matter of fact I stopped at one point and I said I feel some going on here like you know. This is strange mentioned. It and somebody said we're friends of Linda Fairstein like she's our neighbor. We didn't know she did this. We WanNa go from here and pick it in front of her house right now. This is what the people at. Martha's this you know and so when I think about like when I look back as an adult you know. She Elizabeth lederer these. These folks weren't just doing their jobs. They were almost like they had a vendetta went above and beyond like especially with me and being in a courtroom so lettera was the assistant district. Attorney. Fairstein was her boss so I had very little contact with Fairstein in the courthouse. Lettera was the one pushing needle right her anger and hatred towards me was. I didn't know what was going on and I kept trying to digest impresses. Why does she hate us? So you know. Part of it was the way I was talking. I remember getting a witness stand. So I'm not in the series. I'm not on its witness Stanford on in in real life I actually got on the witness stand and I'm talking like how I normally talk without realizing that I made. I made a very big mistake. Which is getting on the witness. Stand thinking that. I had enough mental capacity to mount a proper defense because in the eyes of the Public. Right she shaping the narrative. She's controlling the rains. Hey Yousif what were you doing in the park? I was hanging out with some friends. Did you go to the park to have fun Duh? Of course it went to the park to have fun. The public is listening to this in the in in in in the results of what happened and seeing. Oh shucks he's. He's telling me what himself he went to the park. The half white and I'm not even thinking about this right and in the midst of that she says well. Did you have your Did you have a basketball with you? Did you have a have some baseball shorts you know like did? Did you have some basketball shorts? Did you have some sneakers on you know? And I'm like. What is she talking? I'm not even aware that she's murdering right. She setting me up saying I didn't even come back with what are you. What are you? What the hell are you talking about? We don't play basketball with sneakers. We played with Timbaland. I'm not even a savvy enough at that point to realize she setting me up. She's using my words and flipping them. Because I'm thinking. Oh like like even now when I talk about the dynamic of a An eleven year old being able to hang out with a twenty year old. That doesn't happen. No that's not. Nothing does not normal. But in this particular instance there were people as young as eleven hanging out with people as old as twenty and part of our fascination as younger people to go with a group of people that were older. Without knowing anything about what's going to happen was that we were thinking that we were finally going to be able to see what made the Geez special You see what I'm saying. Every young person wanted to smack. What makes Tori cool like that? You see them saying like how. How's he get his magic and finally being able to share time with you you see it? Oh Wow you know gotta be this or that or you know and so. I think that that dynamic is lost on the public as well one thing that that Ken Burns captured when they see his doesn't quite capture is the sense in New York City of surely they are guilty right. I mean there's this incredible moment in the Ken Burns. Doc when they get their old footage of Ed Koch and he says the word alleged yes I remember like Hollick they tell me I have to say alleged but we all know they did so. The mayor is on TV. You're saying they're quote unquote alleged and and nobody virtually nobody in the city was pushing back against the narrative. Not you know we got so mean fair St and not to have any sympathy for them. Affairs letter are taking the energy. The phone calls the vibe of the city. One of the great young white women of the city from the financial district has been deeply harmed. People fairly they can't jog in central park. These five black maniacs did it get them under the budget as fast as I think it was more than that. I think it was more than that and the reason why. I'm saying that. I think it was more than that is because they needed a caliber of person to likely Fairstein to do what was done just like they needed a caliber of judge. Like in a series you you see where they say to my attorney right You how long have you been an attorney like kind like play on it? But then like Oh. He doesn't know the process. He doesn't know what happens. Usually happens is that they put the judges names in in this wheel. They'd spin the wheel. And then it's just randomly pulling out. He says they didn't do that with case they needed a judge to to overlook the mistakes you know as a matter of fact the judge has been. I mean this is in the series as well. He's sent so many people to his island that they call it galleons. Alex you know he was just that kind of a judge you on and he was behind the same narrative they guilty. Yeah so it. Was this do this? This this Across the board. You know this this dance amongst them right that they all band together and they say yeah. These guys are still guilty. I mean even the judge says are you do you? Have you have anger toward the jury? No I don't at the end of the day. They will set forth narrative they were. They were the ones who Was influenced by the media. They sat and they got to read these papers. These articles that were written about US dot second lives. They said that they thought that the confessions were coerced. And even still voted to convict. Well if you see In in Camden piece Ron goal. He tells yourself he tells you. How pressure right? This isn't even an interrogation room. This is his peers. How they call them rat and he's hold up the process and everybody wants to go home. What are you doing? I want to get to my kids. My family hurry the fuck and he caves and this is a grown man who caves under pressure right. We caved under ten times worse than that. And you're half his age half his age right and this grown man. He caved Emmy and him had a conversation. We both on CNN one time we both on CNN that we had a conversation and he told me he said Ray the reason why he was the only person who saw it he said it's three different stories. Here you have a story entering the story use of doesn't even have a story right right. Never made a statement. If I believe you then I can't believe them. You didn't know where it happened. Exactly he says so. The only person who sees this use of the uneven have a statement. So how can I believe he did anything? See this when people say I would never but you are leaving out. Group dynamics you sitting alone in your kitchen or your car. You can't tell me they're the same person when ten or twelve people are standing around you and saying I see the opposite and I need you to change your mind so that we can all move on this right and that's right that is extraordinarily powerful and the same thing happens in the next track in an ABC special. The woman who said she wished that she held out but she was the one she was the wrong goal of that trial. So what happens you know and and and that's what we asked people. You think that you know unless you have that experience you will vote. People vote on the more things that you've got some guys who fo- 'cause they wife they come home where was you at ship How would that be bar? I had a couple of drinks. Sorry she might even put she the look. The look is a fine fine. I had three drinks right when I was fifteen. Sixteen Seventeen Eighteen. I was in high school. You imprison lost your childhood. Can you get it back in? You love US something balance out your life in some way or just you can live life. You can live full in Di empty now whereas before. You didn't even know you didn't have any highest rations may have been to you. Don't Miss Your heard? I heard her cares one and that was about the job. They next joint tomorrow. Oh my goodness going crazy I mean you. Don't you don't have like you know what tomorrow I need to put. The business plans in place to become an architect. I had a dream of becoming an architect. 'cause I'm a graphic designer but the details of that? No that wasn't there you know so you know. The biggest aspiration in reality might have been man. I want a man. I got nailed. That with my ski you know when I do the skateboard trick tomorrow. I'm going to be good. If Matiz raised had not come forward on his own out of the blue to say. I'm sorry it was actually me and I can prove it. If that had not happened you would have gone to your grave saying I didn't do it. The history would have remembered you as having done it. Not only that in Corey probably would have been still in prison and I say that because Corrie was given a five fifteen year prison sentence however he just revealed to me the other day that Pataki had just changed the law they wanted to change the laws somewhere so for folks who were charged with the most heinous crimes. They wanted it to be left to the parole board whether they would get out or not so a lot of times you may hear him say. I had a fifteen life sentence. And that's what he means. But that's what he means. Even if he got out Pataki was also trying to change the sex offender. Laws where you had to register for life for life here right so we would have been registered for life. Yeah so where were you when you come home from your second bid when many Raise started talking. Yeah I was on my third bid because I had a parole violation and he gave me two and a half years for that. So you got four years for dealing drugs and then to has its first because I came from the seven gave me a parole violation of curfew violation and gave me two and a half years for that right and I want them doing twenty months and then I came back and then And then I got the drug. Couldn't were confined work. I'd have to fill out an application to deal drugs. It was right. There was simple right. Oh Yeah I do know a little bit of math right and so with that route and then I got arrested and And I knew I was guilty at that point so it wasn't about fighting the system it was about negotiating right so I negotiated to get a three and a half seven year sentence because it was considered a predicate felon right and so They Will Charlotte give me more time. Negotiating got that. Because I said I can come back off of this. I have another chance so I was in my fourth year raise came forward. I was in Franklin correctional which is about nine hours from New York. So you were still inside. I was still inside. Yeah we're still inside and your dad called you. I call my dad. So what happened was they brought me back now. Dow State Correctional which is the process of center and these detectives and trying to question me about all the jobs stuff. And I was just like this. Don't even sound right by you. Know why are we talking about? Why are we talking about this? And they try and run some some some lame excuse. And we're trying to change juvenile laws. And so I said all right. Let's see what his goals and. I spoke to them and and and and only one about the Java and I told him I said no we rehearse we never did it. This is what happened and laid on that night. I knew correctional. So who worked there? Because he also worked at the June facility was at so he called me up. You'll get on the phone you know. Get on the phone and I go to call my dad and I'm like you know they brought me back down asking about the GIAGA case and he starts laughing here. You know. The Guy came forward. And I'm like my kid forgot you'd lying and he's like I'm dead serious. He came forward and I hung up on. 'em Stop playing. You know what I'm saying and it wasn't until later on because the last thing you want is fake hoping home fat will make it harder to do your time. You like no shut up. Yeah only only one talking about this right so I hung up on them and then Start Thinking about it. Like Damn did do really come forward right. And it wasn't until they sent me back to my facility that he came out and he did this special. Abc special where. He's telling you know how he committed the crime. So what is the I mean? What is the feeling? How's the information like you know he's on the TV but you can't just watch TV whenever you want? Just how is it coming to you like? Oh my God. Somebody's admitting to having done the thing that I've been telling my God. How's that reaching you 'cause you know? I was in denial. Like you said before. He's like we always thought that they were. GonNa make him the six-man right. I was going to be that thing. He's a six man he's the one that got away. Put them in there and not a packages complete right and I was so institutionalize. I thought that was there was going to do and so wanted to. And that's what they wanted to do. And so what happened? Was that the present found out and then all its support came in and guys with semi articles. They were sending me. This was talking to me. It was actually an inmate who said you gotta exonerate a right and I say yeah and he said you know that drug case that you have you gotta go back and get resentenced as a first time offender. Wow right it was another inmate who told me that and then I call my attorney. He was like yeah. We taking care of it right now so it was. It was my attorney Michael. Warren always had a lot of hope he was saying. I'm GonNa get you home before Christmas and I will be like. Yeah whatever yeah all right. I'll see you when it happens and he did it. How long was it from when Matisse started to win they let you out about eight months to a year because we had to go through the whole Reinvestigation yeah so they had to do the reinvestigation an figure everything out and then it was. It was December fifth of two thousand two when we got exonerated and then I got out. December twenty second of of two thousand and two right before right before Christmas. See you had been out for several years but still struggling. Everyone thinks I'm guilty. How did you first start? Hearing about Matijas raise man I forget exactly where I was when I first heard about him. Might have actually been in. Georgia. You know But immediately my thoughts went to. They're going to make this into the sixth man. You know what I'm saying. They're going to they're going to somehow Make this go away. Sweep it under the rug. This is just you know because I had already dealt with them. Yeah we know how to play. Yeah so it was really ugly to be able to have that hope. Even though I was home for me it was also hope I needed something real. I need something that I could grab onto and say okay. Cool you know. But and then the the beauty of being able to finally have put behind us. You know I remember watching as I was watching the The the television footage of Michael Warrant. He he didn't even get a chance to sit all the way back down in his seat until the judge says so granted have a merry Christmas and a happy new years. Something like that and I was just like. Wow this is finished just like that. It's really over just like that. You know what I'm saying because now that was on new normal this night you gotTa Control You. GotTa go register with the Megan's law every three months. You know it was like that's the new the new normal and that was crazy. It's gone just like that. So here we were with this routine for the last seven years and then when they assist gone he's like I would do I do now right. It's weird because for a lot of people. Your name is still messed up you. They still know this is a gigantic national story. So even as your vacated and exonerated are you showing up for some jobs. They're like Oh that's the central Park Jagger. Oh No we tried. I mean I went for a Job. I going to say who was and they would me. And even though said exonerated. I didn't get the job because of that. And the reason why I found out was because the person who gave me the reference for their as so when she went to hr and she questioned him. They told her and she said you can't do that. That's wrong and so then. They offered me the job but I was like. I don't want it. I'm fine because I don't know what the setup is right right right An- An- and so here we was there. Were still articles being written about us to say that we would not to say that we didn't deserve payout to serve to say that you know. Don't be so fast you know here was Linda Fifteen. Oh Ken Burns is going to do this. Doc and all these facts having become out yet we have a civil suit pendant when all this stuff comes out. Everybody's GonNa see the truth so there was this big backlash all the way up to two thousand twelve right right. It wasn't until the DOC drops and then people go. Wow yeah that's not change. Everything doctrines everything. That's that's one thing that's beautiful about the dog and also when they see us. Is that the the? Both pieces can live on their own But also the dot can be like a precursor or pre lose to the to the actual retelling of actual actors and actresses in. When they see US I mean. I love the Ken Burns piece. I was hurt by the ending. Because they made it like their free. Yay and I was like Whoa not free. They still walking around with this over their head. They don't have any money. They struggle to get jobs. And that's part of why I wanted to write my story because I'm like. Let's talk about the struggle to get this money may never happen. That's right. I mean we have Bloomberg. We have Bloomberg three terms and he said no and then we found out that he worked at Salomon brothers. He got fired from Salomon brothers where the Juggle worked and he received a ten million severance package. Have you ever met her? No No desire. We we used to say you know what I'm saying used to say. There's a different kind of sentiment we used to say you know. The door's always open and in reality. The door is actually always open. I don't want to say we used to say. Tha Tha that close. What I'M GONNA say why I'M GONNA say why say right. I say that. Because if she if she somehow gets it in her mind the reality of how this system messed us up will WANNA meet but if she continues to believe the narrative that the system has fed her. You know they're telling her Don't believe with your say. Your injuries are not consistent with a single perpetrator. Do you know or have you seen. The Monster is acts of Matias. Reyes I mean he was a serial rapist. Who was doing this before and after Kalra this happened. There was a particular ammo that he used that was consistent in this situation. I mean there's no are you saying you don't WanNa meet her. Nope not at all because at the end of the day here. We were saying that the door was open now recently. She comes out as she says well. I don't believe that the police Do their jobs so now she started taking a stance with them. It's none to talk about it anymore. Yeah Yeah She's definitely aligned. And that's the part. She has the mark where I initially said. Because She's aligned herself with that she's she's she's bought it. Hook line and sinker in at this point. That may be the only thing that she can hold onto and she's no longer because it's too tragic young. No it's not even. It's too tragic for the reality of what really happened to be. The system messed up right that her real the real perpetrator was left to commit more crime and she says that part is difficult you know. She says that these are the people that she has been in contact with. These are the people who have been telling the narrative these are friends. She believes him and if she doesn't believe in fully she does she doesn't want to. She doesn't want them to be proven wrong. She wants to believe that they did the right thing. So there it is it is it. Is it strange to see you know the way that Donald Trump was acting when you guys were on trial? And now he's the president and it's just more of the same at a different scale Is that strange to you. Nope not at all we call the in nine hundred eighty nine nineteen ninety and nobody wants to believe her you call what we called what he was and how he was and at the end of the day he proved us right and we sat through all these years of our famous celebrities smiling and his face getting these photo opportunities with them and and I felt disrespected. Here was this mad call for the death of Fourteen fifteen sixteen year old babies right and then I gotta turn around and see him posing in pitches with some favorite celebrity fans. That's that's a hard. That was hard to digest. I mean even like one of my most favorite hip hop parties is not is and I remember when That's on what he says. I want to be rich or something like that. Like trump and mall and maple. You know I was just like I. Of course I know that everybody's now disassociate themselves with trump the clown you just didn't you didn't know that he was one. They're going to be the president of the United States right. That's still hard to digest. Swallow because you know for those people who voted for him they some of them have this kind of resolve that no. Just give them a chance. He'll he's GONNA become presidential and I'm like if your seventy plus years old a good change you are whatever you show what you are. This is the fabric of your being. You are nothing more or less than what you're showing at thirty five. It's hard to change policy seventy so when we last spoke. Yousef you said that. I haven't had a good night's sleep in decades. Sir How are you now? I think that may be true. Still really yeah you know with what it is like even with a nice house in the different trinkets so to speak. You know if mom wood floors creak. My mind isn't thinking the house is settling mine is thinking. Somebody bypass my security. I gotTa grab the Shotgun. Somebody's somebody's coming because it's your in the prison mindset but in that part is a part of who I am. I think that that part will never leave because there has not been a restoration to that trauma. We went through it. We experienced it. We survived you know but when we we've been able to survive we've been able to step forward in spite of you know twenty Montana says right why you got all this surveillance in all these cameras because it makes me helps me sleep good at night. My House is the same way I I. Can't I mean when I didn't have accused security system? They were guns right and is just a New Yorker in those deeper than that. I mean from being incarcerated from being useless. Got A death letter that says thirty years from. Now somebody's GonNa come in tap you on your shoulder and they might ask me. It might be at the moment that they come in to serve justice and so now I have all these cameras around my house and the kids like oh I mean. Somebody opens the door. My House to go into garage in my alarm says garage door. I'm yelling WHO's that? What are you what are you doing? We just went into the deep freeze against okay to has to be announced. I tell my son now all the time. Listen don't just come over or don't just open doors because listen I'm tense. Not only that. I'm licensed have it like tucked into safe somewhere? You know what I'm saying. It's only like listen. I need to know who's coming in my house because like this letter If I can if I can read this letter to you so this letter was written in the twenty fifth of April of nineteen eighty nine. This that says to use of Salaam this letters to let you know that your name has been placed on the list of enemies of society by the Citizens Army New York City branch. You made a decision when you became one of the pack that decided the Central Asia arena and decided to attack violate honest citizens. Who Happen to be in a park so just remember that even twenty to thirty years from now some people will never forget. It may be the one time that you don't check your back. Is the one time that somebody might be there to say. Hello this was sent to all of us. I HAVE COPIES. I kept my dad. I kept them. I kept the copies. You see what I'm saying and so this. This is a devastation that you never remove yourself from you like I remember that. I'm looking at folks and I could be walking down the block In a moment and all of a sudden I catch. Somebody's looking at me and his immediately war thirty this a friend or foe right. A lot of people have come up to me. Is it man? I love the way you put your tied together with that shirt. Now I'm like Oh okay thank you. You know what I'm saying but that realities. They're very real experience. That was had that will. Never be disassociated from that will always be a part of we are always be a part of it Thank you thank you thank you. Is there anything else that you want to say? I'm appreciative of where we are now. In Our story in our lives I feel like we are. This is a second lease on life right. The Globe is giving us love and respect and I think that that is magnificent that that that positioning of swords gives you a different vantage point. That was needed because for you to be a fourteen. Fifteen and sixteen year old child seen as a pariah that is the world. Your neighborhood is the world in now for the whole world to see you as a hero. Even though there's some folks here in there that might have their comments and things like that. You know The beauty is that we can still remain noble. We could be honorable. And which engine people's minds and hearts and we're changing the criminal justice system with this when they see us sees. Oh being planted those individuals that are going to come and say I want to be a detective. I want to be a police officer. I WANNA be a judge. I want to be a forensic scientist. I want to be a journalist. They're using all of these past experiences in saying I do not want to be that type of individual who thirty years from now in my career. I'm on the wrong side of history. I want to be on the right side of history and so these stories. These experiences these these brilliant retailing's I think giving people the equipment that they need an toolkit to push us all into a better space in tomorrow. Thanks to us if Raymond for a great interview and thanks to you for listening Toray show gives you fuel to power your dreams because you can use your dreams like a rocket ship to blast you into a life. You never imagined you can make your dreams a reality and this show can help. Amman twitter at Taurean on Instagram at Tora show. Please leave a review on itunes. It really helps and tell your friends about the show. Toray shows written by me to array and produced by Jackie Gareth. Mono our editors Brandon Taegu and our photographer is chuck. Marcus were distributed by entertainment and we will be back next Wednesday. No doubt with another amazing person because the man can't shut us down. This is a. cast recommends every week. We pick one of our favorite shows and this is one. We think you're going to love. Hello I'm Dan Pelagreeny. I'm the host of everything iconic with Danny Pellegrino. Look if you like reality. Tv and pop culture. I think he might like my podcast. I break down your Fav- Bravo shows and I also feature exclusive interviews with amazing celebrities like real housewives from every city and icons like Fran Drescher Marcia Gay Harden in general if you at and so many more this week I have the legendary Katy Kirk on the show so be sure to follow me on social media at Danie Pellegrino and subscribing listen everything iconic on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts. Cast is home to the biggest podcasts from the US and around the world. Subscribe to this show and hundreds more. Now the Acosta's or wherever you get your podcasts.

Yusef Salaam Raymond Santana C America Raymond Santana Eva du Vernay US New York City Central Park New York Linda Fairstein Central Park Five Bill de Blasio rape Central Park Georgia Playboy magazine Atlanta Atlassian
How Central Park Works

Stuff You Should Know

56:20 min | 1 year ago

How Central Park Works

"Hey, everyone, you know, sometimes things don't go your way. But what really matters of the choices you make when the odds are against you. There's a new show on our network called the brink in host aerial Casten. Jonathan Strickland share the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side. It's pretty great. You can learn about how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire about that. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome stuff. You should know from how stuff works dot com. Hey, invoking to the podcast. I'm Josh Clark with Charles w Chuck Brighton. Jerry rolling over there. This is stuff. You should know. Was that a real staredown? Yeah. Jerry, Jerry, one because I was like I'm time for this any longer. That's pretty funny because this just sort of all the three of us. You guys are having staredown over nothing. You just over there. Grumpy like, KOMO gluco. I was just doing my saying. And then all I heard from you as nice job, Jerry. So like, you could see it share you gave it to her. I mean, Jerry one my friend, Billy the one who passed away from MS s that I talked about he and I used to do staring contest. But it was a certain face. We had to make okay, and you had to not laugh that was our steering contract. So we both make the certain face that he invented in the first one was to break in laugh, which was always me. Can you can I see the face? No, okay. That's fine. I've retired. I understand. Okay. Well, thanks for the story. Oh, by the way, very special listener mail coming up today everyone stick around for that. Whoa. Sarah, the amazing eleven-year-old fan. Eleven and he's reappeared everybody gosh, so delightful to hear from her. All right. So well, let's just get through this then central park central park. It's huge New York. In New York. It square. It's Rick Tanggula, Charles. All right. So let's talk about New York in. Between eighteen twenty one and eighteen fifty five. All right. The population of New York grew four times its size over that thirty four year period from fifteen people to sixty and they were crowded and people started moving further and further north like I like that was a funny joke. I just made. But you just said that the population of New York quadrupled over thirty years now thirty four years, and, you know, New York started at the south as far as people living there and kept going further and further north and Manhattan wise shirt to New York state come on. No, nobody Brooklyn to and poughkeepsie. No, no, sure. All the boroughs, the we're talking about the island of Manhattan, right? And things got so crowded that people would gather in scimitar Aries to socialize. Yeah. Those really weird. So we've talked about that before we like, I don't remember what episode was, but we saw this stuff. It might be ways or something park pizza. It might have been tombstones or something because we talked about cemeteries being designed to be park like because people will go have picnics and some men and be so all the material that has to do with central park makes it sound like that's all they had available where cemeteries if they wanted to go hang out and have picnics and Greenspace. Yeah. It was involuntary. Or if it was designed that way, you're both. But yeah, they it was either a a tenement or a commercial district or the cemetery. That was what you had if you were outdoors. Yeah. And I think I think it's not in silly. That's all you had. But like, maybe all you had that was close in accessible, sure. Like the cemetery is, you know, six blocks from my apartment, right? And also as you will learn much of. Mm not northern Manhattan. But yeah. Counting northern Manhattan, central Manhattan. Right. Where central park now is was gross swampland swampy rocky. You're not you're hanging out there. Anyway. Yeah. Forget the eighteen twenties. Let's go back to point six million years ago. Chuck, oh, there was an ice sheet over New York state that was two miles thick and it just so happened to terminate the termination edge the bowl the edge of it. Sure. Light went right through the bottom of Manhattan went through Brooklyn. And actually like all the heights and hills in in Brooklyn, that's because a that's actual hills right because glacier, pushed the ground up there. Because that's where it stopped growing forward. But as the glaciers were moving down south from the north they were pushing boulders and rocks and stones everywhere, and where they ended up and then finally retreated from they left all that stuff. We why they're bold. Others in central park. There used to be a lot more boulders. They're so much. So that the lane was just basically considered virtually unusable. Yeah. They weren't that area was not being developed anyway, which may it made it a a difficult task. But it made it sort of the only place if he wanted to build a seven hundred plus acre park that was kind of the place to go, right? And so they did want to build a park because again, if you wanted to go outside and hang out and have a picnic yet to go to Greenwood cemetery in Brooklyn that was basically it. So the people who were living in New York wanted this. But then also the upper society, I guess the super wealthy. Yeah. We're like, yeah. Yeah. This'll put our town on the map, man. London's got high park. Paris has won all the great cities have a great park. But there's not one in the United States. Let's build it in New York. Yes. You know, that was was later like initially. There was no call for a park. I mean, it took forty or fifty years. Years of lots of inhabitants to to get this idea. The original city plan in eighteen eleven had no mention of any park, but for you city planning nerds. I know, you know, this already if you're sending planning nerd, but John Randall junior he was the man who laid out that the grid for New York City, very famously Esau documentary on it, a really, yeah, it's amazing. He drove these iron. I believe iron bolts into the ground with his fingers his bare hands it was a surveying bolt. And it was to map out that that grid like every block. Can't you see one still there's one in central park that they found that don't think they found any other ones in central park, but it had nothing to do with central part? Because this is like a good fifty sixty years before they even thought of forty years before they even thought of central it was like, maybe this is part of the grid street grid. Yeah. So there's one in a boulder that I mean, I'm not gonna say where it is. Oh, you got to go find. Well. That's they try to keep it on the down low as far as the actual GPS coordinates. These people that hunted it down and found it to think a Speakeasy, but sorta. Stumps Bolton stone, and you will become the king of New York if you can pull it out, you should not dare nothing should be there for attorney. But there's there's supposedly more of them. And there are people that go around try and find these is kind of neat. Yeah. It is neat. So I guess I am a city planning at heart. I have to say I came across the great site called ephemeral, New York that documents like all the New York that's been lost and built over and changed over time. That's cool. They have a great website go check it out. 'cause we got some some good stuff from them for this episode. All right. So where we left off before my nerdy. Segue. Was you were talking about wealthy New Yorker saying we wanna park there's a more cynical view that was we wanna park in. That would also greatly increase increase the land value around the park, right where we own houses. Yeah. Because just like today the area around central park was very well heeled. While in some places, right and other places not at all in the place where this were what central park is. Now, there was a lot of very low income people living there, so you have very rich people surrounding very low income people, which I'm guessing made the low income people very nervous and eventually justifiably so because the low income people are the ones who had to move to make the park initially for the rich people she go and talk about that what Seneca village. Yeah in well, they're Sinica village. And then they're largely Irish and German immigrants incentive ca village. Well, and all over Seneca village is only one small part of of this immigrant housing that was sort of around the park that of course, when you know, you know, what imminent domain is if the city wants to build the park there. They're going to get that land one way or the other. Yeah. The New York legislature the state legislature said, Yep. New York City, you can exercise them into main over that and take whatever lane. And do you want? You got to pay him fair market value, which is up for debate. If it was actually fair, but those people have to move whether they like it or not, right? So Seneca village was. Founded in eighteen twenty five there was a couple in eighteen twenty four named John Elizabeth Whitehead who bought no they owned farmland. Oh, okay. All right. I thought they don't the land for a long time. Now, they bought farmland between eighty second eighth street and then between eighteen twenty five and eighteen thirty two started selling it off. Okay. And they sold fifty parcels of that land half of which went to people of African descent, which was very unusual at the time to say, the least it was. And so like basically out of this out of the sale of lots over this period of time, the Seneca village started very quickly. The the people who live there built a house or a school churches couple churches houses, and like this village developed this community of so there's a couple of things I was remarkable about Seneca village one. These were African American landowners, which was very unusual at the time because even at this time slavery was still on the books legal in New York. And these were freed or unin slaved African Americans who owned land which men if they own two hundred and fifty dollars worth of land. They could vote which would have made them like like there were a hundred African Americans could vote at this time because that's how that's how how few of them actually owned land ten percent of those people lived in Seneca village, really unusual spot. But it was also an usual because it was a place where African Americans and European settlers or European immigrants live together like lived in this community together. Yeah. But should say y'all said to jump through certain other hoops to vote wasn't quite as simple as owning land. Because that would be I guess too easy for them back then which was as to say, not easy at all. But they still said, no, there's some other things you still gotta do to vote. Sure, we mentioned the other stuff too and big shoutout to Andrew William. He was the first man of African descent who bought. Land that would become Seneca village in September eighteen twenty five, but like you said it was Irish and German immigrants moved in there as well. And they were welcomed in. It was biology counts a multicultural society that got along well with one another when to the same church. Yeah. That's enormous. Pretty amazing buried in the same graveyard. There was a midwife there who lived in the village and she delivered babies of any ethnicity or race. Yeah. No one knows why it's called Sinica village on most maps is known as your Bill. I thought that was a different place that the York field people moved up to Seneca village after they got moved out. Well, your fill that was another Yorktown. Oh, that's what I'm thinking. But this was on maps as your Ville. And no one knows if it was a distortion of Senegal or if it might have been code for the underground railroad. It's another theory. Another theory is that it was derogatory somehow because areas where? African immigrants would live. They would call a bad names of just whatever I see. So who knows no one knows for sure where Seneca village came from the name at least go to was interesting. So sounds like Seneca villages. Great. It was it must have had fortune smiling on it throughout it's time. Right. Not true now. So setting village was in the way of the proposed park. Right. So let's get we'll just go ahead and cut to the chase here. Seneca village was they had to move which is sad because the community ended then when the when the state and the city moved in and said, this is this a city Leonel. You guys will have to move here. Some money for your land the community broke up. It didn't resettle a reform elsewhere. It was like ephemeral like that ephemeral New York site. It was it lasted for a few decades. Yeah. He knows peaceful and harmonious, and then it was gone because they had to move to make way for central park. Yeah. It took a couple of years of fighting the law. But eventually the law one out, and it was a this called in this article a violent clearing of Seneca village, like basically sent cops in there with their batons and like physically removed two people. Yeah. And there was a a big kind of media blitz in favor of moving everybody out. They were you know, derided as a shanty town of squatters and stuff like that. Yeah. Despite the fact that most of the people who live there are a lot of people who live their own their land in their houses and head for decades. Then they were they had just as much right to be there as anybody else, but the popular opinion of the public at the time was they were just squatting, and they should be forced to move. And it was totally justifiable that come in with police baton to clear them off the land in two thousand eleven that sort of weird silver lining is the institute for the exploration of Seneca village history. Got permission after ten years of trying. The central park conservancy to excavate a couple of sites in the village. And they went in there and excavated excavated two different homesites in on one. They found some artifacts. But it was clear that it had been already buried under central park. Whatever we've been built central park. Right. They they'd already dug it up when they did. Yeah. Yeah. The other one though was original. And they found the original soil of Seneca village at the former yard of Nancy more. Yeah. For t- neat, and they have two hundred and fifty bags of material to analyze now and soil samples and some artifacts to see what life was really like back, then so pretty cool. So they better get to it. That's right. I want we take a break. And then come back and talk about the puck K. Is it in Boston New? Yeah. What happened there? Hi, Steffi Chanel listeners. It's me, Josh. And I've just released a new ten part podcast series. It's called the end of the world with Josh Clark. It explores some very big questions. Like are we alone in the universe? And if we are alone. Why is that where we always alone or do the other intelligent life die off? And if that's the case does that mean, we will to it's kind of like humanity is woken up in the universe. In realized that we don't know where we are how we got here. Yes. It does sound like it might be a bit of a Downer. And it is some heavy stuff that it covers. But I'm hearing from a lot of people that it's actually very inspiring. And I'm very happy to hear that. Because that's what it's supposed to be. So if you're into deeply researched super interesting stuff, as I know you are in check out my series the end of the world with Josh Clark. You can find it on apple podcasts, the iheartradio app everywhere. You get podcast. And if you like it lead me rating in a review. And if you'd like join the conversation on social follow hashtag e OT w Josh Clark, and you'll find it on just about every platform and now back to everyone's favourite stuff. You should know. All right, choke. So I think by eighteen fifty three their head. I think in the eighteen fifties IRS like this drumbeat to have a park. Everybody wanted to park. Yeah. William Cullen Bryant was one of the big names who edited the Evening Post, which is now the New York Post, and he was a well known poet at the time in a beloved figure, but he definitely used the post as a platform to advocate for this Greenspace. Now, again, there's a lot of understanding in this day in age that the wealthiest New Yorkers wanted this park for themselves, basically. Yes, they wanted their new city that they had built to two rival Paris or London and needed a park. They wanted to go show off their carriages in the park, but they also advocated publicly for the park for the the working classes the middle class. They should have a place to to come and hang out in this. You know, this is America. Of course, everyone will be well. Adam it's a public park. It will be America's first landscaped public park. And so people really kinda got on board with this in by eighteen though that was kind of ally it was at least at first, but by eighteen fifty three I believe work started. There was a central park that had been designated land been designated for the central park by then right, right? And they had a contest a believe it was the first design contest in the country. A lot of firsts that said designer park. You gotta have a parade ground. Gotta principal fountain. Right. Gotta have a lookout tower got a skating arena. Sure got four cross streets K because people still gotta get through there somehow and in a palace. I'm sorry place for or Palestine not for an exhibition or a concert hall. Right. Very specific rules for this design contest. That. That was won by two gentlemen. Very famous now gentleman named Frederick law own stead and Calvert Vaux, I'm gonna VO. Okay. B U X. Yeah. Vow Vour VO, but definitely not vox vow. Always silent. Yeah. Those two submitted something called the greensward plan, and they won like that name and they won for a couple of reasons. One. Frederick law own stead was the superintendent of central park at the time probably didn't hurt. No. But he wasn't a shoe. And I believe his boss. I can't remember what position is boss would have had his boss submitted a plan to apparently, he invo they're playing this greens were plan that they submitted was just so obviously head and shoulders above every other design that was submitted that it was just clear like from the outset. Yes. These guys should win. And it was considered a a a work of art still to this day. Although they actually went onto design prospect park in Brooklyn lovely that's supposedly they're masterpiece over central park is prospect park. I mean, I love them both. Yeah. They're both great. I've never been to either of them. That's not true. No. I swear to God. I've never I park with you before. But I mean what? So okay, I walked like fifteen paces in central park. Right. It was just like we weren't in there for. Along right. That's that's really the only. Yes, I've never been in prospect park. Boy, I have explored. There's so much of it. But I bet you I've explored seventy five percent of the bottom fifty percent of central park. Well, I haven't been over like eighty sixth street a lot north of that. But that's where it gets a little more wild anyway. And that wild like the parties. But a little more little more wild as far as the design goes. Well, they're purposely. Yes, right. Okay. I'm glad you said perfectly because supposedly the bottom half of central park. So the part of the park itself has meant to vote New York state the bottom ham is much more urban refined trimmed I dunno. Sure. And it's been to reflect New York City, then as you get further up in the park. It's a little more wild. There's parties and coyotes all you know, poughkeepsie you've never been to Bethesda fountain. I don't believe I have I've seen ever been old house. Gating rink so many episodes of order I can't distinguish reality from fantasy. Oh, man. I'm like, I'm going into my memory. I'm like, okay. You're right is Lennie Briscoe standing there. So TV I've never seen an episode of that. So I guess we're even. Yeah. The show you've never seen an episode of the ten thousand episodes of law and order now. Oh, you're missing out, Chris noth, and what was Prisco's name Jerry Orbach, those two. Yeah. Benjamin Bratt was a close second to the Chris. No, Jerry Orbach thing. And then it just keeps going on like they were so good at all of them were just a mania. But yeah, a lot of stuff took place in central park. So I feel like I've been there. Here's what you do Minh. Next time. We go to New York. I know that we typically stay downtown stay up by the park. Well, let's just like get out in it. I've developed a taste for the Upper West side. But but but not the park. Right. You're so close I will go out. I'll take a hillock up. Out of my way, I like Lower East Side and Upper West side of my two favorites in New York Hatton. Interesting. Yeah. What you like lower side. I like it. All man. Oh, I mean, my very favorite part of New York York's the west village for shows. Nice. But I like the recited like it in the east village, still grungy. Is there such a thing as the lower west side Wall Street now like well? I mean, Wall Street's all the way down, but I would say like. I mean, I don't think it's called the lower west side. But like the meatpacking district. Okay. Yeah. Like like the high line. That's probably lower west side. Really great. Art galleries in the meat pack. Yeah. Oh, man play. When I first started going, New York that was when it was still shady of there, and like you would walk through like blocks and blocks of industrial meatpacking plants to get to the one bar that was opened the known art of Giuliani came in different clean, the place up. Well, just thank God for him. Right. So the design of central park greensward. Oh, yeah. Like if so much information to go right now should this two parter. I don't know let me ask you has our podcast gotten more conversational. This question aside. Hesitant. I don't know. Okay. I think we've always been conversational. Yeah. But I mean like, this seems like a pinnacle of conversation all let me say this. I think episodes one through four fifty or less conversations than four fifty through twelve hundred. Okay. But what about what about twelve hundred on? I don't know. All right. The greensward plan. If you didn't know anything about central park, you may be under the misconception that they just sort of squared it off in rake some things around and and it was like there's the park, right? And like, let's just protect the screen space. But it was highly highly highly designed, oh, yeah. And apparently, they used as much explosives as would later be used at the battle of Gettysburg supposedly more to blast away rock and move that rock can remember the glacier that moved all that down. That's a big problem when you're trying to build a park. Like planted hundreds of thousands of trees swamps that they couldn't drain they build in further to build like. Yeah. So it was and I don't think anyone really thinks that like, oh, they just walled it up and said now we have a park. But I don't think I even realized how highly it was designed, and which is probably a testament to their design because when you walk around your dislike it all fits, right? That's I mean, that's the thing. Like, they're they went to a lot of trouble to make it look so naturalistic that you just assume that that's what the land always look for and central park is actually highly managed highly designed Greenspace yet exists in rectangle that when you're in the center of it from my from what I've seen in order. You can't tell that. You're you're like in the middle of the city and that like, the the the roads, none of them are straight. They're all meant to curve. There's meadows that kind of like. Go out of sight, and there's woods the ramble like the whole would walk and all that all of its designed to just completely take you out of the city and plop you into this this world, but it's just so well done in so natural that it seems like that's just what this patch of land. Always looked like well in cool that like even in an era today where that land is the most valuable land on the planet. Maybe that they have protected those eight hundred plus acres now and said, you're not I don't care how much money you have. You're not gonna LOP off. Just no I don't we started at ninety fifth street instead. Right. Then like, what's it gonna hurt? Just we could really use that area. But no is protected. Did you hear like the dude badeah two hundred and fifty eight million dollar penthouse on central park? Yeah. So yeah, I can't imagine house right ever sold in America in America. Yeah. So but says the mountain before we relieve that beautiful beautiful. The phone work of art yet with terrorists it is a two tiered. Let's kind of on the cool things like it sits low, and you can walk from from the top half of it and just kind of gays out upon that in the pond right behind it. And then walk down the stairs and here live music almost every day of the week. It feels like, but that was designed by Emma. Stebbins in America artists was called the angel of the waters. She was awarded that commission very famous sculptor. And we gotta gotta acknowledge her. Sure, it's beautiful when one of my favorite places in the world. I've seen it. They found a body there. So I feel like I've been to the John Lennon memorial heels you or was it with you me. 'cause I'm almost one hundred percent certain that I've been to that. I don't know. Because the only time I definitely was in central park with you will we went with a former co worker who can a baby us on an early marketing trip. Sure, remember that person. Yeah. That's the only time it was with us. Which would explain why you tried to block it from your memory? We go to strawberry fields. I don't remember. Well, then I believe I have been another time, and it would have been with you me. Then I think we did not cause if I remember correctly, it was more. Like, this other person was just like we can we get a pretzel that kind of thing. Margining? All right. So back to the design before we get to the building. They needed those four roads. Yeah. This is the big one which was huge because stead invo they sank there roads. Eight feet below the surface of the park, which really doesn't completely hide them. But they use trees and things to sort of obscure these roads. So it wouldn't just be like this another just straight, you know, cross street, right? And it really blends nicely with the park. And in fact, one of the lovelier things you can do is drive through the park. I saw that. I didn't even know that you, but I wanna Google street view of the road. And I was like, oh, yeah. Totally. I get it. Now. Like, I I got it from reading it. But then I was like my understanding this correctly. And yes, there are sunken roads through the park, which is another reason why olmstead invo one because like a so a couple other designs that I saw one was all the continents in meadow form. Oh, interesting. Okay. Interesting. But also. Terrible. And then somebody just draw drew a pyramid on a piece of paper. Apparently was like boom. There's my there's my submission. So like, they didn't have the most competition, but way, again when they were like, sunken, roads, meadows and stuff like that. It was it was very clear that they had the right vision. You know, the movie Arthur the deadly Moore movie. Yeah, they drive to the park in the beginning of that movie because he says Dr the puck vitim, and you know, I love Jerry's laughing. You know, I love the puck. Yeah. D- me. Russell brand. You know husband was in that one. That's right. I never saw it couldn't do it. I saw the Heisman part just queued that up. No. I just went to the movies waited went in watched Hodgman. Twenty thousand workers worked on central park Irish labourers German gardeners. Stone native Stonecutters native-born Stonecutters and. What does say how many? Yeah. Two hundred seventy thousand trees in trubs were planted. Yep. They move at the beginning. They moved like six million cubic feet of earth in out. That's crazy. Yeah. Just the the number of trees, and shrubs that were planted just mind boggling, and it was extremely expensive to there was something like a five million dollar price tag just to acquire the land. Yeah. Supposedly that's three times higher than what they projected the actual park was going to cost. Yeah. So that's like a hundred and fifty million dollars today, man. This is at a time when you know that was a that was a bunch of money to bash. But it was also I believe there's a financial panic that really made people say like, what's this is a crazy amount of money. What are we doing? But they pressed on the civil war broke out during during this the conduction, and so construction kind of tapered off for a while. And they went and fought the war, then everybody came back, and when they came back, they brought with them an understanding of explosives so that they were able to blow away rock a lot more easily than they were a war. If for sure and there is a of false rumor or a myth that is that what bridges at one of them was supposedly made of cannonballs. Yeah. The heart bridge. I can't remember what it was something bow bridge. Vo bridge the bow bridge is that the bow bridge. Yeah. It was supposedly up until like nineteen seventy four like every book. You could read said they had giant cannibals at his found at as as its foundation has like ball bearings. Because it was like expanded in contract. It so much because of the winters. No cannibals don't they did a renovation on it. So they're building this thing. They finally in eighteen fifty nine in the winter of eighteen fifty nine is when it first opened for public use and by eighteen sixty five that park received more than seven million visitors a year as a lot. But like you said that we need to follow up on it. I they had a bunch of rules in place that. Kind of kept it for the wealthier New Yorkers for sure. So like the history of central park is actually a history of class struggle in New York big time. And when it when it opened initially it was kind of like, thanks for the park chumps the taxpayer money. Yeah. And it was like if there was any kind of vent herb or orchestra band or anything like that it took place from Monday to Saturday because if you were labor if you're part of the working class the only day of the week, you had off was Sunday carriages were very much welcomed, and they made up something like fifty or sixty percent of the visitors arrived in carriages yet in the first decade. Fifty percent were in carriages. But like five percent of New Yorkers were wealthy enough to afford care. That says it all right? Exactly. So basically, it was kind of like a stay out kind of thing. They had a ban on group picnics. Yeah. That was a big ones though. Like, all these, you know, big immigrant. Families that love to get together. In large groups. None of that. Couldn't do it. Go to the cemetery. You couldn't ride around in a work cart? So like, yeah. Like if you had a high struck. Yeah. Sorry. Like you wanted to put your family in it to take him out for a Sunday drive note. None of those you had a nice carriage. So they're always all these rules that were enforced for a little while. And then finally the rest of New York, the other New Yorkers said, this is B S. Yeah. Let's let's loosen these up a little bit and they finally petitioned for some changes in central park. Finally in the eighteen seventies became a true public park. Yes. Like little by little us. When it started to ease on some of these rules, apparently olmstead was not a fan of children traipsing all over the grass. So he would have been none too pleased with family picnics and all of it on the. Great lawn. Yeah. Obviously that changed over the years as well. And since you know, mid eighteen seventy five in on it's been a series of progressive minded, people that have opened up the park in democratized it decades and decades, but it's also been kind of this push and pull like, okay how much for the people? Should we add some like a swimming pool? Yeah. Or like some like should we put the baseball stadium here? That was a proposal at one point in time. And they're like, no, let's not let's not go that far toward the people by softball fields said, okay? Maybe one or two those and then it would kind of go back. You know, like, no the people who screwed it up a little bit. So let's take it over and and make up some more rules, and it just keeps going back and forth. Yeah. Tween too much for the people, and the people are taking it for granted to too strict, and we need to kind of loosen it up a little bit just kind of went back and forth like that. And it's still doing that today. Yeah. And also, I think like. The the greens word plan was so revered it was sort of like the constitution. It was like for decades and decades, they would go back to that original plan and think about like, well, this isn't what they intended right? Yeah. Progressive sort of got on board. We're like, well, we can actually alter this. All right. Keep the spirit of the park and just make it more accessible because softball fields or great. There's a really good example of all this in the casino story. Yeah. So there is this thing called the ladies refreshment saloon. I think there was an original Calvert Vaux building one of the buildings. He built it looks like in upstate New York cottage. Very like a wealthy person's cottage house in New York is beautiful little house and originally if you're a woman who was unescorted by a man to central park. This is the place you could go and get a drink and relax chill out because no men were allowed. It was just the the ladies refreshment saloon, right? And then overtime men started to be allowed in it became like an actual restaurant. And then in the twenties, I think New York got a mayor who is basically a gangster named Jimmy wa-. Walker gentlemen, Jimmy Walker and he was not Jimmy Walker. No, not different Jimmy walk. Yeah. And he was super in favor of Speakeasy and gambling all this stuff. And he helped make the casino or the this refreshment saloon into what was known as the casino. There wasn't actual gambling there. But it was like the hottest nightclub in New York was in this original eighteen sixties building in central park. Yeah. He said, let's take the ladies refreshment salon and make it the opposite of that. Right. Exactly. And so during the day, it was a restaurant that was open to all. But it was basically like a Neiman Marcus cafe where like the prices were. So outrageously high that the average person couldn't afford this stuff that was like coffee for forty cents a Cup at a time. When coffee was like, a nickel everywhere else. So, you know, eight times the normal rate for just a Cup of coffee. Yeah. Which it's kind of like what's not good for public park. But. It was open everybody until night came then it was an exclusive nightclub like you could not get in unless you were on the list. Yeah. And there was like partying like this for years throughout the roaring twenties. And then finally when Jimmy Walker was no longer mayor. He was toppled for corruption the casino became a symbol for the people taking back New York and their park. Yeah. And so mayor LaGuardia appointed a guy named Robert Moses who became the parks Commissioner decades as a big deal 'em, Robert Moses lobbied to tear the casino down. Yeah. He did a lot. Robert Moses, he built twenty playgrounds on the periphery. He renovated the zoo that I think had been around since eighteen seventy one and was and still is very popular. He was the first one to accommodate automobiles. He added athletic fields benefactors private benefactors in the fifties. And sixties. Which was during his tenure helped contribute to the the skating rink a woman rank Alaska, Rankin pool, the boat houses, the chess and checkers house ballfields on the great lawn. Like, he really made a lot of changes for like the people. Right. So yeah, they took the park back. And he actually he was a huge advocate for the park in. It had kind of started to fall into decay around the turn of the twentieth century. And when he came in in nineteen thirty four he just completely turned it around like, you said added all this stuff. But also renovated it and basically restored it back to its original glory. And so Robert Moses was great. He saved central park the first time the first time, but when he left in what did you say nineteen sixty. Yeah. The park really served to fall the pieces because there was no champion. They're like, Robert Moses. There's also no plan in place. And there was also no money new. Yeah. Basically the way that I saw. New York abdicated its stewardship of central park. Basically said this whatever we're not paying attention to this anymore. And it went to poop very quickly. All right. Well, let's take a break there. And we'll come back and finish up from nineteen sixty two today. Do. Don'the? It's the wrong burgundy podcast. It's the Ron burgundy podcast. Guess what? I got up, and you don't guess what? I got up podcast, and you don't Ron burgundy. Puck cast. Join me Ron burgundy on the run burgundy podcast driven by safe auto, the only car insurance company I'll ever use it takes three minutes. And let's face it. That's about all the time. Any of us should spin with a car insurance company. All right. So the park is going downhill in the nineteen sixties and seventies. We mentioned a few reasons another big reason was that. There was no no ownership. No one had ultimate responsibility. Right. Like, I feel like the buck was being passed all over the city. Holy no, one was happy about it. But there was no body in place to say, no, this is we gotta fix this now. And if you look pictures of central park in the seventies, man. Oh, yeah. And I mean, it was like all of New York. It wouldn't look like a wasteland. It was like the warriors in there. Yeah. Like, these classic places like the boat house and the skating rink or like graffitied and like trash everywhere just hard to believe broken. All replace the statue was being vandalized. It's like it is it is it's sad to see. But it's also unbelievable to see now that you know, what central park looks like just how bad it was in the seventies and eighties and interest sixties. It was actually there wasn't. Like, a Robert Moses champion, and it was starting to go downhill, but it was nothing like it was when they finally in the seventies. Where his like, whatever forget it. And it was kind of like that broken windows theory, leasing where once once you once you reach tipping point as it were it just kind of all just turns to garbage and that's central park in the seventies. And eighties was a great example of that. And it was considered like a really dangerous place that you did not want to be no after dark, and there was that very famous central park five case. Yeah. And everybody just found it so easy to believe that some teenagers had brutally attacked a woman left her for dead because it was central park. Yeah. I mean, you can't even be in there at certain hours now like they clear the park out. And I know this because I spent the night in the park for Shakespeare in the park tickets any lineup you hang out and party. With people right in line until I can't remember what time it was. But something like two AM and the cops come around, and they say everybody get up, and they walk you in order out onto the sidewalk in right there on I don't know if it was the east or west side, but they basically move the entire line out of the park. And then then you're sleeping on the sidewalk all night. And then in the morning, they come back, and they move you all back into the park right in line. And everyone just does it must have been a hell of a Shakespeare play. It was the most legendary what was wasn't the Segel every told you about that the Siegel? That's like Chekhov or something. Yeah. It doesn't mean. Everything is Shakespeare, it's just kind of makes it sound like that's just the name of the program. But it's this was the Siegel. Yeah. And it was the CEO with Kevin Kline Meryl Streep enjoyed John Goodman and Christopher Walken. Wow. Dilip Seymour Hoffman and George Seagal Natalie Portman. Wow. And. There was like two more directed by Mike Nichols. It was like one of the most legendary performances ever bet. And that's the one where I saw James Lipton wearing a inside the actors studio jacket. Oh. Oh. Like, you don't need to wear that. It's like Glenn dancing walks around wearing dancing shirts. Did you know that? Oh, sure sleeveless dance. So anyway, that's what happens they move you out at night. So it's kind of fun. I highly recommend everyone doing that at some point in their life. That's a heck of a play, man. Yeah. It was it was really something else. So central park is indicate and in nineteen seventy four man. George Soros who was saves the day, the devil to some people in this country. George Soros and Richard Gilder under working with the central park community fund. Underwrote a management study nineteen seventy four by e s Savvas who was a professor public systems management at Columbia. And this was a big study that basically came away with too big clear initiatives. One was like, we need a CEO, essentially, right? Like one person one person in charge. So everyone can go like I thought he was gonna fix out thing. One person who has like a not unchecked. Authority. But just basically like, they're they're a boss. Their decision is final. Yeah. Yeah. So that was the first thing. And then the second thing was a central park board of guardians to oversee all the stuff. The guy suggested the guardian angels boo shouted down man, we should do one of those guys. Sure. Nineteen Seventy-nine though, Elizabeth Betsy Barlow who is now Rogers was a Yale educated urban planner and writer became that central park administrator, which was essentially the defacto CEO that they were looking for. And then she is the one so many people did so much great work over the years. But she really did. She was the first one to create a public private partnership to get well heeled New Yorkers involved. Yeah. And they apparently were bolstered by early successes like they went in and one of the first things they did was created a zero tolerance policy for graffiti. Garbage anything broken. If the if anybody saw anything wrong with the park, you're supposed to phone it in and they just responded immediately and fixed it literally phone it and not just phone it in right? Right. Right. Right. Or I'll be right there. I'll be right there. They and they would fix it. And they very quickly. It was the kind of thing where like if the parks already clean, you're probably going to be less likely to litter or less likely to spray paint. But if it's already spray painted, there's already some garbage you may be a little, and then you hit that like snowball thing, they kept the snowball from ever growing by being just completely vigilant, and they attracted a lot of attention improved. Like, oh, this actually we'll work and so more money started coming into kinda resurrect the park. Yeah. And in nineteen eighty she brought together a couple of groups of central park task force in the central park community fund to finally merge in create the central park conservancy, which was that citizen based board of guardians that they called for with that initial study. So they have a plan in place. Now things are getting way way better. And then in nineteen ninety eight an arrangement between the conservancy and the city of New York formalized that public private partnership. And there was a man named Douglas blonde blonde ski sure the blonds blonds who assumed her title of administrator, and he was the one that created this really innovative management innovative in its simplicity. I think because he was like here's what you need to do is we need to make it smaller. So he divided central park up into forty nine zones in every single zone had its own Gardner and its own staff. Right. And if you look at the size of central park, that's like probably a few two or three square blocks. Maybe sure per team anybody can handle that. But that's the way to do it. You know, you make it. Smaller lose also can ability to the accountability the top and then ever since then it's been humming. There's a the big thing moving forward is three hundred million dollar. What do you call it like a like a fund to keep it going into that? Yeah. Which is funny because that's double the original price in adjusted for inflation. That is funny. And in March of last year, Elizabeth Betsy another Betsy other Betsy Elizabeth Betsy Weinberg Smith became presidency o of the conservancy and all of these people that do this do it because they love the park. I mean, sure she's paid and stuff, but they're not volunteers. But it's not like I mean, it's a good position to be in. If you wanna be among the elite of New York, but all of these people were nature lovers and like park advocates. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, it's kind of the proof is in the pudding because I mean, they they've done a pretty great job and bringing central park back, especially if you go look at those pictures from the seventies and eighties. And then think about it today. Man, we see a picture from nineteen seventy five you see a law and order from nineteen ninety-five totally different. Just got one more thing. Here sheep meadow used to have sheep. Yeah. The tavern on the green the restaurant used to be where they housed, the sheep. And they were put their very purposely by olmsted to keep the grass cut, but also for aesthetics. Yeah. He said all this green everywhere bring in white and black sheep. They're like as opposed to funny ones made his his Mark is a master landscape designer. He was like a journalist and a farmer. That's what his background was he became the central park superintendent because he needed a job amazing, those that I have one last one the central park zoo started out as an animal menagerie because people would take. Unwanted exotic pets to the arsenal. And they just ended up sorting accumulating pets. I think it started with some swans and a black bear cub is how the whole thing started. If you on a more about central park there is a ton of stuff. It's so much could have been a three parter easily. You could do a lot worse than going to a federal New York and looking or go to the park. I guess you since I said ephemeral New York, it's time for a very fairy special listener mail. Yeah. This is long. I'm going to make it shorter even though of already made it shorter. But you might remember many years ago we had Sarah the amazing eleven-year-old superfan. We got a lot of letters from read some of on the air, then Sarah disappeared from us ghosted us. And. In those ten years, we would remark occasionally like whatever happened to Sarah. She got in touch last week. And it was literally one of the more exciting emails ever gotten those great. She says, hey, guys, listen to can you can your grandfather's. Dia short in your life. And this is from a while ago like two thousand nine or ten. Yeah. But that was a select episode. She heard it as a select and heard the thirteen year old version of myself get shout out. Well, guys, I'm now twenty one has been entirely too long explanation. She said her ipod broke way back then likely story. That's like the modern my daughter. My. About broke. So her ipod broke. It took a while to get back to get the smartphone. Once you got the smartphone. She listened here and there, but she said she was really busy with school. She's like I lost my self proclaimed title of superfan. Even though I dearly loved it admired you the entire time. The fun facts I learned throughout the years also came incredibly handy during my quiz bowl career. Sure. And throughout high school, so yes, I'm very much nerd currently. I'm a senior in college, which is even crazy for me to say, I'm back to being a regular listener. And boy that I miss you guys. I am so sorry we lost touch. She said I just wanted to. Thank you for continuing this podcast and consistently bringing new topics to light, you were also kind to that a little eleven year old version of myself. You inspired me to pursue every opportunity. I was given to learn you showed me that. There's always a story behind everything that I should always ask questions. And she's so got it. She got it man to go. That has always stuck with me in greatly. Shaped the person I ended a it's been amazing to watch. You all what you have? So she graduated in two thousand fifteen went on to study English and psychology at a small private liberal arts school. She traveled to Ghana she traveled to Scotland to study literature. Sure this Scotland Ghana she said aside from travel had a chance to lead on our campus was elected student government president this is all leading to like, hey, this is what happens when you listen stuff. You should know. This is advice for kids weirdly have to thank you for spring. The beginning of that leadership. It might seem like a weird thing to attribute to your podcasts. But truly have to thank you for helping development critical thinking skills early on in my education. You guys truly fostered mentality within me education has always strength. So how about that, man? She's going to grad school. Now. She doesn't know where she's applied all over the map. And she said a little scary of yields increase. She'll do great. She says I feel like your all old friends that have. Connection with and I'd love to fix that Sarah twenty one year old superfan. Thank you so much for getting back in touch. She gave a little picture. She sent a picture. This is me now just adorable adorable. I love it. Thank you very much for writing in Syria. And I would say if you like, Sarah, and you wanna get in, touch, but nobody's really likes. Nobody original eleven year old superfan turned twenty one year old successful fan. Yeah. It's this is well one day, we will read it Email called Sarah the middle aged superfan. Right. And I will be like a million close to sixty which is so weird. I won't be sixty. Now, you'll be just a few years behind me. Well, thank you against there. And if you wanna get in touch Lous, let us know how we impact your life. We'd love here in that stuff. You can go onto stiff you should know dot com. Check out our social links. I'm at the Josh Clark way dot com, and you can send us an Email stuff podcast house to forks dot com. For more on this and thousands of other topics. Visit how stuff works dot com. Hey, everybody. I wanna talk to you about your website that doesn't look good. And it's hard to program because squarespace does it better. Yeah. They do scores space. Is this amazing magical tool that you can just basically go do? And all of a sudden, you have a website to do whatever you want with. You can use it to sell stuff. You can use it to tell your world about all the great thoughts. You have. And now squarespace also offers Email campaign. So you can take your business imbroglio it. Yeah. We use squarespace ourself or very popular S Y S K live website, keeps track of all of our comings and goings on all of our live shows. And it's always a joy to go in there. And update the squarespace site because it's so easy. And it always looks so great, and it makes me feel smarter than I am. Yeah. 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central park New York City New York central park conservancy Seneca village Brooklyn America Josh Clark Jerry New York Sinica village Paris Sarah New York apple Jerry Orbach New York Post Speakeasy Chris noth
Seneca Village

Stuff You Missed in History Class

41:02 min | 2 months ago

Seneca Village

"Did you know GEICO's now offering an extra fifteen percent credit on car and motorcycle policies. That's fifteen percent on top of what Geico could already save you. So, what are you waiting for your teenager to help around the house? Okay, mom, I empty the dishwasher vacuum the basement and folded the sheets out of the dryer. What Oh, and next I'M GONNA. Clean Mountains litterbox in some kind of prank, show or something? That's a camera is that there's never been a better time to switch to GEICO. Save an extra fifteen percent when you switch by October. Seventh limitations apply visit. GEICO DOT COM for details. Welcome to stuff. You missed in History Class A production of iheartradio. Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm holly FRY and I'm Tracy be Wilson so today We're going to cover another topic that has been on my list for a while, and it's you know Tracy. I often talk about our lists and their length, and sometimes something will be on the list, and you're really into it, but then as as you're working on other projects, other things can move around. It's a very shifting list me anyway. Oh Oh me too and then my memory was jogged about this particular topic by Contemporary Television, as is often the case, specifically the Apple TV plus Animated Series Central Park. Let's show did not sponsor this episode, but it does include a song in its opening very briefly mentions the people that lived in New York Central Park before it was central park, and it kind of makes it a joke that hey, we don't talk about that This was a reference to Seneca village, and that reminder of it put it back at the top of the list for me. And Seneca village is significant because this story features a predominantly black community in New York that built itself from the ground up, but the story is also fragmented, because even though it existed at a time when it could have been fairly well documented, there was a vested interest in erasing it and we're gonNA. Talk about that, but first we will talk about the island of Manhattan. Manhattan, and how this one area of it came to be sold off in lots and thus became Seneca village, so if you're looking into the story, the story of Seneca village often is told with the beginning being the selling of land by John and Elizabeth, Whitehead. But that of course leaves out how the Whitehead's came into possession of that land so I what we really have? Have to do is talk about Manhattan. And how it went from being indigenous land to being the property of Europeans, Manhattan Island was according to the version from the point of view of Western history that you have probably heard many times before purchase from indigenous tribes in the area by Peter MINUIT, the first director of the New Netherlands Province in sixteen, twenty six in the purchase. Purchase price was according to these accounts and depending on the source you look at sixty guilders about the value of a pound and a half of silver at the time or twenty four dollars sometimes, or you'll see. It said that it was just a bunch of beads and trinkets, so this entire purchase though is a moment in history. That's difficult untangle. It's even harder to substantiate. For one. The primary source on that transaction is a letter written by Peter Schengen. Who is the representative of the states general in the assembly of the nineteen of the west India company? This is a letter. He wrote back to the west India Company and he stated quote. They have purchased the island Manhat- is from the Indians for the value of sixty guilders. But that is the entirety of the contemporary documentation that alleged purchase has also been represented in various painted depictions as the Dutch representative showing the La- A leaders a trunk of various European items extensively as goods that they were intending to trade for the land right so not that those paintings are intended to be historically accurate accounts, but even if that were the case. It's just completely muddling what the actual situation was because these depictions unsurprisingly make out those indigenous leaders as foolish enough to trade their land for beads or something, similarly worthless This hearkens back to our prior episode that we did on Thomas. Harriet who wrote the influential book, a brief entry report of the new found land of Virginia in which he characterized the indigenous population of North America, as easily awed by Europeans, and thus to manipulate, and if you recall that episode, that book was very popular in Europe and got republished a whole bunch of times, kind of became the foundation of how European saw North American indigenous. Peoples! And that frequently cited number of twenty four dollars purchase price was literally just something that got calculated out as that story was written about in subsequent years, it was an estimate by historians that then started to be relaid as though it was fact less. This whole story puts a lot of significance on one line in a letter that one line is just casually reported with no nuance, and it was written by somebody with a minimal understanding of the indigenous people. He was referring to you that understanding minimal at best I mean he really did not know a lot. I conveniently leaves out the probability that those people probably did not see the situation in the same way as the Dutch, she were seeing it as a business deal the idea of land as property something you could own was not even part of how their culture functioned is entirely possible that they will not pay. We're seeing the goods being presented by Menuet as a gift or an offering to garner permission to live on. On the same land as Illinois, Bay people who were already living in Manhattan modern. dalen obey. People have stated the memorials in New York that reference the sale of Manhattan are perpetuating a Fabricated Myth. We have talked some more about like the nuances of how a different totally different indigenous people, but still indigenous people in North America were thinking about land use in that episode earlier this year on King. Philip's war yeah yeah. It! Is that thing where obviously this whole story that we get normally is from the white European Lens, but regardless of all of that loss nuance, the Dutch did believe that they had ownership, and they made Manhattan the center of their colonization efforts, and when frustrated that lanark were not moving out, they built a wall around their new city in the sixteen sixties to keep the indigenous people out of in it also kept out the English for a time England took control of new Netherland in sixteen, Sixty four and renamed it New York. Says of course part of much bigger conflicts that were going on in the sixteen seventy s the Dutch once again regained control of the island briefly, but it ultimately reverted to English rule in the Sixteen Seventy Four Treaty of Westminster, and of course after the revolutionary war, it was part of the United States and became land that got sold off by the government in various ways, so as we're talking about the section of Manhattan that became Seneca village being land that. That was owned by John and Elizabeth Whitehead. That's the back story. Before it passed into the White European, real estate cycle, the white heads and purchased the property in eighteen, twenty four, and then they partitioned it into lots to resell the area that made up. Seneca village was about five acres in total I've also seen it listed as almost seven and it sits in the Strip between seventh and eighth avenues running from present day eighty second street to eighty ninth street. In eighteen twenty five, the lots that would become Seneca village went up for sale, and while it is very hard to imagine if you are familiar with New, York City today. That area was considered remote enough from the main city that the land there was fairly inexpensive. Fifty lots were sold in total over the course of several years. The first purchaser was Andrew Williams. He was boot black and a resident of downtown. You bought three lots for one hundred twenty five dollars. The next to people who bought lots were Epiphany Davis who bought twelve lots for five hundred seventy eight dollars and John Carter in all three of these first three buyers were black. That's notable considering that New, York's date, a final emancipate was still two years away. You'll recall of course that New York had this like very stepped in gradual way of eliminating slavery, and they weren't to the end of that yet. Two of these buyers Epiphany Davis Andrew Williams were also members of the African Methodist Episcopal. Zion Church Epiphany was actually a church trustee, and that church was the city's first black church, and at the time it was described as possibly being the largest and wealthiest black church in the country. It's unclear exactly how Williams and Davis had heard about the white whitehead's land for sale, but word clearly spread through the church a week after the first lots were sold the church itself purchased several connected lots from the Whitehead's Ame Zion lost their access to. To the city's Potter's field in eighteen, twenty, seven, when that land was reallocated to become Washington Square Park and at that point, several of the Church's lots in Seneca village or set aside to develop them into a cemetery, purchases of the white headland, made by prominent leaders within the church, continued for several years by the time all fifty lots were sold by the white heads in eighteen, thirty to twenty, four of them had been purchased by black residents of the city Seneca. Village had formed although where that name came from is still unknown today. I think as people like obviously the Seneca lived in new. York, that's true, but like we don't. Know, we don't know how the village came to be called that we'll talk in a minute, but there are often when you see. The village referred to in contemporary papers of the day. It is referred to with a racial slur. So in just a moment we will talk about black communities of historical significance to contextualized cynic village a little bit. But, first we will pause for a red front of sponsor. Did you know GEICO's now offering an extra fifteen percent credit on car and motorcycle policies. That's fifteen percent on top of what Geico could already save you. So, what are you waiting for your baby to let you sleep in? Sleeping another half hour. Thanks Sweetheart. You'll change yourself to. There's never been a better time to switch to GEICO. Save an extra fifteen percent when you switch by over seven limitations apply visit. GEICO DOT COM for details. Hi I'm Devin leary and I'm Carolina Barlow and we're here to tell you to dump him. Break up with your boyfriend, and we want you to listen to our podcast true romance every week where we talk about our love lives and the lives of others. Please join our XS who we know. We'll also be listening like Kyle. Kyle. Are you there? Hey, babe, how's life? No, you look good though me. Oh my God sob, please. I haven't even gotten a haircut like three months. Okay, please help us pay for Carolina psychiatrist bills by listening on the iheartradio, APP, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. To. We recently talked on the show about New Philadelphia Illinois, which was touted as the first town designed plotted out by a black man, and that did not happen until the eighteen thirties, but unlike new Philadelphia, senator villages establishment as a community was a little bit more organic, even though those plots were like separated out, and and made as as parcels of land that were sold. It wasn't planned as a community it. It was just broken into those lots, and we know that by eighteen twenty nine, there were nine families in Seneca village for certain, and that's based on records archaeological evidence. There may have actually been more. We should mention as well. There was another area of Manhattan that had a similar black community which predated Seneca village. It was on a thirty Acre piece of land known as Yorkhill because of its elevation. This communities origin on the time line is a little bit unclear, but there do appear to be mentions of it in eighteen teens. Some of this area was city property, but some of it was also privately owned ultimately your kills. Downfall was the creation of the CROTON reservoir. This water system, which was developed in the late eighteen thirty s and early eighteen forties had been preceded by the city, acquiring all of the property in Yorkhill and displacing that community, many of them had moved to Seneca village that uncertainty that we mentioned just a moment ago about how many people were living in Seneca village early on is actually a problem that persisted for much. Much of its history, we know that in the time immediately following the Croton Reservoir displacement of Yorkhill Seneca village had grown to a population of more than one hundred residents, and we also know that Irish immigrants started moving into the village, starting in the eighteen forties, including the mother of future Tammany Hall boss. George Washington Plunkett Georgia and his twin brother were actually born in Seneca village, and by that time the African. Union church had also bought land from the white heads and moved in. It's significant that the white heads were willing to sell their land black buyers. Is that offered an affordable entry into holding property that was unavailable in most of Manhattan. The residents of the village were more likely than New Yorkers of any color anywhere in the city to own the land where they lived in order to vote in New York free black men had to have lived in the state for three years, and had to own land valued at two hundred fifty dollars or more, so the Seneca village land opened up an avenue for black residents in the city to meet that property requirement in the eighteen fifties, ten of Seneca villages. Black residents were voters while that is a tiny number. It was by percentage far higher than other communities within the city. In eighteen forty five for example there were thirteen thousand Black New Yorkers and only ninety one of them had voting rights in eighteen, fifty five. The black population of Manhattan was recorded at twelve thousand. There were still fewer than one hundred who had secured voting rights, and that meant that at the time with only one hundred and fifty black residents Seneca village was home to more than ten percent of the city's black. Black voters there were also people who were not residents of Seneca village, but own land there in order to attain voting rights, so if you look at black voting landholders in Seneca village instead of the population of the village, that concentration is even higher. There were people that chose to stay downtown as where they lived, but they wanted to own this property, and that once again opened up. voting opportunities for them. In eighteen, fifty five, a census was taken, so the information about the village during that time becomes much more robust. There were two hundred thirty people living in Seneca village then in the villages, fifty two homes, so a lot of these were families. Roughly two-thirds of the residents were black, a roughly one third was Irish, and there were a few German residences as well making their homes there. There were also three churches in the. The village by that Point African, Methodist Episcopal Zion Church which was the one that was there from the beginning African Union. Church and all Angels Church Ame. Zion African Union were all black churches. All angels however had a mixed congregation, and was a mission project of Saint Michael's, which was at Broadway, and ninety ninth in that also had a Sunday school as part of it. The cemetery associated with all angels was also integrated. And there was also a school in the village known as colored school number three that had been founded in the eighteen forties Samarra, going to start getting to hell. This was turned into a park. Starting eighteen forties, there was growing interest in ensuring that the rapidly growing city retained kind of green space for Manhattan's residents. This was a valid concern because the natural land on the island was being sold off and built up at a really quick rate in the space of just a decade from eighteen, forty, five to eighteen, fifty five, the population of New York City doubled. That was also driven in part by desire. Desire on the part of the wealthiest inhabitants of the city to have a greenspace similar to something that you might find a European city. Yes, was building up like we should have fancy places like Paris or London. So the rich people can take their carriages through them, and we will feel very worldly and fancy. There was a lot of debate about exactly where a large park might fit into. Manhattan's lay out. There was a one hundred fifty acre strip of land on the East River. That was considered, but that was met with criticism, because the size was deemed too small by a lot of the people who really wanted this park there was also some concern that the park had been suggested by the editor of the evening. Post William Cohen Bryant because he and many of his ideas supporters to put it there happen to own property very near that site, and they would've gotten a financial boost from park project. That would have raised the value of their own. Own, land incidentally Bryant Park is named for him, so he did get a park. That strip of land on the East River was known as Jones Woods, and as that lost favor as an option, the idea of a park in the center of the island started to gain popularity. There were a number of factors that made this location more appealing than the previous one for one thing, a lot of the land there was already owned by the city whereas the Jones Woods Strips had been privately owned would have required a pretty big investment on the city's part. For another that central strip of land had already been deemed tricky to develop as a real estate because of its terrain. This kind of cracks me up because if you look at cities or maps rather from the early eighteen hundreds of New York City, it all had like terrain. That would have been tricky somehow they managed. That, he's do it turns out right They figure it out, but. As the plan for Central Park got underway. There really was not much consideration for Seneca. Village or any of the people living in the proposed park space, the initial plan for the park with seven hundred seventy nine acres, it was later expanded to its current size of eight hundred forty three acres, so those are pretty significant tract of land right in the middle of the city. And even though Manhattan had less and less population density, the farther north you went on the island, the land that had been identified as a potential greenspace for this project was occupied including Seneca village by an estimated sixteen hundred people despite that fact, and despite the fact that Seneca, village had grown into a community on lots that had been purchased from the white heads, the park was generally described as an empty space with a handful of people living there illegally must may have been a case of supporters of the park plan including journalists, either willfully ignoring the residence of Seneca village and other communities in the area or being truly unaware of how developed these communities were. I would argue if they were journalists. That was their job to figure out. Or they may have just been devaluing and disregarding the people living there because these communities were made up of black emigrant inhabitants, I will point out the. was a very different thing at this point. I know but still. Yes and we don't know the motivation of every journalist who wrote about the proposed land for Central Park as though it were uninhabited, but what we do know is that downplaying any human habitation would have helped make the project more appealing for anyone in the city, particularly any stakeholders who might have questioned its expense and its purpose, and there was of course racism in the mix as well people who did acknowledge Seneca village referred to it using a racist slur for years as we mentioned a little while ago. it's interesting because when you look at some of the records online depending on where you see them. Some places that show these newspapers like the image of the actual newspaper have chosen to black bar the name because it is gross There was also this general suspicion about any of the white immigrants who lived in the village, and they were characterized as being very shifty and untrustworthy, and there were all these rumors of miscegenation and a lot of racist language about the mixing of. Of these races the rhetoric of the park, being occupied only by indigent drifters began the erasure of a stable community, both literally in terms of its existence, and in the historical record, and we really want to stress the stability of this village in the book the park in the people, authors, Roy Rosenzweig and Elizabeth Blackmar. Note that if you compare Seneca villages, tax records from eighteen, forty, two, the records from eighteen fifty-five three quarters of the families from eighteen, forty were still living there. If you compare eighteen, fifty, eighteen, fifty five. All of the black residents in the community were still in Seneca village. Definitely not a case of drifters or squatters, these are people who own the land, paid taxes, and had that information captured in the city records Seneca village was more stable than really both city communities during the mid eighteen hundreds. They make a point in that book that if you compare Seneca village to like I think they mentioned a neighborhood in Boston at the same time. They're like this is constant movement. This is almost no movement like it's way more stable. And in many cases to these families were staying through multiple generations with marriages and children, and adding to the village's population and reinforcing the community ties within it, so it was the exact opposite of itinerant descriptions of the homes in the village during the time when the city was considering where to build a park also characterize them as though they were barely standing the words shack and Shanti were very commonly used. These were definitely not fancy houses. They were generally built by the residents themselves. They tended to be on the smaller side, mostly one story. and. There was a wide range of quality from one house to another, but they were there through all those years of records that we mentioned, so they definitely weren't temporary structures on the verge of collapse. In terms of quality of life, if compared to the black population living downtown, the residents of Seneca village had significantly more space as well as outdoor areas for recreation, and they weren't subjected to the cramped and poorly maintained rooms that would have been available in the five points neighborhood where a large portion of the city's black population lived. Yeah, when you consider that most of the people of Color and immigrants, living downtown or in tenements that we're really poorly managed. This was a way better set up again way more stable, but completely devalued most of Seneca villages, male residents worked in service or Labor jobs in the women of the village also worked. They took in laundry some of. Of them worked as domestic servants, there were also gardens and livestock was kept on the Seneca village acreage that supplemented the diets of the residents, the most well off among the people who live there were two grocers in an innkeeper, so it wasn't a wealthy demographic, but it was the highest concentration in the city of an area where black people owned property, the people debating the future location of the park idea were generally wealthy, as the city had expanded north to take up more and more of the island. It wasn't only William Cullen Bryant, who had thoughts of how a park would drive up adjacent property values that was definitely a recognition that the development of what was being called. The Central Park was going to create value in the land of the northern half of the island back. When Jones would or Jones would, you'll see it written. Both ways was still being considered as a possible park location social reformer. Garnsey had a letter to the Tribune in which he said quote, will anyone pretend? The park is not a scheme to enhance the value of uptown land create a splendid center for fashionable life, without regard to and even endear election of the happiness of the multitude upon whose hearts and hands the expenses will fall. Even after that other strip of land was eventually dismissed because it would benefit existing land owners at this point, it was inescapably obvious that any location was going to create a potential new area for affluent buyers to flock to you on July. Twenty first eighteen, fifty three, the city filed a legal action that would be the demise of Seneca. Village that was when the city claimed eminent domain over the portions of the island from fifty nine to one hundred six streets designated for the park for the property that the city did not already own. City allocated five million dollars for the purchase of the properties in that track that were privately held, but naturally a lot of those people did not want to give up their homes, and this is not a case where they just went along with it. Many of them fought it for three legal channels. Over the next two years there were ongoing court cases and appeal after appeal as the residents of what would become central park, and specifically the residents of Seneca village tried to hang onto the community. They had built in some instances. Those battles were over the amounts of money that the city had allocated for specific properties as As they're like purchase agreement. Because the owners really felt that they were being undervalued as the legal issues churned, the city made a map in eighteen, fifty five, that was an account of all the separate properties and their owners as well as notes on what dwellings and outbuildings existed on each parcel. This came to be known as the Central Park condemnation map, but eventually all of the legal avenues for the residents were exhausted, and the city was eager to get on with its park project in the summer of eighteen fifty six mayor Fernando. Wood issued an eviction notice for Seneca village. Still a lot of the residents resisted. News writers penned incendiary articles, indicating that the land should be cleared by any means necessary to make way for the park that included violence How things actually played out is a little unclear, though some modern versions of this story suggests that police were called in in a violent series of actions, resulted often in community members, being beaten and dragged from their homes, but there actually aren't any first hand accounts of how and win. The holdout residents finally left or were removed back Tober. I eighteen, fifty seven, the land set aside for Central Park had no human inhabitants anymore. Demolition of existing structures followed soon after that. By the time Seneca village was destroyed. Five hundred eighty nine people had lived there in its three decade existence, and we're GONNA pause here for a sponsor break, and then we'll come back and talk about trying to trace. Some of Seneca villages lost history. Hi I'm Heidi Markov host of the upcoming what to expect podcasts on Iheartradio motherhood is the ultimate sisterhood Ticino that black MOMS in the US are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy related complication because of a lack of quality care. That's unacceptable, and that's why I'm asking you to join us. Unto Lie twenty-second for our sixth. Annual Bump Day to celebrate beautiful bumps than healthy pregnancies, and show your solidarity and support for MOMS everywhere just share a bum pastor present yours or a bumpy love with the Hashtag bump day for more information. Go to what to expect project DOT org. Construction on central park began in eighteen, fifty eight, and the lake of the park opened that same year, although construction continued throughout the rest of the park for the next fifteen years almost as soon as it had been raised, it was as though Seneca village had never existed at least in the minds of the people who were enjoying their new park. One of the big historical tragedies is that we don't really know where the residents of Seneca village went after they were evicted all angels church. Church actually move their building to a new location on the upper west side the church. Sexton, William Wilson moved near the New Church location. It's also known that resident Andrew Williams moved with his family to Queens but beyond that information thin to nonexistent, and there are still efforts to try to locate information about any of these community members or their descendants. In August eighteen, seventy, one two coffins were accidentally on earth. Wind landscapers were working in the area of the park where Seneca village had been. One of those coffins was really really nice, and had an engraved plate on it with the name Margaret. McGinty, while the other was a simpler style with no identifiers, despite the fact that Seneca village had been an active community. They're just fifteen years prior to this discovery, it was reported as though these coffins were just a complete mystery. There is no evidence. The cemeteries of Seneca village attached to all angels. Angels Church and the Ame Zion church where relocated after the inhabitants of the village were evicted the burial records from Ame Zion burned in eighteen, thirty nine, so the earliest records of burials were lost even before that. Yeah, so it's very very possible that since they basically were knocking down buildings in then covering them with dirt It's very possible that they basically just filled in over the cemeteries. It is difficult for historians to research and contextualized the inhabitants of Seneca village, because there aren't as we've been saying a lot of records and many of the records that do exist were created because there was a desire to move those people off of their land. Additionally as we've talked about on the show before it was the second half of the eighteen twenty s when Nissim started experimenting with photography in France, so there are really no photographs of Seneca, village there are a few photos that were taken of the landscape as prep was underway to turn it into a park in some buildings appear in those photos that may have been part of this, but they aren't the focus off in the distance in the background, and it is not a comprehensive. You're entire community area. There is one family associated with Seneca. Seneca village that there are surviving photos of, but they were not residents Albro and Mary Joseph Lyons had their portraits made as well as their children's portraits and eighteen sixties, so while these are important historical items. They are a degree of removed from actual life in the village. We'll be coming back to them in a moment. Though in nineteen ninety-seven, the New York. Historical Society mounted an exhibition titled Before Central Park the, life and death of Seneca, village, which challenged the long established story that the area that became central park had been essentially a wasteland before homestead. Homestead and vox work their landscaping magic. This exhibit also stoked interest in the subject, helping to bolster a bigger exploration of the history of the parks land. Before it became Central Park. The Seneca Village Project began building on work done through the nineteen nineties that project was headed by Diana Wall an anthropology professor at the City College of New, York, Nan, Rothschild, the Bernard Anthropology Department and Cynthia Copeland of the new. York Historical Society Wall started research into cynic village in nineteen ninety s building up a case for the project to gain funding initially the work that. That was being done. Was largely collecting as much documentation as they could related to Seneca village, and then after soil studies and careful initial probing of the area, it expanded over time into an archaeological dig in this project was funded through a number of sources. It received a research experiences for undergraduates grant from the National Science Foundation. As well as getting funding from National Geographic. The durst foundation the Gilder Foundation and friends of Cornell Edwards in a required a lot of careful and savvy negotiations to get permissions to actually have access to the park for fieldwork. This is something I have summed up here in just a few sentences, but please knows at this work was done in very carefully planned stages over the course of years it was really really an instance of a great deal of dedication on the part of these people who initiated it in twenty eleven. The first excavation project was conducted at the Seneca village site that had a combination of classroom prep-work eight weeks. Weeks of field work and four weeks of lab work for the UNDERGRAD students who participated fieldwork, started on June, seventh of that year, and the excavation located among other things, the foundation wall interior of the home of William Godfrey Wilson and Charlotte More Wilson I'll say they found a number of artifacts that had been part of daily life in the village including ceramics. A pipe childs shoe a teapot. Things like that. Yeah. It's interesting. One of the things that comes up a lot when you're looking at this. Is that people? Want to discuss how this was a very poor community, but there's a really lovely video I came across where some of the people who worked on this project tiny about like no, this China is as nice as like. The middle class would have owned You know there are enough things that they found that kind of bolster the idea of like it. It further enhances this picture of it as a very stable settled community of people that were not just like scratching by. They had a sense of of place and belonging instability there. in two thousand, fifteen new archaeological work began on the site of Seneca village as the playgrounds that have been on the plot of land where the village once existed were set to undergo renovation. The Central Park Conservancy also initiated an effort of our full research alongside the archaeological work during this construction project in an effort to create a more thorough record of the lands history, the result of this project in recent years has been the installation of a number of signs in the park that note the locations of various village buildings and the. The village's residents in the fall of Twenty Nineteen New York Mayor Bill De Blasio that Central Park would get a historical monument about Seneca village focusing specifically on the Lions family. Who you mentioned earlier while they did not live in Seneca village. They were prominent members of Manhattan's nineteenth century black. Community and they ran a stop on the underground railroad in the city submissions for the design of that monument were supposed to be until April of this year, but the pandemic is probably put the brakes on that plan. Yeah, hard to dig up information. Once everything went left. It's cool to me that this has gotten a lot more attention in recent years and I. Like that I mean those people that we mentioned on the the Seneca village project. They are still working on this and they're still you know arkell analysis that goes on and and PA I. Don't know if there are plans for additional digs, but. It's one of those things that has kind of cropped up in the news in recent years, but I thought it might be nice to really talk about just how complete this community was because it's often talked about in that way, It's a in that way, a cool thing and I don't I'm really really glad that they're making efforts to document pre park history of that area I love Central Park, but I also am not ignorant to the fact that it did not just out of nowhere with land that no one ever had. So I hope that we'll get more more more. Stuff comes too late about Seneca village and the people that live. There bit anyway. That's what's up. Johnson Listener Mail I should do this listener males val bonsai This is from our listener. Keith rates. Hey, holly and Tracy I've been listening for a long time I. Just heard your podcast on bonsai. A little behind I don't think that sounds behind sounds pretty contemporary He says it. I'm so excited to actually have a reason to contact you. Both I work at a museum in Colorado and while this isn't my specialty. I did really WANNA mention. Colorado's role in modern bonds I in the US and around the world you spoke at the role of Japanese interment camps in bonsai to my understanding the internment camp in Colorado known as. As a Macci Granada was instrumental in the resurgence of Banzai both the US and Japan after the war a Masha was the smallest of the camps, but it held four expert Banzai artists, so the art was common, their classes developed, and it was picked up by many of the other prisoners, because the plants near the camp weren't traditional bonsai trees, the camp prisoners used nontraditional local trees, such as juniper's. This was the beginning of a new style of Banzai, which focused on the plants of the area that you're in instead of limiting the craft to traditional bonsai trees. That idea was transported back to Los Angeles after the war and eventually back to Japan. After the camp was disbanded. Many of the internees from matchy remained in Colorado. Colorado's Governor Ralph Carr was only governor who welcomed the internees to remain as part of their state Denver actually had to Banzai clubs for years one that spoke English and one that was dominated by former internees, and spoke exclusively Japanese the Denver Botanic Gardens still has a wonderful Japanese garden in a thriving Banzai club that we wouldn't have without this history. All of which me to a podcast. podcast suggestion and he mentions Ralph car He's as anyway. That's interesting to you, not just a waste of your time. Thanks for all the history of the year. Stay safe and healthy, the super interesting to me, and now I have a place on my list of things to do next time. I am in Denver because I absolutely want to go. See The botanic garden It's we've had a few people. Write to us about bonsai which I love including. Our Listener Maggie who shared a picture of one of hers that no longer survives, but it was very very pretty i. I love it I. Blake hearing about People's interest in in Banzai and trees in general great, so please keep sharing those. They're all interesting to me of. You would like to write do as you can do so at history podcast. iheartradio dot, com, you can find us on social media missed in history, and if you'd like to subscribe to the podcast, we hope that you do you can do that on the iheartradio APP at Apple podcasts or wherever it is, you listen. To. Stuff you missed in history class. The production of I heart radio for more podcasts, iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP, apple, podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. I'm Devin leary and I'm Carolina Barbecue and we're here to tell you to dump him. Break up with your boyfriend and we want you to listen to our podcast true romance every week where we talk about our love lives and the love lives of others. Please join our exes. Who We know will also be listening. Light Kyle Kyle. Are you there? Hey, babe, how's life? No, you look good though me. Yeah Oh, my God sob. Please haven't even gotten a haircut like three months. Okay, please help us pay for Carolina psychiatrist bills by listening on the iheartradio, APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. ooh! Hi I'm Heidi Markov other what to expect when you're expecting and host of the upcoming what to expect podcast on Iheartradio, I always say motherhood is the ultimate sisterhood, but did you know that black moms? In the United States are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy, related complication, because of disparities in care and more than two thirds of those deaths are preventable. That's unacceptable and that's why I'm asking you to join us on July twenty second for six. Six annual bump day to celebrate beautiful bumps in healthy pregnancies raise awareness and show your solidarity and support for every mom everywhere just share a bump pastor present yours or bumpy love with the Hashtag bump day, so every mom can expect a healthy beginning and a healthy future for herself and the baby. She loves on July, Twenty second. Please spread the word share the love help save lives you on bump day for more information. Go to what to expect project. Dot Org

Seneca village Central Park Seneca Manhattan New York Seneca village Seneca Village Project Yorkhill Seneca village Seneca GEICO United States Elizabeth Whitehead Andrew Williams apple York William Godfrey Wilson west India Company New York Central Park representative Carolina
Byte Kate Anderson And Elyssa Samsel

Sci-Fi Talk Byte

04:18 min | 2 months ago

Byte Kate Anderson And Elyssa Samsel

"Hi Welcome to season two of bite. This is Tony till auto. Parenting apocalypse it's it's not the same way. You you know how it works any views usually two to four minutes long, but sometimes they can be a little longer. When you when you live long enough, all kinds of strange things happen. Very right in saying that the Greek heroes the original superheroes. In part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision, but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion. ILLICIT SEM cell in Kate Anderson are composers collaborated loss, frozen adventure and the Animated Series Central Park the ladies talk about women composers working together. For very fortunate to have had long price that we looked up to and other female composers that had broken glass ceiling and created a packs for us to follow. I'll never forget being about twenty years old and I noticed. A song called a musical theater song called Taylor tape boy that had been written by Marcy Marcy Heisler Zina, Goldrich and when I looked up at the top of the page to see who had written it I was shocked because I'd never seen two female names on a sheet, a piece of sheet music. Even with all the years of classical training, and all the music that I learned from the age of six, so seeing that inspired me to then pair up with Kate and become law names on the top of sheet music, so the girls can see that realized I can do this to. Being to women in this industry is it's definitely had its challenges, but we feel so grateful that right now and over the last ten years or so there's. been a lot of real need for females and for women to comment until these stories to write material is really authentic to the experience and put him were A. Driven waste on things. You know sadly, we don't see enough of that in Asia shame. And how do they work? They talk process. Our process is yeah different for various projects or project. It's also varied a lot through the years. US figuring out how to work together and then at the more work. We have these kind of figuring out how to do it very quickly. And generally on behalf in idea, I song will start out by talking about the lyrical hook. Enemies of the hook and landing on that I. Lear- Lyrical Hook I just because we want to figure out what what's going to drive a song introduced. What's GonNa? Get us the most real estate on getting us from Point A. TO POINT C So what what phrase can we have us at? Different meetings or a grout Asong so that we can have a an evolution plot and then we oftentimes right music I so. You will generally when we have our. Lyrical Hook go off and come up with a musical structure and handed activity in often lyrics throughout that are helpful in guiding the structure and I'll take a swing at at at flushing out a little more than the we collaborate until leaf feel like it is perfect, so we do back and forth and I walk conversation. Over the phone or in person to try, and get it all nailed out nail down ready to go out on. Oh, look for owners frozen adventure on Disney. And Central Park is on Apple. TV plus of Note Josh Gad who voices and sings for off, also co created Central Park, and he also got another frozen cast made on board and Kristen Bell to voice a character. For Bite. This is Tony Talada

US Tony Talada Goldrich Kate Anderson Marcy Marcy Heisler Zina Central Park Josh Gad Animated Series Central Park Disney Kristen Bell Asia I. Lear Apple four minutes twenty years ten years
Full Episode: Friday, August 21, 2020

20/20

1:20:13 hr | Last month

Full Episode: Friday, August 21, 2020

"For these past few months. Now, we've seen protests calling out the glaring racism in America the disparity between black and white arrest but we saw the very same thing decades ago terrorists free through Central Park. You may see the central park five very differently now in the age of George Florida. Thirty years ago this was a crime that took New York City apart a case that really shocked this country. Off. Rolling band. I was raised. In left for dead. Young black men. Accused of a crime involving a white person new from the moment you heard this story, it was going to explode in. The central park five are almost mythical figures in the annals of New York crime. Police said, they were guilty. The mayor said there was. Donald Trump's guilty disadvantage guilty. I think they should be executed. He's saying kill they must've it. They, confess the police. Took The press has where they coerced into confession could be almost tens amounts. Someone having a gun to your head. There's no coercion kids attacked this woman. There is proof that they were innocent of this crime. The police no, there's a missing man. There was a rapist out politics race. The justice system all. Going to come together on. I. Absolutely. Love. Central. Park. It was released to be out there in nature near you see the beauty of the park. As well as the skyscrapers lights of New York City and the sense that. Wow. This is my city I'm hearing my part. Central Park is center the universe. Makes you feel are beautiful day? The center of things. Kinda great. It just stretches forever. It seems to the heart of that city six hundred football field to Magin that. Supposed to be a refuge haven. Billy place. Uh but by the nineteen eighties, this place that was Mitt to be in central recreation. POB. For. The entire. City. Really becomes more of a barrier. Night would fall. And it would change. It would become a place where you'd be nervous about gone. Simple Park became a metaphor. For the broader dysfunction in New York City's. Many. Best. Understand that as the New York between Scorsese's taxi driver. WHO's come out at night? Some they're real round coming wash all the scum off the streets and spike. Lee's do the right thing. In, the late Eighties York City was very tense. Was a place where people were fearful fearful of crime fearful of being mugged of being attacked. It was just a very violent time in this. This new drug emerged in the nineteen eighties, which is crack. Head this immediate. Devastating impact this has reached. Damage proportions. Crack was like the of drugs. It just ravaged place and it just took the homicide rate through the. Eighty, eight, eighty nine had about nineteen hundred to two thousand murders. A year. Citywide And the victims are. A huge majority of them were people have calling. At the same time that all of these things happening you have the emergence and really dominance of wall. Street. Culture. We're going to turn the bull loose. Appropriate now, it was about making money and making as much money as possible, and during that time period the movie Wall Street came out. Green. For lack of a better word is good. Right. Now I think that should be preserved left and Donald trump should not be allowed to touch center of. The rich are doing really really well, New York. City. Wall Street's exploding with obscene wretches and there's this Gulf that's always been in New York City between and poor but now it's even more pronounced. And in the more affluent read that white communities there wasn't crime. So if crime was seeping into those communities, there was caused for his stem comedy houses. Were in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine you must remember that the city was in the real. Divisive. Full arrives condition. Three white teens arrested in the shooting death last night of a sixteen year. Old Black Youth. was killed because he was black. This time in New York City where if you were black and you went into the wrong neighborhood, it was not be considered unusual for a mob detriot physically attacking that's how bad race relations were at the time. Gets. The biggest. Latest turmoil and this And there's poverty and there's fear and violence and it all wrapped up in one big small Chavez single city. Between big eastern Hudson rotate this is the sort of cards in which the Central Park jogger nationality. On April Nineteenth Nineteen, eighty, nine I went to work. I usually did I worked in new. York City for Solomon Brothers. I always wanted to work in New York. It was a sense of accomplishment and I was devoted to it. I stayed until after eight o'clock and then I went I went home. Iran in the park probably four to five days a week. I, love the freedom of the park. It just gave me a sense of vitality. At the same time as a young Salomon brothers banker is stepping out of her eastside side home and starts running toward central park. There's a group of at least thirty young people about a mile and a half away, and they're about to come into the park. Thirty to forty. Central contacting the. People I'm sure she miley and I'm known as the Central Park. Jogger. It was thirty years ago that I went out for a run after work in. Central Park. And I was attacked. Off. Because Street. Actually. Tenth of. Such park is our backyard. That Wednesday night east a vacation kids we go. Hang on a little later. Monday. I Seen Group of kids answering the Puck at the time I followed. Coming out of he fried chicken came my way as about hanging out with. That was it. You go from hanging out with friends. Thinking that you're going to. Go skateboarding in the park or walk around late to. Mayhem. On the night of April. Nineteenth nineteen eighty nine. Approximately, thirty to forty teenagers assembled at the northeast corner of Central Park. Up there to twenty meal inside talk. Therapy. I was working for to twelve with my partner. And we started to get a lot of radio runs of a group of black and Hispanic Teenagers Salting and harassing people. Want to. Drive in. Central Park. Rolling Bang. Basing Just walk down the street be people up. We walk in on the role so's downtown. Somebody recognized all the man walking across the road had a bag of his head in a bunch of other kids. When Punch him kicking him on. I remember balanced. It was. Crazy to stand and watch somebody. Unreal This almost like mosques being Jones of fire, a child can be a witness to something without being a participant in something. Meanwhile. There was a high speed tandem bicycle driven by Patty Dean Gerry Malone. They're making their way north on the East Dr. Riding. Through Central Park. We saw this whole line of hits I remember thinking I wonder why they're here. So late man female frying the by Ono who was won't person said get them. All of a sudden they jumped across the road. It was actually terrifying favor ripping at my arms and legs and clothing. As a woman, you immediately wonder what's GonNa Happen we all started chasing the bike. Basie they gotTA leave. I would run. To the park usually entering at the eighty four, th street entrance just by the Metropolitan Museum of. Art. Why would go to the hundred and second street cross drive. That would go from the east drive of the park over to the West drive of the park. The whole thing was very chaotic. We're getting a lot of nine. One one calls people coming into the precinct other people stopping cops patrol. At that. The H.? Ninety East. Twelve. Welcome band, Camp. Southward the reservoir. Complaint. On forth worth to Five drive the last of the joggers to be attacked was beat with a pipe in the head. The victim looked like his head got dunked inappropriate of blood he's beaten so badly. Kind of. People were punched in the face pulled off their bicycles rob with their watches I. Mean it was a kind of a crazy. A serious vince took place. The calls kept coming in. So we came. Let the. Pulled on heart and I think one hundred street and Central Park West. And There they are. There's a group of about twenty or thirty of them. Once we came out of the park here we show them across the street. So what we did was we pulled over. Right over here at the curb. Everybody's just started running. They chased a large group over there about thirty to forty people. There's a big foot chase as a couple of cars. When it was all said and done we had five. And it I, it seems like a relatively minor thing. They're gonNA send these kids to family court. They're going to send them home and have them come back again later and then this woman is found in the park. Covered in blood near death. On that night. A little bit before midnight a woman's body was found about fifty feet down. From this area where I'm standing right here in the one hundred Second Street cross path. There were two guys making their way from the west side East side they thought it was a man's body and then they heard moaning. Trish. Molly. Not, conscious barely barely alive she actually had been dragged down to the stream in the Rabin that most New Yorkers don't know about I've never seen it. An ambulance was called took a while to get into the wooded area, the discovery of Trish mealey lying in a ravine. Changes everything. The word we got back from the hospitals that she was extremely critical condition. And good possibly that you would die. So I'd call for crime scene and my homicide squads This morning. A woman jogger was found unconscious and bleeding by two men passing by at about two o'clock. This morning we're told she was taken a metropolitan. Hospital where she's being treated for a fractured skull and a serious loss of blood. Young woman had been brought in who was pretty close to death. Blunt Trauma. They didn't know if he would survive. She looked like a little waif. No one knew who she was yet. I will never forget that. I. Have Seen Traumatized patients many many times but I've never seen somebody like. destroyed. This is the bone in this was crushed severely her body was just so swollen unrecognizable really my left Isaak socket had been crushed in and the force of that blow was so strong that my eyeball exploded into thin plates of my orbital floor and when that happens the entire cheekbone falls inward and then I had several skull fractures and there were deep lacerations. We all know what Biz everybody knows. That isn't describe it but there's nothing like seeing something like this atrocity of such an act. This morning detectives walk through the woods picking up evidence from a joggers night of terror. We ended up with five arrest. Two of the five were Kevin Richardson and Raymond Santana Detectives who were handling asked me to hang onto them so that they can interview them. I hear the phone ring. And that's where we detect the told me. To come, to the reset. To get MASCI. Last month. With, Mesler. And he said well doing some paperwork. And you can see him shortly they can tomorrow. Around three o'clock in the morning when we got there. I see my science looms. Other kids locked in. We had to go back out. And start getting more of the kids that were involved in the attack that included Yusef Salaam Corey Weiss, and they had trouble mccrae, but by the evening of the twentieth. We had. All five in custody. It wasn't. He's been the pizzas. To. I was out here with all bunch of other reporters and cameras and we were waiting. And waiting and waiting for information because in those early hours there was an investigation going on behind closed doors. There was intense pressure to solve the case. This was the crime that had to be solved over the course of the next couple of days. There are these interogations at length. Here we are the twentieth precinct on the Upper West side of Manhattan where police are still questioning some of the young suspects they believe were involved in last night's attack. Those were fourteen and fifteen or supposed to have a parent or Guardian present and largely they do then even the parents I think are pretty naive about. What's going on? They were telling us that Kevin is gonNA come home with us that he's a good boy. They know he didn't do anything and they used us they used our lack of knowledge of the justice system against us and and are trusting in them they use it against us. We had all these kids now in custody. They're all starting to talk. And give stories about what happened. The cops are doing what cops do, which is in these investigations they can y they can say they know more than they do. They can say they've got evidence that implicates a suspect trying to get him to confess. They did all of those things. So these interrogation they're not recorded in any way right? They're not even written down not my rules are the rules I was handed. then. That's what we'd play. Coverage. Just scrambled eggs I really didn't know what was going on is wanted to have home. When I was in a rural I, didn't know what was going on I just know doing. The lead invested in my case, he became fed up, slammed his fist on the table give me what I want and. You take an individual that's fifteen years old and you put that individual. In a room by themselves. With. Two to four to six officers, some of them. Wanting to attack you. That individual be terrified. It could be almost tantamount to. Someone having a gun to. The cops were. Proud that they did what cops do, which is they told. Teen one that number two, number three were implicating ones. You'd better get out ahead of this they told teen for that. There was evidence that had been found, and if you don't get out in front, you're GONNA be implicated. Who did it. That is not into doing. So I was trying to get everybody back I was just blaming whoever? For me he's like with Kevin Richardson I said no I don't ever seen. He says well, you know we know he did it. So when detective heart can produce the picture of Kevin, it was Balmy getting out of it all of these kids and in many cases, their parents. Believed that they would get to go home. If they. Implicate other people if they were helpful in the right way and they were desperate to get out of that room. Though detective of mine, whatever say anything like that. You're. GonNa go home with a crime like this. They played the parents against each other they said okay. Well, we know he didn't do anything by Yusef Salaam said he did this. So then you feel like we're okay, he has to defend himself. So they played against each other the play, the boys against each other, and they made up all of these stories to get their arrest in their convictions. coerce somebody when he's sitting there with his parents. Coercion. None of those the detective. Cal. Would have to resort to walking anyone into a confessional. The words, their words. We don't put words with people's. Miles. This interrogation went on. And on and whether or not you believe that there were coercive tactics. The amount of time itself that these teams have to spend in that interrogation room could in and of itself have caused them to say anything to get out of there. Is No three thirty in the morning on the morning of. April twenty first in nineteen ninety in the early hours of the morning on the second day. Under questioning the teenagers make fateful decision they decide to start talking on video. This I. Are. Not. Last time do. That decision would haunt them all the way to the courtrooms. Over. I was home with my wife. We just turn the lights out and my deputy bureau chief called and asked if I could go up to the twenty, four th precinct and assist Elizabeth Lederer who was up there working alongside the police. Elizabeth letter was the prosecutor in the Central Park Jogger case. By all accounts. She was incredibly diligent. She was not one of these prosecutors who are just in it to win right to lay siren to refuse to answer questions. This point after night in police custody move from precinct to precinct Kevin Richardson implicated himself in this night of mayhem with numerous assaults, impossibly the rape of Tricia Mile. Surrounding. Packing came move. Heaven Richardson Scratch under his I. So the detectives asked them, how did you get the scratch under your Ri- In a way? That's been. Let me ask you saying that she scratched junior indicating place in your face. And it's not just Richardson other teenagers are implicating themselves on video to. Hand. She's Stop in and. I. Did just before the school last time at all for. No visit. And while he was doing that, you feel the rest with both hands. They're all making statements to you know an. Open Confessions of fun of their parents. All of them except Yusef Salaam. He never goes on video and never makes a written statement and the reason is because his mother comes in and says, no, I kept telling them I wanted a lawyer. I told him several times. I had witnesses who hurt me tell them and they continue to do what they plan to do because they had an agenda. I I saw those tapes. Disbelieve Like anybody else I watch a confession tape by first impulse is. Then, this person really wouldn't do that. For. My second impulse is to listen to the details to be enforced. Juggling. Shorts but those just aren't the facts. TRICIA Meili. That night was wearing tights on her legs. She. Wasn't jogging at the reservoir, which is more than half a mile away from where she was fat. Was Kevin Richardson. Said volunteered. This is where I tackled. The woman jogger. Right. About here as well. How does? Her body get from here down the ravine who took down a ravine. So I don't know. The body was found down that hill. Said I don't know how she got there. To look back at these statements, huge problems there inconsistent within themselves. They're inconsistent relative to the other statements and their inconsistent relative to the facts. I shouldn't say that those aren't and she has a fractured. So she was very, very heavy object here. You saw that picture I don't get these lines. You don't get a fractured skull. More. This phrase. Learning. Like a rock. I did. See K.. Pick Up. A boy. Hitting. Close. Officials. Are you just saying that because I knew ask. Why didn't you say before? Why didn't you say before? Asked me taking the paid glass and the dog of. The piglet. Buckle up. The inconsistencies in Corey wise is stay man. And his statements about using a knife in the commission of the crime I think are just complete exaggerations. He was a very difficult person to interview because he kept changing his story. When you watch corey, it's almost like he's desperate to get. Right? He tells one story at this moment he tells this story at another moment. Well, yeah. When you look at false confession cases because when they told the truth, you didn't believe when you made them change it. Another problem or the cops and the prosecutors was that every time they went to talk other one of the central park five they heard the different people were actually the ones that did it. On. St Lopez. WHO said that someone had sex with her? Of course they're going to be some inconsistencies between the statements and in my experience when you take statements who's kind of a range, right? They minimize their own involvement in it by saying, but he did more than I did. down. I wasn't doing as much and it was only. Reading. The teenagers believed that if they said something, they could get out of the interrogation had. Opponent. What they didn't realize why the detectives the Michelle. According to the law of new. York by saying I didn't do the rape I just held her down. That is guilty under the law as if saying, I climbed on top of a woman and raped. At the point where we're thinking, there may well be a brain dysfunction as recovery proceeds. Dozen reporters gathered around Dr Robert Kurz asking for more details reporters descended on hospital. We had to sort of hanging out in the lobby and wait for the reports coming from the doctor. When it becomes known. Better Group of teenagers of color are accused of doing this to that white investment banker that. EXPLO- New York City. People to go to their defense is unbelievable politics race. Emotions. The justice. System. All Going to come together like a fire. There is Donald Trump connection to this case. You better believe that I hate the people that took this girl and raped her. And all this investigations going on Tricia Majlis playing life of Metropolitan Hospital she was in a coma for a week and then she started is. Looking around. Can't you? will she say she remembered something? There was a flaws in tears from doctors and nurses when this brave young woman came out of A. Trish his recovery next. As with anyone like this is fairly slow in by graduated steps. You had. Children School children showing up and holding vigils outside. Cardinal O'Connor made visit their Frank Sinatra sent her flowers. She woke up and looked around saw the flowers. You only smoke what's going on why Frank Sinatra sending me flowers Kid Sense of the magnitude of the news, the story. Terrorists free through central park they found her and the gang raped her the shockwaves of the tragedy felt both north and south of the park the headlines were just extraordinary. was. All of this thing according to police they bragged and laughed about the rape and beating. This was one of the most compelling stories that New York could see that a reporter could cover it took politics, power rape, racial politics. Some controversy people were so angry about what happened. I just wanted to come up here, find somebody and do bodily harm. So there were a total of ten people over several months who were charged in either convicted or pled guilty to various crimes Clark, the DA decides to charge of teenagers in the attack on Tricia mailing. One of those Steve Lopez decides to plead to a lesser charge when he's offered a deal some witnesses against him at evaporated in that left five five teenagers. Kevin. Richardson and Tron mccray Yusef Salaam Raymond Santana Corey boss. Kids really. Hysteria that was being drummed up in the press. Fed into the fear that already existed because of the high rates of crime in the city and the phrase that was used that was a new phrase was the wild thing they go around and they do crazy things. For money. We started hearing this term wilding this phenomenon where kids of color go beserk and try to harm people. Wilding phenomenon. It's all over the newspapers every day. Every news broadcast wild wilding wilding by any name it means terror. They were the wolf pack. They were described in these beastly terms which are signature. Racial. Racist. Terms. They were monsters in the minds of the media and public. That feared them. That fear. The sexual violation of white women at the hands of black men. Is Fear that goes all the way back to the days of slavery in this country. And it is inextricably connected. To the history of lynching. Mob. Violence. All the worst depredations that black people suffered these kids were as every day kids as you can be. They were just starting their high school careers and Tron. Played little. League. Kevin danced in school. Yussef a was an artist they came from strong supportive families. What they were not involved in were criminal activities none of them had record at that time. I think I played a big role. Have we been? White, you. They probably would've. Contacted the legally people. and. Probably have some lawyers down here to speak to us. But because we were from black in Latin communities because we've from some of US impoverished homes. It's like. Hey WHO'S GONNA mind? That another black youth or another Latin you dissolve the Stream, the criminals anyway. Plant. Out of seven anybody else. Okay. All contributed to this heightened sense of fear in New York and this thirst vengeance. Gail was this rising tide? All the boys can coming symbols of all. Of this is why we need to come down on these young teenagers these those we do not want to see racial hysteria. Used to predetermine the rights of some teenagers even in the black and Latino community we wanted to stand for them when the minority was by. No means a populist stand he. Could've been in Mangope patient, but none of. Them I. Think those guys should be send away for life and the press who rely on them police for. Their information about crimes largely relied please felt the case for salt. I. Think that it was kind of assumption they must have done it. Right? They confessed people were in a frenzy. The people weren't all that concerned about fairness about justice that plus a very live and active newspaper war between the tabloids. and lead people to places. They really shouldn't have gone you better believe that I hate the people that took this girl and raped her brutally. Then a full page ad scheduled to appear tomorrow's new. York City newspapers millionaire businessman Donald Trump calls for the reinstatement of the State's death penalty Donald. Trump at that time was kind of a swaggering real estate developer man about town. How does it feel taking pictures played women's for somebody else to do what Donald Trump did. with, up the climate of frenzy around this case. Tire. Free judging those arrested. Now I'm not judging it all. I'm I'm not in this particular case I'm saying if they're found guilty if the woman died, which hopefully will not be dying but if the woman died I, think they should be executed. He's saying kill and I never. COULD DESCRIBE? How enraged? To call for these kids to be. Lynched. It should be played at at a court of law not in the papers DOT TV. Those people who? Made this a media. Frenzy. And set us up so that we could be convicted in the press before we even went to trial how do you find a jury that's going to be impartial with five men that they've read deserve to be lynched it skews the jury. Asked him would like to execute them now is that chip position castrate him? Before this before the arraignment, this is before anything resembling a trial. They were not going to get the benefit of the doubt in that atmosphere. The key victim people are waiting to see if they hear from is the Central Park Investment Banking Jogger herself. Was One of the most anticipated riveting courtroom moments I have ever experienced. When I walked to the witness stand the first time I remember. I was very nervous. There's a big problem for the prosecutors. They don't have a shred of DNA and not a whole lot of evidence period that links the central park five to the crime, the victim or the seat. Next. And yet. The, police new. There's a missing man. That, there is a rapist out there. Something wanted May- fears. Was, we always felt that whenever got everybody? To be another guy. Just, hearing black lives matter these days receiving it too literal. Streets being painted. With. We've been reminding this age of Jewish floor that we haven't learned. We're still fly the central park five raises question that were still answering today. It's the crime of the century is what the mayor called. The case began central park could lead the most sensational trial ever the emotional trial underscored ugly racial Hanson City. What the scapegoats lambs led to the slaughter. How do you find a jury that's going to be impartial? Foregone conclusion the jury would. And I wish to God. I just hung jury. That's been my biggest regret for thirty years. There was a huge problem in this case something that haunted may fears we never got. The semen that was recovered the did not match any defendants. Bonafide Cycle. Path he's a serial rapist. We have news this morning on a case stunned the nation. Did you attack the SYMPA? Panchagarh I. Always knew that there is at least one more person involved in this store which change everything. mean. It. was a cauldron of emotion around this. And it was going to be very hard to give him a fair shot. They were tried and convicted in the in the Kangaroo Court of public opinion probably before the first weekend after the incident. The defendants are Bob to have their two months in court. That's how long it's expected to take Raymond Santana Yusef. Salaam Anthony mccray they are finally through the pretrial publicity and legal wrangling. The New York City. Attorney's Office to crackerjack out for and they put their best people on this case. This was like the. New York. Yankees. Playing Against Your High School Baseball team. You had Elizabeth Letter. And, of course Robert Morgan Fall on the other side, the defense attorneys in this case were outclassed out strategized and outlived to in terms of. Their ability to survive a case like this. Months. After the crime is committed the first of two trials in the Central Park jogger case outside of the courtroom the atmosphere it was pretty intense. There were always protesters. Al Sharpton had rallied a lot of people on behalf of the five. Staff. And there was always a line of people trying to get into the courtroom. There were people that wanted US dead. It became so dangerous that my mother camouflaged me. You know just so and it could be all right for me to walk around. Know that Elizabeth received death threats. So it was it was it was it was pretty serious. Those young man admitted to some. Part, what we call acting in concert in the law of either striking Tricia to bring her down to enable the sexual assault holding an arm or a leg. The first trial involved three defendants, Raymond Santana, and try mccray and Yusef Salaam. Clearly the statements were the most important evidence. What happened to her when she grant? Lopez. Can you hold? On his knees. On, the cover her mouth inherent. Whose? Size smack. The looks on the jurors faces when they watch those videotapes told a devastating story for the defense. You could see it. The jurors were engaged. They were riveted. They nodded their heads in some cases they were disgusted. It's clear as it has been for a year that prosecutors will depend on videotape statements by the suspects themselves. For when the defense went on offense this afternoon, it's strategy also became clear. Teams lawyer say confessions were cleverly staged the initial statement that the jury of the. is whether these statements voluntary or involuntary, and I think that that's a decision that the jury world not take a tremendously long period of time to make that initial decision. Somebody take those. I have watched some of the videotapes that were released. What was he doing with his hands? But with US US twenty. smacky. So Bitch Jessica is very, very hard watching someone descri-. Beat me how people were trying to stop my screaming by beating my face but key victim people are waiting to see if they hear from is the Central Park. Investment Banking Geogra- herself. With the trial Elizabeth Letter gave me the choice if I wanted to testify and. Shoot. In a vans which spread by reporters, the park jogger speaks in public for the very first time. She was unsteady walking to the witness stand what deliberate scars were visible around her left off when I walked. To the witness stand the first time I remember I was very nervous in who Was One of the most. Riveting Koru moments that I have ever experienced will she say she remembered something the courtroom was as silent as a library. TRICIA Miley did not have any memory of the attack, but she was called to the stand. She talked about what normal running practices had been, what she had been wearing she identified or clothing. I thought I know I have no memory but I wanted people to. The condition that I had been left in. She was put on the stand even when she couldn't remember anything. And that was helping to remind the jurors of this who this horrible thing happened to. She was sure of herself and intelligent. Courageous to be sitting there. Watching. The boys accused of doing this horrible crime and somehow she made it through the whole thing was very emotional and moving. They play new motions. Big Time they wanted to see her with the slurred speech. The Moon tour ahead it was powerful. It was. I told myself and my fellow chairs. That is not what this case about. It's about finding the right people. And we must not let our feelings of. Outrage about what happened to her? Causes to to leap to any kind of premature. Conclusions. There was a huge problem in this case the semen. Did. Not match any of the defendants and they didn't have. DNA evidence against these defendants, they didn't have physical evidence against these defense. The fact that they didn't find any DNA matches among the boys should have been of great concern. If you don't find their semen. It's really hard to make the argument that they committed the rain. So we as prosecutors were completely upfront with the jury about the fact that semen had been recovered from. TRICIA. Miley. The female jogger which did not match any of the people that were on trial and certainly Elizabeth letter or talked about it in some Asian. Eight encamp at the DNA. They didn't care about who did this to this woman they wanted to get this case off the books and these what escape goats lambs led to the slalom. Trial of the three young men accused of attacking the Central Park Jogger is coming close to the moment of truth the verdict. Came in. After ten days of deliberations, the verdict Yusef Salaam Raymond Santana, and mccray. All sixteen were convicted of a rape and assault to the central daughter about. Law and order in the nation's largest cities seemed to get a boost tonight as the first three us to be tried in the Central Park Jogger case where found guilty of gang rape and brutal assault and robbery. The emotional trial underscored ugly racial tensions in the city. Some demonstrators claiming the defendants were arrested just because they were black in the climate of New York City at that point in time there was no surprise about the verdict. Spector. Thought after the first trial will useless Salama the to. Maybe in the second trial today would say, well, we've got three disobeyed. But we always try to hope against hope. The two defendants in the second trial were Kevin Richardson and Corey. Wise. What's the old saying? If it ain't broke? Don't fix. The. US These confessions with effectiveness in the first trial strategy was if it worked. To work again, play the tapes and let the Jurors Jefferson's. Tapes girdle. In fact, it was so graphic some of the jurors at least a couple of them look like they're having a hard time watching it. It was the confessions that were on tape that were the heart of everything. The prosecutor kept going back to that emphasizing that constantly hammered into us. Legal Scholars have referred to confession evidence, the gold standard, the king of evidence, the sight and sound individual incriminate himself as powerful as it. In nineteen ninety, it was hard to believe that the police would actually hearse children into making false confessions. I. Don't think any of US could completely grasp that idea at that point in time. Pre. podcast documentary mode pre Netflix's people didn't know about false confessions, but the system knew about false confessions in the second trial, the jury struggled with Corey Weiss's confessions that were two statements they were all over the place. The facts were contradictory self contradicted. who was the first person to have sex with? Lewis Ran. It was I who had sex. Stay. In a sense and ironically. Corey, Weiss's lack of consistency ended up working in his favor at the trial because the jury wondered. Was it just all? Why you want to change. The. Cuban. Of Men He. said to my son. La. Took advantage. My whole innocent been. To Convince. The jury will saw confession tape of Corey wise in its entirety tonight and they're upstairs working deliberating right now and it looks like they're gonNa make this night a light one. I didn't believe that he had anything to do with the rape. Corey wise's confession in make any sense compared to do anything else it just it just didn't line up. Several the jurors kept at me and at me, they pushed me to go to the other direction and I wish to God. I just hung jury on that, and that's that's been my biggest regret for thirty years. Tonight too young men charged in that infamous attack face the prospect of spending several years their young lives behind bars. The courtroom was hushed the judge or the spectators to be quiet. Then the jury foreman read the verdicts carry wise found guilty of sexual abuse, first degree assault, and riot then with respect to Kevin Richardson guilty on every charge. Retrial was very intense. Elizabeth letter to her credit did a phenomenal job of putting the case together when. Writing. It was like the worst day of alive. So It was like somebody stabbing you in. And the haunting image that I will never forget is of my brother. At, US. Cry You. Suck then outside the family of Kevin Richards and aimed their grief at the press one man with a family picked up. Equal. And look like he was born to throw it. We like to believe that New York City is a gorgeous say trials like this. Reflect the fact that there's a deep correct in that mosaic especially released a young black men. McRae Richardson Santana Salaam. They all get five to ten and they go away as juveniles. One of them Corey Weiss is sentenced to five to fifteen as an adult even when admitting their guilt and expressing remorse might have actually given them a shot at being paroled sooner. None of them would. WAS IMPRISONED FOR CONDO DIDN'T COMMIT was just really being. Despair. You don't have your family around you want your family to. See Your family and your loved ones you want to see frame. I saw life standing stale, and the reason I say that is when you put someone in prison, they were outside moves forward. People have gotten all the. People have moved on. Die You know things have changed but they don't go anywhere. then five years after the trials are over the teenagers are in prison there's a milestone involving Tricia Meili. The fall of nineteen ninety, five Iran the New York City Marathon. I feel so proud. Hard work that guy. Was Hard I worked hard. In that moment. I realized I felt that I had reclaimed my car. And it was so exhilarating. Couple years after. Tricia Meili runs the marathon again. The teenagers who had been convicted start to come out of prison they're in their twenties. And so ultimately, the four men who had been fourteen and fifteen at the time were conditionally release based on time off for good behavior after about seven or eight years. I'm so bitter. got so much again. Let's type person. Cheap Also. allows. We, grew up in. Assistant. To tell my brother because you know what you Dave God knows what you did. So it doesn't matter what any man has to say you keep your head up high. Outraged with the verdict, we found many people blame the media. You've done enough damage as. The media fell down on its job. I'd put together a sample of two hundred, fifty, one articles representative of the coverage. Twelve articles not twelve percent twelve articles in that sample used the term alleged. If there's a fault some who covered the Central Park jogger story it may be I wasn't skeptical enough. We're live at Supreme Court in Lower Manhattan. Maybe we were. Too. Willing. To accept. A result that provided piece. When a better job in journalism is digging and digging and digging until you get to the bottom of the trough. Turned, out. That's where Matthias race. So, it's two thousand to new. York City is completely different place. There were still rubble in lower Manhattan from nine eleven. Here's a new mayor who just been. I Michael Bloomberg to. Swear to Central Park Five. In the back of everyone's consciousness thirteen years later for the Fath- had already served their time in prison. But Corey wise was still imprisoned. He gotten a longer sentence. He was in Auburn Correctional Facility, and then suddenly one of Corey wise's prison inmates comes for with the story that would change everything in this store the central park five, they are back in the headlines Prime Time investigation. The Central Park jogger out of the blue a serial Predator steps forward and turns the case upside. Takes Ray is a convicted homicide UIL serial rapist doing thirty three years to life in New York prison. I was lost man this only bad things so many people in. So many ways. He's a bonafide psychopath. Serial rapist he raped his own mother and raped and murdered a pregnant woman in front of her own two children baby same. Scheming. Issues like tossing these screaming. Raise came forward thirteen years after the central part attack. He at that time was doing life for a murder rape conviction and he had had an encounter with Corey. Wise years earlier in the jail in rikers island in new. Flash Ford. He sees him in that prison in upstate New York it seems Matisse race had a flash of conscience. And he decides he's going to take responsibility for the crime that he committed. He came forward to say that he had been the one who had committed the attack upon the. Jagger. Did you attack the Central Park Jogger had Did you rape her. Did you. Did you leave her for dead thought on the. Tires raise manages to get the attention of law enforcement and they do a DNA test and they take his DNA and compare it and Walla They have what they never had in the trials in nineteen ninety. which is a match. A perfect match. I always knew that there was at least one more person involved because there was unidentified DNA. So when I heard the news that wasn't a tremendous surprise but when he said that he and he alone had done it. That's when some of the turmoil started and wondering well, how can that be? When I first heard that they got the matching DNA with Reyaz. I was like Oh. That's great. We got the final Guy Guy who'd gotten away originally in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety. But then he turned around and said, did he did it by himself? Alone, that night. Time I went out to do any crimes or anything like. was always a loan. Muscle The lady she was jogging. I wouldn't be in zigzagging back and forth from one side of the road to the horse rider pads. Sometimes walking sometimes dogging just given high enough distance. At the right hand side are so piece of branch did a stroke overhead with a branch and she felt forward. A Grad the two dragons Bush's has dragged there I remember they took over close. Race new some things about the victim and the crime that had never been revealed, and then only a person who was there now. Act, can you give me the address to our house because I found some keys in a little black one of clue bags jogging sometimes where she say anything So I. Guess I think the escalated the angle would have another beating preceding from. Thought I left the for them. We have news this morning, a case that stunned the nation. A New York prison said that he was the guilty one, not them and the case may be reopened. This after thirteen years is chaos for the New York City. District Attorney's Office for the Police Department for the political system in New York. What we have the real rapist, they didn't do this. Whole thing down. When. This individual came forward it was like all the prayers that people have made in the past all the all the time. My loved ones and people told me listen it's going to be right. The truth is gonNA, come out. Is like. That has been answered. Appraise have been answered. The investigation into anti-israeli his and his story was conducted by the District Attorney's office. Is One hundred percent with the district attorney turn on my then and things that got away with things I do because I've been in one to hold anything back. I went down the with open book. Spring into the summer of nineteen, eighty nine, there was a rash of violent rapes. All along Madison Avenue culminating the murder of a woman ninety seventh street. Rape Call Them Mataya SRT race. was, the east side rapist. The police officer investigating that had his DNA marker in that file. What if the rapes associated with that case took place in Central Park. Not far from where the Central Park Jogger had been. Attacked he'd committed the raping two nights earlier in Central Park. And he was right there all along the rape on April seventeenth. We knew nothing about none of us in homicide of. April's. Sex Crimes dealt with rapes. There's no sharing of information. Maybe there is today. But back then you know they had a full caseload ours was ridiculous. CASE THAT Really, shocked, this country is about to take another stunning turn. This morning Manhattan District Attorney is going to ask to overturn the convictions of five people who were convicted in the one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine crime violently assaulting a young female investment banker. Da Morgenthaler believe that an injustice had been committed to the central park five and basically moved to. Withdraw. The charges that they had raised this woman. In their entirety. Came up praised for this day. Over four, my son and everybody. One day Tim. Tenure Twenty And we all get the victim. Ga gave us the victory. When this came out. We want our saying. From the sex prime predatory. Database I could imagine what he went through. Time I don't WanNA BE WANNA think about. It hard when you. Can't prove something but you gotta keep going. Doesn't undo the years they spent in prison. Some excited. That doesn't undo the psychological damage that doesn't do the shattered lives of these kid. That, stain is very hard to remove. Once you've been accused. Rapists. Even though at charge was removed from the police file. How do you go back to a normal life? Could imagine what went through some tomato want to. Think about it, but you gotta keep going. And I need to be going poor ham. Brass's chains. Everything is now a new narrative. The district attorney has vacated the convictions. But. Now, what happens to Corey Wachs he still has. Played. Away. Thanks for. Being deprived. Of Life. It criminal. MMA vitamin lockdown for so long. Going from Yawn. To Sell Blah. Going from Self Nazi y'all. Tell people say crumbs better than nothing. Mkaku woman. I want my whole cake. Even if disease at thirteen years. When you have a son who has been accused of these types of crimes and has gone to prison. This like something, you never forget this something you never get over. You live with it every day. When I got out I talk a lot to deal. And they would just broken. Everything changed. And they were like, how do I pick up my life for? What am I supposed to do? and. Then even after it is proven scientifically DNA, you didn't do the crime you have people that say you. Doesn't prove that they're innocent. It just means that in the eyes of the law, their convictions no longer exist when Matthias Raya says, he did it alone. It's not just the prosecutors in the cops who don't believe it Trish mailing herself doesn't think he could have done by himself. Is Medical, evidence to support. That more than one person was responsible for the attack on me. My injuries are different. From what Matteis raise? Claimed that he was the sole attacker, we have not discussed. With her they were handprints Preston into her skin that looks red. Wine. Also different sizes so it looks like to me. More than one person doing. The New York City Police Department. Ends up feeling it needs to do something to tell its side of the story, and so the police commissioner decides to a point. Michael Armstrong will deliver the Armstrong report. Was Not considered someone who is big. PROCON. person. Try to piece together what happened fourteen years after it happened was theoretical at best buy anybody. Detective to change your. Statement. Are You doing your own? I don't think there is any credible evidence at. That anything was done an improper way to make them talk. So the police led investigation concluded that the police didn't do anything. We felt that the most likely scenario involved attack by a large number of people, and then she was dragged into the woods there raise either by himself or group perhaps with others practical killed him into the horrendous rape he jumps. Throat into the realm of speculation, and once again, there's mud on the central park five. The difficulty I. Have With downstream report is then to say they had something to do. They weren't convicted of some. They were convicted of the rape. And the attack. So seems to me like you just WanNa make something stick to justify hysteria. It's not a very satisfying document if you're looking for hard proof, but it does become the basis of the city saying we're not sure enough about more those conclusions that we want to issue an apology and pay a settlement to these kids. I think the accident happened. What they did to. The next chapter in the story is they Su-. They feel that they were railroaded. Into prison, they lost years of their lives they want justice for the demo money. Michael Bloomberg is the mayor when this lawsuit is five. Bloomberg was not going to settle this case. There's nothing to be gained by any politician anywhere in the United States advocating on the behalf of these five young. And then things changed again. Documentaries introduced and we see how it can be a game changer in the case. No money could bring the life that was missing. With the time that was taken away breaking bad. A. We are at a point where the lawsuit filed by the members of the central. Park five against the city has been dragging for a decade. Bloomberg administration steadfastly took the position the proper one that in order for the plaintiffs to prevail the have to show that there was some policemen's behaviour. Then along comes Sarah Burns and she decides she's going to take a look at the case and I was really interested in that historical backdrop for this story. So I wrote a book about that case that came out in twenty eleven but it became clear that making a film was maybe the best way to tell the story. So in two, thousand and thirteen, this documentary comes out. Interviewing the five and putting them on camera in a way that they hadn't really been before I think was a new thing. We'll forget wichita laws no money to bring their life that was missing. Why me? God out a couple of times. You know my faith is gone low seven years of my life. I love that sense. Of. Change a life. And eating on. Such, a media-friendly. We were scared. To. Speak. But now we take this. We wherever it as a badge. And people see us through we are. Documentary out. It succeeds not just to in raising what reasonable people would consider doubt as to the guilt of the Central Park Five, it raises the possibility that they're actually innocent. That film was made while we had the equivalent of a gag order from a federal judge. We could not speak publicly the daughter of the filmmaker had worked for the legal team the five. So I. Didn't exactly think we'd get a fair hearing. Kenan Sarah Burns did this city and it did our country huge disservice they perpetrated ally. They created this myth of these kids who are railroaded when that never happened. When documentary came out, it was a huge deal. I think the documentary really laid the groundwork for some of the steps that occurred afterwards. I. Think that the moral issues quite clear bill de Blasio is running for mayor in different New York City an injustice was done and we have a moral obligation to respond to that injustice. Here's this scart. From the dark. That hasn't healed the Central Park case I build a Blasios and he says is a campaign promise. I'll settle. They spent a lot of their lives in jail in prison wrongly. And we have an obligation to turn the page. We have an obligation to do something. Fair for them, but for the whole city, turned the page and move forward. Federal judge has approved a forty one million dollars settlement with the five men wrongly convicted in the central park jogger attack. Justice. The settlement in this case was forty one million dollars close to defendants each received seven million dollars, Corey wise received thirteen. This is amazing. Certainly, they were given a substantial amount of money, but they were not given back through good name. It's a classic settlement on the on the one hand the defendant's get forty, one, million dollars on the other hand. The city sticks by its cops and prosecutors. It's we're not going to hang out to dry. They did not engage in police misconduct they did not engage in prosecutorial misconduct. I. Just don't understand a settlement for that kind of behavior. Sorry. I so wish that the case had been settled I support the work of law enforcement and prosecutors at the time they treated me with such dignity and respect. Do Salat. has given us our lives. Now and they're arguably taking a victory. The, Central Park five believed that the system worked against them. Now they're the ones telling their story consulting on the net flicks dramatization of their case. Mini series titled. When. They seats. In the Netflix series when they see us I think America saw one black America has always seen. Given. See Lady we talking about the Park. and See lady or in any way Raymond saw. Was rainman often times justice system in America treats of color different. After when they see US air, there was significant public outcry. And there's been a lot of fallen. Linda Fairstein has filed suit against Netflix and the film's director Eva Devante claiming that when they see castor as a villain and at the for trail is false and defamatory Netflix's and do vernay reject those claims of asked the court to dismiss Fairstein complaint. Kids are the winners. The five of them went to Central Park to beat up people and they ended up with millions of dollars, their heroes, their civil rights icons, and it's just appalling. Dependency you talk to you'll get a different take on the central park. But all people are in agreement about tricia violet in what she endured in what she's doing with her life. She's advocating for the improvement of freight kits. Nice. Speak to groups all around the country all different kinds of groups. My work now is standing with survivors of brain injury of sexual assault of other kinds of trauma. Central. Case happen. Again. Absolutely. But only safeguard be halved to prevent that from happening. Is History. And our recognition of what happened in that moment. The are takeaways, the interogations before reported. Simplest That's transparency and you know what my question is when you don't do that. You want me to say. Fast. Forward what we now we have black lives matter where they're picking up some of the threads as. Just Straits as. To the belief. People of Color have been making in this nation since the day we Iran. That we are human that our lives matter. Feeling has been system doesn't work for us. To make sure. That we don't. Choose to highlight justice for one and ignore justice for others. More than thirty years later, they're still are no winners in this case. A woman was raped her life devastate five young men lost their freedom the central park. Five. Questions that were still answering today we've been reminded this. Floor. That we haven't. We're still flow

Central Park Lower Manhattan rape New York City prosecutor Central Park Jogger Kevin Richardson US Donald Trump Corey wise Kevin York City Central Park Five Elizabeth corey Yusef Salaam Corey Weiss Michael Bloomberg TRICIA Miley Yusef Salaam Simple Park
Byte Kate Anderson And Elyssa Samsel

Sci-Fi Talk

04:18 min | 2 months ago

Byte Kate Anderson And Elyssa Samsel

"Hi Welcome to season two of bite. This is Tony till auto. Parenting. In apocalypse it's it's not the same way. You you know how it works any views, usually two to four minutes long but sometimes, they can be a little longer. When you when you live long enough all kinds of strange things happen. Very right in saying that the Greek heroes, the original superheroes. In part because of the hopeful nature of genes vision but also because of its message of diversity and inclusion. ILLICIT SEM cell in Kate. Anderson. Are Composers collaborated loss frozen adventure and the animated series Central Park the ladies talk about women composers working together. For very fortunate to have had long price that we looked up to and other female composers that had broken glass ceiling and created a packs for us to follow. I'll never forget being about twenty years old and. A song called a musical theater song called Taylor tape boy that had been written by Marcy. Marcy Heisler Zina Goldrich and when I looked up at the top of the page to see who had written it, I was shocked because I'd never seen two female names on a sheet a piece of sheet music. Even with all the years of classical training and all the music that I learned from the age of six. So seeing that inspired me to then pair up with Kate and become law names on the top of sheet music. So the girls can see that realized I can do this to. Being two women in this industry is it's definitely had its challenges, but we feel so grateful that right now and over the last ten years or so there's been a lot of real need for females and for women to comment until these stories to write material is really authentic to the experience and put him were A. Driven waste on things. You know. Sadly, we don't see enough of that in Asia shame. And how do they work they talk process our process is yeah different for various projects or project. It's also varied a lot through the years US figuring out how to work together and then at the more work, we have these kind of figuring out how to do it very quickly. And generally on behalf in idea. I, Song will start out by talking about the lyrical hook. Enemies of the hook, and landing on that I lear- Lyrical Hook I just because we want to figure out what what's going to drive a song introduced what's GonNa get us the most real estate on getting us from Point A. TO POINT C So what what phrase can we have us at? Different meetings or a grout Asong so that we can have a an evolution plot and then we oftentimes right music I so. You will generally when we have our. Lyrical Hook, go off and come up with a musical structure and handed activity in often lyrics throughout that are helpful in guiding the structure and I'll take a swing at at at flushing out a little more than the we collaborate until we feel like it is perfect. So we do back and forth and I walk conversation. Over the phone or in person to try and get it all nailed out nail down ready to go out on Oh, look for owners frozen adventure on. Disney. And Central Park is on Apple TV plus of Note Josh Gad who voices and sings for. Also Co created Central Park and he also got another frozen cast made on board and Kristen Bell to voice a character. For Bite this is Tony Taylor.

Marcy Heisler Zina Goldrich Central Park Tony Taylor US Kate Josh Gad Disney Kristen Bell Anderson Asia lear Apple four minutes twenty years ten years
ENTREPRENEUR | #3 Central Park, Halfpipes and Ice Cream

On The Verge

13:08 min | 4 months ago

ENTREPRENEUR | #3 Central Park, Halfpipes and Ice Cream

"Credit Iraq ready to raw ready to rock with another story. That actually isn't a total failure as I've been writing out all the stories of my businesses. I'm like Oh failure. Failure kind of little success. Failure failure failure stupid idiot. What should you that lower? Welcome to on the verge with me. Karen Bradley this Special Series called Entrepreneur was produced by my daughter. Julianna during our months together in quarantine the intention of the short series is to share the full picture of my career starting enclosing businesses including those often left out stories of crash and burn failures in this episode. I move past the burning emperors of Blade Skate well into my next few ventures. I'll share my fun. Adventures partnering with Rollerblade the Pioneer of inline skating. Oh and did I mention that there's ice cream? And sprinkles involved stay tuned? Thanks for listening. So after the crumble of Blade Skate wear. I immediately started teaching rollerblading in Central Park. How did you learned in Lionsgate? Was it just pretty natural after ice skating? Yeah I mean totally so for for skaters have players figure skaters. It is like heaven because you're not confined to Arinc. I mean I had New York City was my rank and I skated every inch in New York City. So rollerblade was just getting started. I started teaching in Central Park and started to meet other inline skaters and I heard that rollerblade. The company was coming to New York to do auditions for their performance. Team team rollerblade. They had a small group in La and they wanted to create a group at a New York and we would represent rollerblade in Really promoting inline skating around the world. I got it I got it. I was one of four female skaters in New York City on team rollerblade. It was pretty cool and you got it because of the cart wheel. Oh my gosh. You remember the cart wheel so we were on Broadway in auditions and we had to do a cartwheel on rollerblades. There were a couple of women that could do a cartwheel and there were a bunch of women cooking myself. Couldn't to everybody went to lunch and I must've done. I don't know two hundred or more cartwheel's until I could nail it and I nailed it so I got the part. I got the part as part of team rollerblade and we started to do hip hop shows on rollerblades. It was kick ass back that I mean we were hot shit. Let me tell you because we were all over New York City on skates doing these shows and then we start to travel and so he traveled around the globe. I went to Japan for a bunch of weeks and we did. Tv shows and trade shows. And then I did a six week tour in Europe all over the place. We skated under the Eiffel. Tower skated everywhere. And we were like these Martians on skates because a lot of people didn't know about inline skating so they would see us fly by and they were like. Oh my God what are they doing? So that's how we created the buzz just by being out in the town on skates. It was really fun. I mean inline. Skating was huge. It was huge for about ten years and at one point in Central Park. I mean there were more people on inline skates and they were on bikes. It was so much fun to be part of that trend so happen to be at the right place at the right time. And that's really important because I learned the smell of Trent and I think that has served me since so fast forward. We moved up to New Hampshire because Brian had grown up in keene New Hampshire and his parents were still there and I started to teach skating so I was thrust out of New York City and into a small mountain town in New Hampshire and I started Bradley Skate. School and started teaching skating locally. In the meantime I licensed the name Camp Rollerblade from rollerblade and started to offer skate camps weekend skate camps for adults and kids under the name of Camp Rollerblade. The first one I did was in Stratton Vermont and we built half pipes and had two hundred or more people come to spend the weekend at Stratton Mountain to learn how to skate pretty cool. We had people coming from all over the country for the weekend to learn how to inline skate. 'cause it was really really hot back then. We advertised in inline skating. Magazines and I think in the magazine was a form to fill out an send your check in. I remember everyday checking the mailbox for registrations for camp rollerblade crazy one big project. I was approached by a video production company to create a inline skating instructional video. It's called Skate fit and we produced this really great skating video and QVC was up and coming and they were going across the country and they wanted to highlight products from each state and they wanted to use skate. Fit as one of their showcased News Hampshire Products Tho- Skate fit by Caroline Bradley at Maple Syrup and Maple Syrup right and probably like knitted socks or something. I don't know so they wanted to buy. I don't know two thousand or more videos to sell on. Qvc for their New Hampshire Day. But they're caveat was that they wanted to return whatever didn't sell kind of sounds like nordstroms right but it wasn't my choice because I didn't own the video my video producers did and they declined. They declined I had nothing I could do. I couldn't believe it. Qvc was going to sell the videos. Now I had learned from blades gateway all right with Nordstrom's but I had no power so we had to let it go and they continued to push the video in other ways And then I also wrote a book called Inline Skat- New England so that is my. That was my first book. I don't know I think it might have sold five hundred copies honestly. Well I bought a copy for two dollars on Amazon a couple of years ago. Get Out. No I'm not kidding. You was from Germany on in Germany was selling in. Lionsgate ringling too. It's funny because I think if you search now for skate fit the video I think you can find it in German somewhere so weird so there it is so scathing started to fate for me and then we opened the cone. Klopp talk about a right turn and the cone club. I just have to say it was not my idea that the cone club your idea yes. Why wasn't sure if you would claim otherwise? Yeah no I had the idea of a country club for a country cover ice cream. Guess Oh yeah. He had the brilliant idea of buying this property with two partners and building out a an ice cream shop in a miniature golf course. D Say Brilliant sarcastically totally. Yeah but I went along with it because we were entrepreneurs so we see opportunities and we go down that path that rabbit hole. We see if it's viable and we take it and so we did and we opened up a ice cream shop and ninety thousand dollar Miniature Golf Course in Kenya Hampshire. The town was in love with us. People lining up to play miniature golf in have their soft serve ice cream. And you in your sister would walk into the cone club. Every day you would pull a cone from the sleeve and you'd stick it up. You were too short to do it yourself. And you'd stick it up under the soft. Serve your soft serve ice cream every day and so there. We were in business again. Bricks and mortar business. We expanded to open an arcade like a little Dave and buster's or chucky cheese in our big warehouse. And what the Hell were we doing? In many ways. The cone club drove out of Keane. The club is still there just called sprinkles now but it's still in Keane. It's still isn't ice cream shop. That is our legacy in keene. New Hampshire is sprinkles. Well I remember Your Dad in. I one Sunday afternoon cleaning out the ice cream vats and there we were like with our hands in these huge machines and he looked up at me and he said you know you can make a buck in so many different ways and this isn't one of the ways that I wanna make a buck anymore. And that's when we we basically just fled. We laughed. We left town. During the time I started to find solace in Yoga. I went to a video store and I special ordered a yoga. Vhs With Kathy. Smith and Rod Stryker and I took that vhs and did it every day while you and your sister napped the same video. And I would go down to the basement and I would do this yoga practice. And that was the beginning of my journey into Yoga So this is the amazing thing. Is that people look at verge. Yoga sixteen year old business steady growth steady expansion impeccable reputation incredible success and they. It's so easy for them to just think. Oh good timing on that business or lucky you know and they have no idea the skeletons in my closet. I mean literally. I have so many failures behind me. Well why you're doing this right. It's why I'm doing this. I really want people to recognize that. Most entrepreneurs do not strike gold the first time out. I mean there's no way.

rollerblade New York City New Hampshire Camp Rollerblade cone club Lionsgate Karen Bradley Skating Central Park QVC Skate Julianna Iraq Europe Central Park keene New Hampshire Japan La Stratton Mountain Kenya Hampshire
The Great Is Very Good. Plus Kristen Bell on Central Park, Veronica Mars, and Frozen.

The Watch

1:05:36 hr | 4 months ago

The Great Is Very Good. Plus Kristen Bell on Central Park, Veronica Mars, and Frozen.

"Hello and welcome to the ringer podcast network this week. The ringer is launching a new. Podcast feed called boom bust to new hub for narrative. Podcasts documenting the rise and fall of companies celebrities and trends season one hosted by our own Elizabeth Snack takes you through this spectacular journey. Hq Trivia the ones one hundred million dollar industry altering company turned disaster elicit interviewed dozens of former employees investors journalists and fans bringing you the behind the scenes story of how HQ crumbled from within subscribed boom bust HQ Trivia and check out the first two episodes out now on spotify. Or wherever. You get your podcasts theft. And then walk now. Hello welcome to the watch. My name is Chris Ryan. I am an editor at the ringer. Dot Com. Join me on the other line. He'd like a bear. It's degree well. Do you want to explain that? Works still no well. There was a time I think in culture where it was okay to make like these sort of obtuse references and it would just be like you do you find me somewhere down the rabbit hole where I am. But that's a reference to the new show the great which we were talking about a little bit today. Andy we were also joined by an all time. Watch guests I think for both of us the star of two thousand and four Spartan Christie doesn't thirteen's frozen two thousand and nineteen frozen too with probably a bunch of stuff. In between Kristen. Bell is on the watch. We talked about frozen a lot and Ian Kristen Bell talked a lot about frozen. I talked to her about Veronica Mars. Okay but let's set this up more charitably so she entered. People reached out there like Chris wants to come on the watch talk about her new apple. Tv Plus Max. Show central central central guests. Which is which is very durable. And it's a it's a animated show. Co created by her frozen co-conspirator Josh Gad along with Loren Bouchard who does Bob's burgers. Great cast big concepts lot of fun full disclosure. Catholic Leslie Odom Junior. Like the whole gang's their divide digs. Stanley Tucci Internet's favorite Stanley Tucci. But to be very clear here. I was not granted access to these screeners. And so what we have is a little bit of a seesaw and interview now. I was thrilled to be a part of it. I was thrilled to be in the room. Where it happens shouts Junior while you guys talked about Central Park and then Yada Yada Veronica Mars. Good place in then then. The snow's came. Winter is coming winter came. I finally got to talk about the dominant cultural force in my life from the last years. Which is the Disney frozen franchise and that was pretty cool and it was very too because you know. I know that many people who are not members of the data center hive might think that this is in some way like a performed fandom because of just like Stockholm Syndrome because I can assure them it's not. I truly think that these movies are pretty. Brilliant and the writing and story construction in particular A lot the credit for that goes to Jennifer Lea and so to hear Christian talk about how much work generally Chris. Buckner that people on the creative team of those movies puts into it was really fascinating and also dare say at gratifying. We did spoil them a little bit for you for you. Chris. I haven't quite different these. You haven't seen the films yet so D- feel like less likely to do it now. Did you see that the famous Popstar visit Sierra? Did you see that? She adopted like two teenage boys. Like older boy. She adopted large adult sons. I I'M GONNA adopt some large adult sons who've already aged out of frozen so that we my family unit. We can just look back. It's kind of past that. What are you gonNA go dirt biking and paintball on the weekends? What what are you looking for? What what makes you think that I would adopt? Kids just to make it into eastbound and down. I think you're adopting the children from Talladega Nights. You're pitching me here and frankly I could see it. Yeah and I was like because I'm watching outer banks and there's a DS foster care plotline Outer Banks by the way highly recommend for anybody who wants escape TV. Maybe we could talk about that someplace. Sure it's basically goonies meets the. Oh see okay set in every the banks of what North Carolina of your own despair. I don't know I I've done a lot of traveling in my mind. Recently that I mentioned I crack page five hundred on the Magic Mountain. I have actually when I was a kid but I don't I. I REMEMBER. Thinking was very beautiful. Any other relevant place I ever came across the phenomenon known as the route through the drive thru. Beer Fridge Schweiger. You go and you you just sale to case Miller and they're like it's in your car. It's kind of weird but it's very convenient outer banks Yada Yada. Let me get back to where I was. That has a foster care subplot so I then with the news of his man. It's all coming together for me to adopt a twenty year old. Who's already dependent when you think he's GonNa think of you though and you're like hey first of all. Are you ever going to use this child? Man Man Child name or you just going to sign the adoption papers and turn. It'd be like get in the car buddy buddy from jump what do you mean like am I gonNa am? I going to rename him at twenty. No I just mean like what what. What is your level of intimacy going to be and I mean this completely in a straightforward way like in terms of parenting like. What do you think you will excel at a twenty year old that you would falter at? I thought he and I could like right. Our characters back stories kind of like a little like acting theater like workshop. Kind of thing where it's like. What kind of relationship that we have and you know kind of like more like a you know like I I was emotionally vacant. But then I became a emerged later in life and really taught you some lessons or was I really like field of dreams. Always there for you kind of thing. It seems like you just WanNa play a role playing game like it. Seems like you get final. Fantasy seven remake. Well it seems like you have to watch a lot of frozen skipped. This is the whole full circle. Can I ask you another question for you know because I was I was I was looking forward to talking to you today? Good you want something else you know. I want you to just dial it up. I WanNa put you on the spot here and I know But I feel like this is our brand now in general so people are ready to roll with it. I had a In anniversary of my birth this week I another another another trip around around the old son. You know looking over thirty. Three that is that is not true. I saw myself in direct sunlight recently. But thank you and what I'll say is I was feeling mostly okay because the system the OS has started breaking down yet. You know what I mean about their exercise and I'm trying to try to I. I'm I'm reading about Lenna del Rey on the Internet. Like I'm just trying to keep keep it not one hundred but like like eighty five down. I mean like. I'm just trying to keep Sammy Hagar style. Yeah and I can still basically I have most of my faculties But there is one thing that I noticed that has changed as I've reached these last few ages and I'm curious if you have a similar thing and for me it's that I have you know a few years ago moved out here to Los Angeles home to many things would also a great array Burger town. Like we're the Burger became very popular like drive-thrus Etcetera Etcetera Burger spots. My children really like frozen but they also really like this is pretty out there. They like Burgers and fries is a popular meal thing. It's something that like the dad will do with them. Take them out but real. Maybe we'll do this with your twenty year old son Buddy As I said two one. We're GONNA have one burger and then shake I've done all I can't it'd be like you WanNa have a catch you'll be like not really carpal tunnel from blogging all day. So my only point was to say that I noticed recently that if I have a cheeseburger like nothing crazy not like double thick burger with big and just like a cheeseburger from a reputable establishment. I am fucking pancakes for the rest of the day. It's the sodium like or else the the animal fats and whatever but this is forty. Yeah welcome to the club. You can't do that but I am a guy like I. You Know I. I used to take care of people's cheeto problems for a living. You know what I mean like I could handle high sodium count and I can mess with that stuff but at a cheeseburger. It's not leaves. I'll tell you exactly what you it is because it leaves me feeling like I used to feel after three nights out at fi with you in the fellas in the early two thousands. We were not meant to sit at home and podcast all day freight like back in the day. We used to crush those kinds of lunches hunter-gatherers. No but we would like first of all. You're talking the very important distinction you made is the fact that we moved to the west coast so it used to be that you could go out and even if you had a big lunch you can walk off man you could get. You could get the blood pumping and a really good way and here. I just feel like especially in these days like your boy has to have a salad or a rap because if I go like Oh make myself like a Turkey Sandwich. It's like you won't see me at three o'clock by man because I will be snoozing give it. I feel like California thing rather than an east coast thing. East Coast also. I used to like drink four cups of coffee and smoke a pack of camel lights today so I think the engine was burning a little hotter back. Then I completely agree with you. Like the idea of having a cheeseburger for lunch is like I might as well have an ambient drip pumpkin into my jugular. There's no there's no coming back from that but I ran five miles this morning. I was like I am going to get where I need to be in a sort of like carbo protein blown away. We'll just devour this and I was like this is GonNa be okay for me and I gotta be honest with you. It's not okay. I think you're trading baseball cards. You're like if I do this then. This work but it has to be holistic man. It has to be like a full three sixty. How how much do isolate Joe Rogan right now? The worker one hundred percent like Joe. Chris will be till you need to be on all carnivore diet. Look there's a lot of research out there. Okay it's all say but my point is Andy is like I to think there is a degree to which you're trying to bargain with yourself. You're like if I run wants. I can have a burger but the burger is always going to take you down. You know. It's The a cool class submarine floating around the North Atlantic looking to take down your USS Dallas. And it's like you. I don't know why I went into a red October metaphor there but did that's just the way it is it's a. I don't I don't think it's about you. I think it's about just the way we live in California but I I hear you. I think it's the way we live by being born in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven because I I don't know no disrespect to the hustle by by you or my other colleague Mr Rogan. But like I don't sit around and podcast all day. That's true voice a week I come in. Come in hot chat with you and then then. I'm about my day paper chasing butterflies. Whatever blood affects not just teaching Do you have anything like that? That you can talk about on. A family friendly podcast. What do you mean do I? Are there other areas? Are there other metaphorical fastballs? They've definitely take down a couple takes on the old speed gun. Well I mean any kind of lake real physical activity. I admire your ability to run eight miles. I I never. I was always pretty spry guy. You know what I mean. I think anybody who knows me knows I have a lot of like a flex like I'm just like a jumpy. I like I have a lot of physical energy and I still do but now I think I pretty routinely like terrace seal undiagnosed. I think I shred my knees. My Angle Burst Verte raise. I don't even know but it's just not uncommon to just wake up and be like that that feels like that feels like it's torn you know then I slug it out. You play her but just general pains. It's funny you say that. I do think that people are longtime listener. Should know actually are longtime listeners? Will assume this. But like if you go or if you went to the old ball yard with young see Ryan like between the years of ninety nine and twenty fourteen. Let's say we go to citizens bank park before we destroy ourselves with a Tony Luke. Sandwich Chris is the guy who will be like. I'M GONNA go through a couple of fastballs in the cage like I'm GonNa go. I'M GONNA just test up a gun. See if they got it right. Yeah like well well into your thirties. You're just uncorking him. Yeah Kid flies close to the sun you know and none of the off speed stuff either. No I don't know how to throw it. It's all I got. It was Mario Rivera. I have to pitches. It gets you through well okay. I feel like I've learned a lot but I I. I guess by admitting this I now can't have the special time with my children and we'll have to instead watch more animated Disney movies. It is really nice is of a piece with the texts I received from you usually at about like two fifty where you log on twitter for the first time today. And you're like I'm in a sodium psychedelic as what happened to Lana del Rey. I was also just like if you don't if you log off for a while which by the way please I beg. You don't know what happened to her that what happened. Why did she? I don't know anything. I what I meant was there. Are these things that will come across the transom. Which are they come? Freighted with this fascinating mix of what is this. And I don't really have to know do I. In the these are competing impulses right. Where my desire to understand what people are talking about? Is it once subsumed in almost carried away by my deep loathing of of all of it do you think is GonNa title this podcast. Get a lot of these fucking guys. I think that that's the file name. That's already opened right eater. I don't I don't know I mean I don't know what's going to delray. I've never understood what's going on Woodland del Rey. I've got a lot of fire. Ball takes on the nineteen seventy five that. I'm just going to yell at a cloud later. Why don't instead? Why don't we pivot to the one place where our perspective somehow still carries a tiny bit of a simulated water in that is a world in which prestige television show about Catherine? The great of Russia is is hip? Let's talk about angry because this was a show that for whatever reason and this I think happens to everybody but for me you know sometimes I do not grab by something saucy Trailer for show. And I'll just be like that's pretty good and there is something we've discussed this in different contexts before but sometimes good can be the enemy of interest like if you can establish that something seems like. I'm sure it's competent. But you're you're not drawn to the subject matter or something arresting about the first few minutes or the trailer or the performers or the dialogue or whatever it is that its competence is almost a barrier to entry. I would say that might have been the problem for me with the Great. I don't know why it was written by Tony McNamara. Who wrote the favorite? Although I will say that we should note that apparently the degrade script is the one that got him the job rating the rewrite of the favorite. So the the great in some ways precedes the favorite. The great began as a play in two thousand eight and then took a long and winding paths to the screen but yes it was basically what the tone in that script is. What got him The favourite which if you didn't know that you might be forgiven for thinking. Well you might think you were essentially watching like Fargo kind of or Friday. Night Lights or forty. If you're like an extension of the snow piercer. Yeah an extension of a of a movies. You cinematic universe kind of thing and while there are some chronological similarities. I guessed to the great and the favorite there. Different characters Nicholas Holes in both. And we'll get to him but I think the biggest thing that he shares is tone and a sensibility now. It's notable that the favourite was directed by your at the Mos great great filmmaker Who I think we were really hoping to see. He was rumored to be making an Oliver North Limited series with Colin Farrell for Amazon. But I think that was part of the Great Amazon is cutting people. Ten million dollar checks never asking where the show is period. They brought us too old to die young but not a lot else. Your ghost is not involved in this series and it's not necessarily like an extension of the fears shitty but I did find myself sometimes missing the your goes if at all but still quite entertained by this show so I watched two episodes. I don't know how many you got a chance. Check out. Yeah I would say I hear your point but I also think that it's worth articulating the differences both between this project and the favourite but also the difference in general between a successful TV series in a successful film for sure so biggest strokes just to be clear about what's going on here This is a ten part season potential for more seasons to come about the I would say the rough education of a French noblewoman. As she becomes empress of Russia Catherine the great and played by L. Fanning an actress who I guess I didn't know how to dinner. You know I can't say I've spent a lot of time on the founding train and you know have enjoyed her work in some things like she was pretty good in Coppola movie. But I haven't been checking for enough to realize that. She's a pretty strong charismatic and funny performer and in the pile which is really well made. She traveled to Russia for the first time in his both disabused of all of her innocence and abused by her new husband. Emperor Peter Played various members of his court as well. Yeah play by Nicholas. Hold and the tone. If you've seen the favourite will recognize it is very anachronistic. Very Arch. Very cutting Ray Savage in its in its humor in its depiction of kind of just a amoral. Tawdry backstabbing pile of sin. Basically which is the the palace And I would also say that much like death Stalin onto new cheese zone from a couple of years ago and even to some extent. Tom Stoppard's adaptation of Anna Karenina. That came out a while back with cure nightly instructed by Joe Ray it brings a certain British sense of irony to a Russian setting and obviously also everybody is speaking a British accent. So I guess what I wanted to say. Though in relation to the movie thing is yes this. The pilot in particular directed by match ackman is really really talented primarily TV. Directories worked on. Look him up. He's he's worked on all your favorite. Yeah Right Fargo was well. It isn't the favorite favorite is both brilliant and hilarious it also features three world class performances but it also has what a great director brings to something which is an incredible point of view and and a very sharp focus. The favourite would not work over ten hours. It is very very sharp. Very very cutting. It feels like that would ever glue as USTA. Such the scenes together. I mean it is. It's razor thin. Yeah just flows and works and what I actually came to admire about the great as I start as I got a little bit. Further into. It is that somehow. It's an even more at least in the early going impressive. Balancing Act of tone. Because you can't just be cynical in mean-spirited about this if you're going to grow the show and grow the characters you have to have room to actually and I know this is the stuff that great artists possibly great artists. Like your goes. Don't want to hear but you gotTa root for somebody you know. You gotTa have some skin in the game. Otherwise you're just gonNA tune out and it's going to become a snake pit you know and I I actually think that that was ultimately. What kind of kept my ardor for veep? It's later seasons a little bit at arm's length like I was brilliant performers doing the highest level jokes. But it was just essentially like doing jealous shooters full of venom. Yeah we've had this conversation about a couple of different shows right. We talked about it. I think we talked about this with Sam. About Sam Esmail about succession. We've talked about race when it comes. To veep rate I think any satire. Any really dark hearted comedy that wants to really skewer. It's it's subject matter. Runs the risk of also losing? That will who am I? Who Am I ruining for here issue and even in the favorite? Like what like what you're saying like you. You are sort of initially tied to Emma Stone because you are arriving on the scene just as she is and the same thing goes for just goes for the great like there's a similar entrance for for Catherine I agree with you. It's like in movies especially. I think that you can get away with a little bit more than you can. In shows because a movie you can leave people shocked or emotionally impacted by revealing that it was about the creeping power of nihilism or about how none of these people were good in. Perhaps maybe no one is good at all and it can cause you to question and can leave you with that feeling. Yes but ten hours of TV show. That's not a lesson that you can learn. You actually have to start one place and end up another place and if they plan to make more seasons you have to be able to keep going. So there's a moment in this show where it kind of imperceptibly turns a little bit and suddenly you are on Catherine side. I mean it's obviously you were never on Peterside. Because he is a great monster. But and you mean great but in terms of performance but you're also aligned with her handmade who prior prior to the show. You find out. She was a noblewoman herself. And at the end of it. You're a little bit like okay. She's going to take over the court and that's what this is going to be. It's not just going to be an exercise in anachronistic Sketch comedy you know I. I was really impressed by it. I was really I was really Really entertained really impressed and then by the end I was really drawn in I was well I was going to ask you how you felt about. The sort of I would say obviously brazen anachronisms of the show in some ways. I mean there's a there's an incredible attention to period detail in some ways and then the characters themselves are self aware about the brutality. I think of of the world. They inhabit and also expressing moral and ethical viewpoints. At certain times that are probably not introduced. No I mean I know that the enlightenment is sort of what is being discussed in the show and that bringing that those ideas to to Russia's what is being discussed in the show but there is a zipping to it that is think is probably more contemporary. Well there is a there is a genre now of period pieces that that basically all done with filter of saucy. Lol's and you know it's it's this. Obviously it's Dickinson's some degree. There was a recent. It's not worth saying remake a new version of Emma. Jane AUSTEN NOVEL THAT AUTUMN. To wild the great rock photographer directed came out earlier in the year. And I wouldn't say that there's anything wrong with the tone. I do think it's kind of interesting because it seems like there is a we know this from looking at unfortunately in some ways the internet that we are collectively undergoing a very intense recalibration of how we consider things what is no pun intended. What is great what is important? What is our history? What is our obligation to that history? And what stories should we be prioritizing? Yes and what can we do with the fact that the people who many people who made great art were not good people or weren't as enlightened as we like to think we are today and so one way of grappling with that seems to be taking on this tone where you are a little bit judging it and a little bit sinking into it and a little bit unsure about what that means and I think with the writer as skilled Tony McNamara? You get away with it because he's appears at least through the early going to have a very very firm hand on voice and on tone and also just the dialogue is really really excellent. The long-term validity of this project of like. Kinda engaging with the past. But you know you mean the projects in terms of the project culturally. What I was GONNA say like because I wonder whether how many times when you walk into to pitcher show now if you have an idea for a period piece how how far you can get unless the next thing you say is. It's going to be a fresh modern. Take on this historical period. A- I wonder whether or not you can get away with being like I'm going to do period specific dialogue. Everything that happens in the show is going to be true to what was happening back then at. It's going to be a really tough hanging for for most of the people watching it versus. We're going to play around with casting. We're GONNA play around with with like the sort of accuracy of of how people looked in what people how people talked and what people thought and how people treat each other. Because I think we're going to be saying something larger than the show itself. Yeah and I think and I and I'm very sympathetic to that because I think that the world of costume dramas that existed from the beginning of filmed movie. Entertainment until relatively recently was on some level. At least you could say this. The the filmmakers could say this themselves predicated on the idea of. We're going to show you a world that you otherwise can't see and we're going to spend a ton of money on production values and production design and sets and costumes you know. We're kind of living in a post seen at all universe right where thanks to. Cgi and everything else like the images we see on screen rarely take our breath away anymore seeing a manor house. In enforcer adaptation doesn't necessarily offer the same as gas pleasures that did Two people wandering into a cinema in the eighties or the nineties. Frankly so I think taking different kinds of chances and questioning things. Poking things is worthwhile and really interesting and you mentioned casting which. I think the show is it. It's the show is doing as well nontraditional casting of the court alter the better. Because what is the goal of any project especially of a period Historical piece is it to teach you the way things were or is it to say something different and interesting using that world as a Scrim or Trojan horse for what you're interested in exploring saying no that's what I really. I was reminded of of the stars adaptation of Howards end the came out. I think last year. And how much? That obviously was very much. A faithful adaptation of Forster's work but also fiercely modern in its perspective. Just not in its vocabulary. I guess say it was very true to the book. It was very true to the era but it also came at it from A. I think I think maybe a different perspective so yeah. I think I'm going to continue to watch this show. We'll we'll check in on it a little bit later. I know some people who've crushed our facebook group people have been seemingly really happy with it. I mean Nicholas hold is kind of a kind of a sneaky high batting average. I mean this guy is really really funny and a very charismatic performer. And doing something different than what he did in the favorite but clearly very much in his wheelhouse. Yeah absolutely I would not have. He's one of those child. Actors who obviously was is so precocious when he was in about a boy and when he was doing some of his younger roles and he's so good on skins. And it's it's fantastic. I think it took him a little while to find his footing as a as an adult actor and now he seems to have done it the way that so many people before him have where. When you can't quite figure out who you are as a leading man or as a leading woman you take these you just work on the best material you possibly can and by being in fury road and being in the favourite and doing doing roles in maybe smaller roles and really good material. I think he's really found himself like a very very cool career. It sometimes comes down to a sometimes comes down to a very what appears to be very simple decision. It never of course boils down to one decision. But it's like am I leading man or am I an actor. Yeah and I think he seems to have made the right choice may many of these cases the industry chooses for you. I'm not sure if that's the case. But he seems to be having a lot of fun. I think that I support people right. Led manner. I mine actor down for my son Buddy because I think that's a really good wisdom to impart on him when I run your character actor with that. Let's leave it there so the great is very good. We both enjoyed it a lot and we both enjoyed TV alive. I think we'll probably be checking out some homecoming. We'll probably have a couple of other things to talk about next week. We are going to take Monday off. So that will impact our top chef recapping in some capacity whether or not we do two shows next week. I'm not sure but we are going to do a special next Thursday with everybody Sean Fantasy. It's a a home in home. Where any and I will be talking to Sean about the TV offerings from HBO. Max and then we're going to go in the big picture and talk to Sean about the movie offerings of HBO. Max It's going to be. That exciting deals like that feels like a trap. It is this an intervention but anti is always. It's so good to talk to you about getting older burgers Catherine the great so kristen bell interview. We didn't actually. We should just one last thing about it. We didn't actually talk that much. Good place it felt like it just happened. Had been pretty covered. I hope people forgive us of that in because we really wanted to talk about. We talked about like she's just somebody's so fascinating because I was having a hard time thinking of someone who it seems like almost every live action role she takes every voice role she takes that character becomes iconic and she is obviously such a vulnerable an interesting and relatable and thoughtful like public persona. You know in general but the roles that she is play like Veronica Mars. Eleanor ANA nailed it. You know she routinely just kind of fashion these these characters who then spin out and have a completely for their own you know and I think that's such a fascinating career. Not many people get more than one of those. Yeah it. That's kind of amazing. And she's she's had three of them now before the age of forty. It's pretty impressive Roy. Scheider had like two so she beat him. Congratulations that's who she was running for. Yes who was on her on the big piece of paper where she wrote. Mis Star or my character actor. She just taped a picture of Roy Scheider and all that jazz and it was like right. Diving okay. Let's get into our interview with Kristen Bell. It was a delightful and she was fantastic. Thanks to her for joining the watch. We'll talk to you guys next week. Thank you so much for joining the watch Kristen Bell obviously one of our favorites. Good Place Radical Mars. I was just talking with my wife the other day about one of our favorite movies from the last few years awhile ago now but the lifeguard which I loved. Yeah and it's such an honor to have you on the pot. Andy and I are huge fans of your work. Thank you very much. I'm happy to be here and Chris and we hope that you were briefed ahead of time that this conversation is primarily going to be about the two thousand four films. Spartan actually a big film for my friendship with Chris. We generally big fans of this movie and when Veronica Mars started I think the same year. I think Chris and I said we. She was in Spartan. Did you guys have got your finger on the Christabel Malls? I didn't know this is going to be all about Spartan because not not many films choose to do a a sort of press tour seventeen or so years after they come out with homes do in is one of those films. Spartan is one of those films David. Mamat has never worked in a you know a traditional way. He's always been against the grain. And you know what? Here's here's an easy visual way. You can tell that it was the same year. Is that in the movie Spartan you know. I played the daughter of the president who was kidnapped and she was taken overseas in sort of tortured and they cut her hair. All off. And David I I'm really WANNA cut your hair and I was like. Oh Okay Great. I'm an actor. I'll do anything for the role. And then we cut like a sort of jagged. Bob and I was like I can deal with this and David said No. That looks way too good and let me tell you something did not look so the hairstylist really really made it means you like a child who's taken scissors to their hair and the recovery from the role. The the like really traumatic role was a was a lot quicker than the recovery from that haircut. Oh my God. That haircut bled into Veronica Mars. If you watch the highlight of Veronica Mars you might be like That was an experimental. Look there's like there's like whiskies everywhere it's not it's not very even and that was that was day that's all. I don't think okay the shadow of that movie. It's even longer than we could have dreamed. I'm so happy I also David mammoth hair salon out of my head as why has written a place set in hair salon yet. I mean he could do anything I have. No doubt he'd find the intense undercurrent of militias drama happening in a hair salon. You WanNa cut to hear. I WANNA cut to their. You want just to hear getting really Meisner with it. Oh my God yeah. Air Cut hair cut to here. I think that wraps it up. I'm done that's all. We get Montana in there. We could get you know. Like Rebecca pidgeon could definitely be like circling. This lawn. Somewhere may see everybody. We gotta get all the goodies are still working. We just wanted WTI profile at is true. That is true Christian. I wanted to ask a little bit about Central Park which is going to be on Apple TV. And really delightful. I know that it was some extent a product of your your friendship with a couple of the people working on it. What was it that drew to the project because they you know I know that. Obviously there's you Kinda have to shift gears when you're doing voice work versus when you're doing a live action of what was it about Central Park. That attracted you well. I love voice work more than anything because you and I say this joke but you can go in your pajamas but also there's this added challenge which I really enjoy because I have been a person who my whole life. Here's things musically somebody comes into. The kitchen says good morning. Like that's all of a sudden it's tune in my head and being able to only use your voice as your instrument and make people feel things just by the sound of it has always been fun for me but what drew me to the project was. I'm GONNA say nothing because there was no project. Josh called me Josh Gad who created it with Loren Bouchard who run BOB's Burgers and just is one of the greatest guys in In animation. They called me probably six or eight months before anything was ever done and Josh was like joined do a cartoon with me. And he was like okay. I said Okay Bye and then that was it in one of the things. I love so much about Josh. I mean obviously have worked with him for ten years unfrozen. He's a wonderful light bulb of a person. So I want to work alongside him. I also trust him creatively lot that he will choose the funniest stuff that he's got everyone's best interests in mind is an easy person to work with and he kind of did what my dream is. Which is he just called all of the people that he either loves and admires or are his friends and said we a TV show together. And that's the idea behind in central park so he called me. Dvd Eggs Leslie. Odom Junior Stanley Tucci Kathryn. Hahn Titus Burgess and he was he just said you guys want to figure out a cartoon we could do together and then after everybody had said yes they said okay. What could this be about? The great shows are about family. Even if it's in an office place that's the family right. It's about the family dynamic so it turned out to be this family who was living in Central Park because the dad is sort of the Runs the park. And the nemesis is a woman in Betsy who Stanley played by the brilliant Stanley to trying to Basically build a shopping mall in the middle of the park. And it's just about this family and I get to play this wonderful girl molly who is a teenager but not in the cliche forms. She has a lot of social anxiety. All these worlds going on in her head and she draws comic books and so often the cartoon will switch from real life to her comic book version. And it's just really beautiful. I'm so glad that it turned into this. The story that it did because halfway through the origin tale it does sound like Josh was just trying to get tickets to Hamilton. But once he did he continued to do the work. Which I really admire right would you? Would you describe yourself as a central park head like? Are you pretty into the park yet? Like the real. Yeah the real parts. Because like when I lived in New York I went I would. I would go to central park infrequently I would say at. It would always be like. Did you guys know about this park in the middle of the city? It is amazing. And then I would go back to Brooklyn and I wouldn't go back uptown like four years but it is absolutely magical place to be. It really is and you can't really discover every corner of it. No matter how hard you try which is something we we sort of go into in the show. I mean it's a comedy obviously but there's so many there's like there's a zoo in central park. There's lakes in central park Yeah I went to Nyu York University. And I spend a lot of time in sheep's meadow as all the other college students. Doing a variety of activities to low level of experiments. You know more frisbee afterwards. Yeah exactly afterward. I just gets more exciting after that. I wanted to find out like you mentioned how the voice work is something that you really drawn to. Is there a similar process? Because obviously if the Josh thing is more about collaboration with somebody where it's just like hey let's do something together but do you have a different basically like meter for how you judge material when you're thinking about it as voice work versus when you're thinking about doing something that's live action like inter interrogating it in the same way in terms of story in terms of character. That's a good question. Well I think I do. Yeah have a different way of judging the material because I have one tool I've one tool and it's my voice so it's gotta be very clear. I have to be able basically with the ingredients. They've given me. Which are the words create a really good recipe? And so if I don't feel like the words are there it's just gonNa fall flat like the tone of someone's voice isn't really special to me. It's like how they use it. So yeah I do have. I have a sort of stricter way of judging voiceover projects because I only you're literally doing it with one tool in one tool alone whereas if you read a script you could say oh well. She says yes but her eyes say now. Why can't do that in a cartoon? Either there's so much left to the animators and thankfully I've worked with really really good animators but the other cooling about Central Park that I didn't even know that I would love of so much are didn't even know what's happening as Josh made a musical and there are different writers writing the musicals writing each song so like icing the song it's written by Cerebral S. There's my on the Meghan trainor. There is Cindy lauper wrote some music. Like there's it's really really exceptional music because it's coming from incredible current music writers. It's also interesting because it seems like at least from the early glimpses that we've gotten show central park that it has a sort of serialized story underneath push forward in terms of the threat to the park. I was curious if that's something that appealed to you as well because obviously both the way. Tv is going in general and also your work on good place that we want to talk about. I'm sure momentarily. That show is nothing if not a relentless boulder rolling down the hill of plot which is one of the things that made it so exciting. It it it's one of the ways the TV's generally changed right where cartoon Simpson's can run thirty years because it's just the simpsons but it seems like in this case of Central Park. There's both the Family Element. They could go on for a long time but also some larger plot. That's GONNA to take us through. At least the first two seasons you think the best shows are built like that and again. I'm not a show creator so it's it's I can recognize it when it's done and when it's not done but I don't know that I have the ability to create something like that. But Josh and Lauren do so yes. Central Park does have this. They have the family issues which you do literally thousands of episodes because you have like a young adolescent boy that titus plays who's in love with a dog and struggling with that and is like constantly trying to get closer to this dog not sexually but he's just really loves this dog and then you have the older care Jurmala. Who's a teenager who can't really top two boys but is in love? Lewis this voice cowboy. Who's play by Eugene Cordero? The unbelievable improv comedian. And who is also on the good place? But there's all this stuff in the family dynamic also. Their mom played by Kathryn. Hunt is a journalist and she really wants to do like not have pieces anymore so everybody has a desire like a want. Which is what you WANNA watch. You WanNa Watch your characters. Try to accomplish something. But then there's this bigger broader sort of problem about real estate development that wants to take over the park and so there's a serialized elements sort of not procedural. But you can go along with the family. But then there's also this overarching doom that if the rich people gain controlled park is gone and the family wants to fight for the park. So it's like yeah. You're rooting for two stories. And and again be clear that this is a cartoon musical and it's not this complex but I'm just speaking to the amount of work that goes into creating a show that's really really fun and watchable. Yeah I think one of the hallmarks of your of your work. Is that this shows whether they delve into darkness or not are ultimately really really watchable. Really really fun. I was curious about what it's like to be associated with a couple of roles. Like Eleanor like Veronica Mars and like Anna even where those parts almost like a Chris. It's on of us. Thank you so embarrassed for a second. I get into this now. No you can ask you a question. I have so many frozen questions that I am just sitting on. That's why I'm twitching here. Just LETTING KRISTA. The boilerplate stop so. Please let Chris asks his serious grownup question. And then we're going to get into it. My question was more just like what's it like when some parts that you play almost slip into becoming lake folksongs where they're so bigger so kind of indelible with people that do you ever feel like you kind of like are on the outside looking in of those parts anymore like for me. It's like I know people who've grown up with Veronica Mars and eleanor was such like a huge part of television. But like almost every time you would open up social media on twitter you would see an eleanor like a medium of of something from good place for a couple of years there and auto like obviously that's become a part of so many people's childhoods and be parenthoods. Does it ever feel like those parts? Slip away from you at all. I still feel intensely connected to all of them but where I identify with what you're saying is that I don't ever feel ownership over them. I don't ever feel like they're important to me like they're important to the fans. I don't really ever feel. Yeah any sense of ownership over any of them. I feel like Veronica. Mars was a part of me but I also think that the fans of Veronica Mars feel like she was a part of them and I want to be friends with those characters. Just like everyone else says. I just had the really really lucky experience of operatives to play those characters does that. Make any sons totally. Yeah I mean. I think that each one is probably different. I I was really fascinated. I thought that the last season of Veronica Mars that you guys did was incredible like just absolutely incredible and I know that that was. It was so interesting to see you know. Mars is something that was sustained for awhile by its fandom but then you guys made these really really bold creative choices with the the most recent season and I imagine that there was some tension with that in terms of like this is something that a lot of people feel almost a collective ownership of and we're almost like jumping off the cliff with that in a weird way. Yeah it rocked the boat. Yeah pay rocked the boat just google it so so yeah there was a you know. I didn't make any of these decisions but I was privy to all of them and and watching Rob Thomas's brilliant mind. Work is always interesting and fun but the show. I think was appreciated by people. Because she was the girl you wanted to defend you in high school. She was the girl who said exactly what you think of twenty minutes later to say to the snarky you popular girl with the bad guy or whatever she's fighting for the underdog but she was still complex invulnerable and then when we kick started all this. Got All this notoriety because it was the little show that could and it was under the radar but then the industry was like wait a minute. People put five million dollars to make this movie. What project was this? So because of that rob was very intentional about the movie because he said. Look the fans funded this movie. We are going to give the fans what they want. They painted for it. This is the fans movie so what he actually did was he took he said. What's the scene that everyone wants to see? What will just make them jump out of their seats. It's on Mars Punching Madison Sinclair the most popular girl in High School. The cruelest in the base. And he said okay all right the movie backwards so he got us to that point and then he wrote whatever needs to happen to that point and that was a gift to the fans when who green lit the season four and BRONC was older. Rob Felt like he wanted to a needed to create a new perimeter for Veronica to really push the boundaries. Push the show not just because the it needed to be reinvigorated because if you just did the same thing somebody would find a critique with that what also because television is come so far since then you wanted to be way more complex about a he wanted to do. We will kill off characters a lot now. Game of thrones was like kill your darlings. Ya So he wanted to sort of experiment with that and he also is allowed to be a writer that spreads his wings And I don't know that that made all of the hardcore fans that happiest but I do think it allowed us to accomplish a really creative season of television that we were proud of not resting on our laurels on all the old tropes that just worked for Veronica Mars and we're sort of lazy about it. He he really wanted to try to reinvent it a little bit and give her some older storylines. I'll give her some older problems. It was a character that always was wise beyond her years anyway so to actually have her get this year aging into that wisdom and then learning new things was really also just thought it was really just awesome detective story in in New. Like beach. Noirs like one of my favorite things to read in any way. So Yeah it's fun to watch is really fun to shoot like it. There's something really really special about that project because it keeps coming back and get asked about it all the time and I'm always like look I'll play it until it's murder. She wrote everyone in. Neptune is dead and then you figure out. It's been Veronica's been killing them. I mean I don't care. I just like the character gave me a fair amount of strength in my own life like I played around my early twenties and I needed her. She was my therapy as I was struggling. Codependent still am but Veronica's Desperation to see the underdog succeed and her just ability to be blunt and direct with people like it helped me and then the added bonus of these people grew up with you know Ranch Jason and Ryan and really go my boys to be able to work with them when I was twenty four and then also when I was thirty seven and then also when I was thirty four. It's just it's beautiful. Yeah so now. I'm now that we've talked about aging gracefully. I want to age. The conversation So my older daughter is was born in two thousand thirteen and that was the same year that frozen or as it's known in my house frozen one was released a I have many questions. I've tried to get them down to a reasonable amount The first one was really this. I recently watched the trailer for frozen one and because it wasn't on my radar because I wasn't apparent yet I didn't remember how the movie was. Marketed I just R- remember learning about it as this juggernaut that all the kids who are slightly older than my kids knew about and then I entered and grew to love. The trailer doesn't really market the movie that it is and the phenomenon that became it really is just like. Here's a romp. Here's an adventure story trying to fight this evil queen. It doesn't really foreground the sister relationship all the things that I think made the movie special. So what I was wondering when you came onto the project which must have been a few years before the release. Obviously what was it that attracted you? And what was the moment when you and And your fellow cast members realized that this might be something special Well I was the first person cast and I was cast because I was passed over for tangled. I had auditioned for tangled and I decastro casting director after I sang politely took me room. I don't think this is gonNA work out but I really want you to sit down with the director. Who's doing something in a couple of years? Here's Chris Bach and Chris had directed Pocahontas and he's like an incredibly established animator and beautiful director and we sat in the commissary on the Disney Lot. And he said you know I. I'm doing this Hans Christian Andersen Hill called on it and the Snow Queen. Which will happen after tangled. And I don't tell me about it and we talked and we just I adored him and over the next couple years developed and Chris called me and was like hey. I think we're GONNA try to do this. We're going to have a reading. And then they Initially it was like the snow. Queen was evil. I think at one point is going to be midler and they were not sisters and Chris Throughout the development was like I think it needs to be something a little bit different. We had a different writer at that point and Adina was cast and they ever remember because this was so it was like a highlight of my life also one of the most embarrassing times because we did a reading at Disney for everyone all the executives and they said you need to prepare a song and we were like who will give us a song and they were like nothing's been written. We were like wait. We're just supposed to prepare a song and sing it in the board room at the table. Read what are you talking about? So I've gone to a Dina's house. We prepared wind beneath my wings because we thought that was appropriate for assistance story. Midler had Edina had taken bets part so that was sign of so we saying it got the part but again the script was not a script that came out on his character. What I was just excited to be a Disney movie. That was IT I. I had wanted to be dizzy animations since I've been five years old. That was it. My character though was kind of annoying kind of preceding and just wasn't something I could identify with but I didn't want to. I didn't feel at the time. I had the confidence to sort of say those notes and as in the first few months of working on the script in putting down some scenes because you you record bunch of scenes and then they go back in the sort of semi them. Then you record more and it's this sort of step by step process where you're rewinding coming back to. It finally got the gumption to say to Chris like I feel like unmet needs to be different. I think she's not label. I don't think I also don't the guy can infuse her with what I think. My special energy is to add to this project so about a year into working about it at working on it Chris. Buck and Peter decided to get a different writer. Chris Peter Delvecchio who's our producer and they said. Listen we're the script and I was like we've been working on this for a year. What are you talking about? They said we're bringing this woman named Jen Lee. She's incredible she helped write a wreck. It Ralph and we think you'll ever. John sat down with all of us to talk about our characters because she's really really like research oriented. She wrote something that we weren't prepared for because the depth of it was a very adult story with real complex storylines. It wasn't about defeating a monster. It was about the complexities of feeling. Like you're too much for this world or like one of your special characteristics is not something people like or want and they will refuse it and it could hurt them and so when gently came on the whole project changed and then. I don't even remember the question because I've been talking about. This is making my day. No it's basically you're talking through all the the behind the scenes stuff that I wondered about because even up to the point of marketing. It seemed like one was quite sure what this was because it didn't fit the mold and the trailer the first trailer is like it's a Disney adventure and then you see the much darker inspire spicier and more emotional. That works right selling it works. It works for kids and all you need is for the from a marketing perspective. All you need is for kid to say I WANNA go see that or data. I WANNA go see that but I think the beauty came in depth of Jen's writing and then Jen Chris worked so well together they Had THEM BECOME CO directors? Because this sort of lived in Jen's head but Chris had all the know how and it just became this really beautiful collaboration between Jenin. Chris and basically saying we're GONNA do something we've never done before we're not gonNA villain. I mean you GonNa have a billing and Hans. But he's going to be a really small part. This is going to be about real life and I have such a connection with Jan. Were Fair there. There are quite a few scenes in the movie where we just Improv. Where I just said to gen like I know what she's supposed to be saying right here. In general go okay go and then. I'd stop. Say How is that? She's go. What if you and I go. Yes and then. Just start talking. And that whole be identifiable on a run to me like when we found her was an Improv Which is right when Hans pushes her into the boat and The exact line she says. You're not awkward. Awkward you're gorgeous. Wait what and I was like. Oh that's it that's it and Jen. I remember got really excited and we were like yes. That's her and I don't know any other way to articulate it other than that sentence is character. So let's expand on Nash. She talks too fast. She talks too much weight. What is something? I say a lot because I talk too fast and too much and I just felt like we'd found her Became this beautiful. Journey of everything was making sense because they were following the real complex emotion of they weren't trying to make a kid's story with a hero character and villain character and then they fight and the hero wins that was like thrown out the window. Well I should also say that thanks to you that my younger daughter who's three has been saying wait. What the whole new generation. If I thank both of you for indulging this I just have one quick but I honestly haven't seen him this happy in this week's fun fact about frozen to So frozen to took so long because Jenin Chris Game Are. They're incredibly authentic and they it steamed like we were. GonNa make a frozen too because you make another movie when the first movie is successful. That's how the business works but there had never been a Disney sequel. There's been pixar sequels but it was like a big thing for Disney and I said you know what would roll over in his grave. 'cause he said no sequels but to shareholder company so they decided to make a sequel Yene TO OCCUR. Sweet sweet time writing it and she didn't. WanNa just make episode to like Elsa Loser Shoes what do we do? We found it yet and she wanted to make it as profound as the first one and for months she journaled as the characters she journaled as l. Such journal ads on Chris in Gen went to a therapist and psychologist together and said here the character types. We have what's going on. What are the struggles? What are the next steps in this type of person's life? What does this person struggle with to figure out deeper motivations for Elsa and ANA and then ultimately they decided that the way to end the movie was for on spoiler alert honored to be clean because she loves her people on it to be Queen Anne Elsa to agree and then they wrote the movie backwards. That's incredible that kind of speaks to the question that I didn't even get to ask which is which I can just turn to compliment which is to say that I think frozen. Who is brilliant? And I'm so glad to hear what you're saying about it because that's what I see in the movie I love it because my daughter's love it of course but I also love it because I just think it's one of the most impressive feats of story construction that I can remember It's so thoughtful. It's so respectful of its characters. And so when I see some sort of half baked internet criticism being like there's no villain that's what's genius about it that that's actually true or to an emotional. Are there people with frozen hot? Takes out there like there's no villain owed the yeah. Let me let me let me tell you something about the frozen planning dad contingent on twitter fight is if this movie was not a gift. Everybody wants to say something. Everyone wants to be involved in some people. Don't get it some people. Don't get the data. Actually the brilliant complexity of the movie is that there is no villain or the villain is you. Yeah I mean what could be more media life? You're the only one standing in your way and it goes through some incredibly dark places. I mean. I was joking with Chris before the movie came out when I just saw the The songs had come out and the next right thing lyrics and I was like this is metal this. I don't know this movie might be too dark for me. Let alone my children and yet it is that type of darkness that I think makes the light work. It's actually quite respectful of emotions in a way. The children of all ages can understand and not run from. You WanNa know some secrets about that song the willing to get though I mean. Chris might have to mute himself but I all ready this fascinating so the kernel of the idea of on a having that developmental song. I came in this very early stages from Jenin is sitting down. And she's basically what do you think on it would be dealing west? What do you want to accomplish what you want her to deal with which is not something a writer normally does with her cast but this movie again is so collaborative an. I said I really want her to deal with her co-dependency we're very similar on and I and I wanted her to deal with her codependency I want. I want her to do something alone. She's never done anything alone. It's always been for Hans for Olafur also or for the people like what does she do when she's alone. What kind of decisions to she make? So we'd SORTA figured out okay. Then we'll leave her alone at some point we'll separate them Elsa Nana then they were like well. What kind of how far do we pushed it on? His trial basically her trauma and then during the first frozen movie to people on our team to really really important people one who was our director. Chris Buck and another who was Whenever head animators lost children and it was genuinely rocking for the whole team because a people bring their kids to work so we knew all these kids and e there's no stopping the Disney train. So everybody came to work. You know Chris had to come. Chris's son Ryder was killed. The week we started press for season one for a movie one frozen one and it was like sent a ripple effect through everybody and so I think collectively the decision Among Gen and Chris and everyone was. Let's write about what you do when you don't know what to do when there's literally nothing to do no roadmap so do the next right thing was the teams take on how. Our Co workers got through something unimaginable and soldiered on and still came to work and still live their lives with what must be an immense amount of pain and it was sort of a tribute to that. You just do the next right thing. There's no other way to say it. That's incredible and and you know I. It speaks to something that people have watched this movie in love the songs and not knowing the story but the emotion in it is extremely powerful. You know and and so much more than I think people give or maybe even willing to admit from seeing a movie that you know. It's the Big Disney thanksgiving release. But it's a lot more than that to a lot of people. I really can't thank you enough. Kristen bell begging being the MVP. Welcome thank you for having me have a good one stay. Well thank you okay guys.

Yada Yada Veronica Mars Chris Ryan Central Park Josh Gad Ian Kristen Bell Catherine I Andy Disney Bob Tony McNamara Nicholas Holes Russia twitter Leslie Odom spotify Sean Fantasy apple Stanley Tucci Loren Bouchard
Central Park Karen

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

07:01 min | 4 months ago

Central Park Karen

"Well. We all know you guys saw the viral video the white lady. Known on Social Media Central Park Karen. Her name is amy. Cooper who on Monday call the police while in Central Park New York and pretended a black man pretended now faked it out that a black man was attacking her while he simply asked her to leash her dog. Take a listen. Please don't come close to me. I'm asking supporting. Please don't. Please don't come close. Please please call the cops. Please call the. African American man threatening my life. Please tell them whatever you like. And there is a man American. Recording threatening and my dog. An African American I. He's recording threaten in my dog. I I'm sorry I can't hear. I think threatened by. The Cox. Thank you. Wow I mean she. She elevated each time, but when she. Was Children a damn does. But Guess What J.! They the people that gave with that dog came. got that dog back. Shoot they took the. Dow Oh. Let's go. Rescue. Hear more about dogs in the. Sometime tomorrow drive. This was. That was a horrible scene. It's nothing to play with just because she did that would. If it was a trigger happy, they were dispersed by the time the cops got there, but by the way. This could've went back. Because of her life. That's the thing that's the thing about central park. Karen in her real name. It's amy. Your false reporting you calling the police is why we have. Yes, this is why we have these situations that we have right now. What we're talking about everything that happened yesterday. Because of what you just did. Solden, so she should have been fired. She should have gotten the dog is there. Is there a way for her to get charges pressed up on her, but his act. This shit is is anything illegal with this report? If nothing else, she should get it for that filing A. League report it also. We, all we all need body cams. We. Can the damn sell well, we have our young man. and not to mention she's calling the police department with this false accusation. And then they got a bunch of stuff going on right now. They're you know the cobre nineteen and going on right now. Deal with especially in new. York and More intense as she talks on the phone, thanks elevating her voice and efforts now own. Is African American man attacking me. How can you? How can you be attacked if I'm videoing? How does that help? He's filming me. Aker! She didn't she didn't think that would get out I. Mean beat filming. YOU DUMB ASS! On the lighter side. The John Notice. This is the first time held now. I didn't know it was any blackbird watches. Idea to. What he said I was like blackberry. What? Count Chicken is. The yardbirds. Radio. I'm thinking caught up on today's news. J., please do the honors right, everybody. It's time for the news and trip. Start out with that story. Okay, because now it's Minneapolis of black man seen on video, telling of white cough that he can't breathe as that cop keats kneeling his throat, and yes, the young man is now fired now. The fide officer doesn't remove his knee off a forty six George Floyd's neck He stops moving. He still keeps it on him for about seven minutes. He's unable to revive all for the cops involved have been let go Minnesota's governor Tim Wall says quote the lack of humanity in this disturbing video is sickening. Here's Mr Floyd and here's that COP. Look. What he wants at. Got, him down and relief. Right now being black in America should not be a death sentence. When you hear someone calling for help, you are supposed to help. And that of course was the mayor who also chimed in Minneapolis PD says the cops were answering. Guess what a call about a forgery of! That's all it was a forgery. No weapons were involved and it seems they said the victim appeared to be high on something and for that. He's did meanwhile a University of Connecticut students still on the land, a twenty three year old Peter Manfredini allegedly killed two people in Connecticut kidnapped the girlfriend of one of the victims. Stole a bunch of guns and guns in a home invasion. He was last spotted in Pennsylvania, and they are now reports that this guy's father Robert Man for Donia was arrested last month for allegedly getting two teenage girls trump drunken groping them, and he's free on five thousand dollars bond again. They are looking. They say for MR, Fredonia, anywhere Florida Congressman Val. demings wants the folks at Dizzy. The whole back for while planned reopening, Disney and universal studios preparing to reopen their attractions pretty soon a move that would allow many of the Florida Democrats. Democrats constituents in the Orlando area to return to work, but she wants to make sure that her people are safe from the corona virus, infection and adherence to the CDC guideline, so she said you know just hold up just a little bit unless he read the woman who claimed Joe Biden made her feel quote uncomfortable when she worked for him back in nineteen ninety-three, she has to find a lawyer. Her lawyer after Casey quit, and finally to one zero and lift off the final lift off Lance shoulders of the space shuttle America will continue the dream. That was the last time we really had a space shuttle going up over ten years ago. That was the last time that astronauts lifted off from US soil until today. When weather permitting to American, astronauts lift off from Kennedy Space. Center there'd be heading into the heavens on a spacecraft owned by a private company back to the Steve Harvey Morning Show. You're listening. David Harvey Morning Show.

forgery Minneapolis George Floyd America Central Park New York Robert Man Steve Harvey Cox Cooper US Kennedy Space Joe Biden Karen cough Orlando Dow David Harvey Florida Democrats Solden
Behind the Scenes Minis: Seneca Village and Unearthed!

Stuff You Missed in History Class

14:47 min | 2 months ago

Behind the Scenes Minis: Seneca Village and Unearthed!

"The next one's not a history lesson, but it's something you should know your eyes deserve dependable comfort and precision one contact lenses deliver whether you've got boot camp before dawn or virtual hangouts after dark precision, one lenses get in your way another plus their daily disposables that you put them in. When you wake up, toss them before bed and start with a fresh pair of the next day. That's what you call. Contact Lens Freedom get started today with a free five day trial at see what happens dot com eye exam maybe required professional fees may apply available at participating offices ask your Eye Care Professional. For complete, where care and safety information prescription only this episode of stuff you missed in history glasses brought to you by Schmidt's you've probably wondered if natural deodorant actually works and the good news is Schmitz does it's never formulated with aluminum or artificial fragrance, and if you wanna Gentler version, you can try their baking Soda Free Sensitive Skin Deodorants I am absolutely in love with the Rosen black pepper sent and it's certified Vegan and cruelty free. So I feel completely good about using in Schmitz is the natural deodorant that works visit Schmitz. Dot. com. To learn more or find it at a retailer near you. Welcome to stuff you missed in history class a production of iheartradio. Hello, welcome to the podcast I'm Holly Fry Band I'm Tracy Wilson Welcome to casual Fridays or we are behind the scenes Minnesota. This week we talked about Seneca village. With something I've had on my list for a long time. Yeah. and then you know. The list is like building a castle on sand. It's always shift. but I was really really glad to to be reminded of it and to take some time to dig into it it's one of those things that I love central park and I often go when I'm in New York. But now I have vested interest in seeking out this area so that I can just go and see it. For myself even though there's nothing of the original village there on the site, you can just new you're in that space and I wanNA check out the the various plaques that they've put up to commemorate and explain the the history and see how all of that is has been managed. Yeah. We're having a thunderstorm at my house so if any listeners. What is happening? You may hear thunder in the background today. I have, I think I've only been to central park maybe once because the first time that I went to New York City I was I was in my. Like I think it was an eighth grade field trip seventh or eighth grade I was in middle school. We took a bus overnight from North Carolina to New York City with the strings class. and. At that point I, don't know how much of this was influenced by the fact that we were north. Carolina. Kids from a not very like a A. Our school I think was technically in the city. But like we were asleep from a relatively rural area, I, don't know how much of it was influenced by that and how much of it was really real. We were told not to go anywhere near Central Park because it was dangerous. Well, it would've been more dangerous than. Yeah. I I don't know how much of that was real danger and how much of it was. Like big city. Definitely. Went through very dangerous period. Okay. So yeah, we did not. We did not go there. But. Then the first time you and I ever did a live show of this podcast. I was really nervous about it, which is funny to me in hindsight but I just like I was very nervous and so patrick and I went out and had lunch somewhere, and then we went on a walk. And when I got into Central Park I was like this is huge like it's I did not have a conception of how big that park is at all. Yeah. It's gigantic. This episode also really reminded me of a brief thing that we touched on an earlier episode, which is when we talked about the zoot suit riots. A similar process of Shabas ravined being cleared out of all of its residents to build dodger stadium, which like that had had some similar traits in terms of people being suspicious of the residents there because they were a predominantly Hispanic. And then how outsiders viewed that neighborhood versus how the people living there read the neighborhood with a very similar outcome of than there was a stadium there instead of homes. Yeah. Yeah I I Love Central Park, Brian, and I have gotten in the habit of if we're in New York particularly, if we are staying near the IHEART offices in midtown to just south of central park starts We'll just walk the length of the park like we'll set aside some hours on a day or will book an extra day there and just walk the park and then end up at the met and wander around there for a little bit and it's one of our favorite things to do because it's just a really beautiful space and it's sounds like a great day. It is a great day. We love it. We love just walking around in. Walking around a place in general. Yeah. Yeah. It's one of those things where the last one of the last trips that Brian and I hand there was in the fall and I was so wadded up with work commitments that he kind of had that moment of can I just walked the park by myself as I go ahead? So he went he didn't do our full our full loop that we do, but he went in and hung out a bit because he loves it there to you. It's such an interesting and unique space because it is I mean a admittedly right. We talked about in the episode the reasons for wanting that space where a little bit pretentious in some ways. To emulate Europe's great garden traditions but it is quite marvelous to have that big beautiful space in the middle of a city. That is so busy and there are places you can be in central park and you don't you lose all sense of it being like that even though you can look around and see the buildings, it's still there is a very impressive capture of tranquility and nature. That is surprising. It's hard to imagine what New York would be without it. So Yeah. We're big fans of Central Park and I. Hope to go there again sometimes. On Day when travel might exist ever? Yes. But in the meantime, we will stay home and stay save which I hope all of our listeners are doing as well. So we're almost at the end of July but we do finally have unearthed in July this week indeed. Yeah. It was something that I was planning to do a little bit earlier than we did. But then Coen sale pro morphed into a two part thing. Yeah. which push stuff out a little bit and then this one became a one part thing which for a lot of the time that I was working on it, it was right on the line of is this GonNa be one part or two I always like to ask you if you have a favorite among the topics of the unearthed of that would ever be period were working on and I I the the dog poop story course just I mean it's not even just because it scatalogical just sort of this. The surprise factor of how much dog poop there is in the archaeological record. Delighted. Me I also had. A I had one that I had originally been leading off with. That I, took completely out. That was about poison control. Yeah. And how when we talked about? The poison control system in are pretty recent episode on the evolution of the poison control system. In the US, we talked about how poison control. Exposures were increasing because of there being a lot more focus on cleaning and sanitation and a lot more toxic cleaning and sanitation products and people's homes, and then in the first three months of two thousand, twenty of very similar uptick reported by the Centers for Disease Control in them or morbidity and mortality. Weekly report. As people were trying to. Keep their houses and whatnot more clean and sanitary because of the pandemic a big increase in calls to poison control, it was like a twenty percent increase in q one, two, thousand, nineteen, versus key one, twenty, twenty. And then. A ninety percent increase I. Think just March Twenty, nineteen versus March twenty twenty like a whole big thing and it adds it's not super. Yeah. Not Surprising and it most of the exposures was like more than half of them were exposure to bleach. and. Then the like portions were non alcoholic cleansers and hand sanitizers and a lot of that exposure was inhaling. So people trying to bleach their stuff and not being. In a well ventilated space. And I wound up cutting it out. Because I was like. Now, we have zog about how there's like this trend is continuing. And Like I. I'm talking about it now even though I wasn't going to talk about it in the episode I was like we're going to talk about the thing that the president said where he asked if you could inject. Disinfectants because a lot of cities reported more poison control calls after that, and I was like trying to work all of that NC one episode that already felt a little bit long. It was making it longer and I was like you know what? I could cut out of this episode is this apparently we're just gonNA talk about it in the behind the scenes instead. There you go. AM I. Don't use ever. Now I hate it. Like I'm a little afraid of it for all of the inhalation reasons you mentioned, but moreover, I associate bleach with childhood trauma because my mom loved it. In so many garments by beliefs. Yeah we do have a small thing of household bleach here in our house but our preferred disinfecting methods are are not that we have other cleansers and. US. Yeah Yeah. So. Anyway. That was a whole. I was like this is a the amount of time. It was taking to explain all that was like this is now two thirds of this update section. Right. Right. So maybe maybe we can just leave that out. Yeah. Yeah. I I imagine we're going to be continuing to see. The same trends and poison control calls. Because this pandemic is still happening. Like. Some people have moved on. I also said last time that it was the first time that I had worked on an unearthed episode where it felt like the same world circumstance kept coming up over and over and that was the case with this one also. Because there was a lot more stuff about this work was supposed to happen, but it had to be delayed because of the pandemic or the reason we were going through this part of our archive was because like we're trying to stay busy at work during a pandemic when we don't have visitors at our museum. That kind of stuff. So We'll see how things are in three more months when we do the next. The next unearthed. So long as the pandemic hasn't stopped everything how? In, which case we'll do something else. Yeah Yeah. I mean. Since, since I did not include stuff that happened in July I know for sure I already have a few things that we can talk about next time because we're recording this Sunday July fourteenth there you go. Yeah. You have questions or anything send us an email history podcast iheartradio dot com. Otherwise happy Friday everybody have a good weekend to care of yourselves. Yeah you're working this weekend I hope the people who are coming into Your Business? Are Kind and not rude to you. Thing that I've heard so many stories about over the last few months. Stuff, you missed in history class the production of iheartradio for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio. APP APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. From iheartradio and TRIBECA studios. This is fierce a podcast about the incredible women who never made it near history books and the modern women carrying on their legacy today. I'm your host. Joe. Piazza. Fierce brings you stories of groundbreaking women from the past who made huge contrbutions to the president but whose names still aren't on the tips of our tongues. In this podcast you hear about women like Chinese Sal, the greatest pirate that history has ever known she outclasses. Every other known pirate by every metric, he would use to discover success and Phillis Wheatley who became the first African American published female poet. While she was still enslaved, she published a book when she was at most twenty years old while she was still a slave I mean it's really kind of astounding store life. You can binge all of season one. Now, we even have a new bonus episode for you listen to it to hear conversation about how he can continue the work that suffragette started I supporting women right now it's talk with Jennifer Palmeri the former communications director for Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton and trust me you don't want to miss it. Sound listened fierce on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Hi I'm Devin Leery. I'm Carolina Barlow and we're here to tell you to dump him break up with your boyfriend and we want you to listen to our podcast true romance every week where we talk about our love lives and the lives of others please join our XS who we know will also be listening like Kyle. Kyle are you there? Hey, babe how's life? No, you look good though me Oh my God talk. Please I haven't even gotten a haircut like three months. Okay. Please help us pay for Carolina psychiatrist bills by listening on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Central Park New York Schmitz US Carolina president New York City Tracy Wilson Central Park Seneca village Lens Freedom Centers for Disease Control dodger stadium Dot. North Carolina Europe Phillis Wheatley Schmidt
Christina Hansen 3-8-20

CATS Roundtable

03:28 min | 7 months ago

Christina Hansen 3-8-20

"Good Morning New York pisses the cats round table. Chunk Cats Matiz here and New York is not the same without those beautiful horses Central Park and last week there was a tragedy. We lost one of the horses with fed today to tell us what happened. What's going on as Chris Christina handsome and she's been driving In Central Park for fourteen years. Good morning how are you this morning? I'm good but in a long week though you know but you know we're we're here actually out of the park right now so With my horse so last Saturday I'm sure lots of people have seen the video and social. Gm that the animal rights people circulating. And there's no. It's upsetting a lot of people to watch horse. Suddenly Adam Medical Emergency Aisha twelve year old mayor and she basically me collapsing behind in. She had We're not exactly sure what happened with the vet says it was some sort of cardiac event or could have been genetic conditions. We're still waiting on testing but everybody seemed to video and I know a lot of people said about it but if you look at it what you see are a whole bunch of carriage drivers immediately to help this horse. And that's what we do because we love our horses and the trailer got there within ten minutes which is better than most people could save. Angela Service New York City. And we're able to load the horse on the trailer. Shabelle or she could be safe and comfortable and wait for that to rise. Who is they're our again? It's also very good. Response Time Fortunately they even after doing everything we could medically for her. There was nothing we could do. She never did You gain the ability to stand up And so the Jerry. Difficult decision that the advice that was to have her humanely tonight and how. How old were the worst? She's drummers old so she's not known force in any way shape or form unfortunately there there are occasionally acute medical issues that can sometimes strike down a horse even in their prime like this and it had nothing to do with the way that she is being taken care of here. is something that happens extremely rarely in the city. But of course wherever you've got two hundred horses working and you know out of the park you know eight nine hour shifts. You know every day that you know unfortunately occasionally things happen and the animal rights people at nine class in other words they just sit around and wait for something like this to happen to go into overdrive to exploit this tagedy to meet the political. Ah TO ELIMINATE CARRIAGES FROM NEW YORK city to eliminate all kinds of animals from people's lives. I've always taken the position as part of the ambiance of New York part of the ambiance of New York City part of the ambiance of Central Park and Thank you for calling in this morning. Thank you for six heroes beautiful animals. Apparently the only people who have animals that aren't allowed to ever have one get sick or even though we're APP actually have the capability to take care of them a lot better than private owners. Do thank you for you all right. Thank you this is the case roundtable. Be Right back.

New York City Central Park Shabelle NEW YORK Adam Medical Emergency Aisha Angela Service Central Park Chris Christina Gm Jerry eight nine hour fourteen years ten minutes twelve year
Elizabeth Brooks, Executive Director of Moncus Park

Discover Lafayette

31:59 min | 1 year ago

Elizabeth Brooks, Executive Director of Moncus Park

"Connecting to the AFC hod cast network. Enjoy your stay. This is John swift. And you're listening to did, you know, a podcast Decatur to the people places in culture of Lafayette, Louisiana. The gateway to south Louisiana and the region, we know as Katyusha with focus on the warms you v of our people the beautiful sites scenery, delicious food and the cultural traditions passed down generation after generation today's episode features Elizabeth Brooks who is fictionally known as e b and who is well known in Lafayette for her service is executive director of Lafayette central park. She has graduate degrees in community and regional planning as well as urban design earned from UT Austin Wallace student at U L Lafayette back in two thousand five EBay learned that the hundred acre you L harsh farm property was threatened by commercial development. She and her friends, especially down a Adams launched a successful community-wide. Campaign to save the property as Greenspace for future generations, ten joy, which were all enjoying today. AB it's a pleasure to welcome you to the show. Thank you for being here. I'm honored to have you here. And I wanna go back in time. If we can I met you back when you were a young student, and I think save the horse form signs were still up in Lafayette, and you and danika were really close friends and you saw that the beloved Greenspace right in the middle of Lafayette on. Johnston street was endanger, we're gonna talk about your career, of course. But would you bring us back to that time when you were still at U L, and what happened in what what prompted you to get involved as a community activist. Well, so it's a great story. I actually came back to laugh yet after reading a wonderful book while it was actually started college in Mississippi, but came back here as soon as I could I read a book that really made me wanna be. An activist. It was called Ishmael by Daniel Quinn, and I came back, and I met my mentor, Dr Lakewood and met danika and met all my kind of cadre of you know, hippy activists, and I call them business hippies. Now, we've grown up employed and right, everyone's employed. And so started taking community sustainability classes at Yale and believe it or not you Aleph yet had this amazing program headed by Dr Blake would. And so my senior year that was two thousand five Danny our both in one of Dr Blake woods classes, and it was called community based planning and danika actually lived on the horse farm property the previous year. And so we were all just we had taken lots of classes out there. But obviously knew it as Dan because backyard, and they actually the university Astor to move out and didn't have anybody else move in. So it was kind of fishy, but three months later in the middle of this community based planning class, Dr Blake would came in with this newspaper slammed it on the desk and said they're going to develop the horse farm. And so we immediately burst into tears and got all the most. Title about it. Because it's obviously one of the most beautiful last pieces of like intact landscape in the middle of town. So and for people that may not know if they have moved away from Lafayette, this is right by read law rails, tried itself college. The Bertrand intersection, it's smack dab. It really is especially with the way Lafayette's grown south. It's it's crazy in the middle of town. So it's an amazing opportunity. So we basically focused the whole class on kind of launching this campaign immediately. We had a web designer in the class that put together a web page for us. We went and bought the domain name. I wouldn't ordered yard signs from you know, this, you know, kind of political sign guy, and we hit actually just started recycling at festival cardiac real for the organization that I was president of called speak, which the environmental club on campus. And they paid us a thousand dollars to do the recycling. It was a dirty job. So it was worth the money. But we had this thousand dollars that we could go buy yard signs and bumper. Stickers and by this website. So we actually had the seed funding to get this thing going. So it was really beautiful that it just kind of all came together. Exciting time because there was no question about your motives. You've just were trying to say to the trees. And you know, what Jan the other important thing was that this was right win two thousand five all two thousand five right? When my space and Facebook were coming online. So we were probably I I mean, I would air to say that we're on the side of probably the very first campaign that used says social media in Lafayette for sure maybe kind of one of the early adopters throughout the state and the country. So that way you're able to get not only the young people. I know the yard signs were everywhere. My friends had the yard signs in their yards. But I didn't realize that that was a opportune time for you. It was great. And we use you know, online petition dot com and got four thousand signatures relatively quickly. It was it was right at the time. When all of this kind of, you know, this new connective he was really available. And we totally took advantage of it. And so what happens? Well, lots of little battles were won. And but very early on in. This was really critical. The former mayor Joey Terrell got on board and really saw this as an amazing opportunity for laughing at I think he was really, you know, kind of embitterment in the beginning just because you know, it's the university's property. They can do what they want with it. But after I think understanding how you know under served in park space, acreage, Lafayette and Acadian a really is compared to other cities our size across the nation. I think it really just opened his eyes to being very passionate about getting behind this project and making this become a dream come true. And he's still a supporter he's on our board. Absolutely. So right. I know when we travel people talk about, you know, going to Austin or a love Fort Worth my husband has family there. But when you travel around the country, it's the outdoor spaces that really call for me, you know, I love the outside and and. Lafayette to have preserved the screen space. I think is critical to our future. If we want to move forward and be a mecca for people as a place to move to absolute or stay here. I think this was very critical decision on behalf of our community. So so you were here for that. And during that time, you had also helped co found earth share gardens that correct was that through speak at the university, or was that a separate endeavor? It was a separate endeavor. But it was basically a group of people. So I mean, you know, we all just kind of did everything together. So when I first started with upper Lafayette, I started my TV show upper left on the move. And you in danika were two of my first guest we've filmed out at that beautiful. Holy rosary grounds gardens was remember that on a Sunday night. Beautiful. It was in. It's one of my favorite interviews because you were both so passionate about your love of the outdoors and environmentally friendly decisions. Yeah. Well, I think we were you know, we weren't like the earliest adopter. But I think it's obviously a trend that has really caught on. I think a lot of people, you know, especially the future generations are just going to care a lot more about that kind of thing. And so as you mentioned with the park, but also local food systems. I think those are real values that the future generation, you know, looks for when they think about places that they want to raise a family or where they wanna live in work and play. And I think we have got to adjust our planning and make our cities accommodate that. If we want to remain economically viable, and these wonderful places that people wanna move, right? So let's jump forward. You left to pursue graduate degrees as we mentioned in Texas and you worked in Houston and Austin is that correct fan. But then you ended up back here when the horse form was really taking off. And it's now called Levy at central park. And I think it was recently renamed mangas parkas has parks due to a very generous benefactor will tell us about what's going on with the park. I wanna talk about bigger picture. But I think this is a very important part of your message. What is going on right now? With the park and plans to develop it. Well, so we Lafayette central park is a nonprofit and a lot of people ask us if the park is in the parks and recreation department, and it's not, and you know, one of the things that you know, the question that we get a lot is why not and it's because the parks and recreation department doesn't really have enough tax funding dedicated to it to really do anything. But Moses property, and of course, Lafayette aspired had this amazing beautiful community asset. But this is not just Lafayette. I mean, this is a growing kind of trend across the country where parks are being put into nonprofit conservancies because there's a number of benefits that we can bring so one is that it's the only part that we focus on. I mean all hundred percent of my dedication is to raising money and operating and and building this world class central park for Lafayette as opposed to dividing your attention amongst thirty six parks throughout the system, or whatever the second benefit is the private philanthropy. I mean, we have an opportunity to offer tax shelter for donors. We also have naming rights available. It would be. I mean, I don't know maybe you'd have to pass an ordinance to get something really named in a park in an easy way. So I think there's just a lot more fluidity in a lot more flexibility that you can have a nonprofit. And so this is happening across the country. I mean central park in New York discovery green in Houston. I mean, you name it autumn park in New Orleans was one of the first to be in this nonprofit model. So it's just the first tap nd in Lafayette, but it's not an uncommon model across the combined. So so so far about eleven million dollars has been raised. Yeah. I read your bio, that's right. That's a huge chunk of money relation. We started raising money in late twenty fourteen when oil prices started going down. So that's it's even more of a bit of feet because it's it's not been is, absolutely. The best time in Lafayette. But obviously, there's still very passionate donors out there that I'm Dr stand the impact in the legacy that this project will have so right. So what's plan for the park? What can we look for over the next few years? So the it's a hundred acres and in the master plan, which was developed after a really robust community outreach. Effort that involves like over seventy four hundred citizens. I mean, it was huge online and in meeting in person meetings that really helped us shape what the vision for the park is in that master plan. What came out of the public feedback was, you know, really of concentrating most of the activity up towards Johnson street thoroughfare that it's right on and then keeping most of the back of it, really passive and kind of really just enhancing the landscape features that people love today. There's these beautiful wide open expanses of kind of meadow. And I think we're basically planning around that. And of course, there's these beautiful live oak trees that are just such a like an archetypal beautiful look of the Louisiana landscape. So we're definitely building around those. And planting a lot more live oaks to create ocala's and that kind of stuff, right? But there are a couple revenue generating elements in the park that we are building. I because I think there we are we need to be financially sustainable, and so what we focused on is building some event venues. So there's going to be a farmer's market. Billion? There will be a little mini golf course. Which will be fun. Putt. Putt. I mean, it's going be kinda classy. It'll be ladder where lush gardens big clowns and weird stuff. But. But I mean, it will be a great revenue generator. I think, you know, with the younger generation, it's actually a lot of fun to kind of go out there and around so and then of course, we'll eventually have a beautiful amphitheater, but until then we'll just continue to do kind of open lawn cutting concert series and stuff eventually there will be a botanical garden, so it'll be a beautiful event. Then you and obviously lots of plant specimens and kind of really beautiful gardens that are more formal and wonderful places to rent for, you know, either fundraisers or your wedding or whatever. And then there's also a dog park. Everybody loves the dog parks. She didn't let fight off leash and you don't have to actually run around with the dog while they burn off the energy. And then, of course, just your standard park stuff. I mean, there's going to be one mile running track two and a half Cade loop. So we have five ks and ten K's and hiking trails. There's tons of woods on the property. So really just kind of putting in some formal, you know, kind of trails structures and just letting people kinda enjoy being in the middle of nature in the middle of the city. And of course, you know, walking. Paths and different gardens here and there and a couple of ponds that are helpless deal with the drainage, but one of the other important kind of fun things that we just had happened. This year was the society for Louisiana irises dedicated the park is their home gardens. They're going to dedicate over ten thousand. To the park to plant this amazing visual display of Louisiana irises. And then also we will have a specimen actually two or three specimens of every hybridize variety that's ever been developed. So it's really exciting traveled from all over the region to come and see that right? That's really exciting to you know, it's amazing daughter. Kelly is here and Shane her friend. She's eighteen they love it the park. Just like it is. So to think about these enhancements is so exciting because it will be a destination absolute people, and well this remain a free park that people can walk into or will there be memberships? How will that be? It'll be a free. Well, both. So it's gonna be a free park you can walk into it. There will be certain elements, and you can go almost anywhere in the park. But you might have to pay to go in the Batano. Thank me for the maintenance. Hey to play many Gulf or whatever, but we also will have memberships. And I think that's that's only just kind of as a revenue generator. And maybe we'll have benefits where you know members. Only. Are invited to our picnic in the park or something like that. So, but it's not required to ever access the park you obviously love your job. I wanted to talk some today about you being here. You know, you really could have lived. You could have stayed in Texas are with your background and your your talents. Ebay you really could live anywhere in the country. And yet here you are a now your family's here, your mom is still here. And is that right? Yeah. Yeah. And your family's here. But I wanted to talk some about why you decided to move back and what you'd like to see for our community because you really are driving force for a lot of your. I don't even want to say age group. I think you are an inspiration for all of us. No matter where we are on the path. But would you talk some about why you decided to come back home? Sure. Well, first of all, thanks for that compliment. I don't you know, I don't necessarily see it like that. It's just a great. It's a great project. And obviously a lot of the causes that I'm involved in her just like passions that I think are really important for you know, a brighter future for Lafayette, Louisiana as a whole. So you know, I made this decision a long time ago as well. So when we when we launched the whole save the horse from campaign. I'd actually just been accepted to the peace corps, and I deferred twice. And finally, they were like listen lady, you got to you gonna have to reapply, you can't defer anymore. And I think it was at that moment that I really I had to make a real decision that I wanted to. Stay in my community and make it better here rather than choose to Galvan off across the country and help some other community that wasn't you know, near and dear to my heart. I wanted to make a difference. And I just had this opportunity kind of serendipitous Lee spring up right at the time when I was making this decision to make different somewhere. So I made that decision as a twenty three year old. And I think I made that decision again when I moved back because it was just such an incredible opportunity and part of it was also just like, I couldn't imagine watching someone else. Do who I'm done. Well, you know, you like I was like man if I'd stayed in Texas, and like look back home at someone else doing it would've just it would've me crazy. You know, not this wouldn't have done a good job. But but anyway, so I think Lafayette has so many unique things about it. I think that you know, you talk to people from here who have lived elsewhere and come have come back. And I think it's the people and this like you said like joie to even this just amazing cultural fabric that. We all tie into that is we we take it for granted. And I think when you leave and come back us, you finally can have that appreciation. I think that when you travel you don't necessarily get immersed in a culture to see that that's not necessarily there. You're still the tourist that. Maybe looks at the fact that they had this fabulous. You know, public transit system are that they have this. You know, something that may be laughing at doesn't have or doesn't have as as great of. But I think that it's the fabric that you kinda if you do move away, and you do get immersing another culture. That's what you start realizing that we have that is it's just you can't fabricate that you know, you can't fake it. You can't. I mean, they have all these workshops and stuff on place making and all this cultural activity, and it's like they're having to host workshops in these you know, to figure out who they are figure out who they are. And how they're going to create their identity, and we just don't have that problem. I mean, we're so far ahead of the game. So I think you know, when it comes down to the benefits that Lafayette brings. I just think it's just such a unique place to live. And it's I think that we also are such a warm and welcoming and we love being connected. And so I rarely I don't think of ever gotten the sense that there was like a click that I'm not a part of her that I'm not welcome to engage with or whatever. And I felt that in other cities that I've lived in that were, you know, it was kind of a doggy dog world, or it was very highly competitive or you didn't have enough experience or you weren't connected with enough people in that group to be fully accepted. And I just don't think that's here anything we're arms open, and we want more people to be part of our click one. Big Lafayette click. Right. Oh, you know, I was really interested through my civic involvement. I've learned a lot of history that I want to share with others in many may know it, but from one of seen over the past thirty years it. It was really win this community embraced being Acadian ah that things began to click for us as a community. We had the oil and gas revenue we had the wonderful people. But other people have told a similar story years. Bob Guilbeault with priyanti restaurant only when he went, you know, he was in the service and came home the same for Robert Dafur d- the acclaimed mural artist when they left for the service and came back. They realize when they were gone that there is no place like left yet. And you know, it was I guess Cajun. They would say, but it Katie Anna has a particular ambience about it with the food the culture and the people that they work hard. They play hard, and they love, and you cannot replicate that in other places. You know, we hear about that. We laugh about the food. You know, if you have Cajun food somewhere else, it's got too much pepperoni, and it's not seasoned, right? But the seasoning is really in the people. That's right. And that's what you experienced. So you wanted to come home? I'm not trying to put words in your mouth. But a saw you leave. I was sad. And I was so glad when you came back. Well, I I would have stayed except I was very dedicated to get one type of education. We didn't have it here. And. Yeah, but you brought it back home. Yeah. And I think. You know, you're right. It's not just it's not just the people. I think that's the other thing. I mean, we have this trifecta if not it's more than three things, you know. It's like so many pieces of the pie that people love about the places that they live what they call home that we have in place here, you know. But I mean to a lot of conversation that our communities been having recently. I mean, they're still like lots of things that we have got to come together around. So I think as beautiful as it is. I think we have got to come together. And really think about strategies to make sure that we continue to be this amazing place that people wanna live work play Ryan, raise families that sustainable, and I know that's what you're you're rude 'cause his nine ability. We were both talking before we started taping. This about recent article to Kevin Blanchard wrote and thank as a community. We do have decisions to make that have to do with development and how we develop and continue to grow, you know. And I guess it's a question. Do you grow? Up or do you grow out and sprawl, but those are decisions that I think when the community speaks our elected leaders will listen we just have to. I think there has been more discussion, you know, in our discussion today is really about that is our ability of living here in Lafayette and in south, Louisiana. There's so many good things just being based here in Lafayette. I'm always amazed at the opportunities to go bird watching, you know, my husband loves hunting, and you can fish around here. You can go to like Martin to I guess canoe watch the birds and just see the beautiful scenery. But it's it's all based right here in our hub city. Absolutely. Yeah. Ours form is a big big draw for that right in the middle of quite so far, if you really want to get this may be a left field discussion when you were talking. I was reminded when you said serendipity, would you mind sharing the story about your home and the vision that you had to her vs got a beautiful home? I just. Want to say, and it was a vision that you had way before it was ever built. It's very strange. Yes. Talk about serendipitous. But in two thousand four I went and got certified in permaculture, which is like a sustainable agriculture and design kind of I don't know way of thinking or whatever designing and in that, you know, we started talking about sustainable architecture and sustainable design, techniques and technologies. And so I started sketching out this, you know, cool kind of house. It was chicken coop. Designed clear story windows, solar panels, you know, water catchment systems and geothermal a see all this kind of stuff. Well, and you had drawn and your had drawn in my little. Yeah. My little booklet just like what my dream would look like if I ever built one. So then fast forward literally ten years to when I moved back to Lafayette. And I had been working at the park for about just under a year. And basically, you know, obviously knew I was going to put my roots down here. It was like a camera by home. And so contacted a realtor on Thursday. It was the Thursday. And I just said I wanna live in this neighborhood. And you could start pulling together stuff. She was like a stuff really doesn't come up for sale in Freetown Rico, very often. So you know, it's going to be tough. Where else would you wanna live? And I was like, well, let's start there. Well, like the next day, the independent published an article called the courthouse could be yours. And it was this expose on this beautiful home that the U L students in the architecture program had designed and built over the course of a year. And I knew nothing about these homes. You know, never seen anything about him. But that this was the third home. And it was literally like you said I mean, it's almost exactly the same. That she on. I know like to the too weird points where I was like to double glass doors like mining anyway. So it's amazing. So I saw it and I immediately. It was for sale. They had an open house on Saturday. And they were accepting offers on Monday, did you show up with all your cash like with all of my hippie friends? And I was like let's do some happy dances in this courtyard right here because we've got to get this in the family like this is such a fabulous. Pretty and so we did. So put an offer on Monday. And I mean believe it or not I mean, I think it's it's such a strange product and because it's not a traditional home. That's just built like a regular home. They they really have had a hard time finding people to buy these homes. So I was actually the one one other person was interested in buying it and previously. They've actually had to kinda like lure buyers the table. So I think moving forward enough people are kinda into where it's like the t tiny homes, you know, that sharia bears pushing I think the market is there, you just have to get the word out, and it's a small percentage of people that would want this. But there's plenty. I mean, there's plenty that wanted. So you wanted to live by the downtown to be close to festivals, and and Freetown it's one of the oldest neighborhoods in town. It's got this. Great diverse history, tons of two so much richness there that I my parents live in Saint streets. And that's a great neighborhood to that was a little out of my price range, honestly. But Freetown was exactly where I wanted to be. It was you know, it's just it's so colorful, and it's really fun neighborhood. And an yeah. So it was like a perfect storm of everything I've ever wanted. So right, right. I just wanted to bring that story up, and I apologize. If I was throwing you for a loop. But that to me was a good story. But how you let things roll you just let them unfold, and it seems as though your career has mirrored that that it just unfolded in a way that you probably couldn't have planned for. Yeah. Absolutely. Or if you like throw it out there, like just I don't know somehow it manifests, right? You know, start drawing dream house. Ladies and gentlemen, may hear that Kelly. Maybe it will maybe someone will build it for you offer it to you. Right. You've been really active in the community. And when I went through your bio, I didn't realize how many accolades you hit gotten you've been recognized as one of Katie on his top twenty under forty rising young business leader person of the year, you're active with the seven of five young professionals you've done leadership Lafayette, and you've been awarded the community championship team leader award by the US green building council and in many other awards. I may add I know that you're active in working on the I forty nine working group. We both serve on that. And you serve on other commissions. Is there any next step for you? Have you looked ahead as to what you might be interested in or I know that's a great question. And honestly, you know, I'm almost hesitant to say this on the you might as well, you know, people ask me, oh, you can probably gonna work for the park forever. And I think and I may, but I also I don't know like. I am also open to the possibility of getting the park open and run it for several years. And then maybe make a switch to do something else. Because I'm I mean, I'm just not sure what I love about my job. Now is this campaign management and the million moving pieces and not that operating park wouldn't be that same drive, but I've never managed to park. I've never been a park administrator. And so after the first five years, I mean in my really gonna love that as much as I love building a park and fundraising for a partner will we already fundraising for phase two. And so it's not going to be a very different situation for me. I don't know. And then also you always kind of wary about people call it kind of the founder's syndrome people who just have a hard time stepping away from something because it was their baby. And I don't I don't want to hamper the parks growth or the parks innovation or ability to meet the community's needs. Because I have these fifteen year old preconceived notions that we talked about really early on. And right. I mean, if the park needs to be dynamic, and I just I don't know maybe I will be open to. Being that dynamic thing that allows people to change. I don't know. I just don't wanna wanna lock myself in. But as far as what would be next. I don't know. Yeah. I don't know. I love I mean, I could maybe see working for downtown or, you know, obviously working at the city. I mean, obviously, basically been a public servant my entire life so far. So as for I think previously there has been some consideration. And sometimes people ask for us like are you gonna run for office of his curious about that? I, you know, and maybe I will obviously I think had keep it on a local level. I really appreciate working on a local level as opposed to going to state or federal levels. But and so maybe that'll happen. One day. Maybe I'll be a council member or something like that. So I want to encourage you to stay looking ahead because I really can see lefty at adopting more green spaces once the horse farm. You know left at central park is built in underway. We do have I think an opportunity to look at how we. Our space. Thank your, you know, your peers in particular wanna see Lafayette be as livable as it can be walkable by 'cable, and livable, which includes a lot of Greenspace. So you've been an inspiration for so many of us. Well, thank you. How can people find out more about the central park? Where would they go for more information? Well, our website is laughing at central park dot org. And we have whole kind of series of different visuals in the master plan and a beautiful fly over video that actually takes the master plan into three d animation program. And kinda shows you what it looks like when it's all grown up. So it's really it's really cool to kind of see these beautiful images of what the vision is gonna look like when it's kind of fully planted and has a little time to get stabbed. So that is at Lafayette central park dot org. There are also kind of bits and pieces about like the history of the park, and some really great old historic photos of what it used to look like when the university was operating as dairy farm. So those are always just really kind of tug at your heartstrings because it really is this kind of I don't know. I mean, kind of conic beautiful old farm that really represented Lafayette's past was, you know, I mean this was back in it was bought in nineteen twenty and it was back when that was country way country. I mean, really really country and then in the fifties when they built like Judy San on Johnson story down a gravel road. If people can imagine that. And it was so far to town. And they told the duties they were crazy. And they were like you just wait, right? And now, it's literally if you Google EFI yet. It's right. The pin-drop is like right where the center is pretty much because again, like it's just grown so much to the south. Right right anyway. So it's just I don't know. It's a really it's a really great. Kind of project. But also we try to capture that on the website kind of highlight. What it was before what it is today. And then where we're going tomorrow. Yeah. Maybe this is such a pleasure. Having you on the air. And I wanna thank you for your friendship to you know, you make a difference. You've always supported me in mind Evers and another like that with your friends in the community. So we're we're lucky to have you here. I'm glad you moved back home. I want to do. Well, thanks. I'm excited about this podcast. The purpose of it is to highlight, the many wonderful people and things about Lafayette, Louisiana. We have we're Jim here in Louisiana. And I want the country to know about us into come. Visit us, you know, come be a tourist maybe consider moving here opening businesses here. So you're a crucial part of that. And thank you for sharing your story today. Yeah. This is John swift. You've been listening to did, you know, a podcast dedicated to Laffy Louisiana and our guest today has been Lisbeth, BBB rooks. It's active director of laughing at central park. Thank you Lissouba. And thank thank you for joining us today. The views and opinions expressed on this or any program on the podcast network. Do not reflect the views and opinions of Lafayette, consolidated government, Cox communications, L, US, fiber, A, O C community media. It's board of directors or its staff to learn more about becoming a community media producer. Visit us on the web at AO. See I n c dot org.

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Full Episode: Friday, August 21, 2020

Nightline

17:42 min | Last month

Full Episode: Friday, August 21, 2020

"This is nightline. Tonight. A city country thrown into turmoil over joggers right now thirty years. Later we're hearing all sides I was beaten and left for dead days of police questioning leading to confessions. came. The media firestorm shocking twist plus older lady twos jogging sending the case back into the national spotlight into what climate change to this day. This special edition of Nightline one night in central park star right now. I absolutely loved central. Park Central Park is site center the universe kind. But by the nineteen eighty. This place that was Mitt to be central recreation POB. Really becomes more of a barrier. Night would and it would change. It will become a place where you'd be nervous about golf. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, nine. You must remember that the city was in real. Divisive Colorado's condition. This is sort. In which the Central Park Jogger. Narrative. emerged. Tonight a look at a case that captivated the nation, a group of teams accused of Raping Young Bank throughout an evening job. It became a lightning rod at the intersection of class race and politics in America. That Wednesday night at least vacation kids we hang on a little later. Go from hanging out with friends. Picking. Skateboard. To. Mayhem. died. Arabic people. We started to get a lot of radio runs of Group of black and Hispanic teenagers assaulting and harassing people. I would run. To the park usually entering at the eighty fourth street entrance adjust by the Metropolitan Museum of art. The whole thing was very chaotic. We're getting a lot of nine one one calls. It a large group over there about thirty to forty people. There's a big push as as a couple of cars comes. In what it was all said and done we had five kids. And I. It seems like a relatively minor thing. They're going to send these kids to family court, and then this woman is found in the park. Covered in blood near-death Trish me not conscious barely barely alive the discovery of Trish mealey lying in a ravine. Changes everything. I have seen traumatized patients many many times, but I've never seen somebody like. destroyed. This is keith bone and this was crushed severely, we all know what rape is I mean everybody knows that isn't describe, but there's nothing like seeing something like this the atrocity of such an act we ended up with five arrests. Two of the five were Kevin Richardson and Raymond Santana. We had to go back out. And start getting more of the kids that were involved in the attack that included Yusef Salaam Corey. Wise and they had trauma Craig with pressure mounting to solve the case days of questioning began those who were fourteen fifteen or supposed to have a parent or Guardian present and largely they do. But even the parents think are pretty naive about what's going on. They used us the used our lack of knowledge of the justice system against us. Starting to talk. And give stories about what happened. So these interrogation, they're not recorded in any way right? They're not even written down does not my rules this is the rules I was handed. What was going on as? The lead investigator. In my case, he fed up any slammed his fist on the table and give me what I wanted. He loves me. If you take an individual, that's fifteen years old and you put that individual. In A. By themselves with two to four to six hours that individual be terrified. Could be almost tantamount to Someone having a gun to your head, all these kids, and in many cases, their parents believe that they would get to go home if they. Implicated another people if they were helpful on the right way and they were desperate to get out of that room detective of mind whatever saying anything. Go home. Crime like this. They played. Against Each Other, the play, the boys against each other, and they made up all of these stories to get their arrest in the convictions. Coerce. Somebody when he's sitting there with his parents. Guy Elizabeth Ladder was the prosecutor in the Central Park Jogger case by all accounts. She was incredibly don't. She was not one of these prosecutors who are just in it to win and the early hours of the morning on the second day. Under questioning the teenagers make a fateful decision they decide to start talking on videotape. This while I. Did this before this last. After night in police custody, Kevin Richardson Start to talk implicating himself in this night of mayhem, numerous assaults, and possibly the Rape Patricia Miley throughout him packing came movie. And it's not just Richardson other teenagers are implicating themselves on video to. Abraham stop and. All of them except Yusef Salaam. He never goes on video and never makes a written statement when I first saw those stoops I didn't disbelieve. Like anybody else I watch a confession tape my first impulse is. A. person with really do. Church. My second impulse is to listen to the details to be enforced. I shouldn't say that. She has a fractured so she hit with a very, very heavy option. In saw that picture and don't get these lines you don't get fractured self definite at. Home. When you watch corey, it's almost like he's desperate to get it. Right? He tells one story of this molly tells the story at another moment. When milica false confession cases is because when they told the truth you did believe, made them change it? Of course, they're going to be some inconsistencies between the statements and in my experience when you take statements, here's kind of a range. Meanwhile Tricia my league is clinging to life in the hospital. She was in a coma for a week and then she started opening her eyes. Looking around little. Did she know she was waking up until media firestorm? A terrorist free throw central park they found her and the gang raped her the shockwaves, waves of the tragedy felt both north and south of the park and all contributed to. Heightened sense of fear in York. And this thirst vengeance from from. The first trial involved three defendants, Raymond Santana, Antra McRae and Yusef Salaam. Clearly the statements were the most important evidence. The walks on the jurors faces when they those videotapes told paid devastating story for the defense. It's clear as it has been for a year that prosecutors will depend on videotape statements by the suspects themselves. But when the defense went on offense this afternoon, it's strategy. Th also became clear. Teams lawyer say confessions were cleverly staged. There was a huge problem in this case they didn't have. DNA evidence against these defendants, they didn't have physical evidence against these defense. So we as prosecutors were completely upfront with the jury about the fact that semen had been recovered from Tricia Miley, the female Jogger, which did not match any of the people that were on trial. After. Ten days. Ability rations, the verdict Yusef Salaam Raymond Santana, and Amtrak mccray. All sixteen were convicted of the rape and assault the Central Park Jogger. The next trial was Kevin Richardson Corey wines, and once again, the prosecution relied on those confessions tape us brutal in fact, it was so graphic some of the jurors at least a couple of them look like they're having a hard time watching it. In the second trial. The jury struggled with Corey Weiss's confessions. Statements, they were all over the place. The facts were contradictory self contradicted. I didn't believe that he had anything to do with the rape. Corey. Wise. This confession, make any sense several the jurors at at me. They pushed me to go to the other direction and I wish to God. I just hung jury on that and that's that's been my biggest regret for thirty years. Perry wise found guilty of sexual abuse, first degree assault and Ryan. Then with respect to Kevin Richardson guilty on every charge. Nineteen ninety-seven four of the men completed their sentences and were released from prison. When we come back in unexpected admission the the story back in the headlines I thought at the death. Nightline one night in central park continues here again Byron Pitts. The Central Park. Five in the back of everyone's consciousness. Was the last ones to imprison. Then suddenly one of his fellow inmates comes forward with the story that would change everything. A serial Predator steps forward and turns the case upside down. Taos raise is a convicted homicidal serial rapist doing thirty three years to life in New York prison. Lost at this only bad things to so many people in on them is so many ways he's a bonafide psychopath. He's a serial rapist. raped. His own mother and he raped and murdered a pregnant woman in front of her own two children. Potatoes raise came forward to say that he had been the one who had committed the attack upon the jogger. Did you attack the Central Park Jogger? Did you rape her. Did you track. For Dead Thought of the day. raised. Manages to get the attention of law enforcement and they do a DNA test and they take his DNA and comparative and. They have what they never had in the trials in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety. which is a match. A perfect match. I was like Oh. That's great. We got the final Guy Guy who'd gotten away originally in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine. But then he turned around and said, did he did by himself Was On that night. Muscle. The Lady, she was jogging at the right hand side. I saw piece of branch dead a stroke over the head with the brand and she felt follower. Grad to dragon inside to the bushes. has dragged there I remember that I took over close. Race, new some things about the victim and the crime that had never been revealed and the only person who was there now the spring into the summer of nineteen, eighty nine, there was a rash of violent rapes. All along Madison Avenue. Culminating in the murder of a woman ninety seven seventh street. Side rapists, they were calling him the police officer investigating that had his DNA marker in that file. One of the rapes associated with that case took place in Central Park. Not far from where the Central Park Jogger had been attacked the rape on April seventeenth, we knew nothing about not in homicide of an. April. Seventeen sex crimes dealt with rapes there's no sharing of information. Maybe, there is today. But back then. They had a full caseload ours was ridiculous. The DA vacated the convictions of the five men, and that does not mean that the five former defendants are exonerated. It doesn't prove that they're innocent. It just means that in the eyes of the law, their convictions no longer existed but soon, believed her injuries were too severe to be inflicted by just one attack when Matthias Raya says, he did it alone. It's not just the prosecutors in the cops who don't believe it Trish Molly herself doesn't think he could have done it by himself. Is Medical evidence to support. That more than one person was responsible for the attack on me the New York City Police Department. Ends up feeling, it needs to do something to tell its side of the story, and so the Police Commissioner decides to appoint Michael Armstrong with deliver the Armstrong report. I don't think there is any credible evidence at all that anything was done in an improper way to make them talk. So the police led investigation concluded, the police didn't do anything. The next chapter in the story is they sue They feel that they were railroaded. Into prison, they lost years of their lives they want justice for money. This documentary comes out and it's made by Sarah Burns Ken Burns and David. McMahon no money could bring the life that was missing. With the time that was taken away breaking bad. It raises the possibility that they're actually innocent. That film was made while we had the equivalent of a gag order from federal judge we could not speak publicly the daughter of the filmmaker had worked for the legal team of the five. So he didn't exactly think we'd get a fair hearing. His approved a forty one million dollars settlement with the five men wrongly convicted in the Central Park jogger attack braces justice done hosted the defendants each received seven million dollars Corey wise received thirteen million. This is amazing. It's a classic settlement on the on the one hand, the defendant's. Forty one million dollars sent on the other hand. The city sticks by its cops and prosecutors is we're not going to hang them out to dry. They did not engage in police misconduct they did not engage in prosecute tournaments. I. Just don't understand a settlement for that kind of behavior. tied. It's outrageous. We're ready to go to Supreme Court. My work now is standing with survivors of brain injury of sexual assault of other kinds of trauma. I believe they gain strength to to move four.

Central Park Jogger rape Central Park Yusef Salaam Corey prosecutor Park Central Park Kevin Richardson Yusef Salaam Raymond Santana Yusef Salaam assault Colorado Kevin Richardson Corey Mitt Metropolitan Museum of art Trish mealey New York City Police Departmen Corey wise Corey Weiss Supreme Court
Central Park 5 --3

A TRUE SIDE OF CRIME

1:03:09 hr | 1 year ago

Central Park 5 --3

"Hello Welcome back to a truth IDA crime I'm your host. Angela and today I have a guest host cody I'm a ghost host. Today we're going to be focusing on the case of the Central Park five one of the biggest cases of this year that were that was one net flicks. A lot of people talked about it and it was all over social media and how people were disgusted with the way these kids retreated. Today we're going to take you through what happened that night and what followed including the confessions of the main five but also some information on the other boys that you may not know about the ones that were arrested and didn't really serve any time and Kinda got off with being punished for anything kind of slap on the wrist a compliment. Steve Lopez Cory Wise `Antonio, mccray Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana Yusef Salaam were all indicted on rape one sided one sex abuse one attempted murder to to counselor salt one robbery one to cast a robbery to assault one to council assault to write one Raymond Santana and use of were also ultimately what they were charged with was rape in assault. They didn't ultimately what they were found guilty for was ripe us all they were never found guilty further attempted murder. They weren't found guilty. I to me. They were charged with all these things but they were not actually found guilty those charges ended up. They ended up being found not guilty for them. which I guess is good since it gives them less time even though they still had crazy long amounts of time. Okay. The first five. That are the main people are Corey Weiss. Use of Salaam, antra trauma. Kevin Richardson and Raymond Santana. Jumped here. All of these kids were fifteen under. So. We kinda found out cory and use for the only to the actually knew each other. The other was just Khanna saw each other in passing I guess. Just like A. A big party going on in in Central Park that night you know like a bunch of kids know school is having a good time, Kinda. Messing around like kids do. So some the other kids that you'll see brought up in this case are Mike BRASCO and Steve Lopez. Steve Lopez actually knew one of the other boys. And they were kind of together that night. That's how he got drawn into a but. Like, they were brought up on charges. Some of them were dismissed some of them they pleaded down. One of the boys actually initially wants a court. And then he took a plea deal will get into the rest of that later. So the initial charges that were issued for these boys were. Attempted murder, the second degree rape one and assault one. These. Are Some pretty heavy crimes. Li. got. Sodomy. Sexual, abuse these things are something that people would like if you were accused of these things. Were found guilty or not guilty people will still raise their eyebrows when they saw you so would destroy your character even without the fact that these children were. Beaten to a confession basically and Forced upon forced to accept these charges. These are pretty disgusting charges that you would give a child a child in A. It was just unbelievable. The way that these kids were treated. Based off a something that was not true. Especially, with having kids around age, I couldn't imagine like. If you tell me, my kid is in John First of all I'm coming up they're like. My kid come home. You're not about to put your hands on them, and if you do I'm filing a lawsuit against you especially in like it makes it seem that today's climate in the climate from eighty nine is not different at all. condescend time. A. Lot of black kids today. You know they grow up a little bit bigger than the white kids. You know what? I'm saying. The people view that as a a negative, and they are Kinda intimidated by that like their threat because there be even with myself. You know what I'm saying I'm. I'm light skinned or mixed. I should say I'm of the lighter complexion but have dreads and stuff, and sometimes when I go into a white neighborhood when I do a delivery or something like that I just recently a man came out in his yard because he heard rap music out there and he just stared at me for about ten minutes until I left his neighborhood after I did my delivery so. Any things like that like how big you are and kind of doesn't doesn't matter to someone that wants to view you as a monster and the crazy thing is if you listen to rap music whether you're black why Asian Hispanic like people automatically view as like ghetto or like a hoodlum or something when if you actually listen to some rap music is not negative music all rap music is not about what people think it is half of is not about violence. If they would actually listen to understand. But. So the police ended offense. Kinda. Put together this time line. and. It's kind of weird to me like I don't know where they even. I don't know where they got all the information. They Kinda can screw the time line between what the boys told them and what actually happened because there's no way that if what the boy said is true, there's no way that. The documentation that the. Police, in the defendant I mean the. Police and the prosecution put together. Now. In saying that if you've watched the documentary you Kinda know that. It's day kind of rearranged stuff to try to make it fit. Into me, that's we're. So. Michael Briscoe. He was eighteen. The prosecutor ended up saying that there was no evidence against him in the ripe case. So he ended up pleading down. and May of Nineteen, ninety, two, the saw in robbery of one victim. And to one. Other jogger. So He got saw robbery. pled out one year he was never ever charged with anything at all. he actually was the oldest person. In this case, he was eighteen years old so he was actually an adult. And I don't know if that makes a difference in how he was treated or what happened. Obviously, we weren't there but it is weird that the one grown adult is. Like the one who they say they have no evidence against. And he's immediately. Plead it down to one year in prison. The other. Talk about was Stephen Lopez Stephen Lopez they said that they were able to tie him to the Ray. Bought, ultimately, they ended up not doing it in Jay were ninety one Elizabeth. Letter. She is. The assistant district attorney she was on a prosecutor central five case and it was craziness so. She ends up. Not Wanting to accept deals from anybody else except Stephen Lopez after all of the. Charges. In trials. So Stephen Lopez. He tried to. So As I was saying, she didn't want to take plea deals anybody who was indicted on right? Somehow she came. An agreement with Lopez and his attorney to accept a plea deal for him. Apparently because he didn't say that he raped her in his videotaped confession those other boys said that he was involved which they said that. They each said everybody else involved because he didn't and I guess witnesses. Would not testify. They said, they felt for their safety they were scared. She didn't want to try him. And they accepted a plea deal from him in ninety one and he was sentenced to eighteen months to four and a half years. And he was because he was, he only played guilty to Mugunga jogger. So he got off he was fifteen just like the other boys. There's not a lot of other information about Stephen Lopez or about Michael Briscoe other than the fact that they were arrested, they were questioned there were indictments handed down the same indictments that they handed down to the other boys initially is what they handed down to them. But none of them stuck is the difference because automatically all the boys were indicted on attempted murder. Rape Assault. Rioting robbery like they had multiple council robbery. Multiple. Council, assault. and that's crazy like it seems like they kinda gave them all of the charges for everybody. So the police and the prosecution put together this time online it starts about eight fifteen between eight, fifteen at eight thirty, a group of thirty kids from the projects and the Slumber Plaza gather at one hundred, tenth street and Fifth Avenue. This group of kids enter the park. They walk around the south pathway parallel to the East Wall between hundred Tenth Street and one, hundred, six street they encounter a male Hispanic who they considered attacking. But decided that because someone knew him his name was Eddie they left him alone. About eight, forty, three, a melania female. They're both black were seen walking down snake he'll. In one, hundred, six. So the group leaves this couple long because there's a female with him, which kind of contradicts everything they do that night, but we'll get to that later. At Eight, forty five, there's a yellow cab. The yellow cab has bottles thrown in rocks thrown at this happens at about one hundred third street, a male Hispanic a constant at one hundred and Third Street and east Dr Rocks and bottles thrown at him. He runs eastbound to Fifth Avenue. Nine zero five another male Hispanic is the saute and hundred seconds street and each drive. His food is taken at nine, seven, a male and female white. Right, bike riding northbound on east Dr Harassed by the Group of people. The group runs eastbound across the North Meadow of a female victim is grabbed at hired in Second Street, cross drive and she runs. East the rape victim leaves home eight, fifty, five between the Times of nine twenty. Nine forty-five. There was somehow created a brushfire. To north west of the crime scene, direct line of vision from crime scene to the Fire Corey wise states that he observed too far while female was being attacked. The group leaves the rape scene. They go southbound across the ballfields they skill. The ninety seventh street transverse row a end up on North pump house fire units are dispatched around nine, thirty, nine and at nine forty. Nine forty, the group arrives at the North the North Pump House the reservoir at nine, forty, five, a jogger assaulted at the reservoir named David Lewis Leaves residents at about nine ten to nine fifteen at nine forty sakes the same jogger reports are sought to a uniform scooter officer on Dr by Ninety Second Street at nine forty, seven, an unidentified jogger harassed chase by the. Group the jogger asked the group. If they want to race, he out runs them. How's that him being chased if he asked that race, that is the this whole time line is a bit weird people czyz. A lot of things that they were penciled in is like some third grader sat down with the crown came up with these things. So we'll woman after that jogger. John a sonic on the reservoir at ninety ninety third to ninety, four, th street he leaves his residence of nine, thirty, nine, fifty, a grew the group splits up some exit, the park at ninety third and P. W. and some remain in the park. The Save. Jagger is before John is found by exhilarate police on the eighty seventh street and West at ten. Oh Five. Uniform Peo- response to seeing the Laughlin assault ninety, four, th street and Ninety Third Street about five minutes. Later, a CPAP AC observed some us at Third Street and C. P W when the AC van pulls alongside them, they jumped the wall, the ACC chasing once they go off at about ten thirty, A. C. Apprehensive five suspects just to be clear AC exhilarating cop so at. Ten fifty. The AC in the suspects arrive at the Central Park precinct the people that were apprehended. were. McCall Kevin Richardson Clarence Thomas, Stephen Lopez, and Raymond Santana the conflicting stories of the defendants. They're saying this an approximate time line based on what the boys initially said, which is not completely true because half the stuff they say until after they were. Assaulted and harassed and held without food. So because of this time line in the major differences that happened in this. It kind of looks as if the rape didn't even happen. At least it's not they're saying that they went to the park at nine not. Doesn't allow time for them to commit a rape. So. Cabinet Raymond were both arrested at the park nine incident. but it was for lesser charges, unlawful. Assembly. they had found the jogger at that time. So they got him for a lawful sip a assembly ANC. Rioted and stuff like that. 'cause it was thirty boys running through Central Park. Of their parents didn't know they were even at the precinct until hours later, which if anybody which I'm sure you do watch any crime shows, you cannot question a minor without their parent. That doesn't even make sense. They're fourteen fifteen. They don't even know what's going on. So. They got detained they get questioned hours later their parents find out there. officer say that Kevin Stadium while being transported. ooh Police record state that Kevin said Amtrak omitted the rate. But there is no evidence that Kevin. Ever. said that. Kevin and even know and. So I don't know how they thought that they were gonNA prove. All, right. So moving on. The very next afternoon corean use of were apprehended. Reports differ as. The next afternoon Korean use of were apprehended. The reports differ as to why Corey went with the cops the cops say his name was on a list it was just misspelled. The young men state he went as a friend. So from what we were able to look into, they had use of name. and Use of went core was whistled. So they were like, Oh, you wanna come with your buddy. The cops say that's not the way happened. But seeing as they lied about a whole bunch of other stuff, I'm inclined not to believe. So and trump take into the precinct by his parents the next morning. He actually got home. He was really dirty. His parents were trying to figure out what in the world was going on day found out that he was at the park that night so. They were like a need to see what's going on tell them what you know. They didn't think that he was actually involved in anything. So. They took him just to take them up there and let him talk to the police. So anybody that they feel that they have and that they can convict, they have them already. So what transpires now in the next sixteen plus hours is a bunch of A. Heart wrenching things such as. Accusing Children of doing these heinous crimes. Depriving them of food in order to get said confessions. the JOGGER. Also going through a lot of stuff after she was found she's fighting for her life. She's. In the hospital. Like she's unconscious she's in a coma. And she thinks that. When she wakes up, she thinks that what the police have been doing is the right thing and they're trying to get her justice. We know that it becomes a different story later. So all these boys they were held for and then interrogated for extended periods of time for different reasons, and they used different tactics in order to get this stuff out of these boys. And the first guy that we're GONNA. Start with this Anton. his parents. Brought him up there they talked to him. He said he annoying thing about a jogger. He anything about rape they keep berating him will the cops ask his mom to leave. His dad's steps out quickly and he talks to somebody and they throw him his dad's job. Tell him that you know if he doesn't cooperate we can't help you. If might you know reflect badly on you that you're not working with the cops because his dad worked for the city. So he comes back in an he. Pretty much rates and Angrily has outburst against his own son to make him tell the police what they wanna hear. He tells them to tell them what they wanna hear which to me is crazy. I couldn't imagine tell my kids lied to the cops especially to admit to a rape. I mean, what do you think? I think. This was pretty extreme for them. Due to these kids in that. That Anton actually had to go through this with apparent is that he wanted to save his job than save his son was kind of A. I don't know man I believe I could do that to my kid yet. I know like New York is the eighties. There's a lot of high tensions on the late eighties was black people in the government police but. I'll find another job like I'm not sacrificing my child and then the resentment that your child will have free because they know what you did to them. So moving on, we'll move to Raymond so. Raymond was interviewed with his non-english-speaking Grandma. So. She didn't even know what they were asking him or what they were saying what they talking about. The charges were downplayed to his dad. They didn't tell his dad the whole situation when he got there hours later they told him like Oh you have to implicate other people they manipulated after they told him like Oh, this entrance saying that you day. Okay. Let's say that you did it this boy said you did it and he didn't know these boys. So he thinks that the police are. Telling him the truth when in actuality they were offering him fake help they gave him a fake deal telling them. Oh. If you just tell us what these other boys data's fine and then when he's right, he's like, Oh, well, you have to put yourself in there. You can't say that you didn't do anything. Once you do this, you'll get to the home. So Yousef was held in question. and not a seemed as if no one tried to contact his mother, his mother had been calling around for hours trying to figure out where her son was, and then she finally found out that he was in police custody and was being interviewed in everything and want to go basically save them. I. Think he was the only kid who? Like parents came and took him out of the situation. I. Maybe. She was new understood more I. Don't know I. Don't know why specifically his mom took him up situation idiot ended up helping him in a long run but at least he had the support his mouth. So. The next person we're talking about Kevin. Ken was also manipulated to implicate other people. They told him the same thing that they told Raymond like, Oh, just tell us what happened. Tell us what they They yelled at him. Screamed at home deprive him food kept telling him will you can go home. If you just sign this, you can go home. Sign this form writes Your Confession Day manipulated him and his sister to sign the Miranda form because his Mama, his sister came his mom had to. And his sister stay and his sister wanted to read the papers. But with the police yelling and screaming and Kevin's like just sign it. So I can go home because he thinks that if she signs his paper, he gets to go home. and. That's the one thing they kept telling these kids you can go home just do this you can go home. And they never went home. So then we come to Corey. So if you remember Corey is not relieving supposed to be here. He's kind of here as a friend, but the police end up somehow using him to piece everything together. Corey had no parents there at the time probably due to the fact that he also. Wasn't really there to be interrogated. He was there as a friend for his buddy. But he was very scared. He was manipulated like very hard core and they eventually. Promised that he would go home and that they would help and as long as they gave, he gave information. which he did end up giving information. So if you think about it being a teenage boy, you start hearing things like this guy said this about you. Oh, this guy said this about you. You automatically become defensive. So you you're offenses to intern. Start saying stuff about people to take the spotlight off of you. That's that's what any kid would do. So this is kind of what happened which it all spread out between these five boys these five. All were manipulated into believing that everyone else was telling on them and then they're just scared may ended up just telling a story that didn't exist. So. That's. That's the craziest thing like this whole thing came from them saying, well, he said he did it. Because I firmly believe if they weren't well, he said you did and if you tell us what he did, you can go home they win the confess to this. Also, when use of mom came to get home use mom did not know that Corey with him so she leaves with use of. Course left. He was there as a support system. He had fallen asleep in a different room and because they lost one boy, they kinda just replaced. Use of with cory because use of wasn't there anymore them to beret. So there are video confessions from everyone except use of because use of was taken away by his mom. and. I'll. Put the links and the show notes so you can watch them they are. Like if you watch the mannerism of these boys. They don't look confident what they're saying they look afraid. Like? And there's parents in the room with every single one of them and. In the videos the first time you'll see cabins dad which I'm not sure where he was during the rest of the situation, but he is there when he does his videotaped interview. And they're just looking at their kids in complete utter dismay because I don't think any of them believed that their kids are capable I. Don't think anybody thinks that. That is true. I would never believe that this would be my child. Accused of Rape Sodomy. And among other things. especially with a group of boys that. He. Didn't even know like I. Think this whole situation is crazy so. They do. They try them for. Rape Sodomy assault. all a slew of charges that you would never think of fourteen or fifteen zero will be charged with. So They ended up separating the boys into. Two different trials. They did this the defense and the prosecution Kinda wanted this because they didn't want all the boys grouped together. They figured it will give the boys a better chance. So the first trial. And tron use of and Raymond. And that was twenty, five, nineteen, ninety, two. The eighth month of nine hundred ninety. by vein the. Rape Victim. She was conscious and she wouldn't court. She didn't really have any evidence because she couldn't remember anything from that night which I guess is a blessing and a curse is a blessing from her because she ever happen. But. It's kind of a curse because maybe she remembers she can say that it wasn't those boys. Because it wasn't those boys, that's the crazy thing about it. So, they have their trial, they're all convicted. There are convicted. And then they have a second trial later that year. This trial consisted of Korean. Kevin took place from October Twenty Second Nineteen, Ninety two December of nineteen ninety. So. They. The only person in the situation who was tried as an adult was. Cory because he was the oldest person at the time. And everybody else got like seven years. He got double. They gave him fifty. and. He was sent to all the dot prisons while the other boys got to be at the kid prisons and if he would have watched the movie and things Because of Corey not going to school and things of that nature, they kinda use his economic against him and HE A. Man He was he was a thing that glued this whole thing together for them because they played off his ignorance and also he was the one to take the The like the most of the punishment. And then you would see him getting getting into fights having mental problems inside prison things of that nature his His sister, which was also his brother ended up passing away while he was locked up and it really took a toll on him because that was the person I really looked out for him. When he didn't go to school, she will always fine house accredited thing she knew he was skipping school where she would tell them like you gotta go to school you gotTa Education you've gotTa get Outta here. and. Their mom kicked her out because she was transgender and you know transgenders thing to be in the eighties or nineties so and then he found out why he was in prison that. His Dad also died while he was in prison to wade which they didn't portray him having much of a relationship with his dad, which is something that I would like to look into. Yeah actually have. A half him out of Corey as a friend on facebook and follow his life a little bit and is just very uplifting to see where he's taken this thing moving forward because he's doing a lot of good things right now. Yeah. He actually Is has his name on one of the innocence projects. The one in Colorado is called the poor wise innocence project now because he gave a bulk of his money like I think. Closer a quarter of two and a quarter and a half million dollars to them to help get. Other people exonerated because it was. innocence project who actually got the boy exonerated so They spend all this time in prison. A ton of time in prison and. Some of them get how Kevin gets out use of. Gets. Out. And try and get solve and the thing to focus on the most is that. These these fellows they have their childhood taken from the rest of what was left of their childhood. Basically. They were forced to Become victims theirselves so not only. was there a jogger that had been actually a victim of the crime that they were being accused of they also intern became victims also of being accused for a crime that they did not commit. that's. I think that's one of the worse things. This is that. You took one victim and now you made six victims because you added five more. Because those boys had nothing to do with this. In Mind in my is you know what I'm saying I'm seeing that all this corruption within the police force and within the. District Attorney's office and things of that nature. And Not really seeing any of these people being punished for what they've done. Well the One lady you know she got taken off all her stuff. the prosecutor. Yes Well she was the prosecutor. Yeah she was a prosecutor she got. Removed from everything she's written books and she made all this crazy money on all this more than that to me is not just taking your books in your money and stuff it's about not. Being able to see. The things that you put this these kids through this what I want them to see. Well, she won't because they heard she did she did the right she doesn't cares to me even these cops they said Oh. Well, they need to look into this case because they did the right thing louder denied. They still think that what they did is what should have happened also, caps also fought to follow orders. So whoever gave the orders to tear interrogate to manipulate to without food? That's the person that should be punished. In those main detectives. because. It wasn't these weren't regular cops. These were actual detectives. And Somehow. Another department wanted to take this case and it just is so unlucky for these boys at the other department didn't get to take it. Because this lady was over overrated, I think the other people were like violent crimes or something like that, and they wanted to take the case, but they weren't allowed to had they been allowed to. Maybe this turned out different because she wouldn't have been in charge of. That's what I always think about. But years and years and years and years later. Everybody, served pretty much their entire. Length of time their entire sentence. and. So. He gets out of prison he kinda. Go to live with his dad and that's a lot of turmoil from. What we looked into between his hand, his daddy step mom. Do, you remember what they were. All black craziness will just the fact that there was a whole life without him created he no, he comes in. The stepmom could be looking at that as him barging in on their life. which is a typical step mom situation I, don't think that's true. Though with the typical step, mom's situations that that's usually the evil stepparent is both me though I don't I guess maybe on different other people. I. Don't see it as intrusion in our life because when you get married that person's party, we got to consider the fact that he's also a grown man that was recently. Believed to be a rapist and things of that nature to that could also play is always gonNA play a role. No matter what. Yeah 'cause I. Guess at that time, it wasn't The Dad didn't believe he did it but everybody else said Dad Jimmy loved his son and they were both played into this situation. By the police in. A sad it is super updating but it ended up forcing Raymond to do other things like he got involved with drugs because he had to make way for herself and it was very hard to make way for yourself when you're convicted of such heinous things. So in order to make away, sometimes you have to do other heinous things like sale drugs and things of that nature, and then when you get popped for that, you're also adding onto the. Things that you already being accused. Yes so He gets out. He falls back into drugs he gets rearrested. And try and gets out and his MOM's happy for him to be out she moves in back in. The only issue is his dad lives there. His Dad is going through some kind of disorder sickness. And He kinda can't even look his dad in the is Kinda does no longer accepting of his dad because of the way he handled the whole situation and how he cared more about what he got out of it than what his son got out of it, which was the destruction ultimately of his childhood. And by the time that he like realized implications, it was just it was too late. Like, and he also during his trial, he didn't even go to the trial at all. It was just trying to his mom. So I think that added insult to injury that you didn't even have the decency enough to come to the trial and in his father's defense is probably because he relies what he did and he couldn't watch what makes us exactly. which in turn on his heart, he already knew. Hope I did this to my marquette as a child and I know that he remembers I know what I've done. I. Know that this is something that has almost unforgivable I took his freedom and his childhood. Yeah because entrance mom had divorces day and then he got sick. So she moved back here. She just wanted to be helpful to him and entrance dad did try he liked brought him place the food but that is nothing compared as man's been several years in a juvenile detention like. Not Okay That's that doesn't mean anything this brought me means nothing. But finally I mean, right before his dad died they did. Kinda. Reconcile. Him. And but his daddy passed away in. Toronto believe moved away and started a family. He colleges wanted to stay out of the limelight a lot for a long time he actually didn't. Have anything to do with the previous documentary though one came out in two, thousand, twelve believe. Like his his face wasn't in it, it was only I think his voice. He did have something to do with obviously when they see us, he was more free to open up thin. So Kevin Kevin. Guy Out and. He moved with his I think he had the biggest support system everybody. Like sisters mom months everybody came to see him. They held him down. He had a lot of support losers crazy. Kevin seemed like he was the smallest of the group at the time. And then They expected this smart guy to do all of this. Also remember we saw that his actual video and he was like a bigger do but they portray him as a little bit petite key in the show, which is super posturing trying to give someone a visual. Take the total opposite and put a small guy some place and expect him to be. Overpowering you're grown woman that is a jogger obviously fit in raping her stuff in it's like. Sometimes you can't correlate with a movie compared to the actual facts. Yeah. So we we watched all of these confessions they were growing really tough to watch. That's tough to watch for boys confessed stuff that you. Know they didn't do. Because they were off, me exonerated and they file the of the the rapist. So. When you watch the movie I, then we watch the the tapes and then we watched the actual two, thousand twelve documentary, and that's how we realized like an transfer trail in that. Miniseries was not anything like what he actually looked. Okay. So. He's that boy was probably like a good five nine. Like push in two hundred pounds he was a big bully. That's about my is. Two hundred something paneling and give you the fool. He wasn't I don't think he was to hyder but he was getting close. He was a good one, eighty, one, ninety, he was a bigger boy though. Like, big silo he like a football player. And they gave him like a kid that looks like my Niger. Seventy five pounds. So there was a little kid did he didn't even look like he was fourteen he looked like he might have been eleven or twelve at the oldest, but he got out in. Brown's family was super supportive. They helped him get a job. They held him down really strongly he kinda was able to put his life back together. You've got out in the same thing happened he got married and started having kids and. His life just. Would crazy. But all this time while they're getting out and they're putting their lives back together. Corey is still in prison. Like in. Solitary. Or. Being beaten up because of guard want him to do something he didn't do it. So the guard pretty much set him up. But the thing that I admire most is that through all of this. He still. Refused to accept the fact. Or. This wasn't even fact except that Oh, I'm being charged with these things that I did not do he stood he stood strong and. Always said that this was not him. He was not this person they made him out to be and he was strong in believing that. Yeah, he's stopped. His thoughts he stopped going to his parole hearings and they come every time. He was eligible the Garba don't like. Hey, corey time. He's like if they don't WanNa hear my truth. Then there's no reason firm for me to go. And that is a very admirable thing to do because a Lotta kids at that age. Wouldn't have done that I. It's grown people. Wouldn't have done. That is grown people that that just say that they are instead of so they can get out on parole or probation and come to find out they never even Bailey anything. But they In turn, they will walk around with this this thing following them because they accepted the fact. They accept lesser punishment. All because it was a lesser punishment. So, this brings us up to two thousand two at this time. Raymond is in prison. Corey still in? Prison. and. Corey is approached by a guy that he got into a altercation with back in the early nineties when he I was in prison. matteis rates, and if that name sounds familiar is because he is actually the central park rapist. This is like proved DNA. He's actually a serial rapist. So. Matas has. He has been known around New York. He was actually. A prominent rapist in New York already, that's why he was already in prison. He raped a pregnant lady. He attempted to wrote to other women like it was a lot ultimately the last woman. Is who identified him. He was identified there was DNA. And they proved it was him that committed these rates and he got to prison. so He'd been in prison sentence ninety. Two More about. Race. Raise. At, the time that this was happening, he will still super young he was eighteen. But. He had committed his first attempted rape a year before. Two days before the Central Park Jogger case he raped. While he attacked another woman. He raped her he beat her in the only reason that he didn't murder this woman. Was Because? A. Passer-by. Saw Him. This Lady Dade give a description of him. The crazy thing is detected went to a local hospital they found out who he was, but for some reason he did not. Get arrested immediately. They didn't bring him in for question at all. It's crazy to me. Absolutely. Crazy. On top of that. He attacked five other women in their apartment. One of them was a lady with the last name of Gonzalez he raped and murdered her pregnant. And she had children. He stabbed her nine times in her chest and abdomen in her basement with our children here. This man was. A horrible horrible person. So. At this time, he has attempted rape. This other rape that happened two days before. The rape of the central. Park jogger. Five other women? And then the one he was actually caught for. He ranked a lady named make in her apartment managed to get away from him. And Neighbors pinned him down wait for police to get to him and this happened in ninety one. So he committed nine rapes. One of those rates was also a murder. and. They didn't catch him till ninety one. He was never a suspect in this that is. Razi to me. At -solutely, crazy. So. Good thing finally, he was caught in ninety one, he served his time. and. He found guide. Which is ultimately what save the Central Park Five. Along with these boys but nobody ever kind of connected the dots. And speaking of the DNA there was no gain that connected the five boys at all but they just kind of blew past that and try the kind of set in their mind that all these are the ones we need. These are the ones we want. We need to hurry up and get somebody convicted in order to not received backlash from the public. So they kind of focused on these boys and they went for them from hard. Line ultimately got what they wanted. Yeah they. They referred to these boys as like a pack like a pack of wolves were animals. That's a that's super upsetting and. It was there were pages in the newspaper they say that they should be Hong Oh, donald trump reared his ugly head in there. Of course, our president and no matter how you feel about him as president. That's a horrible thing to say about. They were at even that time they weren't even convicted they were just. Allegations, they should die like they should be hung. These are children. Do I think that horrible things should happen a rapist? Yup. Because right is horrible. Crime is something that you have to live with for the rest of your life that is a trauma. So I think rape should be locked up, throw away the key they need to stay there. They need to get more time than Dang or anybody else rapists and child. Dr Way too key. But before these boys were even convicted, it will say that they need to be hung and now into the nineteen after they resigned rated, he still won't take you back. He does not apologize he says that they did it and apparently he knows someone though cause he's still stay strong with they did it. Which is preposterous to me, but he can't be wrong. So. At least in his mind. But backs array so Raise and Corey had got into offer Catia prison court was initially. So in two thousand and to. Raise come to corey and he talks to him telling he found Guide and he wanted to let him know. He's the one that committed the rate. I don't know how I would feel house corey that this man Ko to me tell me that twelve after I started twelve years in prison. He committed the rape and I've been in prison for I would kind of lost it I believe I would have been like I probably would have fought because I've been fighting my whole child rest of my childhood already. So why not fight for something that was true in you know I would. Probably, would would've coke me. But Somehow Corrie de. And raisins up talking to the then district attorney and they DNA has to him he there's a recorded confession from him to. And it's crazy. So in two, thousand two. Raymond is released Corey's release chorusing said, it's a joke. He thinks that his mom's full of crap. He doesn't believe a he's released and it is the best thing ever. So they have to wipe these boys. Criminal Record. And wranglings released because if it wasn't for the initial charges. He would've never actually been in prison the second time because he wouldn't be a repeat offender. So. They release everybody the boys file a lawsuit they filed lawsuit against. The city of New York the State of New York and they win. They go. They go on to do pretty good things I say corey does innocent project. Use of as a public speaker and he speaks to us. Raymond has his own clothing line like they're all doing. Really really you can go look these guys up on facebook different things. It's look up their story. You can follow them on different social feeds and see the positive things that was created from this negative. And the NAM. The only thing that I see that happened that was weird as that. Through Spiritual. Enlightenment. Did matteis risk come forward and confess to these things? I feel that without that, he would not have done this in these boys would still be held to this belief that they committed this crime. So It took the rapists in it took the rapist order to save. Them. And that is very odd, will respond to put our faith into our justice system. Are Just as some definitely it's. Broken there. Some of the stuff was put in place at a time where it was needed. And I. Think it needs to be revamped now. This is a different time they need to revamp things. But that is the story of the central. Park Five. If you have not seen. When they see us, I suggest you watch it. It is heart-wrenching I cried a little times I was angry. And then I as a man speaking fathers out there if you have young boys, please sit them down and discuss with them. The nature of sexual intentions with young ladies, all kinds of things because we never want to see our kids and up in these situations. So the best way to keep that from happening is to teach them how to stay away from these situations. Be Father in your kids lives, quit leaving it up to the mothers to raise men. And I, that's that's pretty much all the the things that I would ask of any man. We actually made the kids all the cans, girls, amboise watch this just because I feel like it's something that they needed to know they were taken aback. These boys were accused the things that they didn't do. especially my son because the naira wants to be a cop. So he was baffle. He still wants to be a cop that didn't deter him, but he just didn't understand how cops who were supposed to do good. It's something so bad. So you have any other comments or anything to put in cody. The only comments I would have is my reaction to the movie is at first I kind of felt myself wanting to pick the TV up toss it a couple of times Because I was just like. So like I couldn't believe it that this was happening type of deal and. Just. I just didn't like it. At all and I know some people say that the show was one side but we watched a show we watched the documentary and we investigated and everything we found was the same. Like we didn't find these boys never change their stories. They always held to the same stories. So it's not like they said, one thing the next day said another thing the only change was what they initially say to what they were say after they were harassed slow basically if you feel that it is impossible. For a A black child or black children to be innocent maybe you should start looking in the mirror and taking a look at your character and find out how innocent you are. if. It's weird. I think that was one of the biggest things that people were saying. It's because these were all minority children. And it was against the White Lady and back the in that was still now we have the issue but then it was very very prominent that that was what was going on in New York and La this was around the time of the right and king beating like. Lots of racial turmoil. Yeah. A Lot. A lot and it's mimic like today nowadays is being mimic really really strong set for allow times now. It's death instead of incarceration. was that are losing their lives whether been incarcerated than die? We still have a fighting chance. Because these boys thought their lives were over and they got exonerated they were giving money which money is not going to give back that time in their lives. But what it will do is allow them to have. Both And the ADA. She stands firmly by. Her convictions. She will never say that these boys were not guilty. The only punishment she has received is. Everything was taken away from her pretty much. she was made to leave Columbia Law. Which I think is something that should have been done. They said that they didn't want. Stuff to negatively affect. Their College Which? I completely understand. She was supposed to be writing more books. That's not going to happen. dean. From. The school says. I am deeply committed to fostering a learning environment that furthers this important and ongoing dialogue one that draws upon the lie. The lie lived experiences of all members of our community actively confront the most difficult issues of our time. Another Dean is quoted as saying that the minute mini series reignited painful invited national conversation about race identity and criminal justice, and that's true because. Nobody. Kinda. Ever. And now we get to Linda Fairstein. she was. The real crazy driving force behind. Elizabeth. And Elizabeth's. Approach to the detectives. She is the one that want that manipulated timelines entail they fit. She's the one that pushed everything to go the way that it did. She got deals after this. There's There's a lot. Of things that? I don't understand. I don't understand how this woman. Could. Look at these little boys and think. Well. Maybe. They're all guilty. They did. But on the other side. Of the coin. There was a gentleman named Robert Chambers. A grown adult man. Who did murder a woman in central park. They refer to him as the preppy killer because he was well put together. successful man. And he got a plea deal. For actually killing her. Because he did not say he didn't kill her. He knew he killed her. and. She gave him. A plea. But these teenage boy she saw. As. culprits. That is baffling to me. I can only hope that. There are some repercussions. For her behavior. because. It was a gross abuse. Of Her power. She was. The. Chief. Of the Manhattan, District Attorney Sex Crime you. So Elizabeth, who was the prosecutor worked under her? And? She's the one that I can't help but think maybe if it didn't go to her. These boys might have fight gene. I'm there's been online petitions to. boy car boycott her books. Removed from from board positions, which she's resigned from several the boars that she was over. In lieu of this situation. Probably because she knew. That eventually, they were gonNA, take her. And for this like she deserves. To be stripped of all of it. Whatever good she did for other people does not completely wipe out. The horrible thing she did in this situation and she didn't necessarily do good for other people because this woman who I want to cover this murder later GonNa Cover. Murderer Robert Chambers in a later episode. But. The victim in that case did not get justice. So. What are your thoughts guys? All right. Thank you guys for tuning into a true side crime. I'm your host Angela, our guest host today, cody. I would like to thank you guys for having me. It's been fun to sit here and stare at this woman in the face and talk about something that is very important to me and I. Hope it is important to you. So if you like us have cody back as a guest host. Please let me know comment on our facebook page like us on facebook at true side of crime follows on instagram at a true sided crime. You can leave voice messages on anchor at a true side crime. Also, you can send us an email at a true side of crime at Jamila Dot Com once again thank you for listening I really appreciate you until next time. Stacey.

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Central Park Karen Case

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

09:24 min | 2 months ago

Central Park Karen Case

"Boost with FACEBOOK's summer of support here. Join them online. For six weeks of free digital training classes, interviews with business experts and presentations from renowned entrepreneurs. All the help businesses get back to business. Find out how to get more creative with your marketing discover how to embrace e-commerce learn how to build an online business and a whole lot more here from business, experts and entrepreneurs like Magic Johnson. Shark Tanks Kevin O'Leary Uniworld CEO, Monique Nelson and Moore join us now at F. B. Dot com slash summer of support again. That's F. B. dot com slash summer of support. Don't miss out, you guys. By I'm Devin leary and I'm Carolina, Barlow and we're here to tell you to dump him. Break up with your boyfriend, and we want you to listen to our podcast true romance every week where we talk about our love lives and the love lives of others. Please join our XS. Will also be listening like Kyle Kyle. Are you there? Hey, babe has life. No, you look good though me Oh. My God saw please I haven't even gotten a haircut like three months. Okay, True Romance Premiers July sixteenth on the iheartradio APP, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Okay Carlos. Is this going on with this? Bird bird-watching not cooperate with. They do. Well Junior. You Remember Central Park Karen. Her real name is Amy Cooper the white woman who called the police on the black man whereas a bird watcher who asked her to leash her dog in. New York Central Park. You know she has now been charged with falsely reporting the incident in the third degree. which are you know misdemeanor charges, and if convicted, she could serve up to a year in jail, but anyway the however the man the bird watcher. Go Ahead Not sending away woman in jail for calling on a black do. State so this America go ahead. In this league roles, I didn't know Negroes. Was Bird watching I my first this first, blackbird watch. Yeah. I know we very. What I would you know? If a layers. But I'm just. Senate a white woman to jail for a year for calling. Go head call okay so here we go so however the man, the Bird Watcher Tommy. Christin Cooper that's his name and her name is amy. Cooper, no relation but anyway. Who she call the cops on Christian Cooper. He told The New York Times that. He feels that amy. Cooper has suffered enough and. He's not cooperating, but he did say Mr Cooper Christian, Cooper. He did say that he understands the principle of it all, and if the DA needs to pursue the chargers, then he should, he's just not more to cooperate because shales me. Yeah, he feels like she suffered enough. She her reputation. She lost her career so. That's his point, and so he says. Look I man to do. You know I mean less than learn I mean. What else are you going to do? You know I I'm not. His point. That's his point. She suffered enough. She lost her job. She lost a job. I mean you know she got beat up on social media reputation. Try you try to do something that didn't work. You bought attention to a cause I'm through with it. But you know what Steve. A lot of people are looking at the fact that this could have gone left in. It could have been deadly and. Police to show. Keel absolutely. Now look at the other side now. I'm just throwing this out there for you to consider. I know I if I'm the bird watcher. Which is that? If you were in the park, I can't go down to. Instinct ain't no telling what come up. To. The victim in this situation that. Pool records and they'll flip it. Yeah you. Might be knowing Hey I. don't need no more here. Let's just let bygones. be it or need by need to go into my past. Oh, you're. Always been a bird watching. Broddrick Harvey Browder. We've been looking for him. down. He tried to help the DA now. Take No. Roku, stay the way man I ain't man Bro! Sita suffered enough. Know, his history, yeah! As, they say, let's go y'all. Hey, let's go. Get off of me. Dog Check on the Dole. is though it was some serious. It's the principle of it all. It is. Something well all right. For today's headlines, Ladies and Gentlemen Miss and trip. Thank you, thank you, everybody. This is Andrew for the news and let's go with this. Lieutenant Colonel Alexander than men has announced his retirement from the army may not remember the name, but vitamin was on the receiving end. He says of a huge backlash, and for months ever since he appeared as the key witness at the congresses impeachment, hearing an inquiry into Donald trump so them and says that after twenty one years of service he's. He's retiring from the army. Then men's lawyer says his client has been subjected to a campaign of bullying retaliation and forced to choose between pleasing the president and breaking the law. The trump administration's former national security adviser John Bolton tells MSNBC that he thinks the way. The colonel was treated with shameful in my experience with him I think he merited promotion. His performance was exceptional sodas, the performance of his twin brother yet who is in a different capacity at the NFC. NFC you know it was. It was just as unacceptable for men I think to be singled out for Alex Veneman to be singled out even worse in a sense for his brother yet who's only said as far as I can tell was he was his twin and again? Alexander is leaving us. Supreme Court sided with the trump administration yesterday in a case involving to birth control under the affordable care, act or obamacare. The high courts ruled that employers can refuse to. To provide coverage for contraceptives on either religious or moral grounds covert nineteen infections continuous spike in several states Florida's reporting more than ten thousand, six hundred new cases Arizona over thirty eight hundred new cases Arkansas there's been about a twenty five percent jump at Corona virus infections, and just the past week, so now is the Republican National Convention approaches for the first time. The trump campaign seems to be preparing at least be flexible president. Trump has been counting on a large impersonal turnout. Next month convention, which was moved to Jacksonville Florida from its original site in Charlotte North Carolina after the governor there and court North Carolina expressed a wait and see attitude about hosting such a large event with Corona infections, going all over and changing, but trump just may have to make his RNC presidential acceptance speech virtual. When after all at least he seemed a little, less sure of things when asked by Greta, Van Susteren TV grew. It depends on the timing. Look, we're very flexible. We can do a lot of things, but we're very flexible. Asked the first time you heard that. The GOP nominating convention is set for the last week of August. Finally said news singer Sharon page has died. She sang with Harold Melvin and the Blue No. Members one. Youthful voice now back to the Steve Harvey Morning Show you're listening to. Morning Show? Why is it that we assume that technology and the Internet? It's just for White Dudes? The Internet would be nothing with the contributions of women. Communities have colored other marginalized people get those same contributions. Go overlooked in raised until now. On my new podcast there are no girls on the Internet portable monuments. All the ways marginalized. People have been using from the Internet to change the game since the beginning. Listen to their inaugurals on the Internet on the iheartradio APP, apple podcasts wherever you get your podcast. Episode strapping every Tuesday. This DJ. Glad and I want you to check out the Vlad TV podcast since two thousand and eight Vlad TV has been the leader in hard getting no-holds-barred interviews with the world's biggest rappers singers Hollywood stars professional athletes and former big time criminals, and now you can catch all of our full. Leith interviews availables audio podcasts, so listen to the Vlad TV podcast on iheartradio. APP Apple, podcasts, spotify or wherever you get your podcast.

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Extra: New York Icons: Central Park Zoo by Garry Winogrand

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

23:54 min | 9 months ago

Extra: New York Icons: Central Park Zoo by Garry Winogrand

"This episode of Studio Three Sixty is sponsored by Kohler. Imagine if your home was perfectly tuned to your individual needs color connect smartone products. Let you enjoy enjoy customized experiences all the sound of your voice with a single app you can connect and personalize a range of settings fear shower toilet kitchen faucet and water filter set preferences to match a range of moods and a variety of routines and make your home as unique as you with the full range of colour connect smart home products. Wchs brings smart to your home at Kohler Dot com slash. SMART home. I'm curt Anderson. And this is the studio three sixty podcast studio. Three six thousand series. New York icons tells the stories behind works of art that took shape in the city but which have shaped the lives of people everywhere on this episode. We Look Gary winner. Grant the brilliant prolific street photographer. Who worked from the nineteen fifties into the nineteen eighties? He photographed all kinds of things but especially crowds of people in public spaces beautiful women and zoo animals and their human visitors uh during his career when a grand celebrated for his idiosyncratic vision and style in got three guggenheim fellowships. He also got plenty of criticism Zim for photographs. That seemed to a lot of people to objectify women win. A grand died at age. Fifty six in one thousand nine hundred eighty four but his pictures still will make waves for the latest in our American icon series producer. Richard Yea looks at why win. Grants photographs are so riveting by going inside his most controversial photograph made in the Central Park. Zoo that's photographer. Todd PAPPA George. He's talking about a pitcher taken by Gary. Win The grand what we see filling the frame pretty much or a couple an an attractive blonde woman and an equally attractive black man and they're very well dress in each one is holding in his arms chimpanzee dressed to the nines little shoes on and so forth. The notion of child is that idea that the chimpanzees or their children is provoked and that Susan his merrick she was alone. Time photo curator. At a museum of Modern Art. There is a little boy in sixties. Sort of proper Sunday. You Know No. He's got little cap on little nice formal coach and he's in profile so he's very clearly seen in the picture. Once you get over the craziness of the chimpanzees. It forces the viewer to confront their feelings about race. Their feelings about what happens if a white woman and in a black and get together. The picture was taken in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven the year. The Supreme Court made a landmark ruling on interracial marriage loving versus Virginia. The loving were married in nineteen fifty eight outside of Virginia here in the District of Columbia but they were convicted under Virginia law which forbids any white person on an colored Richard Loving a white man and his wife. Mildred woman were sentenced to a year in prison for getting married. The legal term is missing nation and those who support such laws claim. They are necessary in order to preserve the purity of the races with its ruling. The Supreme Court struck down all remaining meaning anti miscegenation laws in the United States. Right away the number of interracial marriages around the country began to rise. You look at the picture and anyone with any ability to create an hour is just going to say my God is this. What happens when the racist mix? Is this what they produce Bruce Chimpanzees Hap- George was actually with window Grand Central Park Zoo that day. The too happy confronts the year before and was sometimes walk around the city city together shooting pictures on the streets. Those walking ahead of him and made a vertical picture of the four when the two chimpanzees were walking on the ground between them through deserve and then I felt so shoved out of the way by somebody which turned out to be Gary who in his own kind of way was uniquely eager to make that picture he says win. A grand was chasing a sort of artistic hunch. All I saw was kind of strange bizarre New York event but he saw something he saw the projected projected picture and when it comes to photography PAPPA George believes window ground was generally less concerned with the ultimate success of a pitcher. Then win rent hard the problem of making it. How do you follow this more interesting than than the then? What happens is really the problem? That's dairy win. The Gran taught into photography students at Rice University in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven something beautiful. How do you make a photo? And it's more beautiful than what was was photographed. That's really odd problem. In the end. He seemed to be saying that. The distance between how a photograph loops and the actual things that the photograph describes describes is to space for artists. Intentions the word dramatic hassle apply. It always it's always about that. Is the photograph more dramatic matter of what was photographed. It has to be many of winning grants. Most memorable photos contain some dramatic just decisions in mundane situations like the the image of two girls and presumably your mom's on New York sidewalk. Everyone's arms are in the air. It's symptoms are looking down the street trying to fly down a taxi and the girls are looking at each other playing clapping game very hard to sort of say this is a singular Gary winner grand photo. That's Jeffrey Jeffrey. Henson's scales a photo editor at a New York Times he met women ran in the early nineteen eighties when they both lived and worked in Los Angeles. He used the White Angolans England's For a vision that was uniquely his at the time. One of the things that you often see is you know groups of people in the sort sort of seemingly choreographed situations where they're gesture their body language their facial expressions are all different but they add up to a complex flex hold kind of dance sometimes. His subjects can look like they're dancing even when they're sitting down like his photo from the nineteen sixty four world's fair air of six young women in summer dresses sitting on a park bench with their. Let's trust the three in the middle seemed to be sharing gossip. The to underwrite are staring. That's something mysterious. The edge of the photo the one on the left escaping that a man. That's to her. There's so much going on here and as you keep looking around you you begin to see that. The horizon is tilted which adds even more dynamics to image his use of tilted horizon as a compositional element. It was one of the pioneers of using that sort of visual device effectively. They're just great pictures so many great pictures so many pictures not all great you know. He liked to photograph women. He's very interested in women. And you know that was caused some controversy through the sixties and early seventies as the feminist movement saw gains in areas like workplace protections and reproductive rights when the grant took a lot of photos does of attractive women in public places just going about their lives. They're often attractive. You can often concede their breasts easily defined in the pictures again. Moma curator Susan Kiss Marriage. The pictures were interpreted as being part of the male gays. The work was terribly criticized. It was absolutely ill timing thoughtless winner. Grand didn't do himself any favors favors. When he collected these pictures in the book on apologetically titled Women Are Beautiful Still? America has much more forgiving tate on his women photos than most credits at a time see. I saw the picture is more complicated. Perhaps then looking at breasts or looking at beautiful women women weren't wearing bras then in the seventies they burned bras. If you remember it really is about a kind of physical energy. I think he saw them as breath. Great powerful equal if not better. I think he absolutely admired women. It's he was an absolutely devoted family man. He was absolutely devoted to all three of his wives. She says that's why women ran. started his career shooting commercial assignments for magazines and he had to make a living. He got married married when he was quite young to Adrien Lebow and I think she was all of seventeen years old so he did commercial assignments and the the assignments were always the best when he was sort of given freedom. Commercial Work didn't satisfy win grant and soon in his early twenties. He began shooting personal work on the street. I think he had specific ideas. The word on the street begins in the fifties and Manhattan at the time. I mean after the war. It was America's this sort of Academy of post-war prosperity and Gary was well all aware of that especially being John Her caskey described him. A Hick from the Bronx Giannattasio was the legendary director of Todd. At Moma who was perhaps the BIS booster of win Lebron's career so gary comes down from the Bronx goes midtown Manhattan. Where all of this is happening? By the time I think around nineteen sixty one or sixty two rolled around is trying to figure out how to make a living once. He gives up the magazines and he starts running workshops for catastrophes top PAPPA. George was in those early workshops in winner Rans Upper West side apartment. He says the plastics felt more like toffee touches in a way. Hey it was puzzling. 'cause Gary would just asked question after question after question was not so well acquainted with Greek philosophy. The time that I didn't recognize this as the socratic method happe- George who later headed the graduates photo department at Yale. School of Art Says Immigrants Philosophical Sophal tapes on the medium influenced deeply. The whole purpose of from his point of view was to clarify and begin to articulate his ideas about photography. That was the tremendous lesson that I learned from Gary and then this whole working theory photography Eddie was structuring. Creating through these laugher `ISMs he would say what photograph isn't a still life. They're all these aphorisms from Gary which AH can be maddening. Like photograph to see what something will look like photographed when he says famously photographed to find out what something will look like photographed. It's not something casual. That took a lot of very very hard thinking on his part to put together. We'll continue with our story but I I WANNA remind. Can you to follow us on twitter at studio three sixty show. Imagine if your home was perfectly tuned to your individual needs colder connect smartone products products. Let you enjoy customized experiences all with the sound of your voice with a single APP. You can connect and personalise a range of settings for your shower our toilet kitchen faucet and water filter step into a shower heated to your ideal temperature with just the right combination of sprays and steam and and tuned to the playlist. You want streamline your routine with a mirror that has an embedded voice assistance and hands-free light adjustment. Relax the ultimate comfort of an intelligent toilet that lets you customize your personal cleansing nighttime lighting and see temperature set preferences to match a range of moods and in a variety of routines so you can experience the perfect environment for however you're feeling or whatever you're doing make your home as unique as you with the full range change of colour connect smart home products bring smart to your home at Kohler Dot com slash smart home and now back to the podcast before for he met with a grand PAPPA. George was taking photographs across Europe and imitating the style of Andreotti Ebersol. That of course is the French master who coined the term earn decisive moment. The idea that the artistry of photography was to know exactly when to treat the camera to achieve the ideal composition of life and other the forms that would not exist a moment later or sooner. I had this allusion that it was that somehow related to famous phrase decisive moment That you went out and you. You tried the streets at waited and waited for things sort of fall together in that miraculous moment beginning beginning in one thousand nine hundred thirty s hearty zone pioneered the genre that became known as st photography in which two subjects typically don't post for the camera and are not aware career being photographed. The result is a sort of candidate realism. That can be summed up by the word. Verite the French word for truth when you're photographing on the street it's very physical activity. You have to move through the crowd you have to sort of be in a dance to try to remain anonymous anonymous. You don't want people to alter what they're doing because of your presence. That's the challenge and Carter son was able to remain a fly on the wall wherever he photographed in part because the cameras are a lot smaller especially the lighter range finder it so compact in size the shutter and film Winder Winder were so quiet it was often the only type of still cameras allowed on the movie. Set in the lighter was so easy to shoot with street photographers. We use light. It's an extension of your arm. Gary would do this thing where you take a picture. And then he'd look at cameras though something was wrong with it and it. Was this very clever gesture to to help the people who may have photographed who are thinking. Wait a second. What's going on here? Why is it oh well it didn't work anyways so I'm GONNA keep walking? It's Ok see photograph me. Imagine you're going to scratch only in the hand that strike the scratch it. That's all they saw. was somebody lift the sink of Lucas. Because if he was just touching his nose cameras now together and it was totally unclear whether whether he in fact made a picture and most cases he have Underneath data skies trump's the camera guy win ran was able to move around his subjects on the street and remain relatively inconspicuous and while Tortilla persona prefer fifty millimeter lens which had a similar perspective to the human eye. When grant always shot with the White Angolans which has images it's a more expansive and dynamic look with Gary? I saw the possibilities of pictures were much much more present and shifting overwhelming than I ever thought the film was cheapest thing you you had to you. The camera cost award the film. The film was the cheapest thing you had to use before digital cameras. Utah only take thirty six pitchers on a roll. And then you had to rewind the film process it may contact sheets proofs before you knew what you really shot winner brand made more than a million pictures in his life. He's been called the first. We're still photographer. Because he was so prolific. And that's what. Jeffrey Henson Steals Remembers about meeting winning grand in the early eighties. I met him at the farmers market in Los Angeles Angeles and I had been working as a freelance photographer. We talked for a long time and you know one of the things. He told me that the trouble with photographers see felt in La La as many of them are waiting for someone to give them an assignment and they never really would realize their own potential because they were always waiting for an assignment. which for me was Pretty life altering because then I started shooting every day. I really don't think anybody really live from teachers. You learn from work. You have to be your own toughest critic and you only learned that from work from C.. Work Again Gary Win a grand at Rice University of my experience. Evans's was radically different for my money. He's probably the most transparent. And he's talking about Water Evans who documented the plight of poor farmers in the dust bowl and the effects of the Great Depression for the Farm Security Administration more than gets out of the way he's as close to being transparent to being too not existing. This thing that's the way I have to express it. I would like not to exist. I would like not to St- that's another one of winning runs. FAMOUS APHORISMS assumes the desire to be totally inconspicuous if the essence of street photography. And what better place to disappear. The New York City New York is really great. David Delgado a photo journalist from the Bronx. We'll have different. Quirks may be the way you walk. It may be be the way you look at things. Maybe what you're wearing and maybe just the way the light is heading at the moment and he's always shooting for where to Simon's he uses modern digital cameras with bid zoom lenses but in his free time he likes to walk around with his little lighter. Range Finder you go with for prime which is fixed focal lens and did you zoom a few feet. Sometimes I'll see image half a block away and I'm running through foot traffic because I see the the movement is fleeting and I need to grab that image. He's talking about the so-called zone zone focusing method which winner grant was known for with the Prime Lens. Meaning Not Zoom lense but one with a fixed focal length street photographers can preset your lends to focus on a desired range. Say Six to twelve feet and as long as they stay within that zone with their subjects they can take photos twitchy without the need to re-focus every time you move around. This is a ballet of sorts. Where you're you know moving around people to get a photo you're dodging and you're moving? Yeah probably grab it with a Zoom Lens but zoom lenses kind of cheating. You know as photographer August you need to get into you. Need to get dirty and put in the work. That idea street photographers need to get up. Close and personal with your subjects. Maybe the enduring legacy of winner grand around curator Susan his Merrick. What Gary Does for street photography say he may be the last person to have really pushed watched? What the thirty five millimeter camera can describe? The pictures have so much information so much detail so much energy. There's so much action. There's so many things to think about in each photograph and I think Gary perhaps more than anyone pushed that I mean he changes inches from thirty five to twenty eight millimeter Lens and he did it specifically for the that reason to see how far it could be pushed to win the grand. More information doesn't doesn't mean more answers. Let's face it I mean. What are you know from a photograph? They don't have narrative ability to cow jumping. If it's going down even from the picture so why should you know where the hell was taken. And that's the trouble with the chimpanzee photo from the zoo and why it's become such a controversial image and winning rance body of work. We don't really know anything about the couple PAPPA. George says they look like models for a fashion shoot but doesn't remember anything else about the event the interesting housing is. There's a seeming paradox functioning. They're not ambiguous. There's nothing about any of these yet. You don't know what's happening in the picture. The women's blonde hair is neatly tied up in a church if the chimpanzees arms trained onto their human guardians the sunlight perfectly illuminates the group and everyone looks very serious like they care about one another. The pitcher is full of details. But it doesn't have much action or context he. He refuses to back away from the actuality of things and the actuality the limo moments the moments between the raising of the flag. A Mo- Jima as wonderful in symbolic that picture is the Limo Lohan says how we spend ninety nine percent of our lives. There's not a lot of high drama so so if you're interested in life you can make pictures that are highly symbolic and fairly obvious and easily accessible or you can try to describe something that is complicated complicated. Intricate and I think Ari was successful in doing that by being alert to all of all of it out there when the left New York in one thousand nine hundred ninety one I moving to Chicago then to Austin and finally to L. A.. He continued to photograph until his death in Nineteen eighty-four shortly shortly after being diagnosed with cancer. Too many of his friends and credits his work was not the same after he left. New York. Like the Greek McKEN Taos lost his strength when he was lifted up from the earth. Straight from the earth I think Jerry's total brilliant is is an artist came from the bedrock of the silent that were on Manhattan City is Urban Chicago can the urban. What's Haley's doesn't happen that way but not existing York? I'm annonymous I could. I could go straight as the same street corner every day for ten years. I've never seen I wouldn't see the same people twice while to the timing really MM-HMM WNYC's Richard Yay produced our story and was mixed by Wayne show. MEISTER OUR NEW YORK ICON series is made possible by a grant from the booth Ferris Foundation to hear more of these stories head over to studio three. Sixty DOT ORG Thanks for listening. And you can subscribe to studio three sixty wherever you get podcasts.

Gary Win Todd PAPPA George New York smartone Kohler Dot Rice University curt Anderson Jeffrey Henson Los Angeles America Kohler Supreme Court Virginia Richard Yea Susan Zim Wchs Central Park museum of Modern Art
 Ep. 272 - The true costs of white fragility & toxic masculinity

The Breakdown with Shaun King

18:50 min | 2 months ago

Ep. 272 - The true costs of white fragility & toxic masculinity

"Did you see the video that I posted earlier today of a man of middle aged white man in a? Red t-shirts a lot of white supremacists to wearing all over the country. At a costco. In Fort Myers Florida. Just loses it absolutely. But COMES UNHINGED! No mask. Screaming right in the face. Of An elderly woman working at Costco. Because, he was asked to wear a mask. They just want break down that video. A breakdown. What's going on, but Neef the surface? To you about? White fragility. Toxic masculinity. How it's costing us so many lives in this country. This is Shaun King. You listening to the the breakdown. The the breakdown. A breakdown. At the very root of the spread of the corona virus. Throughout Florida. And Texas and Arizona. And even. In other states. At the root of it and the video that I just referenced I WanNa play the audio of that for you here in just a second. At the root of it. is the reality. That from the top down from Donald Trump and Mike Pence? They staked out a position. Making wearing a mask. Something that was for liberals. Something that was for hippies. something. That was for weak people. And trump and pence in refusing. To wear masks, even when visiting hospitals, even when visiting factories that required everybody to wear a mask. Trump and pence and others have refused to do so have refused to do it just to demonstrate for their followers and for the country in the world. That wearing a mask matters. Just this past week, Mike Pence was confronted on it. Trump has been confronted on it, but for them it's political. And they have basically put themselves in a position. Saying that wearing a mask is something that. Lesser People Do. They put the country in a position rather the such that. White men and white people across the country. Are Now refusing conservative white people in particular are refusing. To wear mask. And when you ask them to do so. Even, if it says you can't enter the store without one. Even, if it says you can't shop here without one, even if managers and staff and others say. MA'AM For the health of the customers and staff here, please put on a mask or you'll need to leave. And when they are asked. Because they have now, put this idea of wearing a mask as A. As a Democratic Party kind of thing as a liberal kind of thing when they are asked to wear, they lose it. For families with young children, I'm about to play. Video that does have some foul language in it is just twenty seconds, and so you could skip past it. or You could play it just just to illustrate the sheer foolishness going on all over our country. Let me play the video for you. Of A man at Costco in Fort Myers Florida. Absolutely blowing up. And what you won't be able to see for those of you who are just listening, but if you go to my instagram page, you'll see the video. Is Not only. Is He screaming in the face of an elderly woman working at Costco? His mouth is wide open. And he is coming toward her in a rage, looking as if he is about to assault her, it was terrifying. Let me play the clip for. Me Not. Your. Job. Back to fuck up your fucking phone down. In my typical fashion I have. Watched this video. Dozens and dozens of times not because I I. It's not a police brutality where I'm looking for clues. But I'm just trying to understand. What is it that I'm looking at? How could. Blow up, so violently I asked on Instagram, and I was really only half joking. Could this man be on steroids? Is this Roy rage? We don't know what we do know is that it's white rage that the book that I would love you to purchase. Its white fragility. That's the name of another book that you should absolutely purchase. And at the root of what's going on is also toxic masculinity, which really knows no racial bounds. Every man from every ethnic group. Has the capacity for toxic masculinity. But when you combine the three of those things. White, rage, white fragility and toxic masculinity. And then dropping. Some bigotry drop in some trump ISM. Drop hid all the right in the middle of a corona virus pandemic. And what you are seeing in that video for those of you who haven't seen it, but just heard it for the first time. What you are hearing. Is actually dangerous. It's deadly. It's it's violent in multiple ways, but doubly so. It's violent in the coronavirus pandemic. He might as well have been spitting on the woman's face. Everything we know every scientists in the world is saying. That the number one transfer mechanism. Of the corona virus. is droplets of fluid. That come either from your nose or your mouth when you have the corona virus in are projected into the air onto someone else into their airways, and they are now infected as we know, millions people have now been infected with the corona virus over a hundred and thirty thousand Americans that we know of. died. And in Florida. Right where this incident took place, and as we know, senior citizens are more successful, not only to the corona virus, but succeptible its worst possible impact. That in Florida. We have forty one is see us. That are now over capacity. They are full forty-one different intensive care units at Florida hospitals that are no longer able to accept patients. The cost of corona virus is overwhelming the system. That's just this morning. Thirty more hospitals in addition to those forty one. There I, see us their intensive care. Units are now at ninety percent capacity and are expected to be full by the end of the week. That's nearly seventy five hospitals in Florida, which for the longest had no hospitals? No I see us at maximum capacity now. They are at nearly seventy five on this Friday. Elective surgeries are being. Canceled across the country and Florida's governor again, let's talk about toxic masculinity and and white rage and white fragility. As cases sore. From the top of Florida to the very bottom. The Governor Rhonda Santa's still refuses to just issue a mandatory order requiring people to wear masks. Why is he doing that? Even Texas with its deeply conservative governor, even though they were four months late issuing the. Even, Texas has now said yes, you have to wear a mask, but governor Rhonda. Santa's who is simultaneously. A, state of emergency, for his State? But also refusing to issue a mandatory order, requiring masks to be worn. is putting everybody in Tanger-. And when you look. At the nexus. Of White Fragility. I posted another video of of white woman, literally chasing a young black man out of her neighborhood, who was literally just walking through it. But these videos are are now so regular so consistent. That on most days. I'm not even posting them anymore. I see several of them a day and I'm not even posting them. In what we see is. A nexus of bigotry. White supremacy, white fragility, white rage. And? It's just gross. and. It's not something that you can. Criminalize your way out of I. Don't believe so. You may have seen yesterday that the woman who. was at Central Park in New York and Harassed a black man who was bird watching in central park is. What he does. For Living. As he was watching birds. This man is a is a. Harvard trained scientists and I'm not dipping into respectability politics. I just wanted to understand what was going on. He is literally on the board of a aviary. charity in New, York And as he's in in Central Park, looking at birds. He sees a woman who lets her dog off the leash and he lets her know that's dangerous. She begins as you've probably saw when it went viral, calling nine one one claiming she's being basically attacked by a black man. Understand that people have gone to prison. After being wrongly accused of attacking a white woman in Central Park, people lost their entire childhoods over that. I'm thinking of the Central Park Five. And yesterday. New York decided to criminalise that behavior and I understand. And there's some satisfaction that we have in getting retribution for somebody making a false report. But we have to always be careful. To to think that we can criminalize our way out of certain problems. Because when you create laws like the enforcement of this type of call, eventually, it won't be used against Karen is going to be used against black and Brown people indigenous people. It's GonNa be used against poor people. It's going to be used against the primary people who are actually in jail in prison, which is not privilege. Why people it's just it's just the case. And so. WE HAVE TO FIGURE OUT How does this nation confront? White fragility white rage. Toxic masculinity the nexus of all of these things, and and they can't just be blamed on trump. These things are woven. Deepen deeply rather into the fabric of this country. That they certainly existed before, trump will exist well after he. Leaves Office either through defeat or term limit or anything else and. And yet he does exacerbate it and make it worse. Yes. But. These problems are at the root. Of What Kill George Floyd? Were at the root of have what has. Killed in hampered in brutalized, and and cause so much pain, not just in fatal police shootings. It's at the root of the very people who were plotting my own assassination. That's where we are. In how're we as a nation. Truly going to confront the thing. If we're being honest. As fueled the primary power structure. Not for a few months. Not For the first few years of the trump administration. But has fueled this country. For Generations for centuries. Are we going to get over this? Are we going to pivot and change? Today? I don't have the answers. What I do know. Is that. This. Fragility and toxic masculinity and rage. Is Not only dangerous. It's at the root of what we just saw in the video. Yesterday of White folks who literally. were, plotting to Lynch a young black man in Bloomington Indiana. Same thing. White fragility, wide rage, toxic masculinity put them all in a cocktail, and they literally have a black man pushed up against a tree and are talking about how they need to get a noose. This problem's not new. It's a really really. Oh! Yet we have to continue to confront it. Face to face. Policy by policy person by person. Until we. Get rid of it. That's not getting rid of white people. Before you say that I said any such thing. This nation has to rid itself. White rage, white fragility, toxic masculinity which. which can be advanced in so many different ways with the cocktail of those three is dangerous. And we have to push back. I've gotTA run. We are working on so many important projects. Thank all of you. Who are supporters of the breakdown on Patriot. You can go right now to patriot dot com slash the breakdown. And support this podcast and support the breakdown live our weekly live video broadcasts of the breakdown. We'd love your support. We need your support to support our staff to support our technology. Many people don't know that it actually even cost. Just to have the podcast up and the more people who listen to it, the more we pay, it's not free actually. And we pay a significant monthly cost, not just for our podcast, but for the production of each and every episode of this podcast of woke at work of Mary to the movement of sick empire and of the breakdown live in, so please chip into today at Patriotair Dot com slash the breakdown. Take care about. Birth. It down break it down. Break it. down. Hey everybody. If you love the breakdown podcast I. Don't know if you knew this, but we have two other amazing podcast. That I would argue might be Ethan better than the breakdown right now. If you go to your favorite podcast player, you can search for sick empire, which is our podcast about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic in New York or you can go to my brand new podcast with my wife. Racal Mary to the movement where we just tell our story, not just about how we met each other and fell in love, but what it means to lead and be married together in this movement for civil rights and human rights, so check out sick empire checkout married to the movement. Leave great reviews subscribe and let us know what you think. Check them out breaking. The. Bring. Bring. The, Britain break. The break thirty. The brick by brick.

Florida costco Donald Trump Texas New York Mike Pence Fort Myers Florida Central Park Shaun King Rhonda Santa Racal Mary Tanger assault Fort Myers Florida Democratic Party George Floyd Central Park Five Britain Roy
The Transparency Project: Yusef Salaam

The FRONTLINE Dispatch

36:03 min | Last week

The Transparency Project: Yusef Salaam

"If law and order means the many of us will lose our lives. Or we just have to accept things as they are. What are we saying? When trouble? And this is a fight for our lives. Salama's falsely accused of rape and assault of a jogger and central park in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine in what became known as the Central Park five case he was exonerated in two thousand and two, and is now an activist in motivational speaker. As part of frontlines transparency project all this week riposting key interviews from the choice twenty twenty and the run up to the release on September, twenty second of that two hour documentary about the major party presidential candidates. Interviewed by Frontlines Gabrielle Schander Yusef Salaam discusses the full page ad that Donald Trump took out in New York City newspapers in nineteen, eighty nine calling for the execution the Central Park Five. The frontline dispatches made possible by the Abrahams Foundation committed to excellence in journalism and by the W. H. Catalyst Fund. Support for the front line dispatch also comes from the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. Early, detection is key to catching and treating many cancers. You can learn more about the innovative programs at mass general. Dot Org slash cancer. Mass General Cancer Center every day amazing. I'M GONNA actually. Take you to New York City in nineteen, eighty, four to nineteen, eighty seven. Can you help describe the atmosphere of the city crime live up engines were high hate me there. What he? What do you remember about the New York of the Mid Eighty The yoke of the mid eighties was a very. Interesting. Place it was it was dangerous, but it was home if felt. It felt normal to walk around to see young people flipping on mattresses that were just out there on the streets. Sometimes. Those mattresses had coils exposed which I think about now and I'm like that's I. Don't know how he did that you know. But then as well, there was a huge of station of. Drugs. Pests. Just, everything that you can. Not. Imagine you WanNa live in was that's where Harlem was like that's New York was like you know a lot of abandoned buildings a lot of graffiti on trains it just looked very drab but. I would say very nightmarish almost almost as if someone was going to create a a movie about something but this was the wheel scenery that that you can see. It's a much different New York then the city twenty twenty, right? I mean I think about? Every day. I mean Hell's kitchen Times Square I mean. Almost we're talking about city year, right? Absolutely. To cities you know it's the tale of two cities. That's the most interesting part of of a New York, city itself, and really America. That we've been living in this juxtapose. Of Privilege and non privilege, you know Forty Second Street was, which was a place that we were kind of forbidden to go to. But it was also a place that we wanted to venture into just to just to see why we couldn't go there and of course, there was all kinds of. Trying to, I'm trying to find the right word to use I. Don't want to just say a new bars and things like that. But I WANNA use a different type of language that can describe that is escaping me what kind of language I can use but. The battery. All kinds of the barbary was president. down on forty second street. It was the center of what you wanted to. Avoid and also being I, mean imagine. Right, next to What would be like a a a huge gaming center you know going to place in this like all kinds of pinball machines, video game machines, and all that stuff and you came in here with a bag of quarters because that's basically what young people did back then right next to that, there was solicitation. Of all sorts going on. In that was normal. That was like, oh, hey, that's forty second street. Let me ask you a little bit about. The violence around time because I think many people don't remember the amount of violent crime towards black you toward black men there were these aren't killing the black men often by mob. And you know I'm trying to again place our audience there. How old are you during this period? Can you sort of describe? Those tensions the. Memories of the anger between. Whites and blacks around time period. I do think that it was it. Was Normal. You know they're talking about me being the age is being between the ages of twelve and fifteen. And it was normal to hear about. What was going on you know and also to be a shocked but also was normal though it was almost as if now as we wide social media, we're. We're seeing all of all kinds of atrocities happen all the time. In. It's very shocking, but it's normalizing because when we turn it on, we say ourselves Oh this must have happened. Last year. Five years ago, ten years ago in this happening either right now or yesterday. And that's the thing to be able to. Live in a space where you know you knew that you were not welcome. Even in places like central park but at least in the park that was close to us, that was a welcoming place. But also that was the place that you know. If you walked around the lake, which we always said was our lake but you walked around the lake and there were dead fish in the lake. There was algae overgrown algae in the lake. There was all kinds of of. Solicitation. Going on it was it was almost like forty second street, but just about inside the park on that area. And We kind of knew what was safe to go to what was not safe to go to. End Sometimes. If you found yourself self in a place that was considered unsafe you knew that it was you venturing. Into your own curiosity will why? Why can't I go there? Let me just see Oh that wasn't that bad and then you know. But it's a IT'S A. It's a crazy I'm thinking about it now I'm like, how did I? How did I live in that? Abnormality. In make it normal. Like. It it it. Is Not. A place that children should be raised. Even remember feeling. The blame that. A lot of white new. Yorkers put on the black community for that high crime for that. That city that felt like. Of? Rudy. Giuliani's perspective that needed law and order to come in what's what's interesting about that is that I do remember but I'd never noon. I never placed the weight where needed to be placed. There was always the assumption right you you went into certain places I I used to while you high squad actually I was in high school since I was about twelve years old I started high school early. And I remember Laguardia High School. That's downtown s Lincoln. Center area. That's a more affluent more wealthy type of neighborhood. and. You would. You would check yourself. You know you would make sure. Okay. If I have a Hoodie on I take the hood off but I still have a hoodie jacket on or sweatshirt on. You would maybe turn your music down a little bit. Just not to draw attention to yourself. And it was the it was the It was the expectation of you. FITTING INTO THAT SPACE AS OPPOSED TO YOU BEING Accepted as an individual who is value? In those spaces as well. There was that. Like. You didn't you like we couldn't describe it as abnormal. We couldn't described as what would be considered. What's the word that they use now in a Harvard study where people do the tests? A the implicit bias right. So they so you have the implicit biases going on you have racism going on you have Racism perhaps happening that you're not aware of. Meaning like the person exhibiting racism may not be aware I remember. this film that I was in as a commemoration to William Kuntsler. Pellet attorney during the time I was going in trying to fight this case after we were convicted. I remember William Kuntsler. Saying, all white people. Races. And of course, we visited that in the film William Counselor disturbing the universe and what he described was very important. It wasn't the fact that all white people are racist because of their own implicit bias or implicit reason it was the past that was given. Without them wanting it. Because of the color of their skin. The assumption that. You know this, this person is less able to commit crime. Whereas the ones who had darker. Or dark skinned people are the criminals. These are not. To give you, you're not to give the assumption of innocence until proven guilty to these folks, these folks are guilty and have to prove themselves innocent. And oftentimes you you don't even know they were fighting a system that is alive and sick. You'll find in six systemic racism, systemic implicit bias, all of those things at the same time and. You're not the the the. The unawareness to the be able to describe in words what exactly you are feeling or experiencing is always there. But you just continue on as if this is life. That this is this is this is how the world is. So to speak how palpable with that in the eighties in New York. Very, much palpable. It was it was it was there. It was always present. And you never thought that. Things would ever be different. This was expected. Let me now bring Donald trump onto the scene. So we're we're still in in this time period, but he's now been in New York real estate for about ten years. And he's a guy come into, you know the local local apparatus by kind of selling himself near cities financially in bad shape trump has used that as an opportunity to come in and infuse capital into. Commercial Projects Commercial Real Estate Project. Can you help me understand? What he's doing And what? If anything is, is it specific to him as specific to sort of? Well in New York around the time. I think that I think that when you look at what was happening It was the further expression of oppression. That we experienced today. But we would we would almost think will yesterday was different than today. But the fact of the matter is that is cyclical was like we are experiencing what was we're just now able to describe it, define it where able to label it for what it truly is. and. So to have for instance slum Lords. Didn't care about the conditions that you lived in who oftentimes you would. You would complain now about things like your water not being hot the water being turned off rats being in the Buildi- roaches, the investigation of roaches all of those things being a part of your existence. Without realizing that. These things were put there. Right. In some ways. One of the worst things that we figured out was that a project, for instance, like King Towers or taff projects or any of the others car projects We're talking about and I'm talking about. Manhattan of course, because that's where I'm from. But we're talking about. A. Place. That people live in. That if you define project. In. A way that we understood it now as experiment. Then, you really understand what's going on. You really understand what you're seeing an forget hearing donald trump. described. Hey anybody can make it. I got a loan from my father. And I made it. Well, what how much was the lone? Right, and if you look at that number in relations to what he said when we won our lawsuit when we justly one our lawsuit because of the injustice that happened to us, right He said that. We, this was the biggest heist. In New York City's history he said that about. Who We were known as then the Central Park Five. We WanNA lawsuits they found out that they should not have prosecuted us in the first place but because of bias. He said, this was the biggest heist in New York City's history. He got. A loan from his father that was almost equivalent. To the amount of money that we each received individually. Before. We had to pay our attorney's fees. Plus a lot of money before we get to the AD. What what. What would it put that on you at that time period, you know the biggest thing that would have put that target on me in that time period unbeknownst to me nothing that I had any choice or say in the matter. Was the color of my skin. The. The thing given to me at birth that said, you have human rights. The thing given to me birth that said You have. The ability. To be treated equally and fairly. No one is above anyone else. The thing that you have to do Is your best. But. Being born with dark skin. Immediately. Makes you be born with a weapon. You can never be disarmed. And in that expression of yourself. Right in expression of yourself whether that means you have dreads in your hair with us. You have braids in your hair whether that means you have a flattop with it. It means you have waves apart whatever that means the expression of self. BEGINS TO FURTHER The ability for. The system to say see. This is why. They are problem they are savage. This is what the this is how we are defined to the world. This is how we're Express to the world. Support for the frontline dispatch comes from Mass General Cancer Center. When facing the unknown, it is often the small acts of courage that we experience in our daily lives that power us to face another day. We're all in this together. Ask You about. The ad I wonder if I can ask you if you could describe them. Where were you when you saw them when you first heard about them? And if you could just help me understand the effects that it had on you and your family. Something to tell you, I'm a set the scene in this way. A Young Woman Is raped. And almost near death in central park. There's A group of individuals that were arrested. That night. Who became part of what we were known as the Central Park. Five. There's a rush to judge. Because there's a rush to solve the cry. In in in rushing to solve the crime because the young woman was found in the northern end of Central Park. We a pseudo experts who watch CSI NCIS WATT any of these great TV shows that are out there. We understand that they go right into the surrounding community used to try to find out as much information as they can. And They. Round up people. And Begin to question them but the questioning isn't. with the assumption of innocence. Is The assumption that you know what happened? You either participated. Or you know who participated in this. Two weeks after that process. This adds shows up in New York City's newspaper. And I want you to understand. When anything is presented to the public especially in a in a prestigious newspapers like the New York Times the daily. News any of the four dailies at the time that were considered prestigious in new. York. Those ads. have to pass the bar. And the bar by the bar I mean is those ads have to. Look presentable. They. Have to all of the the is have to be dotted. All of the t's have to be crossed. The presentation of it has to be acceptable and and able to to give off what it is that the that is the desired result. And when you look at the Ad, the Donald Trump placed New York city's newspapers as a graphic designer. You see this and you say to yourself. Wow, this is captivating. Even gone to trial yet. But two weeks passes and we are. Essentially given a death sentence. With this Ad. Bring. Back the death penalty the ad says. Bring, back our police. and. All of the stuff as he as he lays it all out, and then he signs his name at the very bottom. People don't sign your name things they're not proud of. He signs his name at the very bottom of this act. And is placed in the papers. Alongside of that happening. Off Numbers are names and our dresses were also being placed in the papers. This ad was a whisper into the darkest most sinister parts of society. That somebody should come out of that. And do to us what they had done to Emma to. This is what this ad words. and. So immediately. The. Visibility. Of who we came was heightened. We couldn't go anywhere without being recognized off faces will on the front of the paper above the fold. Our faces were there the case was there it stayed there. There were over four hundred articles written about us. Pulling apart lives. This was a SU- NAMI. And I remember watching this movie once and I said is that what a Nami looks like meaning a real su-nam people aren't supposed to survivors who NAMI. We will onslaught. With articles pulling apart lives. With the AD that Donald Trump placed in New York city's newspapers with Rudy Giuliani time. We, were we were a part of. What needed to be corrected. Needed to be erased, Donald Trump believed you were what was wrong with New York right you and your and your co defendants. About that You know the the the biggest belief was that. Me In particular. I was a person who? Thought? That I knew how to talk in a way that was compelling that could describe things in defend myself. And I Realized very quickly. That was. into deep. By that I remember going on a witness stand saying man I'm just GonNa tell them the truth. My truth wasn't received while. My truth was twisted. My truth was turned against me. My truth was fighting against Miranda right in Maranda the Miranda warnings. A says you have the right to remain silent. Anything you say the second part anything you say can and will be used against you. In a court of law. Not, used for you. Used against you. All of my words will being twisted. All of my words would given meaning other than the meaning that I had desired it to be. And here are was this expression. Of Blackness. This expression of of of humanity, this expression of equality. That was not. Allowed to be. I was what was wrong with the system we became what was wrong. We became expendable became those who we could we could we could live. As long as we were relegated to. The new slave. Reality. The. Prison Industrial Complex. Gown trumpeted. If toe in the water of a presidential run about two years before. The ads run. So when eighty seven gone up to New Hampshire to. Investigate. Running with that sort of in your mind. What do you think he? Is considering when he enters the controversy of your case and does it in such a? In such a public manner. He thinking about politics? Oh absolutely, I didn't know that. I. Didn't know that there was a time where he I guess I guess it's something that you should consider an fine of course like when you go back into a person's history, it tells you everything about what they're going to do, and so in this particular instance, there is a need. For him to be. At the top like brought to the top. Whatever, the whatever the candidates could be the pool of candidates. Right. If the if the candidates are coming from the base of White, people. Then, in that space, who can we put? As a candidate. And by doing things that kind of allows you to skip grades skip ahead, skip to the top. You do these outrageous and outlandish things. You do it because you want people to remember you. Right, in being person who put these ads in the papers being the person who came out against. What he considered was the worst of the worst they call the scum of the earth. They said that we should have been aborted. The hate mail that ensued said things like. Not only should I not? be, allowed to live, but my mother. Should not be allowed to live either because she gave birth to me. All of these rush to judge. Never came with an apology still to this day. We still not we still have not. been apologized to. From the people who harmed us. In that way that political way. Right, this still this this murkiness. This. Cloud of of. Indecision. As to whether we were guilty or innocent. The truth of the matter is that deoxyribonucleic acid freedoms. The truth of the matter is that this woman put up a fight. And when they arrested Raymond and Kevin. Who didn't Know Each Other? They were able to divide and conquer. They were able to show a photo to Raymond. that. Looked as if. The person in the photo had been in a fight had been scuffed up. Without. The person looking at the photo realizing that he got beat up by the police officers. But when you look at the the details, right the facts of the case. They said that she put up a fight they said that she scratched. Kevin. Kevin, skin should have been underneath her finger now. Kevin Skin. Was Not Underneath her fingernails. They said she lost three fourths of her blood. This was a violent rape. This was a violent attack. No one had a drop of blood on. Not a drop. But yet. Because of their rush to judge. Two things happen. was they dropped the ball? They got it wrong. We went to for a crime that we didn't commit. We serve someone else's time. Into and this is the most. Unfortunate. The real. Criminal. was out committing more crimes. Should never be. Our system should work initially work very well, and it should workweek because we. The right thing. It should work because we are those individuals who Volunteer to protect and serve are doing the job. Correctly, those individuals who are prosecuting are doing their due diligence and making sure that all the. The is are dotted and the t's across. The judge is making sure that he's weighing the evidence. and. Allowing cases to go forward that should go forward. In disallowing cases to go forward. That should not. In more importantly, that means that the people who are. Given the opportunity to participate. With their civic duty. Don't shirk that responsibility. They don't say themselves like in the in the film, the twelve angry men, they don't say themselves. Something scenes off. The Central Park Jogger case there was a juror who said. I there was so many. Things that were that weren't adding up in the Central Java case. I was going crazy. He said I found some cockamamie excuse to vote guilty. Just so that I can get out of there. Ask. You about. Trump's use. Of. Media. You know around around. Sad to magnify. Society stereotypes about race. I think. Trump's use of media to magnify the society stereotypes about race. Has a lot to do with. Making people afraid. and. When people are afraid they, WANNA be. Put in a position where they don't have to fear again. And so when you create these scenarios. You have these points, these opportunities that they call -tunities that allow them to really push the envelope. Describing and given definition to something you could be looking at something. And what you see you could say to you. So this is biased this is overwhelmingly biased. How is this man placing an ad in the papers two weeks after these folks were accused, they hadn't even going to trial yet. How was he able to do this? And then you have someone else saying this is heroic. This is exactly what we want our citizens to do. They need to speak up they need to put their money where their mouth is. By the way he paid eight five thousand dollars for these ads. This people today who do not make a salary close to eighty five thousand dollars was a lot of money. Then that's definitely a lot of money now. But when you're when you're looking at something in this being described away from. The bias. Now, you see the problem and I wonder if the. Some of these things today in how he's handled. The deficit of George Floyd, the way you described protests. The way he's handled, the movement is happening. Now they're saying that you reminded of that. We think back to Donald, trump or nineteen, nineteen, eighty, nine. Almost. Certainly. The. Whole the whole way he is moving. Is Screaming to us. We're. In trouble. We as a society on trouble I'm talking about all of boss I'm telling you about we the people. The unintended. Reality. By that document From the founding fathers. But what the where we are. Now, we are the people all of us are in this pot, we are the kaleidoscope of the human family. We are in trouble. Because at the head. Of this ship. The captain is directing us. Not even into treacherous waters as skilled. Captain. But lying in saying. Just a little ripple we can get through it. Meanwhile to the BEE's. You're being told, make sure you have your safety belts and you have your harnesses and you're strapped in. But. The rest of the folks who didn't get a chance to fly. Or to be to be in the boat in First Class. Right. The rest of us. Those are the ones are who who going to receive the worst of the treatment, and that's what we're seeing right now is seeing that we have to ramp up the fear. And Buy, the antidote to fear. Is this law and order president? Making America. Great again. But when we look at that We look at all the things that go along with it. In Charlottesville as an example. You had people walking around. Chanting states rights. The TIKI torches and so if the glory days of America. Was the time when. Black and Brown bodies were enslaved. What are we saying? If. Law and order means that many of us will lose our lives. Or we just have to accept things as they are. What are we saying? We're. In trouble. And this is a FIFA, our lives. And our I'm talking about the kaleidoscope of the human family. The choice twenty twenty releases on pbs on air and online Tuesday. September twenty second. You can go to frontline dot org to learn more about our transparency project. This episode is produced and mixed by John, beaman additional production by Lauren PRISCILA. Yo in Max Green Phil Bennett is our special projects editor Andrew. Matt's is our managing editor I'm rainy aaronson executive producer frontline music in this episode by Stellwagen Symphonic. The frontline dispatches produced W. G. B. H. and powered by PR ax.

Donald Trump New York City Central Park New York Manhattan Rudy Giuliani Central Park Five America solicitation Mass General Cancer Center twenty twenty attorney rape Kevin Skin Harlem New York Times Massachusetts General Hospital William Kuntsler Abrahams Foundation Gabrielle Schander Yusef Salaa
Full Episode: Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Nightline

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Full Episode: Tuesday, June 11, 2019

"Hey, I'm Brad milkey, and I hosted new daily news podcast from ABC news called start here. Every day we get you up to speed on the story that are going to be driving your day. We get important context from experts with on the ground access, and we do it all in twenty minutes. So start smart and subscribe to start here. Good evening. Thanks for joining us tonight, the buzz and the backlash over the net flicks miniseries on an infamous, rape that gripped, New York City and the nation a wave of criticism now washing over the former head of the sex crimes unit for her portrayal on the show, and she's now, publicly firing back. They made a sly. Right. A crucial turning point captured in the new Netflix miniseries when they see us. A visceral and dramatic retelling of the infamous central park, five case through the eyes of the five teenage boys. Convicted of raping and brutally beating Tricia Miley issue, Johnston central park in April nineteen Eighty-nine. The reason the case became such a sensation as because it was a true intersection of several really pertinent and sort of toxic social issues, the racial bias sexual assaults and the rise of the tablet media after years in prison. The young man's convictions were vacated in what has become a permanent stain on the city's police and Justice system, although they were never officially exonerated some argue, the public perception around them, should change the language of exonerated five is able to Varna encourages us to use is far more powerful and transformative than the central park, five. When we hit central park five we hear while and we hear crime. We hear trauma. We hear violence, when we hear exonerated five, we moved the spotlight away from these kids in on a system that led to a gross injustice, the Netflix series from EMMY award winning director. Eva doer nee executive produced by Oprah Winfrey, sparking renewed discussion about the polarizing case and how thirties handled it, especially the woman in charge of the city's sex crimes unit. Linda fairstein portrayed in the series by Felicity Huffman, make the name their accomplices. This is not business as usual oppress is crawling all over this. No kid gloves here. These are not kids, they raped this woman, the real Linda fairstein, speaking out yesterday about the series calling it an outright fabrication that defames her in a Wall Street Journal, op-ed, Davante tweeting out expected and typical onward in response. This series seems to portray fairstein as determined to pursue conviction at all costs. I think there's little room for doubt who the villain of when they see as is, and I would argue that. In the Wall Street Journal, op Ed, I Uni agrees with the boys convictions being vacated, but says they were guilty of other crimes that night for, which they should not have been cleared. She also claims in part, MS d'ivoire nays film attempts to portray me, as an overzealous prosecutor and a bigot the police as incompetent or worse and the five suspects as innocent of all charges against them. None of this is true, she added that she never made any of the comments, the screenwriter tributes to me. Ms devante does not define me and her film does not speak the truth questions about the prosecution's case, and the validity of some of the videotape statements arose in two thousand and two when serial rapist Mataya raise confessed to attacking raping vilely alone. A serial steps forward and turns the case upside down at the time of his confession. Breyer's was already behind bars for another horrific rape. Did you attack the central park jogger? Did you rape her? Did you beat her? Did you leave him for dead thought? A DNA test revealed raise was a perfect match to the DNA found on Miley something. Prosecutors never had from the five teenage boys. You have people who are bewildered that the system could be so flawed that they could wrongfully arrest charging five people, but ultimately at the core was a national conversation about how our ability to accurately assess who's incident who's guilty who should be incarcerated who should not is at best flawed and at. Worst working in such a way that the vulnerable get criminalized what they did it or not raise had raped another woman in central park, just two days before Miley. He insisted he acted alone and seemed to know details about the crime. On the night muscle. The lady, she was jogging at the right hand side. I sold piece of branch dead a stroke over the head with the grants, if she felt forward grad to drag his to the Bush's has dragged on there. I remember that I took over close. We'll do choose to who will you who did you somewhat the two thousand twelve PBS documentary, the central park, five examined, the case for the first time from the men's perspective. Might take us to the back of the free sending killer in an interview with ABC news earlier this year, fairstein took issue with PBS's portrayal, that film was made while we had the equivalent of a gag order from federal judge. We could not speak publicly the daughter of the filmmaker had worked for the legal team of the five. So I didn't exactly think we'd get a fair hearing in the aftermath of the convictions fairstein became a successful crime, novelist. A high profile prosecutor and a celebrated advocate for sexual assault, survivors, final jeopardy cold hit, but in the wake of Netflixing take on the case versus life and legacy are being called into question. Linda has sort of overnight become a pariah, and she's just sort of losing, steam everywhere in the days since the Netflix series, debuted social media has taken fairstein to task with the hashtag canceled Linda fairstein, and online, petitions of sprung up demanding her resignation from various. Positions even request to prosecute her fairstein has deleted her Twitter account resigned from the boards of several organizations and has been dropped by her publisher fairstein declined interview requests from ABC news. Devante also did not respond to ABC Musa's request for comment. She told me two years ago that the case has long been one, she wanted to examine the criminalization of the African American male. Yeah. The left mill image of that. And so that said this, this myth that black people are more is just that a Memphis, though. The central park, five case was the case that we used to Zam. Mitt, the criminality you're being it's able to do for nays imaginary version of the fair skinny some police involved in the case are defending fairstein including the former detective Eric Reynolds. It's appalling. Most people who are against her, they'd hate her, or whatever their feelings are, they don't know the facts of the case. The jogger Miley told ABC news earlier this year. It's possible race did not act alone. There is medical evidence to support that more than one person was responsible for the attack on me in the wake of the prosecutors dropping the charges against all of them. The police commissioned, an independent report to evaluate the police's conduct and that report concluded that it was still very likely then they attack these other people in the park. And then maybe they were even involved in the attack on the jogger while the report concluded that police had not engaged in any misconduct and obtaining, the confessions, the men continued to maintain they were coerced into confessing, and that they are innocent of all crimes the backlash that Linda fairstein has received is entirely fair. The criticisms are on point. What we don't want to do, though is, is late or scapegoat her the problem with that narrative, is that it makes us believe that if we could just get rid of that, bad apple or if they're bad apple had never existed. We'd be just fine. But the truth is, it's not a bad apple. It's a spoiled system and the whole bunch needs to be reimagined reassessed as the public's fascination with the case continues. The men at the center of the saga have sat down with Oprah Winfrey in an interview to air this week on Netflix. Necessary. Watch. There will never be closure in the central park, five case, no amount of money can bring back the years that those boys lost the innocence, that was taken from them, and you have five boys who are attempting to piece together the shards, and the fragments of their life, after one of the most horrific injustices in American history. Coming up next diving into the world of underground ballroom and the stars breaking barriers with their truth. Get cash cashback for shopping, you were already going to do racket in is a free member base. Loyalty program that lets you earn cashback on shopping. It over twenty five hundred stores like Macy's best, buy, Nike, and more shop online internet percentage of every purchase you make up to forty percent cashback every three months members are paid the pay pal or another method. Sign up today at Rockhampton dot com. That's our A, K, U, T E, N dot com. Capital. One is building a better Bank. One that feels an axe nothing like a typical Bank. It's why the reimagining banking and building something completely different Capital, One cafe. They offer accounts with no fees, minimums, they also offer one of the best savings rates in America, and you can open a Capital, One account from anywhere in five minutes, Capital, One, this is banking. Reimagined open an account today. Inexperienced banking reimagined for yourself Capital One. What's in your wallet Capital, One NA member? FDIC. But pride month in full swing groundbreaking show. Pose is serving up looks and truth. Exploring the multi-layered world of the LGBTQ, plus community while featuring the largest cast of transgender actors in series regular roles tonight, the stars speaking out about breaking barriers with their unflinching storylines. Is singing about wing create everything. That's about to change. And the category is historic boundary pushing. I comic television is you dream. FX is critically acclaimed series hose strutting into season to come on. Just days before the premier I sat down with some of the team in front of a live studio audience part of ABC's pride speaker series. Pose made history with the largest cast of transgender actors in series regular roles. The stories onscreen at times influenced by lived experiences. Coming here from the Caribbean and realizing that I didn't have a say space in the place that I called home. It was very difficult, but coming here and being a part of ballroom, and being a part of all of this has helped me to realize that we have to work hard in things that we want. I dropped out of school because bullying was really heavy. And I just couldn't focus on my work because I just. You know, I, I wouldn't be able to use the restroom without a security guard following me in the bathroom. But, you know, bullying a lot of my life has shaped who I am. And it's made me a much stronger person. And survival has made me brave. Pose once again delving into the nuanced and often ignored ruled of New York's underground ballroom scene in the eighties nineties her cow again. Fusing glamour, and heartbreak and taking on dark issues in the LGBT plus community homelessness to violence to HIV. You know, it's moments like these that make your life flash right before you. Crazy thing is not my life. I'm seeing rain was accused. It's basically about community. It's about finding a place for people that don't feel like they have a place outside of their homes that they've been kicked out of I guess it's something that a lot of kids really searched Flynn algebra community, especially in the Latin and junk African American community. When they're ostracize a lot. A passion project for co creator, Steven canals who teamed up with Ryan Murphy on the series, the force behind shows like glee. Assignation of John for sake. And American story. What do you think? What made you be unafraid to tell these raw stories? How did you think that Hollywood would be ready for it or the audience for that matter in truth, I didn't know if the audience would be ready for it. And I think that, that's a large part of the reason why it took so long to get this project off the ground. White required someone who is a true disruptor. Like Ryan Murphy to say this story deserves to be told. God. I've never thought you better Janet mock stepping in the first trans woman of color to write direct and produce for television series while the series explores America's past some argue the themes are, especially present in this moment. Trans rights seeming to be rolled back by the Trump administration rates of homelessness, suicide and violence in the community still disproportionately high brands gender woman who was beaten in a widely seen video the body of Chanel Lindsey was pulled from white rock lake Saturday evening, the recent murders of two African American trans women in Dallas, a reminder of how dangerous it still is for some in this community to live there truth. A lot of stuff that happened in nineteen eighty seven this happening today in two thousand nineteen there are a lot of individuals who are at the hem of death and violence, I think shows like pose will leases and leverage is us. It gives us hope it gives us. Lens into allies, human beings. We believe we heard. My daughter. At present the average life expectancy for transplant of colors, thirty five years old. So a show like posed becomes critically important in showing that the trans community deserves love and deserves respect. We have to work together to keep them safe. Offscreen series and it stars helping their community. Be seen in the mainstream. The category is India, more ELS I ever trans cover star. Billy porter turning heads at the Oscars the cast. Wow ING at this year's met gala, and Harry, you are white hot spotlight in the middle of mainstream culture. And yet, there has been a lot of cultural appropriation over the years. You look at Madonna's vote. Let's be really clear about right when you are a community that is fighting to survive in finding your own love within self and creating your own space and someone like Madonna comes along and says, let me put you out there. That is like knowledge, -ment appropriation is when you come into our community and you felt to size us. And then you take from us, and you don't acknowledge us. But when you uplift in that way, it's almost like a lifting and empowering and with June's pride month in full swing. We couldn't let them leave without one more question. What is cried mean to you? Each of you. Let's start. Stephen with you think for me. Pride is about walking unapologetically in your truth. Think about think about systemic oppression. So it's like loving and enriching parts of yourself at the world is telling you isn't doesn't allow to isn't allowed to exist. Those of us that have the privilege of being able to be visible have to fight for those that do not have that same privilege. Pride is the pillars or the totem poles that the younger generation either rest upon and to look up to and see the history that has been fought for so long. And if they ever hired they can always look up and see how strong that pillows for them to keep going brilliant, brilliant. You can catch pose on FX now up next, the USA women's soccer team, breaking records. Finally making history in a rousing route for team USA. Gets on the half turn the US women's national soccer teams record setting victory today. Igniting the world cuts pitch blowing away the competition Thailand in the opening match thirteen now scoring the largest margin of victory ever men's or women's in the World Cup forward. Alex Morgan with five goals on her own conquest continues as the defending champions side their next titles. Let's go team USA. That's not line. You can always score. Full episodes on Hulu can night, America. Okay. So when the New York Times polls, you wanted to eighth news podcasts worth listening to well, you to say thank you so go on start smart with start here. The ABC news, daily podcast take us with you. Listen to us now free on apple podcasts.

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The Central Park 5

The Nightly Rant

16:57 min | 1 year ago

The Central Park 5

"Welcome to the ninety rant which your hosts pike. This is the show where we examined society from a sarcastic point of view you like in Saint conversations. This is definitely show for you. Let's get into today's topic. Why Piane people, I don't know about you, but I love helping out a friend. That's why I wanna shout out, my friend. Brian Little, and his podcast, your favorite blockhead. This is the only show that manages to weave together peanuts and MMA into one. Heck of an amazing podcast, you can find your favorite blockhead wherever your favorite podcast reside. And at your favourite, blockhead dot com. Do me, a huge favor and listened to Brian show. You'll be entertained, and you'll help out a friend now as I said, let's get into today's topic today was move into actually, it was kind of a two-day move in day. Wasn't it? We got unexpected love on Friday expected. Love question, Mark could we had brought our stuff with us then that she would have let us put it in the office? Well, yeah, and then we'd have been able to finish moving in like put up a shelf and all that shit today. Right. Well, maybe not. Well, you probably would have gone to this morning, instead of going to the office first, and then fed lunch and then got up Steph anyway. I think that it's going to be nice to have a place to be that's ours. I think so too. I think the only go if we go tomorrow afternoon to set up the shelf and everything to get it done before Monday morning, cool, if we don't we don't. But I think it'll be nice. Like we get there at the ass crack of dawn on Monday morning to like be able to have my slack open. My click up open and like a bunch of other stuff like tiled on one monitor and then have one door on. That's my life flan. Nice lucky. You challenge. You, are you. I'm in. No hurry, then surely. So I was trolling through mid flicks. When I was looking through their net flicks originals. Yeah. And I came upon this called a short series or something like that. We as probably what like eight episodes. It's called when they see us might be forced for ups and it's. Based upon a real story of the central park, five. Okay. Who the heck? Central park five were falsely convicted. There's Anton, McRae, Kevin Richardson Yussef Salaam, Raymond Santana. And Corey wise those are the central park five k they were convicted falsely of raping Tricia Meli in nineteen eighty nine in between them. They spend between six and thirteen years in prison, the real perpetrator, whose name was Matiz radius, wouldn't be known until two thousand and two, which is crazy, especially since he was in the same area and convicted of a bunch of other like convicted of other things and performing other sexual assaults in the same time period. And it said they found DNA the scene. Why was this DNA never like why was there never? So kinda they railroaded those kids. And like it says here that the race guy was born in Puerto Rico, seventy one he moved to New York City's a child. And at school report. It's this is where our system fails right here because I've seen this firsthand with four different kids. I've seen this thing school reports noted his, I q as being in the seventies and described him as being emotionally disturbed. He later told psychiatrists that he had been sexually assaulted as a small child. Okay. So that's where our system fails us because this guy went in brutally raped this woman and did a whole bunch of other crimes, apparently for other women and murdered Wyan people noticed the problems with him and called him emotionally disturbed early on. But the system doesn't have anything in place that can force, the parents to get help the kid or no, not even force. Let them know that they think their kid is a sociopath so that they could take the proper measures. Yes, he then those little spots like that, are where I sometimes differ with libertarian thinking, because I can see. See making it a really strong suggestion that you might kinda sorta wanna do this. I can see that, okay? I can buy into that. I think that's fair. But yet most libertarians would not buy into that because there's force involved. But if you're just telling the parents that you've done some testing in their kid associated path, you're not forcing them to do anything. Do you think that would change anything? I think responsible parenthood at least get their kid a string. So you think that most parents don't know this about their kid. I think that some parents are so freaking absent from their kids life, that it would take a sledgehammer hang them in the face with the information for them to notice. So you think that most parents dismiss it? Yeah. What causes them to miss it is, he wanna know what I think, causes them to miss it. What is watching today? When we were at I ay, and there was a kid who was like lounging around on this display leaning on this thing and leaning on that thing, the mom was busy reading. The card those attached to the product that you think you're not paying any attention. Dad had one foot up on cart, and the other hand on his phone, and he was reading something or watching a video on his phone, a pay they paid zero attention to that child. And that is why parents miss things with their kids this show that we watch a day, Baid, a big deal out of the fact that there for low income, single-parent families all five of them. Yes. So think about it. Because with this happened was nineteen Eighty-nine. Nobody had a cell phone that they were carrying around with them at Kia. But single-parent. Attention got to be working probably long hours to keep food on the table. Parents all seem like hardworking people at least portrayed in this like at the beginning, when the dad was the worker I'm gonna get fired right now. Right. So there have any, they don't have the time. So somebody needs to tell them, especially the school. They know what kind of neighborhood. They're in. They don't students are in other from single-parent low-income families. Why aren't they trying to help out in paying enough attention? And pointing that kind of stuff out to the parents, because they're the ones who spend the most time with the kids. I think that even some people, the mere mention of it to the parents is going to be akin to forcing them to do something is you're forcing them to recognize something. Maybe they wanna look the other way on I mean, I know that stupid. But that's what some people would say that would be there like their Goto is, like, oh, well, blah, blah, blah. And I say, yes, I call Bs on that giving. Somebody reality check isn't force, right? And I. Think, though that the result would probably be a lot of parents being shamed into making sure they took care of it. And I hate putting it that way with. That's what I think the ultimate result would be because I think I personally don't agree with you. And I think that at least fifty percent of the parents have seen it in their kid and they've recognized it in their kid and they've chosen to look the other way I'll give you fifty percent. Seems like a reasonable reasonable to go with but okay. Schools are ready. Shame you. Why do you think they said like extra progress reports if your kid is below average greats all? You know it's not shame is it is or no, it's not. Come on. They're trying to show you how well your child is doing just happens at your child's not doing that. What they're the only send it. I remember asking Lissa, why, why is every us getting progress occur, not you? And she looked at me, like I was an idiot, because, you know, it's what elicit does when I asked her a question like that. And she said, because my grades aren't low, in the Eliza tone, the sassy, Eliza tone, or if she thinks, why don't you know this? You dumb ass you into school once not to mention in a different country. Right. Let's, let's just forget about that part anyway. But they really shave you. Yeah, you know kinda funny because as I think about it, Lissa her attitude exactly like me. Okay. And actually outed, xactly like me. Why is it elicits attitude? Ashley that. Do the same kind of are actually chooses not to show you. She hides it better. Did she chooses not to show you whereas list you like today? Something was bothering her. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with us, but something was bothering her, and it was clear that something was bothering her. But don't dare ask her. What's bothering her? Fair is you'll get told nothing. And if you ask are you sure she'll yell at you not worth it proving that some PD was right as just not worth it? So I let it go when I see that. I look the other way, but it bothers me because it makes me uncomfortable that I can't go to her, and ask her without her getting mad, then I think about it. And that's how I've been in my past life, and I've tried, I've been trying to change that going forward to where when someone comes to help me, I accept the help. I don't act like I don't need it examines. Yes. But I just I'm not understanding how we got here. Why? Because of her and her. That's how she is, is exactly like that. And so is my oldest daughter. They're both like that. And one. Covers it up better than the other one. That's all okay. Back to school shave used did not cover it up that well back to schools shaming you into doing better things for your kids. They do it with club with the close your kids wear. They do it with parents who don't send their kids to school with adequate lunches. Okay. You know what? Shame really interesting. What when her friend was principal. Yeah. School near where we live came on board after principal who wound up going to the school district work. And by all descriptions, wasn't super well liked by the parents. Okay. And she took over for him. So she could have pretty much no done anything she wanted. And people probably would love her because she wasn't him. But stead she looked at the situation and she realized the clothing thing that you talked about, like, yeah, that's kind of a problem. There's a lot of kids can't afford that. So his we're. To do. We're going to create a uniform with blue Dickie pants and a t shirt with a cougar on it. That's the uniform, and it's gonna be gray and blue pants will be blue and she didn't go. She aided good deal for the prices. And she sold it to the parents at the cheapest possible price to not make a profit. Okay. Okay. Then she said she got pushback on sit. Look, it's because everybody's gonna look exactly the same. They're all gonna. Let the same says going to have the benefit that when kids are roaming through neighborhoods to go home, and they do something bad. They're identifiable we know at school. They came from four sure, we don't have to do any work, and she said it also takes the whole. Oh, I wear Gucci shirts, and you don't out of the picture, Rawle dressing the same way. And then for the second year what she did was she told people that were in the older grades. Yes, she asked them to donate their shirts, and their shorts and you know, pants and whatever. Yeah, she had them. Especially dry cleaned Hoster like two dollars an item or something like that end then went ahead and sold it to parents at an even much cheaper price he to the parents of the rate at cost you to get it dry-cleaned basically. Yeah. Exactly. So they got a good deal and it was able to continually be perpetually moved on from one place to the other. But it addressed that, that gap in income that exists in that area. And it was good for the kids to do that. But there was a lot of people who hated the idea, of course when she laughed the second year principal was there. They didn't rock the boat first year. But second year they'd get away with it just and it was working. So, well, unlike we notice that there was a complete reduction in how many kids would go to the office to complain about someone talking crop about them like that. It just before it was a huge number in an awesome. It went down next to nothing. I don't know. I think there's something to be said for. For you know, uniforms like that in a school environment. I think that people use your clothes they use your hair, right? A user what glasses frames you wearing if you wear glasses. The fact that you wear glasses. I mean they you so many different things about physical features to use it against you. But the reality is, they don't know the hell you are not nice. It's not nice. It's not nice. It's not nice, certainly not nice not even a little bit. And I think you're limited how to put it. I believe that people are happy not knowing all that stuff. So I'm happier. Not knowing about a lot of stuff too. But I still need to know about it like I'd be much happier. If I'd never do about say, I don't know a bake again, having zero dollars in. It was happier. If I don't have that stress in my life. Right. But should I know that? Well, if I wanna live in a house, I probably should. Yeah. And so if your kid is a sociopath or somebody says suspect your kid might be. And I feel like that's your bubble of happiness, that somebody's entitled to burst, you know, see your kid doesn't go off and rape, five people in murder one later in life. Just thought dude worked at a deli and he slept in his van near the deli. Okay. He had raped before multiple times and investigators apparently never connected that Melis, rape was similar to a rape that had occurred just two days earlier, or they would have never been able to convict these boys. I wonder if that was accidentally missed or purposely missed for like a quick conviction. Somebody pushed her, you know, I like that he finally got caught on August fifth nineteen eighty nine he followed his final victim into her ninety first street apartment and raped her. She managed to escape and run for help summoning a neighbor in her doorman who apprehended Reyaz until police arrested him the thirties quickly identified him as the serial criminal name, the east side slasher or the impart -ment in Asia. Rates and raise confessed to the crimes in detail. Under interrogation his DNA was later found to match that of three victims, including Gonzales, race accepted a plea bargain agreeing to serve thirty three years to life in prison at his nineteen Ninety-one sentencing. He punched his lawyer had be cherry out by guards, the judge recommended race being prison for life, he, then I guess, met Corey wise, one of the central park five when they were in prison together on Rikers, the got into a fight over the television than the encountered each other again, in the prison yard, had a nice conversation, apparently raise guilty for the fact that wise was still imprisoned for a crime. He didn't do so he came forward to confess to raping nearly murdering Melian nineteen eighty nine. So the real killer was already in jail when he confessed to. Well, I guess that's kind of nice for different crime. If you know you did it, you're ready in prison for life. What the hell was it hurt? Well, yeah, doesn't hurt any to get five hundred people at a dozen hurt anything. But. It also didn't help anything so it helped them, but it didn't help him in any way. So my point is, he could have just been a selfish bastard. Not done. Anything will, yeah. But he didn't. So there's that I guess you could be rape and considered others. Shocker off. I'm just going to forget that fact. Just shocker which anyway, anyway, that's the show or watching right now. I think this shows really good in hold my attention because so far really enjoyed it. Remember the rule, we can only watch the show until we only have enough time before bed to watch something else, or I won't sleep. Yeah, I know. I know. But talking about sleep in get night. Everyone ASTA LA by scary creatures. Thank you for listening to the ninety round. You enjoyed the show, please give us a five star rating on apple podcasts will play. If you didn't enjoy the show. Please just ignore that. Police request for a rating. This has a yogis podcast network for action.

rape principal Corey wise Brian Little Lissa Eliza tone Steph Mark Matiz radius New York City Wyan Puerto Rico Baid Kia Tricia Meli Ashley Asia apple Rawle Anton