20 Episode results for "California"

Introducing This is California: The Battle of 187

This is California: The Battle of 187

02:34 min | 1 year ago

Introducing This is California: The Battle of 187

"They keep coming to million illegals in California the federal government won't stop them at the border legal I'm stop assault and undocumented immigrants if it went into effect families wouldn't be able to one eighty seven to have bugs me for years like who came up with prop one eighty seven just simply enough. Are there enough people involved an angry about a situation. What was one eighty-seven really about race or saving tax dollars going to so called I'm a threat to you like I'm a law abiding citizen I'm going to go to school trying to better myself like because of who I was ultimately did prop one eighty seven win and is the same the people of California Bolt here well I think initially the food is better. The food really is better from the Los Angeles Times unfulfilled or studios.

California Bolt Los Angeles Times California assault
Introducing California City, presented by LAist Studios

This is California: The Battle of 187

07:14 min | 2 months ago

Introducing California City, presented by LAist Studios

"Hi podcast listeners I. WanNa Tell You about a new investigative podcast theories from Elliot's studios. It's called California city this story about real estate salesman who have been peddling a vision for sixty years. If you buy land in this small Mojave Desert Town, you will get rich one day. That town is California city and it was supposed to be a brand new city la without the traffic or the smog, but that didn't happen. Thousands of people many of them, hardworking immigrants believed in that vision, and yet were left with next to nothing. People like Ben Perez, who saved money. Money, for years to open a food truck, it was his version of the American dream, but then he says salespeople convinced him to spend his savings on a piece of nearly worthless desert land. Who are these real estate salesman? And how has this been going on for so long with the PODCAST California city? You can follow host Emily Garin on her journey to find the truth all right I'm about to play you a short clip from the show as you listen, make sure to subscribe to California city on Apple podcasts, but a fi or wherever you're listening right now. This was only supposed to be a story about water, but in California stories about water, always napping about money, power and deception. were. It was June twenty sixteen, and I was new to California I driven into Los Angeles just a month earlier from North Dakota with my two cats, cowboy boots and a wedding dress. I'd been hired as the environment reporter at a public radio station in the first assignment. My new editor gave me was go cover the drought. Historic drought. Governor Jerry Brown wants to cut the state's overall water usage by twenty. It was the worst anyone could remember. Lakes were evaporating before our very eyes. Entire forests were dying in thousands of wells were running dry. On Dry Grass and we should be standing in five feet of snow. California owes its very existence to Hubris to the relentless battle. We've waged for decades to make this desert or garden. But during the drought, people started to wonder if we're going to lose that battle. Maybe the California dream really was Mirage. This one town I'd never heard of a Mojave desert town called California city. It was wasting a ton of water so I drove out there to figure out why. I. had been expecting a town, a small town with a bustling mean street where you could drink a beer. Get a haircut and buy shovel all on the same block. PA- California city. It wasn't like that. It was a quiet, sprawling uneasy place. It's the third largest city in the state, but with about fourteen thousand people. Massive amount of land that's out here. And the roads just. There's so many roads on every single direction. They're all leading to nothing. It turned out that California's city was haunted haunted by the decision of one man more than sixty years ago to build a city for half a million people way out here in the desert. Rat Man's name was nap Mendelssohn. Nat believe with all his heart that God gave Him the vision for the city. He bought the land. He built the roads the water lines. He built an airport and a lake. He was a dreamer, but he made dreamers of us all in the beginning we cut. He'd lit are torch. He hired thousands of salesmen to sell his vision. Hey, listen, you. Don't sell the steak. You sell the sizzle. That's what sales are. They sold land to tens of thousands of people. We thought it was a golden opportunity and we're GONNA. Make millions off of the most of those people never moves to California city. And a lot of them came to think they'd been deceived. Scam or it was a scam and I, bit. And now the waterlines Mendelssohn had built were rusting and leaking. That's why California city was wasting so much water. But I learned something else on that first trip to California city something I really didn't expect it all. I learned that sales. People were still selling a version of net mendelssohn stream. The idea that this place was going to boom one day and if you bought land now, you'd get rich. I learned these sales people. They targeted a very specific group of people. You know what we immigrants we thought in America. We cannot imagine just happen to us, so they kinda marketed to a I guess a vulnerable. Noble Group of people I have a plan for Doug money to open a food truck business, but I feel like a whole may dream is not gonNA happen anymore. Three years trying to figure out exactly what had happened in California city. What had gone wrong? And, along the way I would meet a saleswoman. Shrewd people called her the Barracuda. I need a former prosecutor who later murdered his wife. A retired police chief who quietly decided not to investigate an open secret in his own town. An emigrant who spent his life savings on a dream. A dream he realized was too good to be true. And I would meet the government officials trying to stop this once and for all. I'm Emily Garin from La Studios. This is California city, the dark side of the American dream. A story of money, power and deception listen wherever you get your podcast. You just heard a clip from California city, a new podcast from La a studios subscribed to California city on Apple podcasts spotify or wherever you're listening right now.

California city California Mojave Desert Emily Garin salesman PA- California Mendelssohn Los Angeles Ben Perez Governor Jerry Brown Apple Elliot La Studios Dry Grass Doug money North Dakota reporter editor
L.A. Times presents Coronavirus in California

This is California: The Battle of 187

13:43 min | 5 months ago

L.A. Times presents Coronavirus in California

"Hi I'm Gustavo Arianna with the Los Angeles Times if you liked listening to this is California at the battle. One eighty seven. I want to tell you about another La Times podcast. That I think you'll want to listen to and subscribed to I'm the host. And the PODCAST is called Corona virus in California stories on the front lines every weekday. I'll come to you with dispatches from Californians in the thick of this pandemic which is to say all of us we'll hear from nurses and teachers athletes and parents people from crescent city to Costa Mesa. All reach out to my colleagues at times to get reports from the field. We'll bring you stories that tell you what's actually happening out there in our golden state that make you feel less alone that prepare you for what's to come as you listen to this episode of Corona Virus in California. And if you like what you hear subscribed to the shore and Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to your podcast you can also find a link in the episode notes from the Los Angeles Times. This is corona virus in California stories from the frontlines able to pay rent on April first. What about where? Will you get the money to pay for? Food medications necessities. What about your neighbors? Your family your friends. Housing affordability is always a huge issue across the state of course but now corona viruses forcing all Californians to ask those questions there on the homepage of the La Tenants Union. A group devoted to fighting for the rights of renters in Los Angeles. Here about sixty three percent of angelenos. Don't own their own homes. It's one of the highest populations of renters in the United States. Politicians are scrambling to help Californians pay mortgages rents but the Elliott tenants union is calling for landlords to forgive all rents for those who can't pay it because of this damned pandemic the idea might sound radical. But it's a proposal that more and more people are crossed the state not only want to hear about but would love to see happen to explain their 'cause I'm joined by Elliott Tenants Union activists. Being Need Louise let me ask you the question. Your group poses to me that were you and your neighbors family and friends able to pay ran on April first or speak to the building of now. We're all organized here in checked in with everybody and everyone was able to pay rent this month only because our landlord is a small mom and pop owner. They keep rents about fifteen hundred below market. Rate you're an echo park and so we're able to a afford these rents have a two bedroom and I'm I'm paying fifteen hundred below market rate. But I don't know what this means for next month. I don't know if I'll have a job. So this is where the choice between food and medicine and supplies versus rent comes into and that's affected tens of thousands of tenants across Los Angeles. Already with this. What are they telling you about their situation right now? Well they've lost their when mayor. Garcetti and governor newsom sheets. Dan home orders on March nineteenth. A lot of places closed in fact. I was getting a haircut at the time. And the place closed right as they were issuing the orders Those Barbara's went home and they have not been working since and so the tenants union launched a campaign called food not rent or we the the. No it's a guide that helps tenants. Kinda worked through some of these issues and protect themselves because after may thirty first landlords will be able to file a victim even if they've lost work to corona virus or they've gotten sick from the corona virus. Yeah so tell us a story about maybe a family that reflects their struggle to be able to pay the rent right now in this time of Corona virus. There's one tenant that I'm very worried about his wife and kids and he was working in a restaurant in downtown and after the restaurant closed down he you know he was essentially living. Check the check as a bus boy and he also doesn't have papers so he's he's terrified so he's been you know asking neighbors tour and France for short loans to be able to pay the rent and I've asked that he really needs to think about this because he these paying the rent and he's not able to put food on the table without working. You know what is he going to do? This case is special because he doesn't have papers so there's an added level of of Tara for him but there's other stories just like his as well. There are so many in the last God in the last three or four day. We've got hundreds of emails from people who work in the economy from people who were selling food out in those street vendors. We've gotten contacted from You know from all walks of life in Los Angeles enabled to pay for rent because of the stay at home orders and it's unfair that tenets are forced to stay home unable to work and unable to pay rent and still be able to be a victim by their landlord. Tenants are coming together. There are some that are helping each other out with delivering food to their neighbors who are elderly so these are just. Some of the intense situations and tenants are facing. So what are the right of tenants of especially right now to stay where they are? Despite not being able to pay rent basically the stay at home owners issued protects tenants Until may thirty first there are no lockouts. Alonzo cannot file individually against you you do. You won't get overcharged for any late fees or having extra people in your apartment but you do need to let your landlord. Oh in written that the chronic virus has affected you so that you can later use that if you're landlords is is to take you to court in June as a defense and that's where you begin to provide proof you lost your job. You'll have to present that to the court for now. It's just a temporary. Stay on injections so California. Governor Gavin newsom ordered that statewide ban on fictions caused by corona virus and Merrick are here in Los Angeles announce that landlords can increase rent on over the half million apartments under the cities rent stabilization programs. So what are your thoughts on their on their measures. You know the the measures don't go far enough in the crisis we are in now. These orders that they issue would have been great ten years ago or five years ago to address the housing affordability prices and that has resulted in sixty thousand homeless in in Los Angeles alone. And so now. We're in a new crisis now with Kobe. Nineteen so the governor us more responsible in this. He has more powers as the governor to issue a blanket moratorium on all victims no matter what our city local city council members took a vote last week and we came one. Vote Short from a blanket. Moratorium on all fictions I blame council members like You know Mitchell Farrell and Council president nor Martinez. With that. Why do you think there were opposed to that? Well it's interesting. They were more concerned with landlords and they were more concerned. That tenants would take advantage of the situation. By now paying rent and having a not being able to be affected by their landlords so landlords they would argue You know your your group is asking. For forgiveness of rendering corona virus and those landlords would most likely say that rent forgiveness would bankrupt them with put them out of business. What would be your response to them? You know I feel a lot for the mom and pop. But on Lord's own one building two buildings and a pretty fair to their tenants you know. I have no sympathy for corporate developers in corporate boards. Who are buying up all these buildings and victim of their tenants but it's much easier for a landlord to find some kind of forgiveness with the bank. You know we have already seen governor newsom issue of you know a wave mortgage payments for six months and in the case of Bank of America. Only three months you know. They're they're a much better position have equity in their home. But I I you know I still feel for the small mom and pops they should be also part of this Rent forgiveness that interesting actually. Good Union of two. Would you would think it's two completely different sides. I I know the L A tenants union has waged rent strikes in the past but I think a lot of folks can't even comprehend of that idea so talk a little bit about a wet. What a red strike is and whether they can be successful rent strikes have been successful for the tenants. Union before the cove in nineteen crisis rent strikes were used as a way for collective bargaining. They're technically not illegal. If a judge rules in favor of the tenant I wow yes so so. I organized a rent strike at Burlington building. Which is about two hundred families have a neighborhood. It was here in West Lane and also the mud gotcha in In Boyle Heights as well So some of those cases went to court but the conditions of the building were so terrible that the judge ruled in favor of the tenants with the Reno reduced rents and made their rent strike legal. In the case of Burlington we went nine cases to court. Six of them we wan rent strike at three of them. We lost but it's still risky so eventually the landlord dropped all those cases. There were like eighty nine hundred cases that dislike dropped and they got to keep six months of rent during that Red Stripe and this case we have something completely different. It's more organic rent. Strike out of necessity again are not paying rent. Not because they don't want to because they have stayed homeowners the business closed. There is a complete shutdown so this is more of an organic thing that's happening and I think this will only get worse next month. Those who were living check to check in April and you know are not gonNa make it this month. They won't be able to pay and those who have a little bit. That are a little more well to do their jobs and may will be able to pay Dan. So this is only going to increase as time goes on. I don't know that this stay at home. Order will be done in a postseason. You may so. I don't know how much longer this will go on so for a group like yours. You see an opportunity to be able to help tenants if they do. WanNa do a rent strike. Yes it this is. This is the moment where this crisis has exposed. How unfair and the lack of protections tenants have this is not a question. This is a political question. And and it's it's a moment that tenants have to ask themselves. I lost my job. I can't pay my rent in my entitled to my whole and those tenants who are targeted by corporate developers for evictions are the ones that felt that the most usually those communities that are being gentrified but now everyone is feeling it so this is an important moment and I think we cannot miss this moment. Yeah I was GonNa ask you about gentrification obviously housing rates through the roof over the past decade or so a lot of gentrification in downtown in the east side the really side of La at least. How do you see this corona virus crisis affecting all of those different housing movements? While I think it's just going to supercharge them like I said we've had Hundreds at least in our local alone. We've had hundreds of emails tenants who cannot pay their rent and we're talking a lot of people that work in the GIG economy. I mean just a whole range from working class poor to lower middle class and so this is just you know it's just really supercharge. The organizing and people are waking up. Like wait a minute. You know the situation here in L. A. is terrible with rents and with the lack of protections for tenants and affordability. You know things have to change. And it's just things cannot continue the way they are and the governor and the Mayor Local Government and state government are only providing solutions. That would have worked for the previous crisis of affordability. We need something stronger now. And that's not going to happen without tenants coming together so right now in your apartment complex. A lot of you're staying at home. What's the mood like like? How do you folks interact with each other at all in at your apartment? Well there's only four units in my building so we do keep a distance from each other We do sometimes leave notes on each other's doors or slip them under the door. We want to communicate We HAVE SET UP. Watts threads in other buildings. There are twelve twenty units and that were. They're all able to communicate with each other. So the that's the method of communication between your neighbors is very very important. So you said earlier tents especially in southern California they could vary wildly from a retiree on the West side to documented folks to even hipsters. Do you see this corona virus crisis uniting these disparate groups under the banner of not being able to pay rent. Yes absolutely this is again. This is a unique opportunity to really build a movement. That is just not citywide but it state-wide it was already happening before the groundwork has already been laid out and and and this is the moment to really just catcher all that that angst and all that worry and really put hard questions to people. The old system work. How easy is it for you to lose your home if there is no human right to housing? And it's a privilege for you to have your home than that privilege so. This is an important moment that I think is an inflection point for anyone who rents in the city of L. A. And it brings everybody together rich or poor black or brown. I mean this is how we have to see the landscape. Thank you so much for this interview. Absolutely ridiculous though. Thanks for listening to listen to the rest of grown virus in California stories from the front lines subscribed today on Apple podcast Badeah Fi. Or wherever you get your podcasts. See you there and stay safe.

Los Angeles California Elliott tenants union La Tenants Union Los Angeles Times Apple Dan Governor Gavin newsom Costa Mesa Spotify Gustavo Arianna governor newsom United States Union Burlington building Louise Good Union Barbara Tara Alonzo
Assessing Recent California Wildfire Damage

Environment: NPR

03:55 min | 11 months ago

Assessing Recent California Wildfire Damage

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply there has been pretty light compared to recent years so just how bad are things here to help largest wildfire in the state right now and it's big that can cade fire northern California firefighters big in these conditions in this day right now when you factor in the changing climate the overgrown earlier this week ignited near the Getty Museum thousands of people evacuated a about Station how does this compare well they just don't so far you know as you say the Campfire it's built out into extremely dry forests and the year prior to that the at least so far right at least so far I think that's the key but I'd say it's a combination of things pretty hard on their emergency planning and their evacuation routes and drills and another thing really good at teaching these offshore wind events in these extreme fair risk event down as dry desert winds blow in almost the tea fire managers you know they know this could even land and also you know the the forecasts are aiding power companies knowing I mean like I said we could qualify here that all of this progress have been talking about into well that's shortening dramatically and it's getting a lot more fickle attempts have risen of year but also just extraordinarily dry fuels and if these winds continue and the rains.

Getty Museum NPR California
California Love

Campaign HQ with David Plouffe

41:47 min | 7 months ago

California Love

"Hey David cluff apologized for the audio. I'm just walking out of the NBC studios after some postgame debate analysis. What matters most in terms of the debate? We just witnessed last. Night is obviously what the voters in Nevada and then in South Carolina and all who are currently voting earlier by mail and Super Tuesday states thing so I think we should be careful about Offering interpretations when we're going to get some evidence soon. You know but my top line thoughts where I think. People understood the stakes of the debate. So you saw people come out much more aggressive than I think. Most of them had been in previous debates. I think Elizabeth Warren had a very very strong night. A man. I think probably shot in the arm financially. You know I thought Bernie. Sanders was consistent as he always is. And that's one of his real gifts in this campaign in debating. Joe Biden had one of his strongest debates was much more focused. I think Buddha judge which are also had their moments. Interestingly they sort of went after each other and they're being the aggressor there but I think what you see there. Is these debates now. Aren't simply about who did well. The directly connected to your pathway to the nomination or lack thereof and so mayor Pete I think clearly seeing club Char's someone who is Cannibalizing or at least competing for some votes he thinks might be his. You saw them all pile Bloomberg. I think we saw Mike Bloomberg paying the price for this being as I debate and You know all these candidates have gotten better with practice. And it's hard to go up there cold so I thought he had a better second half in the first half. But you know we'll see ultimately whether his money and advertising a make support debate performance moot But certainly probably something that's not GonNa continues on them so you know it was related to bay. We'll see as I said you know how the Ray shakes out particularly relates to voting And see if we see polling and then actual the votes. We'll see some in Nevada Saturday. Hopefully if they get counted and then a week from then in South Carolina but again this is not about. You know figure skating judges or diving judges giving you a score. It's did you somehow improve your chances to be the nominee and I think a lot of that is based on folks needing to figure out from a positioning standpoint. Who are they in competition with votes And so I think if you're Bernie Sanders you quite happy. Biden had some dustups Hyun Bloomberg hasn't desktops but for the most part. Bloomberg seemed to take a lot of the fire. You saw Elizabeth. Warren I think being aggressive with the entire field To try and give her candidacy a boost that's needed And then you saw which are and Buddha judge but I think sanders who is the undeniable front runner. At this point. You know leaves the debate stage relatively unscathed? The other thing. I'd say is is the question that Chuck Todd asked about. Should the person has the most delegates even if it's on a majority be the nominee Bernie Sanders maybe not surprisingly said yes and they all said no the rest of them and I think what that means is a lot of them probably think sanders is GonNa get the most delegates and they wanNA preserve the ability to go to the convention and maybe went on a subsequent ballot. I personally believe that's a very very unlikely strategy. I think having party insiders the super delegates come in and give the nomination as someone who did not have the most delegates I think is something that would be terribly damaging to the Party so I think that bears a lot of scrutiny in the coming weeks because some candidates who might look like they had no chance of getting anywhere near the delegate lead may stay in simply because they wanna bring delegates to Milwaukee so I think that answer to that question I think was pretty revealing. And we're going to learn a lot about the strategies in the coming weeks as we see decisions. Candidates are making are not making so We have another debate next week. Most importantly Nevada caucuses on Saturday. And we'll jump into now our discussion with our guest. E Smith about all things California as Smith. Thank you so much for joining us. It's a great honor. Thank you so California has moved up It's primary and it looks like it's going to be even more important than the architects of that move might have thought so. Let's start with just some basics. California has four hundred and fifteen hundred sixteen pledged delegates. Absolutely right. It has Well three hundred seventy which makes up since we have much smaller pool. It made up twenty sixteen nine point three percent of the total of makes up ten and a half percent. So it's huge so it's it's a massive amount of delegates We won't even talk about the super delegates so I'm talking to you On Tuesday February nineteenth and a ton of people voted. So what would you estimate? The percentage of people who voted in California by the timeless as the South Carolina primary happens on February twenty-ninth what percentage of the electorate We'll have already voted. Probably forty percent forty percent. So for instance if you are let's say if you are clocking in around ten percent and forty percents vote is just doing the reductive math. You better be able to go twenty percent or so. The rest of the way to get viable vibrating minute. So what that means is for candidates right now. the momentum that you've either gained or lost you're paying appraiser you're benefiting from at the ballot so the notion that you just like let's say somebody pulls off a big win in South Carolina. They won't be able to get the full value of that as relates to the California primary true true and is one of the completely misunderstood things by California weather gradings. California's essentially we have twenty nine days to vote. So you can. If you feel programs for instance it's such a large state. It's almost impossible. Do it all in one day but if you break it up in two thousand nine days. It's actually field is actually very doable. But the the flip side is if you let too much much water. Go under the bridge. It's really hard to change things right. So obviously have Bloomberg who's Any idea gets funded. Good or bad But if you were in a scenario where you had a healthy budget but not a historical budget. What are the types of things you'd WANNA do? An presidential primary that. What kind of campaign would you run to run here in California to maximize your vote share? You have to run a radically different campaign in California than anywhere else. And that's frankly when the big mistakes I see people make again again coming to California. You don't do it with clipboards endure knocking. That's beautiful staff and we we love. It's part of our politics but that works in local races here in order to move stuff a point or two or three you talking about moving high hundreds of thousands if not over a million people and so and you just don't do that unless you have some extraordinary amount of money by door knocking in canvas and the all the traditional things you have to get into a much more mass audience And and you have to communicate and do field anyway. That's just kind of mass production. Was that mean you have to have the capacity and you probably won't have volunteers but you probably have to probably do it. Patch in paid volunteers. But you have to capacity to do massive sweeps in. Id's so that you can figure out who your voters are who potential voters are apply in lyrics to it and then essentially figure out who those people are and then the beautiful thing is. You've got twenty nine days for them to vote and so you can talk to those folks and almost check them off the list. But it's his long arduous process. And you if you're not doing volume you're making yourself feel good but you're not doing anything worthwhile so you'd also be doing persuasion advertising digital TV radio super expensive though five million bucks a week minimum five million week and given the size of the state how important can candidate visits. Be Tremendously important you you and I know that from two thousand eight You you were doing President Obama's campaign I was here State Director for Hillary Clinton both those campaigns. I really think it's kind of the model You have to come to California to fundraise anyway and so both. Those campaigns did a huge amount of press. And it really did make a difference. And that's the other thing unique about these presidential campaigns. Is You can do all the press you want in these local races. And maybe he'll get it. This is something that people are actually paying attention to their seeking information. So at whatever you can do in common old versus ice called free press but Communications and getting the news and getting those streams is incredibly important and the things that changed radically in my lifetime is all news. Kind of use to kind of emanate like the bottom people's News pyramid was local and state news. And it's completely flipped. It's now national and international news. And so it's not like you're trying to grab people and get their attention. This is what they're focused on so there's tremendous opportunity there right right. Let's talk about that resume. Little bit connected to our discussion with Israeli vote period. So you know our view and maybe our data was not one hundred percent accurate as we close pretty well. We thought we did relatively one election day But from a raw vote standpoint Lost you know by a decent margin here And I think Hillary netted thirty five or so more delegates So so in the early vote period back in. Oh wait what were you doing? To mitigate against the momentum that we ultimately got wasn't enough for us to get over the Hump here but L. Maybe you know Bernie Sanders. I is not going to get north of fifty. But he's in the lead now Probably having run once before he benefits from understanding California low better. So what are the types of things are front runners doing to just make sure your your banking so You might be able to withstand a surprise from one of your opponents. Sure and that's exactly what did happen. Yukon a lot of momentum but there was two two obstacles really obstacle number one Edwards had soaked up a whole bunch of votes that you needed in that early vote period and the early vote that you never get back and I. There was a lot of a lot of bitter voters who wanted to take those votes back and revote them. That was that was Pretty important But we also had a in the twenty nine Dave Oh period were times when we had a much larger lead and we were just aggressively banking those votes again to create a position. Where kind of you as you get towards election day you have to win by twenty points rather than five points right and it seems to be in this race if you're not Bernie Sanders. There is more pressure. He's got pressure on election day but everybody else probably has even more pressure correct. Yep and the other the other real misunder really misunderstood thing and and really By the pollsters so a lot of what was done. If you go back and look at the polls from twenty sixteen you'll see that they had sanders way closer if not winning in almost all the polls leading up and They also over stated. In a lot of cases President Obama's vote and the reason is very simply this The the declined to state voters are just incredibly hard to turn out for these Democratic primaries. And so if you're looking at the slice just kind of theoretically it looks like he's GonNa be much harder than it always ends up being. It probably ended up being something like maybe fifteen percent and declined to states now or the second largest group here in California right after they are they way our pass Republicans. Yeah they they traditionally the the challenge with them is. They're traditionally much harder turn out for primaries than for generals right and they can't just show up on election day. Can they have to fill out a form prior they can? They can now so that they changed. Okay that was a good change. Okay yes yeah but to to give you a sense of how that's working They actually even this time. The all the different county registrar's out postcard saying hey. Do you want a ballot for In remember you can't vote in the Republican primary. Their party rules used to be able to but Forbid that so you really. You're only viable choices. Democrat unless you want to go some minor party and so they sent out postcards but they only got five percent returns. Is that right? Yes and so. Roughly and so e e e is that something that a good campaign that was on. The ball should've should've juice. Those numbers up significant absolutely but they just. The campaigns were active at that point. So those would people who would have been mailed a ballot for the primary so they can still show up on my vote down but the numbers suggest that it may not be as large number. That's interesting and also if you if you talk someone doing action like that you know this better than anyone once you get them to do the action the action getting the second action is just one hundred times easier right. No you've got to open that first door so let's talk about Delegates here which ultimately what this nominations about so California like every other state and territory. has a statewide threshold of fifty percent fifteen percent so there's a set of statewide delegates that you're only eligible for if you pass fifteen Not really asking you to play like pundits as but but just looking at where the races and the math and number of candidates. What do you think would be a safe assumption? About how many candidates past that fifteen percent threshold and then would be dividing up the statewide delegates? I think it's probably more than people think. Just because I do believe that Bernie Sanders may have a ceiling and his ceiling may be in the twenty five to thirty range of. Es Ceiling Save forty percent would be more challenging right. He could get all the statewide delegates with that. The trick to this and we don't know none of our crystal balls have been working so while recently but let's imagine scenario where Joe Biden Win South Carolina. Just kind of is coming back. I mean there's so much so many momentum things that are happening there's this big debate coming up in in Nevada. There's Vada Caucasus. There's a lot of huge momentum things that will really kind of shift things around. I think pretty dramatically in the meantime inches. It's frankly I think the LE unknowable. Right right so sounds like that is the important question. What what is Sandra ceiling because if it is lower Twenty to thirty. Then he probably is gonNA see some other candidates past fifteen if it were to get into the mid thirties. It's not impossible to do the math. Where like four five people twelve fourteen and and then of course like every other state I WANNA talk about Texas which you also ran in in two thousand and eight Which offers delegates at the local level the state Senate district but here in California CD which about California is a fairly healthy number of odd della districts Meaning five for seven and in certain scenarios. That's a way to really you know if you can figure out a way to steal some delegates there you get ten or fifteen delegates of California in matters so if you're running You have run successful presidential campaigns here so if you're running this campaign now how does that factor into strategy? I mean is this really a CD by by CD campaign and reality right now? It should I mean and the CDs in California Also they're they're almost worlds unto themselves and so just to illustrate the point the two seven delegate CDs our Nancy Pelosi's number twelve barbara lease thirteen and those are seven delegate. Any fuse think about those is like the the number gets you could pick up from doing well. In most districts would make up the lead that Pete. Buddha judge has right now Ashley Jason Those two CDs Right. So what types of things because of the campaigns will obviously there may be a CD where they're six and all the campaigns. Say you know what there's going to be three of US viable probably so raw. GonNa get to rarely. Does it happen that neatly? But then there's others where you say. There clearly is the ability for us. Either in an even one to maybe do so well we could pick up an extra one or an odd one. So what are the types of things that you might do in those CDs with more intensity than you would in other parts of the state the interesting thing about a lot of the ways CDs break to is they especially in southern California? There's a lot of low CDs that have very large Tina populations or African American populations And and so it allows you to yes. You need to go. Cd by CD but you can also go community by community reaching a broader scope but having greater impact in the CD's are important and that was a huge part of of the Hillary Clinton campaign. You know eight which was just really focused on Latinos and Latinos Latinas specifically And you know yeah I think it made. It made a huge difference on some of those but so you have the ability in California which is Kinda cool of going broadly but in a way that creates intense focus in and actually kind of intense results that benefit. You tremendously right right. So let's talk about Texas for minute. And just because we're talking about Latinas and Latinos where I think you implied that strategy brilliantly and then we'll come back to California so Texas now annoyed I will say there was kind of a caucus and primary process. You guys won the primary we won the caucus we ended up netting. I think a few more delegates pleaded I think what's fascinating is. We almost overlooked Texas. Which is a massive state which is also on Super Tuesday What is different about running a presidential primary campaign in Texas versus California or is it largely the same in terms of execution? What's different is the the early voting different who I I loved about Texas and I'll never forget his they forever have had these massive in person voting centres and so allied these and was different from county county but a lot of these counties would have situations where they would they would pull up. Essentially voting than mobile voting. They pull up in front of a place where people actually want like a Walmart and and that would be the voting centre for the weekend. And so what you could do is you could do these just massive rallies right near the vote centers you had to be like a thousand feet away or wherever it was and and you could really just get people coalesce them there and then give them to vote and that was a beautiful thing. You guys did a brilliant job of that particular in West and South Texas. You just drove up massive margins but but I mean there's a way to do it in that still exist which is just a wonderful Texas thing The the caucuses Would you guys did? There was just absolutely brilliant in in that that required the sort of You know feel game that that you had there was unparalleled. So how do you look at Texas vis-a-vis? This question of can how many candidates will be viable statewide to sanders in your view. Have a similar ceiling there What's your view of Texas? I think it's very similar to California. Which is if he has a ceiling. a part of. What's what's so crazy about this race. Is it kind of feels? Like the the only reason I can analogize it to his eighty-eight where at this point going Super Tuesday. We remember Super Tuesday was the the big southern strategy so didn't have Californian some of the other states are in now but going Super Tuesday. You had who'd you have your Jackson Gephardt Dukakis Simon in who am I leave or in Gore so in this incredibly splintered thing and what what Dukakis was able to do as well remember was he he actually picked off a whole bunch of CD's that kind of overlap different media markets in in very brilliant way but but it was the same sort of splintered type thing. We're seeing today. I think I I think it's depend upon. How kind of on splintered things get in the next two weeks? I if if some of the more minor candidate start falling off the cliff Vote wise you know that that there's just really to other people or maybe three other people because you just can't do the math otherwise right. While the question is coming out of California Texas exit to an arrest of Super Tuesday. If you have Bloomberg and Buddha judge and Biden enclosure jar still moving on to March tenth and March Seventeenth Big States Michigan Missouri Arizona Florida Sanders could get the plurality of delegates with a ceiling of thirty correct. He could he very well. Good Yeah Fascinating we. We've started to see candidates. Come to California You've got you mentioned the Nevada debate than the caucuses then South Carolina and that we always one of the most intense weeks in presidential politics but you have California and Texas looming not to mention other states. So how important is it? I mean so. Let's just say that week between Nevada and South Carolina which is eastern time zone. You're in South Carolina. But how important is it to be in the ground out here? You know a day or two. Do you think leading into you. Know Election Day Morton I think the sleep for these candidates I mean you you you really do move people through mass media in California. And if you can't afford it you can otherwise get it because the fighting. California's California was so out of the K- kind of consideration for so many years. I mean you have to historically you have to go back to sixty four and sixty right the last two major primaries and then you have to fast forward all the way to thousand Californians is always kind of felt like a little bit left out of the presidential primary process and so I just think there's a hunger here that you can actually tap into an end is not just a hunger for hearing from the candidates a hunger for consuming news and hearing everything about this right. So I'm curious You've been responsible for a lot of can't campaigns here in California candidate campaigns bowel campaigns Talk a little bit about what you're seeing from Bloomberg. So let's stipulate that there is no precedent for this. I think there's a report today that he is now spent more money on Media that we CAN TRACK THAN BARACK. Obama did in his two thousand twelve reelection campaign. So no one's ever spent this amount of money but you have seen folks spent a lot of money in California And what's your assessment? It seems to me you mentioned five hours a week but I still think even with that. If you're spending a data level it's just harder you know we see some states where Bloomberg's moved up you know into the twenty s Smaller States California. Just even if you're spending five million. It's hard to really move. So what's your assessment of? What do you think his possibilities are? Here he's still got another couple of weeks of spending I mean. Do you think it's possible? He could push into the twenty S. I think everything's possible at this point I really do. And I just wouldn't rule anything out and I think his fate though is yes. It's tied to what he can do to communicate with voters in in spending a lot of money but I think it's also tied on the to the fate and the and the rise of the downfall of his opponents. Right right now. He's less dependent. I mean he. He has more dependencies. I think on his trajectory than others so talk about on election night. When you're I'm sure Going to be diving deep into the numbers is returns. Come in Whether it's by CD or or Media Market County talk about a few places where you're going to be super interested to see what happens and why. I mean the first thing you always wanted now in let me just kind of backup and say there's there's two there's two ways to win. A city wide race in California and that have traditionally worked one is to run up remarkably big numbers in the bay area in the I eighty corridor and then essentially break even down south down south and because it California really does functions two very distinct states and the other way is to break even but not lose not get crushed in the bay area. But do but you'll you'll never run up the same margins in southern California. You can run up in northern California but there are more voters especially a presidential race than there isn't a statewide race. Run up some decent margins down there and and that's a way to win and so you you if you're Bernie Sanders People. You're looking at the margins. You have coming out of the Bay Area. You know are you. Are you running the table? Any of your not running the table in the bay area. I think you've got some stuff to worry about Because that's that's the way he succeeds. Tremendously If your another candidate that's on the ascent I think you're GonNa Kinda look at because I think the voters are a lot more movable in southern California. You're looking at how you doing in the Los Angeles area Washington media market which is of course Riverside Orange Ventura La County and seamer India. Now and he actually goes all the way up into Kern massive massive part the state. And if you if you are running up decent respectable numbers they are Say for instance if your Bloomberg you can have a really good night and wire voters in the southern part of the state more movable than the northern and used to be speaking about a Democratic primary. I'm Tara any election anywhere. It's just. It's really a cultural thing. Folks in northern California a lot more tuned in is always been true into politics. You can stand in line at your coffee shop and getting schmoozing with people. And they'll tell you why they're upset about their local supervisor or they and they can tell you who their congressperson is and their state REP Cetera et Cetera in southern California. You're lucky if you can get them to tell you. One of the senators the president of the United States and the governor. It's just a different. There's different industries dominate down. Their people just aren't as interested in so There's usually a lot more flexibility right. So you mentioned Bloomberg is is a candidate with potential down south. Who Do you think are the biggest threats to Bernie Sanders probably not to win the bay area but keep his margins down? I think you'd have to say people to judge I think clearly the question of Biden is his viability if he remains viable. I think is a huge threat. And if he doesn't I think you have to look at what tapping the Bloomberg right right. What's your sense on turnout here? I whether that's a number or common to thermometer superstrong okay and I guess I'd say some there are some myths about it. Yeah and I ran numbers and projections For you here I'm so. Let's talk about what happened last time. Last time There was a sixty two percent turnout on. This isn't sixteen in Sixteen and in eighteen. Point five percent turnout for declined to states I'm thinking there's GonNa be a little bit higher. Probably more like sixty five in twenty but the ultimate pie in remember when things. It's tricky about about turnout. Models and Democratic presidential primary is Democrats. That's the only place. Vote and the vote with Gusto and declined to states. They have to do this. Extra step and they also just aren't historically great primary voters so if there's a place where if you're like Bernie Sanders or Bloomberg where you could actually move. Numbers would be there. And I don't I don't have enough knowing what they're doing but there's a lot of potential there because you could move that vote. I think by like ten percent right so as it relates to lessons we can learn how to California and I guess you know if you want include Texas in is given your experience there Now obviously there's a lot of other states voted on March third. But you know then we move into You Know Missouri North Carolina and other stay. You have presidential experience in Arizona Florida Illinois Ohio when we look at Maybe it's you know declined to state. That's the term here in California. You know other states use other terms like independent or unaffiliated their vote share and turnout performance in the African American community. Latino Asian community like. Do you think that you'll be able to draw a pretty direct line? From what happens here. Demographical in March third to those other states or or. Should we be careful about doing that? I think with some groups of voters. Yes which is I think with them. I think. Some correlation between what you can do with the Latino vote in California and elsewhere in also with the African American vote But the the independent voters in California are I think a different flavor Kind of wrap your brain around that. The largest percentage Recently kind of of independent voters in the states. His generally being in the bay area like San Francisco Alameda Contra et Cetera et CETERA. Aids is kind of not what you think of when you think of independent voters they tend to be essentially best descriptions they tend to be socially very liberal. I if not progressive but fiscally a little bit more conservative but it. It's not in anti-tax tax kind of fiscal flavor. It's it's more of a just show me. You're being smart with my money right so there'll be some important lessons. We can learn how to what might happen in future primaries here particularly the released seems like some of the minority voting groups. Yep but less on independence So what will happen? Will we know on election night here in California? Both who's won the raw vote and delegate total or are we going to have to wait a while for that never okay. Unless it's a blow out right there is. I mean it's like I just cracked me up. Every last number of election cycles everyone wants to say one. Hundred percent of the voting is in there. Still millions of votes counted and It's just what happens is I mean. There's there's two things A lot of people just are showing up with vote by mail ballots to their to their selection election and just dropping him off it. It's kind of funny. California's are so used to either. There's a certain group of ours who had just use the vote by mail and they vote by mail and they sit down the computers due to the weekends. And then there's a group of voters who always enjoyed voting person. But now we're getting ballots by mail. But they actually like to take their kids. Have the experience of going to the polling places huge mattress in his law. Also a huge amount of provisional ballots and the numbers are staggering compared to other states. And why is that just size of the state size of the State People also there's people move around a lot and California's you now and so there's just a lot of people who show up and they provide he registered for the registered somewhere else in California and and thanks to the all. The rules were changed after the two thousand election. Provisional Voting He. You know you you really can make it happen right right. So do you think that when you reflect on where California is now? It's clearly gonNA play? We think anyway a pretty significant role. Maybe thinning the field. Maybe giving somebody a big delegate ye yield like a Bernie Sanders if not that could impact the race but being on the same day as the rest of the states as big as California is I mean do you think the descended up As it was intended using maybe it would have been better to go a couple of weeks later. What's your view of And it's challenging because we've talked candidates Nevada there in South Carolina. They've got to go to Texas. They got to go to Alabama California's clearly the magnet on that day but still just three days after South Carolina. I'm just curious how you assess You know where it landed date was I is going. Turn out to be a great thing for California. I just think it's going to take a few cycles for to really shake out. And what's different is that it's changed permanently now so the last couple times when we've played around with moving it it's just been a a one off type thing and it's now permanently moved. I just think these these elections It always takes it. You know the dynamic of having a few cycles and see how things really go and people will look back and figure it out and I. I'm a California exception list so I think we should have a much bigger voice in that we've had and for goodness sakes. I mean the last half the last century were eight presidents. Roughly speaking in we two of them came from California and a lot of the big change. Things come from California so California does deserve a bigger voice. I think we'll get one right. Actually it was interesting to me is just given the fact that you know there is a scenario. I it sounds like you believe sanders. Ceiling may a little too low to accomplish but you know. Sanders could basically secure the plurality delegate lead if he were to net one hundred delegates. Outta so for the rest of the candidates you need to prevent that and I. I think if anything California should be getting more time and money than it is just because I think it's got an ounce so Lasting as you you mentioned you know presidents coming from California. You were You have a long history with Kamala Harris helping her win different elections throughout the state. We're helping her presidential race with a little bit of time and space any observation on I guess specifically Kamla who entered with such. I think promised strength had a moment of you know. I think in that debate where she had the exchange with Biden where it looked like she made take off but also you had booker and Andrew Yang and all the all the candidates of diversity You know not left. And we're left with all white candidates Mostly men maybe too soon but any observations on why that was I think. Democratic voters are so desperate to be trumped. They just don't want to kind of go out of their comfort zone and and take any risks and I think they saw all those candidates is even even if they were just a slight risk in the and they're just kind of like. Let's just be really safe and get this writing. Even so this time will put aside are wanting to fall in love with someone to just making sure get it right and I think that that doomed. Lada candidacies yeah so you fast? Anka's obviously I hope more than maybe anything in my life that one of these candidates ends up beating trump. But you know falling in love is how you create excitement enthusiasm and you know it's hard. It's hard to paint by numbers in these things. I know you did it. Well it's hard Why Smith thank you for your time. Today I think Folks need to get smart about California and Texas And hopefully begin to spend time with media market maps and Congressional district delegate allocations Because there's different ways this race could fall actually any way of falls so if if somebody were to come out of here with a big net They probably get a huge Leg Up in terms of the nomination Nf basically we just split the delegates. I think it probably means You know the rest of March gets even more interesting And so your view right now and I'll just ask so. Is you think that it's more likely than not the California's not going to end up. Where one candidate and I think at this point we all think he'd probably be sanders nets such a large amount of delegates that they gain that kind of lead that it's hard to give up. You think things probably are a little more distributed. I think that with with one caveat caveat if the race remains a splintered is is it. Is We sit here speaking today. The opposite could happen. Which is he enters comes out with massive delegate lead right which you may never give up smash a question just as a longtime democratic strategist and and someone who cares deeply about the party? Do you have a view on if we don't have a candidate who reaches the majority pledged delegate threshold because of splintering? But someone is the plurality leader. Do you think that person should be our nominee or do you think we should be head to the convention? I think the way we decide these things by going to conventions ends in the process. So I it's it's easy to get angry at the process but that's what we have. I think the other scenario might be the other candidates who fall short decide that they're going to throw their support to the pledged. Delegates Plurality Leah writes. We've avoided convention fight but I think California's the most important Factor in this question because if if the delegates here get relatively evenly distributed. It's hard to see how someone gets a majority. I agree so I think there's not enough. Focus on that so If somebody you know nets a lot out of here that person may have a fighting chance to get the majority. They certainly would have a fighting. Chance to be plurality delegate leader but if things are spread relatively evenly You know it seems like we`re. It's it's hard to do. The math. Particularly in that scenario would mean probably multiple people did well enough on Super Tuesday to keep going on Right and to your point about eighty-eight eventually that thinned-out And it was really Jackson into caucus at the end but if we have four candidates going deep into March and deepened April with Atlantic. It's hard to see I get to majority and the one thing that's changed that that is also a lot you know that kind of doesn't get baked into people's thinking is back in the say eighty eight. Everyone was still hewing to the You know the the federal limits and so the it was much easier to rhyme money and that's out the window now so people campaign run out money By large in so I just think all these these things will go on much longer for that reason as well well let me ask you last question then so right so historically people get out when they run out of money do you think this time there may be some people who have the ability to go on financially or organizationally but they're delegated path. Just get so narrow that they decide for the good of the part of the get out that would be counter to political behavior. What's your view of that? I tend to think the optimistic Beth human nature and hope that they'll run for the greater. Good Yeah I mean because my view on this is once it's clear we're going to have a nominee You know if not in numbers in reality you know. We got trump looming out there. Hey man with more money than we've ever seen before more data and digital sophistication and someone who's more obsessed with winning reelection in any president maybe put together so we got to get to the main event here. Can't agree more. Ace Matt Thank you. Thank you great honor. Well hopefully you got from the conversation as Smith. How different the California primary is from Really the rest of the country the complexity how expensive it is to run a campaign. You know the delegates situation the fact that you're not just dealing with one state but at least two states really in terms of of political behavior so California is going to be critical The question is is. Is it something that gives somebody the kind of delegate yield they need to seize if not an impenetrable fortify delegate lead or is it going to be something that gets more evenly distributed Which means The Ray certainly will continue if not till Milwaukee deep into the calendar. So hopefully you learn something about California and Texas a place where. He has also led a successful presidential primary campaigns.

California Bernie Sanders Texas South Carolina Joe Biden Nevada Bloomberg Mike Bloomberg president Buddha Milwaukee NBC Pete I President Obama Hillary Clinton Ray US Chuck Todd E Smith
New Gig Work Law Leaves California Scrambling

The Journal.

19:32 min | 10 months ago

New Gig Work Law Leaves California Scrambling

"This episode of the Journal is brought to you by business schooled a podcast by synchrony in season two of business schooled new host. Sarah Darby is meeting with with eight American entrepreneurs to find out how they're not just surviving but thriving to business school. Wherever you get your podcasts war over the last decade Gig has become a defining piece of the US economy? There's there's a growing number of people who are working jobs for platforms like Uber or lift. These people work sometimes as much as full-time jobs. But they actually aren't fulltime time employees. They don't get health insurance worker's COMP or other employees protections labor advocates lawmakers say that this is a misclassification showed that these companies are getting the benefit of workers labor without the employment costs and earlier this year California passed a sweeping new law. Aw meant in part to take aim at the GIG. Economy laid out a definition of who should be considered an employee that law goes goes into effect in just a few days but rather than bringing order and security to California's workforce. It has so far led to job cuts lawsuits in a standoff with the Tech Industry today on the show what California's new law means for the GIG economy and for everyone else Welcome to the Journal. Our show about money business and power. I'm Ryan Connection and I'm kate. Lima it's Thursday. December nineteenth. The origin story of this law doesn't actually they have anything to do with the GIG economy. It starts with a California Supreme Court case and that case was known as dynamex Christine my do covers California state politics in the economy. The dynamex case was brought by courriers. Who worked for the company and wanted to be treated as full time employees but when the court handed down a decision last year it gave guidance to all sorts of companies? What was determined in that court case was that there's this three three part test to determine whether or not somebody is truly a contractor or not the test is called the ABC test it's three criteria which Christine laid laid out as three questions one? Are they being directed by their employer. Their boss how to do the work and went to do the work. If your boss is not. I'm not telling you how to do your work. Then you're a contractor but that's only if you also answer yes to question. Two is the work that they're performing actually outside side the scope of the core business of the person. They're performing that work for so if your work is not court of the business and your boss isn't telling you how to do your job. You're a contractor but wait. There's a third question. Does this person actually operates kind of an independent business where they do the same kind of work doc for other employers in that setting so if you've got the freedom to have a lot of clients you're a contractor if you have a single contract with one business you're an employee that's the ABC test a contractor's work must not be directed by a boss courted. The business and the worker must have the freedom to have many many clients. If job doesn't pass this test then. The company has to treat the worker as an employee when the California California Supreme Court handed down the decision laying out this ABC test employers immediately felt like it could have huge implications with the court case ace seemingly everybody might fall under that right it could be. Doctors could be lawyers. Everybody who works as an independent contractor could be affected. Did it clearly was a monumental decision that really could change the nature of work for millions of Californians in California. There's around two point. Eight million people in in this category and these people's jobs cover the whole cross section of the state's economy the most visible example of contractors may be uber drivers or door dash drivers vers. Some of these people in the GIG economy but contractors also have included people like therapists or nurses. Who have the training to provide anesthesiology? She there's physical therapists strippers among them. And also freelance writers musicians and people who deliver newspapers your paper boy. That's right with so many industries possibly subject to this ruling businesses. Wanted clarity about what it would mean and they look to the legislature to do it. which led to the crafting crafting of the bill? It's currently causing this controversy in California. It's called a b five so that's where the legislature stepped in and they looked at ways in which they could could codify this and clarify certain situations in which people may or may not fall into that the proposal the California legislature came up with took that test from the state eight Supreme Court's ruling and started crafting it into law and almost immediately certain industries started lobbying for exemptions. There was plenty of opposition to the bill. Certainly the giants like Uber. Lip spent a lot of money. Lobbying against the bill while it was being debated Uber spent more than five hundred thousand dollars in lift along the same minds just in lobbyists to have their voice heard in this ongoing discussion. Some workers spoke out against the bill to saying they like the freedom and flexibility ability. That gig work gave them. But the bill's author Democratic assemblywoman named Lorena Gonzalez felt there were bigger issues at stake. She's from the San Diego go area and she's really just deeply steeped in the labor movement. Gonzalez the DYNAMEX decision opened up an opportunity to go after the rise of Gig work. She told me that really. Her Outlook in the legislature has always been to fight for the worker and fight for the little guy. We have a tremendous amount amount of working poor in California that to rely on food stamps. We have to rely on emergency room care because they don't have health care in so many of these workers are miss classified and that's a former Labor leader in San Diego and she's the daughter of an immigrant farm worker and a nurse who actually fought to unionize nights her workplace. She was a single mom for years. She's really got experience taking up issues that have been controversial in the past. Some of the bills that she's authored co authored include one of them that Titan vaccine exemptions so she's been the target of Anti Baxter's in past she helped pass the motor-voter law which automatically medically registers many people who show up at the DMV here in California and helped raise the minimum wage fifty dollars an hour. I'm proud to stand in solidarity garrity with my brothers and sisters who are saying. It's time it's time that they're treated with a little bit more respect. I hope Gonzales and other Democratic lawmakers the the bill was a chance to take aim at an innovation of the last decade companies that build apps for on demand services and employ a lot of contract workers to perform those services. You know one of the most poignant close I think from semblance speaker Anthony Rent known came in the midst of the debate about this bill I hear about folks talking to five the New Economy the GIG economy the innovation economy and he kind of said people talk all about how. Wow this is the GIG economy this is you know innovation at its best and his key money quote was and what the point he was trying to make was that there may be different names for how you do something thing whether it's through an APP or not or how workers are able to find their work and pick up jobs. The basic reality is that these companies pennies are kind of shirking their responsibility to pay people a living wage and to give them the protections that we as society in California have decided workers should half half and what is the criticism that lawmakers and labor activists have about how the current system works. There have been a lot of complaints from drivers specifically typically about how the company can utilize early set rates or cut rates or cut their reimbursements than there. Kind of at the mercy of the company to set that how much they're gonNa make any time you have executives for these companies getting billions of dollars in bonuses in any given year. And you have some drivers who say that sleeping in their cars. Because they don't have enough money to make ends meet. And you know some of these drivers make a couple of dollars on some trips because of the way that the APP and the system is structured hurt in Sacramento when the bill was being debated there were uber drivers in cars clogging the streets around the capital and honking their horns and and flying these banners. He you might have heard a lot of honking at the Capitol Today. And here's why over and lift drivers were rallying in support of the bill that would make them employees as contractors the plan on the when the bill was finally fully crafted it did include some exemptions boyer's and architects doctors and real estate agents people. Gonzales said had more bargaining power than the average worker but the bills still included a vast swath of the workforce contract workers the places like Uber and lift and also paper boys and strippers. Freelance writers truck drivers and this kind of work is growing at big companies companies. Contract workers can make up as much as fifty percent of the workforce it lets them shrink their employee base and pay less benefits at alphabet Google's the parent company. There are more outsource workers than fulltime employees. California's lot will affect a lot of these workers. Yes it was passed in September. We'll take effect in January with just a few months. In between businesses and workers across the state have been scrambling to figure out how how the new law applies to them. That's after the break. This episode of the Journal is brought to you by business school a podcast by synchrony synchrony is changing what's possible for people and businesses says with consumer financing solutions digital innovations in data insights. That help them grow in now. Business schooled is back with the new season and a new Host Sarah Darby. She's meeting with eight entrepreneurs to find out how they're not just surviving but thriving new season new host new things to learn on season. Two of business schooled. Subscribe wherever. You get your podcasts. Welcome back in the California legislature passed. AB Five to create more clarity for contract workers but the bill they passed left a lot of open questions a lot of employers not just startups but all kinds of employers. Don't know if the law applies to them and there are big implications if it does certainly many of them have costed this out and they estimate that it could add anywhere between fifteen and thirty percent to their employment costs so that's a big thing that they're grappling with so I spoke to one marriage and family therapist who owns a group practice and Glendale California and he services a lot of Armenian speakers and Armenian immigrants in the area and he has an office space he has a receptionist and staff that he pays and so then he takes a cut of each of the licensed therapist who come to his office in practice under his practice under the new law he essentially is going to have to classify them ause part time employees and he's not really sure what this is going to mean for his bottom line. He's going to try it but he did say that he thinks that this is going to add somewhere between fifteen to twenty percent went to his costs and he may either have to let go these licensed therapist an future or downsize as business. He's not really sure what he's GonNa do. Some workers are in the same position facing down uncertainty this week. Vox Media's espy nation. A sports blog said it would be ending contracts. Thanks for about two hundred contractors. It's used in California. Some of those contractors can join the staff others will be terminated and there are consequences for all sorts of other contract workers even ones who feel like independent work is beneficial so I spoke to tongue men who is a truck driver and he's been an independent truckdriver for more than fifteen years. At this point he can make enough in a year and fat a certain point in the year. He's made enough to sustain his family. He'll just take the rest of the year off off. He really always loved the flexibility. He tells me he was able to raise his kids and cut down on childcare costs with his wife because he was able to be home when she was at work and he almost exclusively finds his work through a trucking broker. Which is somebody a company who kind of lines up jobs for him tells him where and I went to be what the specs on the job are? How much is going to get paid? And so he's always lined up his jobs like this and under the new law he can no longer do that. And you know marches busy season. He tells me if he can't find enough work to fulfil his need by January or February. He's going to have to move out of state with his family. How does Lorraina Gonzales respond to the criticism that this law is going to encumber people bowl? Who had really enjoyed the freedoms of freelance and contract work and she thinks that that's clear that people are concerned about their own situation -Tuation and she understands that but that there are a whole host of people also who are going to benefit from this and she's not willing to wipe that out? I think for the people who support reported this law and continue to support it. The goal is probably to rein in some of the excesses of the GIG economy. Some of the fundamental changes that. We've I've seen in the past decade of how people do work and how they're compensated for it and how they're protected when they can't do the work for example or when when they get injured and so I think applying more and more protections to those people within that category who maybe have the least power and the least ability to negotiate and advocate on their own behalf but Gonzalez his goal of giving more power to people like Uber Drivers. This might not happen. Because while a lot of other companies are scrambling to comply with the law Uber and lift the companies. That help spur all this debate. Eight and concern about the status of freelance workers. Say this new law doesn't apply to them. Uber and lift took a pretty I would say contentious stance in terms of saying that they just are not gonNa really change anything about the way they do their business. They don't think the law applies. They're not going to reclassify their workers and come January first. They're not Planning on making any of their drivers employees at this point these companies consider themselves tech platforms. And if you remember what the. ABC test says says someone's only considered an employee if their work is core to the business and Uber says the driving. A car shouldn't be considered sittard core to its business because the test is hard doesn't mean that we will not be able to pass it. This isn't Uber's chief. Legal officer explaining explaining the company's position on a media call in fact. Several previous rulings have found. That drivers were is outside. The usual course of Hoover's there's business which is serving as a technology platform for several different types of digital marketplaces for its part lift. Says it's looking looking to find ways for drivers to get benefits. While maintaining the flexibility. They have as contractors but both Lifton Uber are planning on fighting. Ab Five Live by bypassing the lawmakers and taking it to voters Uber Lift and a number of other GIG economy companies have put a hundred and ten million Leeann dollars into a campaign account for a ballot measure that they promised for next year. They say they're gonNA start collecting signatures in January and they're proposing that essentially they would just be carved out of this law but it wouldn't apply to them and they're hoping that they can take their case directly to the California voters if this ballot measure were to move forward and pass ass it would mean that the companies that were targeted by this law in the end would get out of it that will remain up to the voters of California. The very state state that gave rise to Gig work. Seems like like there's some irony here in that Silicon Valley in California California have have created companies like Uber and lift and now lawmakers are taking aim at at the very heart of their business model. Yeah I mean it was the birthplace of companies like this that gave rise to the GIG economy that spread very quickly and really re really thought we think of the nature of work and people who work and how they're doing that. I think it really goes to the heart of California as a place of innovation. Vision is a place of kind of new ways of thinking and doing things and business models. I think that a lot of times because of the speed of innovation in California on Ya sometimes legislators can be caught by surprise or they may need to play catch up in terms of regulations for new emerging technologies. California has always been seen as a trailblazer in terms of public policy. And so there are a couple states including New York that that are considering similar legislation. And there's the American Action Forum which is kind of a conservative sister group of the American Action Network which has ties to the Republican Party. But they put out a study saying that if this type of policy was implemented nationwide this ABC test ab five codifies would include kind of more than thirteen million workers nationwide who are responsible for more than one point six trillion dollars economic output. You can say what you will well about the organization and kind of its leanings. But I think that the bottom line is it's clear at this type of policy catches on it would have major implications for the economic life of millions of people. That's all for for today. Thursday December nineteenth the journal is a co production of Gimblett and the Wall Street Journal special. Thanks to Lauren Weber for additional reporting. If if you liked the show follow us on spotify or wherever you get your podcast. He come out every weekday afternoon. Thanks for listening. See You tomorrow.

California ABC California Supreme Court Sarah Darby the Journal California California Supreme Lorena Gonzalez Lorraina Gonzales Lima US ABC Ryan Connection New York Glendale California spotify California California Christine
California Dreamin'

Today, Explained

15:57 min | 11 months ago

California Dreamin'

"You ever notice that the standard school they in America is about two hours shorter than the standard entered workday that creates a lot of work for parents a lot of stress. There's an entire industry out there designed to deal with the work and stress us of this two hour gap now. Some argue that changing school schedules to align better with work. Schedules would be better for parents and Dan Students and today California senator. Kamala Harris is introducing a bill. That would do just that. A lot of the details are forthcoming but the big idea is to make kids stay at school a little longer and that doesn't necessarily mean teachers have to teach more but maybe the school provides free childcare. child-care after classes are over Senator Harris is not the only one thinking big about school schedules back in her home state. They've already made a big change but to understand the change you have to understand zero period. I had no idea what zero period was when I moved to California from Kano. Ah when I was a teenager but it immediately became an essential part of my life. Zero period is actually where I made my first friend and the United States. ZAC Saker. You're going to hear me again. Hey I I wanted to ask you a couple of questions about high school. Got A second go. I don't know if you remember how we met a do your junior year junior year of of high school. I remember I just moved to California. I didn't have any friends yet and you sat. I'm going to say in front of me in Mr Stor. Rob's zero period Algebra two math class is that right. Yeah I remember. You had a blink. One eight two. Who Sticker on your folder? Something I like blink way to grow. Can you WANNA I WANNA be friends. And that's how it started. Do you remember what time that class started. Seven am seven am where brands to be literally federally. Do you remember why we elected to take a math class at seven in the morning. I just remember I was trying to get out of school at noon. I think that was the only way to do that. Did you hear that future Zack's Shawn's might not get to meet at school at seven in the morning anymore. I did not California just passed the first just law that mandates later school start time for middle and high school students. Katrina Schwarz covers education for K.. Q. E. D. in San Francisco. It's the first of a kind law. Although some school districts and other parts of the country have done something similar but this is the first statewide law and it would go into effect in three years. So district's basically have three the years to figure out how they're going to do. This is California just coming around to the idea that asking kids to wake up at five. Six o'clock kind of extra. Yeah I mean the the reason they pass this law is that there's a lot of research showing that especially teenagers they're circadian rhythms are a little bit different as you go through adolescence. And so really they need to be sleeping sleeping in a little bit later in order to be fully awake and so this argument is all about achievement and sort of wellbeing for young people that you know being at school at seven. Thirty in the morning is really not optimal for this age group but on the other side are all educators and school administrators. Who are saying you know? This is going to be a huge shift for us us. It takes a lot of logistics to change the school schedule and it's going to affect a lot of people so can we talk about the law explicitly. What exactly does it dictate? Yes so the law says that middle schools have to start at eight. AM or later and high schools. Have to start at eight thirty or later you can still have zero periods by the way so you could still be going to school at seven thirty in the morning. But that's mostly for like electives and things. Yeah and then. There are a few exemptions four rural schools obviously those schools that have the biggest issues with transportation so they are exempt although this does affect charter schools who you know in many other areas as of education law have a little bit more leeway but in this bill they are affected by this as well and people push back saying this was. I don't know nanny state cool nanny state state who lets you sleep late Yeah there was pushed back a lot of districts pushback and like I said teachers the School Board Association the School who administrators premature any adult who is in charge of running schools. Push back against this and of course there were some parents too. I mean I think parents are kind of split on this but I should just tell you that the California California State Parent Teacher Association wasn't favor of this bill. They backed it so parents are probably all over the place on this depending on their individual circumstances. But it'll really depend. And how districts do this like do they get buy in from the parent community. Do they tell them about the science. Do they tell them why they're doing this. And why it's important and kind of get people on board before where they just like. Make a sweeping change that affects the mornings of you know hundreds of thousands of families and not just people with kids but people driving to work at the same time as people with kids in school buses is having more kids. Start at the exact same time. Potentially we're going to create more traffic effect municipalities and other ways. I think a huge issue was just the amount of administrative effort. It will take to reschedule. Schedule all the buses because already buses are staggered. Like one bus might be used for a school that has an earlier start time and then pick up a whole other set of kids for a different school and those are like carefully monitored. They're trying to maximize the use of each bus and each bus driver. So definitely some districts were saying. This could cost US millions of dollars to one one figure out how to Redo the schedule. You know all the administrative time and thinking about it and then potentially having to use more buses hire more bus drivers evers that could all take time and then the other big thing was just this idea that one size does not fit all like what works for. One district doesn't work for others and people just really feeling feeling like we value local control in education. That's like a core part of education in the United States. That's why we have such different laws in each state and it's true of local districts as well they implement laws differently every community looks different between how diverse California is as a state and all the conflicting needs needs of parents and all the scheduling. It sounds like there could actually be a lot on the line here for California whenever you're the first in the country to do something people are watching watching you and you know California's a big state and often especially with education policy other people follow suit although it gets trip like many kinds of policy in California so so you know. Other states and districts are aware of the research around this has been like in the conversation for a while the effect of lack of sleep on teens. I mean especially because we're seeing seeing some high rates of anxiety and sleeplessness. What chief rates and stuff like that people are saying okay? We need to really pay attention to the mental health of our adolescents. And not just have have. These schedules dictated by the adults in the system. We should be really prioritizing. The young people themselves so other people are interested in this may be studying. It are considering bills of their their own and they're watching California to find out if it works here so I think how it's implemented and whether we do a good job with that that'll determine a lot for the rest of the country starting school later actually help kids sleep leap more. That is after the break on today explained a few water you do and doing and doing radio and reviewed Dan every now. Vicky a favourite into friend one Every now favorite personas to doing I do and show de day. Ex- I am Dr Lisa Meltzer. I am an associate professor of pediatrics at National Jewish Health and Denver and I am a pediatric sleep psychologist. Let's just start with the million dollar question. Doc Doc. Why do we need sleep? That's a great question and something that researchers continue to look at. There's a number of competing theories about why we sleep. There isn't one single one that's been identified but clearly sleep is essential otherwise it would be as great researcher said evolution's greatest greatest mistake that we need to sleep every single night but what I noticed lately at life because a lot of my friends have kids that babies sleep all day. Ed Ed as someone who makes a Daily News podcast clearly adults can get by with very little sleep. How much sleep do adolescence need adolescents? Have a biological logical need about nine and a quarter hours of sleep nine and a quarter nine and a quarter. Yeah they did. These really cool studies where they put teens in a special sleep lab for several weeks. They were completely disconnected. No technology no clocks. They had dim light twenty four hours a day so they never knew what time of day it was and and they let them sleep as much as they wanted. And that's how we know that when you catch up on your sleep. These teens on average need nine and a quarter hours of sleep so again. That's a range. There's some teens who made only need eight hours and there some teens who may need ten hours but there are very very few teens who actually need less the eight hours yet. In the United States we know that about seventy five percent teams get less than eight hours of sleep. How much sleep do I need? I'm very selfishly wondering the answer to that question now. It's a general range. Adults generally need between seven and nine hours again and with an average somewhere around the eight hour point but There are some adults who definitely do need more than nine hours every night. And there's some adults who really only need seven hours. There are few people who do need less than seven hours but the majority of people who get less than seven hours of sleep are getting by on that so that's not their actual sleep need. They're just functioning in a constant state of sleep deprivation. It sounds sounds about right. Why do adolescence is need more are they? Are they lazy now. Their brain is developing and changing. Their bodies are growing so one of the first things that happens after you fall asleep growth hormones released so our teens our kids. Our babies at their growing during their sleep and sleep is really important for physical growth. It's it's a important for their emotion regulation so this is just biological development and this carries into adolescence continues all the way into the early twenties days so this really is a need for sleep that people often just say is laziness. But it's not. I guess tying this back to this California law and the reality -ality here I. I wonder when I was a teenager. I stayed up until midnight. Talk into the homeys on the phone and stuff. I could have just gone to sleep earlier. I suppose is. Is that an issue here. That giving kids more time in the morning won't necessarily fix their sleep patterns. Just stay up even later no There are no studies that consistently show that teens stay up later so when it gets dark out in the evening most of us Melatonin is released so so melatonin. Is this hormone. It promotes sleep now. What happens in teens? Is that the timing of that. Melatonin is released later by about one to two hours for most teens. And what that means is that it's hard for them to fall asleep early on the other end when you have the early school start times. We're asking our teens to wake up five five thirty and six o'clock at the latest in order to get to school on time so it's not just an issue of telling our teams to get off their our phones and go to bed earlier. It's about giving our teens. The opportunity to get enough sleep each night is their chance you that kids starting school later actually Hopes them out academically too so there are a few small studies that do show some improvements in grades most notably in the first and second periods. Because those are the Times that our earliest so when you delay those start times than those class periods get later and students do perform better. So that's something something that we're seeing What we do know is that delaying start times? Do actually help kids get more sleep so here in the Denver area one of our large districts changed their start times. And we've been following up and what we found was that prior to the start time change just like the national average less than thirty percent of our students were getting at at least eight hours of sleep and following the start time. Change Our students there. Sixty one percent that are now getting at least eight hours of sleep so we more than doubled. The number of students who are getting at least eight hours of sleep simply by starting school later I mean. The science isn't all new. Is it why you were having kids. Wake up so gosh darn early in the first place. So there's a lot of competing theories for why school start. Times continued to get earlier and earlier allotted district's they'll tell you it's a transportation issue. It's a safety issue. It's a farming issue. None of them are really that important at this point when we know the science we know the need for sleep we know the biological importance of teens getting enough sleep so this is not new information. It's taken a long time for it to become important enough for our society to act on it. Do you listen to hip hop Leeson. Not Much Nash. Half those rapper who famously wrapped on his nineteen ninety-four Magnum opus. Ill Matic sleep. Sleep gone the. What do you say to people who are just like you know sleeping that important? I'll I'll do it when I die for the rest of time when I was in graduate school and I'd complain. My brother would always say Lisa you. I can sleep when you're dead so now do I tell people I tell people that is true. The problem is is that. If you don't sleep now you will be dead a lot sooner. Lisa meltzer is a pediatric sleep psychologist at National Channel Jewish Health and Denver Colorado Katrina Schwarz. Who you heard from earlier in the show is an education reporter at cake and the CO host of NPR's mindshift podcast cast and Zach? Hunts Saker who you heard from

California United States Denver Dan Students Dr Lisa Meltzer Melatonin Senator Harris Katrina Schwarz California California State Pa School Board Association ZAC Saker America senator Mr Stor San Francisco Rob Doc Doc E. D. National Jewish Health
Friday, November 15th, 2019

Gemini Today

01:58 min | 11 months ago

Friday, November 15th, 2019

"Good Morning Gemini. Today is Friday November Fifteenth Two Thousand Nineteen the Gemini Moon Moon is void. Of course you may feel unstable while the moon is void of course in your sign but this can still be a day of self discovery in progress. This is Gemini Today. A podcast original. Let's begin your day. Keep your head down and focus on your work. It's the Best Line of Defense as the moon goes void of course and your sign fine. They'll find stability as the moon moves into cancer this evening. In the meantime don't be rattled by anxious areas. Who wants to to disrupt your flow? The to feel unnerved now take a moment to reflect on your relationships and chips an early morning heart to heart with a friend could leave you on unstable ground especially if it feels like your friend was overreacting reacting hold off addressing the issue until this evening the sensitivity and clarity required will be abundant once. The moon moves into carrying cancer her. Contemplate your path to personal growth. Not every desire is worth pursuing. Learn to be more discerning in which pursuits earn your focus and time you'll feel more fulfilled by putting more energy towards a few special special goals Gemini. Today will be back tomorrow to learn more about your horoscope. nope visit California psychics and connect today for scope. Today is a podcast original.

California
Southern California Wildfires Rage

Environment: NPR

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Southern California Wildfires Rage

"Get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply this message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like Xfinity X. by A._Q._H._a.. Dis Radios the California report salt thank you I'm sorry we don't have more time. No worries thank you the California's largest utility companies shut off power to hundreds of thousands of their customers to prevent wildfires from being sparked here to talk about the wildfire and blackout firefighters at his home I understand they're also been major evacuations Oh yes I mean really big ones we've had about one hundred thousand people who've been evacuated from commute it can cause a very big fire this particular fire so far has burned over seventy five hundred acres and destroyed about thirty structures many of those single family homes lag warnings warnings about these winds that continue through the weekend for listeners who don't know already would you explain why those planned power blackouts were implemented while they were Al's per hour but when they're blowing at thirty forty fifty miles per hour it becomes a whole order of magnitude much much harder to do so and that's happening that continues today we have read the winds behind her and these are these are the the legendary Santa Anna Winds of southern California blow in very hot and dry and strong from from the inland areas fire that's yet to be seen there was a fire for instance east of Los Angeles if which is claimed two lives which was caused when a fire kind of started on a garbage truck a wildfire continues to burn the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles and it's being fueled by dry vegetation and strong winds that's happening the same week implemented to prevent wildfires some of the worst wildfires in recent California history had been caused by wind knocking branches into date on the wildfires in la including where they're burning yeah they're burning a in the far north side of Los Angeles and that's really a place where thing I'd rather be in an earthquake so how big a factor are the wins in these fires will you heard I think in that soundbite Charlotte's spoke and you can he's that I met Charlotte Schmeltzer she evacuated for from from her home just before midnight with her adult son and some of her pets and this is what she had to say. My heart was beating the electrical infrastructure power plants and transformers those spark a fire sparks small false small fires which turned into very big ones because of the wind so this megalopolis comes right up against very dry hillsides that are full of vegetation this time of year very dry of vegetation and one spark or the oceans and they are the arch nemesis when it comes to fighting fires this time of year firefighters hate them they'll they'll tell you to a person it's one thing to fight a fire you know if the Windsor five it's is Saul Gonzales Co host of member station K. Q. E. DS the California report saw thanks for making time for us no worries thank you Sasha and would you bring us up to right now whereas of a little bit earlier this afternoon it was about nineteen twenty percent contained and we've had one reported fatality a man in his fifties who died of a heart attack while talking to wildfire suspicions obviously tend to be people start to start thinking about our electrical infrastructure and if that might be caused just because of our power systems crazy and I couldn't breathe and it wasn't from the smoke is just I've hated flyer since I was a kid is so vinyl when burns it Burns yeah the the the the driver pulled over and that fire on the truck spread to nearby brush we still don't know the cause for this fire that's burning north north Los Angeles but entities like Filmar and Puerto Ranch a lot of them have made their way to Red Cross centers that had been established at local schools and parks and community centers. It's there that I at one a preventive measure both in northern California and here in southern California meant to be preventative but there are wildfires is there any sense yet of whether they were wild they work well we don't know what causes

California Los Angeles NPR Saul Gonzales Co Charlotte Schmeltzer Burns Sasha Puerto Ranch San Fernando Valley Red Cross Charlotte Al Filmar seventy five hundred acres nineteen twenty percent
MRN Outloud - California

Motorsports Monday

27:32 min | 7 months ago

MRN Outloud - California

"Are Out loud is presented by money lion and by Hercules tire. What he came joining you again for our Auto Club speedway edition as we get set the head to southern California and who better to talk to about that then a California guy himself the man who finished second at Las Vegas Motor speedway the driver of the number twenty one Ford Mustang for the weather's Matt Benedetto Matt. Congratulations on a strong. Start to the season and now You go back to your roots a little bit after thank you. That was a good way to start off. You Know Daytona side Starting off year. Vegas I kinda normal race of the year I guess and then So yeah cool way to start going back going back to the home state now for you. Kind of lose track of how big California is when they talk about home state. You're from the area called Grass Valley. How close is that? The Auto Club speedway is that I imagine very different from that particular area right. Yeah for sure I grew up in northern California. Grass valley was probably about an hour away from The Sacramento area in the foothills Sacramento so Auto clubs probably I think Some of my family usually drive down there. It's about a seven ish hour drive so pretty far south. Yeah but I actually had a lot of family that You know lived in La so it's still a family down that way. No you live in North Carolina now but a lot of folks talk about the difference between nor cow and so cal northern California and Southern California. How would you describe the difference? Yeah they're completely different work so you know what people are like. Oh you grew up in California. Was crazy busy up like do. We grew up in a even smaller town than I live in North Carolina. Hickory figuring out there so it's It was pretty Nice area. There really really quiet And basically it was just in the foothills there so very very small town. So that's kind of what I've been a accustomed to growing up and that's why even moving hickory North Carolina people are like. Oh you live in a way out there hickory. I'm like no you have no idea. Well that being said how does a kid from grass valley get hooked on racing? And how do you make that work around your area that got you interested? The interesting story but So my dad was actually big into baseball. Nobody in my family was into really racing cars and stuff but you know it was about the extent of it So we He was passing through the channels on. Tv BY NASCAR. And I made him watch it. And at that time I was riding a four wheeler and a bike and I was wide fricking open on every single day. So clearly they were like okay Motorsports bachelor he likes to go fast. Yeah made him watch NASCAR every single weekend with my mom and my dad was like what the heck do you want to watch that for? Then it became our thing. We watch it every single Sunday and then you know they became do so it just became our our thing in a friend that I played baseball with On our little league teams My Dad was like the trophy ceremony. Like this is my my little Jeff Gordon. He likes baseball but love racing. And well it gets just so happened racist cycle AF speedway where kyle grew up racing. Both come out and check it out and that's how I got started. That is a really cool story. You move from from not much interest in the family to baseball and into racing after that and now here you are driving for the wood brothers. Does something like that kind of make you pinch yourself at times ago. I can't believe all this has happened all the time. Just a fan of the wood brothers that love studying the history you know the team in the in the sport and all their famous drivers and all this stuff and so I was just straight up I mean honestly. Fan and then Bachelor today I would never I would. I couldn't even script the story as crazy as it's been and then I joke all the time and say the only way you would believe the whole story from start to finish and how crazy then how. Many thousands of things that the lineup perfectly. It'd be the right place right time. Like the only way to believe it is hopefully long time from now after I have a long career. I'd have to write a book. You shouldn't that that'd be an interesting read. Just based on what we've talked about so far. I think it would be a Lotta Fun. Met You mentioned The two racist to start this season. Obviously Daytona kind of out liar for the superspeedway perspective. But you had to be really encouraged with a strong runner up finish at Las Vegas Motor speedway the meat and potatoes bread and butter if you will of the series on the intermediate style mile and a half tracks. That was a little bit of of a an early encouragement for you and the whole team was wasn't it? I mean that that's a strong run. Oh yeah the so. The things I'd point out as the you know most encouraging to me is that it was not a one of those picture-perfect weekends. Where you go out. Car was close right off the bat and all this it was one of those weekends where we as a team had to. Click Mesh really well and work. Super Super are together on the carcass. We started you. Know and got looping we were way off on the car And had to work really hard on getting out and we started the race of still needed. More time So we had to make big adjustments me and Greg Erwin my crew chief Ed to communicate back and forth Really well adjusting big on the car in a lot of people were loose. Says you saw so we were not the only one So we were battling the same thing and So we made big swings on that then the right pit calls. I mean and doing all of the things that were. That's what was the most impressive me. All of us are pick through through a ton of work changes and all that stuff. And then droughts day making our way forward where it's like okay. Boom our easy top ten car and then all right now we continue to make the right calls and decisions and put ourselves position at the end. So that is what to me makes an extraordinary team and it just showed me what I already had confidence that this team is so dang good Benedetto the driver of the number twenty one Ford Mustang for the wood brothers and Matt talking about that specific track granted drove for a different team a year ago. But how different is the car itself not necessarily Ford Versa Toyota. But this particular package one year removed. What you saw most recently Las Vegas versus a year ago. Yeah you know so Last year at all far we were. You know. Really trying to build that team We have strengths and weaknesses And we were working on them but we're trying to build the team up and when we go to mile and a half We we fought this kind of some of that. Ross beat Those are it wasn't it was a. It was no secret that our strength were more on the tracks where we had that offer all time The the short tracks on the road courses and we were working on the speed Now fast forward in this year it was just so cool to Hop IN THIS CAR. That was twenty one car. What brothers do we just have to really strong? As far as hordes super fast and then and it was like man once. We just got the car. Handling close in the ballpark the speed of the car just automatically has you up up in the top ten. I mean I'm not driving it any different. It's just how you know how fast those race cars are. And how good they are and make it on the best thing. That was really cool. You know them in the Lions and support the team penske gives I mean. It's just a school strapping in such a such big with really good people around you. Let's look ahead before we wrap up mad at Auto Club. Speedway giant two mile track worn out racing surface. What can we expect there this weekend again? Comparing it to a year ago and what we've learned about these cars in that time It's funny thinking back to ten year ago. None of none of us do a Dang thing going to the track of the rules are so different We don't know how you build your car's need more speed or handling or what so. It's still kind of a moving target. But Yeah we're I plan on the on the plane ride on Thursday to watch the entire race finish from last year But fonteneau fun because it's a little different than like Vegas. You know the surfaces more Warren. How laptops fall off more? So you're in the gas a lot and it feels painfully slow on the straightaways for this package. And you're kind of drafting and all that mess But Lap Times also fall off. So it's like where's the fine line of how much speed or handling you want at school? Because the nice thing we on the corner and run off the lanes I mean actors. I think eight different ways you could choose from there to run the line of the guy in front of us. Five billion error in the corner so that just makes it a fun place for racism absolutely going to be fun to watch a love seeing the guy slip and slide out there and concerts around for the different lines Matt. Congratulations on a strong start to the season night. In the standings runner up finish at Las Vegas Motor speedway. Keep an eye out for that number. Twenty one wood brothers. Ford Mustang continued success. We'll see you this weekend. Yeah sounds good thank you? Thanks for having me on there you go matt Benedetto. We'll take a quick time out when we come back. It'll be time for our money. Line financial crew chief segment. Did you know that banks collected over fifteen billion in unnecessary fees? Last year. Come on enough is enough. It's time we took back control of our finances. That's my money. Line is proud to bring you the financial crew chief and to be a NASCAR sponsor. Look no one more about hard work and pursuing their dreams NASCAR FANS drivers and teams. So we want to bring you the kind of thinking that the big banks would never built with features like zero checking and zero fee investment accounts and because life is also meant for join with Money Lion Nascar fans get even more. We're giving away fifteen hundred NASCAR. Tickets are members this year. Plus you can get five percent cashback on NASCAR tickets at track purchases and all purchases at NASCAR DOT com learn more at Lyon dot com or download our APP. This is America's most powerful financial membership. Money Line here. We wore citywide do countryside. Whatever you drive wherever you go. Hercules tires has the value selection and industry leading warranty to get you there no matter where the rotates you go to. Hercules tire DOT COM. There you can find the nearest authorized Hercules retail location to you plus. You can use the tire tracker to find out which Hercules tire fits your vehicle the best. That's Hercules tire DOT COM Hercules tires. Ride on our strength back on ran out loud time now for our money lion financial crew chief segments. It's presented by money lie in the world's most powerful financial membership money line here we roar this week. We had a chance to catch up with Jimmy. Johnson's crew chief cliff Daniels Dylan. Welsh found him at Las Vegas Motor speedway to tell us about auto club speedway this weekend first of all just logistically speaking for getting out of Daytona and getting everything prepared for not only here but all the West Coast races. What kind of challenge did a Monday night? Race present actually presents a big challenge for all of us in the garage with the preparatory or do we need to do to get our west coast cars. Ready to get sent out Obviously the first season. There's always last minute item. So you're checking over adding or updating on your cars Fortunately everyone at hitter. Motorsports did a great job of getting our cars prepared ahead of time. So Tuesday for sure was a long day but once we got the cars loaded to come here to Las Vegas. We felt really good about them and now like wiser are shop is doing a great job of getting everything. Ready for California and Phoenix coming up and looking to Fontana. You weren't in the crew chief role there last year. What kind of challenge do you anticipate that presenting or what are you kind of keeping your eyes out for as we go there next week. California's such a cool place for for us in the four day just the history of the track for what it means to Jimmy. The success over the years so the challenges are being away. What you need for the straight line speed versus the the group in the corners. The track does have off but obviously it's a two mile track and there's a lot of inherent speed you need to have built into your car so there's a lot that we've been working on to make sure we're prepared and ultimately wants to get on track we'll find out the bumps on the backstretch something we always talk about their How do you compensate for that or can you in any way compensate for those? There's a few things that That you can adjust with with your shocks and you're right heights and how you approach your your springs in your bump stops. We've done a lot of work last year. Trying to improve. Not only the bumps on the back straightaway. Which obscure there that you mentioned. But there's also a lot of bumps in the corners to so handling over the bumps premium. Managing Your ride height control is definitely premium again. All of our engineering staff. Everybody at Hendrick motorsports in a great job of last year's of developing shocks and springs and and things correctly to help in those areas so I will be pretty well prepared with it. Being Jimmy's home track his last race. There as you mentioned what? What are your emotions like? Are you know what does it mean to you to be able to go there? And be the guy calling the shots and his his last trip around there definitely excited and there's GonNa be a lot of really positive energy around. There is a lot of his local fans and even family. They're going to be there. I know he's got a pretty large guest list and just to to be in the moment and into share that excitement with him for the last race for his full-time season at which you would call his home track. It's going to be really cool. I can't wait to get going into the weekend. His feedback is always so cool there. He he'll run low hill. Run high quicker than some guys will just move over the tracks so the way he approaches this a lot of fun. We're different looking forward to it with this package of car and racing that we have what is racing at a two mile track like I mean. It's it's obviously in the middle of the mile and a half and the super speedways that we saw last week. So what are the things that you kind of try to prioritize? You know on the car when you race in a place like that. Yeah a place like California so unique because you have such a high level of fall off on which is great for us because setup come so much into play at a place like Michigan which is a two mile over oval. It's so smooth. And there's so much inherent grip on the. You're really doing everything you can to maximize straight-line speed from your car out Shed drag even the expensive downforce California. You kind of have to have the magic mix of downforce Sandra you have the straight line speed for long straightaways as the run goes on and the pace falls off. Have to make sure you have enough fair. Dame Griffin grip too. So it's really kind of a cool a mix of both worlds for us to be able to approach a track like that and it's GonNa be fun. What's the toughest part of the West Coast swing just the grind of three weeks in a row back and forth coast to coast? The grind of three weeks is tough back and forth. And in one of the most difficult things is obviously. We're going to learn a lot in practice today at Las Vegas so anything that you learned that you WanNa get applied to those cars moving forward. They're already through the system and they're basically the day away from being loaded So it's difficult to adapt quickly if you need to. Sometimes you'll see teams come to the West Coast and have a great west coast swing and that can really You know kind of leapfrogged your season in a positive direction and teams that come in struggle. Early it's hard to get caught up in his heart to adapt so With reparation we've done over the winter. I feel we're going to be you know pretty well prepared and the challenge. Just DEP quickly. If if we need to cliff Daniels from Hendrick motorsports sonar financial crew chief segment this week brought to you by money. Line a timeout. Then Kim Kun joins us here on our end out loud. Next time those engines roar don't just get pumped up get five percent cashback with money. Lion are members. Get five percent cashback on up to two thousand dollars in annual purchases of tickets to NASCAR race from authorized ticket sellers. You'll also get five percent off any attract purchases and all purchases on NASCAR DOT COM. Just use your money line debit card and it couldn't be easier joined the world's most powerful financial membership money line here we roar sir. Are you where you were going? Forty miles an hour. This is a residential area. Sure but I'm on my lawnmower. Wait am I getting a ticket? No I've never seen anyone top nine miles an hour on one of those bad voice and mother attire lawn and thirty seconds. Got Into you. Well it did feel up at Sonoko this morning. At Sonoko we know fuel peak performance. He'd been doing it for American racing for over fifty years fuel. Your Best City wide do countryside. Whatever you drive wherever you go. Hercules tires has the value selection and industry leading warranty to get you there no matter where the rotates you go to. Hercules tire DOT COM. There you can find the nearest authorized Hercules retail location to you plus. You can use the tire tracker to find out which Hercules tire fits your vehicle the best. That's Hercules tire DOT COM Hercules tires. Ride on our strength. Welcome back to out loud. We're joined now by Kim. Kun My former co host on the NASCAR. Live free ratio. I Miss You. Let me say that right off the bat. It's been a little lonely without you but I'm glad you're here today. Let's talk a little bit about the season today. Only two races and so far. What has jumped out most at you to start the season. I think how well penske drivers and teams have transitioned with all the changes that they made over there basically playing musical chairs with everything they possibly could and right out of the Bat. I feel like both Ryan Blaney enjoy and Brad Keselowski have all been very good and very strong both weekends that we've been at the track. I expect the same going into this next weekend and for me. That was the biggest price because again when you change things you never know teams are going to react. People underestimate how important those personal relationships are and how much a team really is a team sport. It's almost like football. Where the coach and the quarterback all the attention but all the other guys make it go to absolutely and then another thing that stands out to me Hendrick motorsports. I think this could be a year where we see. All four of those cars. Get to Victory Lane I don I don't Wanna I don't WanNa change with you. But they've shown speed. I think the new body on the Camaro is working well for them. I know we're only two weeks and I think auto club is going to be very telling if it continues to be a trend of them being fast and running up front or if it's just maybe a fluke or the first two races. I don't know I I think you're probably right. I think they all will have a very good shot at getting the victory lane this year. You mentioned Auto Club. You're going to be out there this weekend. On pit road opening up with practice. Now give folks that idea if they haven't listened to our streaming practice coverage what they can here on those shows. They can hear a lot of fun. We have a lot of fun on the practice shows. But we're covering all the teams we also kind of we then the story lines of the weekend whether it's on track or off track stuff you'll get some fantasy pigs usually jeff Is VERY ADAMANT ABOUT US. Getting our pigs in for the weekend. No you love to do stuff like that. Sometimes you'll get a little bit of history especially of Winston Kelly's out there working the garage or one of those practices and then we always try if we can to get driver interviews and or crew interviews sometimes even an interview with somebody from goodyear or somebody from the engine shop for our team so we always try to get some different voices outside of to add perspective to the practice shows and if nothing else you'll know where people are running without going refresh refresh your at your desk. Yes and you'll know if something went wrong because that does happen from time to time in practice. I hate to say it but I've had care center duty during practice which is usually very unfortunate kind of a downer. 'cause you're talking to somebody after something bad has it wasn't even in a race which. I guess it's probably. That's a better better time to have something go wrong. Then during a risk for sure you've been out there quite a bit southern California California in general because of all the other things you do with with motorcycles and NASCAR and Indycar. What are some of the things that are in that specific that you would have on your must see list must do list? Oh goodness actually took a trip earlier in the year with my mom to Santa Monica. So it's not that far from where we are out at the racetrack and supervision or what was going on. He turns sixty hour so we took like an art trip together. to celebrate her sixtieth birthday but Santa Monica was so laid back compared to every other part of southern California like Los Angeles and Lax. And that whole can be a little Santa. Monica was laid back and peaceful and anything. There is fine. We went to Venice beach and walk. The beach watched some of these skateboarders. Because they've got skateboard parks so that was kind of a refreshing getaway. So if you have the opportunity if you're out there for the auto club race in you're willing to drive a little bit. It's not too far just to kind of catch your breath Santa. Monica was wonderful out of the way from every all the hustle and bustle sure A lot of folks are familiar with glass case emotion. It's been a huge hit. You and and Ryan Blaney among others on the show. What can we expect this season? I hear that you're going to have some. Some new guest hosts along the way. Yup We're back this season actually leaving the studio right after I finished with you to record the first episode. And it'll be a lot of the same we might see some other faces cycle in in the Third host position see but Ryan will be back He's out West right now so Not going to give away. Who might be on the show this week? You'll have to stay tuned but yes last cases back which the fans have been clamoring. I wearing I love you. I love to support but it's nice to finally be in studio to record it into put something out there so they can get what they want now for folks who aren't familiar with and haven't seen it yet. You should be watching if you haven't but it's not you get Ryan on and go now on lap one eighty two. What happened there? That's not how this goes. It's actually very much the opposite. We do talk some racing and if there's something specific that happened on track whether it was an incident or maybe Ryan victory we do talk about that or situational stuff where it's like man. We can't ignore this but it more comes naturally we're not gonNA just force a storyline. That comes from the racetrack just to talk racing. A lot of it's more about like pop culture lifestyle news of the weird. What's happening in our lives? Weird is really cool. You gotta get into that yes. Everybody needs more weird. Weird is good it certainly is now in addition to that as we mentioned you're doing some indycar stuff still. I'm assuming and are you doing the motorcycle stuff again this year. What's what's your schedule looking doing. The indycar off the grid show again this year. It might have a little bit different. Look that's all day so you're just you're just for that. You're just hinting mightily. Lots of hints. So I'm very excited for that. No flat track motorcycle coverage on the docket right now but that doesn't mean I'm not going to be watching. Because a man they they are so much fun to watch the flat track riders. Yeah Yeah I know that when you first started you said. I haven't done anything like this before you came back going. Wow Yeah I mean bar banging their the some of the toughest motorsports athletes out there and it's just so fun to watch them so I still very much keep along with the story lines that are happening in that. Motorsport and I'm starting to wonder if you ever sleep or eat with all filling your schedule but locally in the Charlotte area you're on WCBS in the Mornings. That seemed like it started off a little here a little there but now they they probably have a room for you. There was like a little appetizer. A little snack of me here and there but when I can when I'm not traveling for Nascar or anything else I co host. The eight o'clock hour which is a fun kind of topical our and then I very much fill in for the news reader. Who has to wake up very early and read the news from four thirty to nine? But that's not like permanent. That's just like billing in here. Sleeper. What are we talking about? Somebody's on vacation or tranquilizer darts with your So yeah not recently but it keeps me on my toes and traveling for you know a Marin or any of the other things I'd do it kind of keeps me fresh and gives me a purpose. He's my schedule busy. Busy an understatement. For sure let's circle back now before we wrap up to auto club speedway a worn out. Surface there a lot of speed at that track. It's going to be a little bit of a different animal than what we saw Las Vegas and certainly Daytona as we move further into the season. What things are you going to be keeping an eye on over the next few races and specifically this weekend? I'm really excited about auto club like you said it's one of the older resurfaces we go to it's a two mile track so it's different than both. Daytona in Las Vegas. I hope we see some of what we saw in Las Vegas. Though because man I was surprised isn't the right word but just so excited about how good the racing was in Las Vegas. The restarts crazy we saw you know greenland passing. We saw racing and so I hope we see some of that this weekend to at auto club and I'm just looking to see if Joe Gibbs is going to position themselves kind of out of a little bit of a whole I feel like they're in these on Vegas now obviously Denny Hamlin went out and won the Daytona five hundred but I think you have to separate daytona apples and oranges tone. Then the season starts in terms of getting to really look at a thermometer of how teams are going and Vegas there were. No Toyota's Toyotas period not just jobs in the top ten which we haven't seen that in a very very long time so just seeing if they kind of rebound Greenwich trucks did have a Good Vegas. Ron had that incident but kind of see how they rebound because cobb Bush won the article embrace last year. Kind of seeing where they shuffle out and then I wanna see some good stuff from Jimmy Johnson this weekend. I think he's right there knocking on the door. I think he is. I think he and cliff are gelling not that. They weren't gelling before but they finally got into a rhythm. We saw great speed from them in both the Daytona five hundred and then in Las Vegas top. I'm finished and then you look at Jimmy. He's a six time winner at Auto Club speedway and Man. If he could just game if he could just have a walk off at auto club it would be so cool and I think Shannon the girls are doing the commander so there seems like there's going to be a lot of good synergy there so I'm very much looking forward to auto club to see if what we saw at Vegas in terms of people that were up front and people that have been fast if that trend for all those different storylines continues going to be a lot of fun to watch We got a schedule coming up this weekend. On Motor Racing Network at Auto Club speedway Friday afternoon practice starts at four o'clock eastern time. Kim will be on that first. Practice session also Friday and other practice session on the Cup side at five thirty eastern Saturday Cup series qualifying. Also Saturday three thirty eastern time. The xfinity raise the production alliance group. Three hundred CAM will be on pit road for that one on Sunday. The auto club four hundred two thirty eastern time Kim again on pit road for that. I'll be hosting the NASCAR live pre race show on that Sunday as well. Make sure you're with us for all those check dot com for complete schedule information and we. WanNa thank money lion and Hercules tire for joining us on out loud as every single week and we hope to see you right back here next week.

Las Vegas Las Vegas Motor speedway Auto Club California Auto Club speedway NASCAR Jimmy Johnson NASCAR Ford Daytona Ryan Blaney Hendrick motorsports California Matt Benedetto Matt Kim Kun Mustang baseball NASCAR Hercules retail North Carolina
Ep. 2: Save Our State

This is California: The Battle of 187

25:42 min | 11 months ago

Ep. 2: Save Our State

"It's early November nineteen ninety-four about a month after those white boys yelled one eighty towards eating Jimmy Chunga just kicking it under big trees in our usual spot all of a sudden some guy I know I don't know where leaves a quad with his backpack like no there's going to be police and I'm a nerd so I don't want to ditch school I might get in trouble you guys do it like whatever girls help each other put their feet are doing the same across California people at school had whispered for weeks that it was going to happen we have the power we're doing something about it I look for my friends on TV they're they're to the haters like Oh using US Mexicans are taking over well here and this is the battles one eighty seven is the first story on our new podcast the tone for political debate in California a voter initiative is likely to be on the November the number ballot one eighty-seven residents angry about the idea of tax payer money going to quote unquote illegal immigrants you've families wouldn't be able to go to the hospital except for emergencies the first polls showed support for it by Latino voters voters supported it they felt somehow threatened by this new huge offers when he was just two years old and he'd always tried his best to fit in growing well we wanNA bring Baloney sandwiches because all the message from our teachers was being Mexican was bad. It's an one eighty-seven is on the agenda The so-called save our state initiative from what for me I'm a threat to you like I'm a law abiding citizen I'm going to or he learns about one eighty-seven Angrier still gets he decides to figure out how words of students in a crash course on how to fight one eighty-seven here's material here's ways to stop save our state the one eighty seven committee in Orange County is finding its little experiment ripped do not get into a race war with anybody you're debating this is not about race cut this guy in NPR's morning edition Nineteen ninety-four a San Mateo resident named John. Richardson Goal You have twenty to thirty guys that will literally bum rush your car if you stop or not they sit out was to move to my neighborhood today I wouldn't buy the place I turn around and walk out that's around and in one thousand nine hundred four Gloria Molina is an La county supervisor one about me it was about people like me I was the one that was going to be asked just because of sponsor ability to oppose one eighty-seven and thinks it'll be easy to stop so she forms uh it was a very very difficult task almost impossible task and she surprised to learn normally reliable democratic donors and politicians name associated people were intimidated dots how popular one eighty-seven was powerful people in California and back then she was pretty tough on the border patrol agents new fencing lighting equipment in October nineteen ninety-four finds portrays herself as a martyr going so far as to claim the decision might cost her the Election Gloria Molina was upset at Feinstein for waiting until the last minute to oppose one eighty seven would you tell her or did you meet with her doctor at all during our have decided never could be his ticket to reelection for most of his career Pete Wilson was actually not stereotyped these he was a US senator who try to make it easier for farmers to bring in migrant workers a normal middle of the road Republican but then when he started we'll help push California into a twenty billion dollar deficit in the next decade take more than they give Wilson recommended denying education and health care to illegal immigrants in nineteen ninety-four Wilson's Democratic challenger Kathleen Brown the daughter of former California so a month before one eighty seven qualifies for the ballot he runs this commercial coming the images lots of people presumably Mexican immigrants running across the border hard to help the border patrol but that's not all I'm suing to force the federal government to control the coming the US Mexico border or something trying to storm a castle Lord of the rings including from two people you might not expect Barbara and Bob Kiley from the one eighty seven campaign the only that but it's racist you know why it was racist coming Saves Pete Wilson although he would officially endorse one eighty seven until September. The one eighty-seven resistance tries one last move stay with US across the globe at the L. A. Times we report the story of California because it will shape election day is right around the corner things are looking good for one eighty-seven polls show on November slight edge over Kathleen Brown and Latino activists are getting nervous they feel Democrats personally here another Latino activists decide to strike back with the only weapon the plan is to get those affected by one eighty seven undocumented immigrants and their friends and family L. A. It's sunny not too hot I remember fooling now says up Trophies Avenue which connects east La to the rest of Los Angeles else drop to the ground because the people came out there responded to City Hall fifth-generation Chicano Students Today Laborers who recently crossed the border they joined the Latinos in Los Angeles stumbles into and so as we marched new hearing the chance here in the cheers here in the music I mean she was just bursting with pride and just excitement I remember after that we went to Kentucky remember that this was something what impress clippings and news footage from that day something right here's Gloria Molina then Anneli county

California Gloria Molina Pete Wilson US Jimmy Chunga Orange County Kathleen Brown NPR Los Angeles La county San Mateo federal government City Hall Richardson L. A. Times Chicano Students Today Laborer Bob Kiley supervisor east La
Bonus Episode: Re-Pete

This is California: The Battle of 187

55:33 min | 11 months ago

Bonus Episode: Re-Pete

"From The Los Angeles Times Studios. I'm disturbed wedding handle and you're listening to a special bonus. Episode of this is California. The Battle of one eighty-seven. We're here to have a ten o'clock with Pete Wilson. If you haven't listened to the first three parts of our podcast I knew it right now for travel. They'll tell you about proposition one eighty-seven a nine hundred ninety four California ballot initiative that targeted illegal immigrants and change the state forever over and it affects a national debate. The issue even today former California governor. Pete Wilson played a big role in setting the stage for one. eighty-seven AH tried to arrange an interview with him for months to ask him questions that have been bothering me forever. Like who created that crazy. FAKE KEEP COMING AD and undocumented minute immigrants like my father ruined California well the day our podcast got released. We finally got a date on the calendar. So here I am at Wilson's law offices says with my producer Abby Swanson to have that conversation so tell us where we are. We're in century city. Were going to go meet. Pete Wilson to who do an interview that we've been working on for months and let's see how it goes and thank you three security guards who get to Pete Wilson. We go up to the twenty eighth floor and we just a couple of minutes on white leather couch before Wilson Secretary comes out to greet us. You must be happy abby. How are you Gustav? Yeah sorry governor. How's it going good unless you good? Yeah what do you want. What do you make of? Yeah out of the heat we can then we get going. I asked the governor who's eighty six now to introduce himself he does and then I'll be honest. The first twenty minutes of our conversation version are kind of wonky. Lotta history stuff but after that it gets lengthy I ended up spending an hour and a half with Pete so we edited the conversation for lengthened clarity Freddie and I'll also pop in every once in a while to offer some commentary or corrections after the fact. Thank you so much for allowing this to be able to happen. Obviously you see you've read my stories about prop one eighty seven. I just want to hear your stories. I also asked mostly questions. Maybe I'll ask for your opinions on some things but mostly I really want to get your record on one eighty-seven not just wanting to seven but your career on illegal immigration so actually want to start with four incidents from early in your career career that I think is going to surprise a lot of people who don't like you so the very first incident I could find about you involving illegal. Immigration was in nineteen seventy three. When when I think there was a lawsuit that allowed San Diego sheriffs and police to be able to arrest people if they thought they were undocumented? Do you remember that. No nineteen seventy thousand. Nine hundred seventy three would have been statute that you would have been mayor of San Diego at the time and there was this controversy. Where cabdriver ever were being told to report anyone that they thought were documented to the sheriff's Department or the police and you actually came out against that you had an issue with that uh-huh I don't remember it but it sounds like you? Yeah I can think of others but I'll accept that one I just I don't I don't remember it time out. It makes sense that Wilson wouldn't remember that incident. You originally met with activists about the issue but then they denounced him as uncaring carrying. They ended up suing San Diego over the police abuse. Back to date. Okay so that was one incident the other incident. I think you'll remember more. Apparently there were gangs on the. US Mexico Mexico border exploiting and beating up undocumented immigrants lying in wait for them and you actually asked that the police and sheriffs and the fads of course come in and help out those undocumented immigrants. So you can you take us back to that time I can because it was a really a nasty situation we had thugs lying in wait on the. US side of the border waiting for these poor immigrants to come across and when they they did come across you know they were really the victims of well of real atrocities. I mean ray robbery. In some cases pretty close is to murder. Will the interesting thing was that on the San Diego Police Department there were as you would expect a number of Latino officers and and one day the city manager came to Manny said. Some of our guys are really pretty high under the collar about what's going on down at the border and I said well I'd like to hear from him so so I did and I sub subsequently said we will allow volunteers to go to the border in anticipate these thugs who were lying in. Wait and who are actually coming across from Tijuana lying in wait for the poor immigrants who were coming up through the border and he said well you know there is likely to be some shooting. He said these people who are lying in wait are thugs. They are beating up people raping them in. That's why our guys WanNa be there and I said they have my permission and frankly my encouragement because their role on this side of the border is to preserve order and to deal with dogs with whatever forces required and we had some great great guys about a dozen of them and they went down and cleaned that ALP in short order they got into a firefight. I saw that clip. Yeah and after that there were no more thugs lying in. Wait on this side of the the border did that happen within the jurisdiction of San Diego. Yeah why why was that important to you to support those Police officers because I dislike thugs that prey upon innocent people. That's ends at number two or at least from your record the third one I know. Of course you'll remember the Ku Klux Klan Dan in nineteen seventy seven they announced. Hey your face has already like a they announced. WE'RE GONNA go to your we're going to basically be on the US Mexican border. We're going to deter people coming across the border and you say no you actually ask the feds to do everything possible within their legal power to keep them awake. Do you remember that. uh-huh talk a little bit about that. Well in the first place I am not a respecter of the Ku Klux Klan. Never have been never will be and end. The fact of the matter is that they were in a different fashion a very different fashion admittedly going to create a situation. That was violent down there. They were not police officers. They were not people who I trusted in terms of their judgment. I wanted people down there who were responsible and who had no ax to grind other than performing law enforcement. You just one of the border patrol there. Obviously that's right no other citizens groups or anything like that least of all the KKK. That's right what did you have any interaction with the clan in yourself with David Duke. Did he ever try to reach out to you and try to convince you otherwise. No I think he knew better I. It's interesting because I saw a clip in one thousand nine or you you know. Read a newspaper clipping. I think it was seventy eight where you're thinking of running for governor there In California you went to the Mexican American Political Association Russian seeking their endorsement and talked about Your interaction with the clan and I believe the quote was I told them to get the hell out of here in the audience cheered you. That's I think you've probably accurate was reported at the time. So I don't think I I don't think they would have said otherwise. So what ended up happening with the Klan. Did they end up showing showing up there. I don't think so at the end of everything now. No they were effectively discouraged. Yeah time out. Actually the clan went to the California Mexico border near San Diego Multiple Times into the nineteen eighties. Got National attention back to tape then. The fourth incident This is happening in the early eighties. I think the mayor. But you're probably going to turn senator soon but this is involving Simpson Rubino and you had an issue with penalizing being employers who knowingly hired undocumented immigrants and you had a problem with that. Do you remember that well what I remember is that I had a problem with. Employer is being penalized for unknowingly hiring them and having no reasonable means of being able to identify them. Once I was in the Senate I can recall coming into lax on a weekend. I'd been contacted by Some federal federal officials. And they said would you be willing to have a meeting with them at the airport and it will take no more than probably probably fifteen minutes and I said what's the purpose they said. Well they really WanNa show you something that I think you will be interested in because it's directly relevant to the very problem that you were just discussing now so I said I will be happy to meet with them so I came in was met by them and they said Senator Senator. We're not gonNA delay you long but we do want to show you something that we think will interest you so they led me to a room where there was a table about at this. Is I'd say it's about Three and a half four feet wide but ten feet long piled high. I mean I'd say about three feet high. Maybe more of driver's licenses social security cards. All all manner of ide- yeah filled with documents high. The guy turned to me and he said Senator Have Adam Adam and I said if you can tell the real ones from the fakes. You're a better man than I am. And better than any technology we've got and his point was as if you're GONNA put legislation on the table that holds small businessmen farmers growers accountable than it's only fair to them that there be a means whereby they can determine whether someone is or isn't he said these fake. ID's their damn good. He said if you go down town into Macarthur Park for thirty five dollars you can buy one of these. I said I get the point so anyway. Anyway that continued to be a problem until far later but And it was primarily actually a problem with growers ores who had become dependent on people coming north to harvest one crop after another all away from San San Diego to the Canadian border. Last crop was apples in Washington. Now they were obviously the people who needed the money who were willing to work hard and this has been going on for years with no oversight and they would come up stay through the harvest. Whatever crop was earliest and then states right through the apples in Washington and then go back home and come back the next year? Bitterly opposed list by labor unions. Why do you think they did? Because they didn't want the competition and frankly because I I think they were guilty of some racism. They they didn't want to take them into their unions. They just didn't want them around timeout. A January Fourth Nineteen eighty-three Los Angeles Times. Article Stated Wilson. Wilson was quote especially troubled by immigration. Bill that would quote impose sanctions on employers who knowingly hire illegal aliens. His opposition rested on his claim aimed at the bill would discriminate against minorities back to tape. So we talked about all these different incidents of your past and other reading older clippings from the seventies you engaged in active conversations with the mayor of the The president of Mexico Lopez for deal talking about how to how to solve this issue of illegal immigration. So I think for a lot of people who have cast you as anti immigrant warrior to hear this history where you're actually helping out undocumented documented imigrants by getting the police to help them out not get assaulted by trying to be in conversations with Mexican officials. I think a lot of people would be surprised by that. Why do you think that history history of yours has been forgotten at least in the popular imagination? It hasn't been forgotten. It's been never known there were occasionally stories I remember one. The new mirror of Tawana at invited me to come to the inauguration ceremony and I had done so and there was a photo graph on the the front page of the Union. Sandy a union of us in an Rosza and I got about five or six pieces of hate mail for for you and engaging in a hug with him yeah right auto boss was press secretary and he said what he wanted to about. I said trash. I'm not even going to bother responding. I also read somewhere. That at one point the seventies you were taking Spanish lessons twice a week. Did any of that stick. He's headed right now so I have to ask no because I tried and found that. I've got a good here. Yeah but the rules of Grammar Emmer conjugated verbs all loans. It's a little bit too hard for all of us so you have a record of wanting to help understanding the situation and try to find find solutions that seemed to at least include both the Mexican side event Chicano activists. I mean. You're going to map I and you're talking about your situation. So then you flash forward to nineteen ninety-three when you throw down the gauntlet you say okay. The federal government has not done its job on a legal immigration. I think we should end birthright citizenship ship. I think we should deny public services to undocumented immigrants I think we should deny public education to undocumented immigrants. Some of these got into proposition. When at seven others like end birthright citizenship didn't it seems to me to completely diametrically opposed ways to solve this issue of immigration? Do you think you changed or no. I didn't change at all but I think your basic premise is mis dated. Because it wasn't that the federal government was not doing its job job to the contrary not only were they not doing the job. Adequately in terms of securing the border to the contrary they had mandated very expensive services upon the state's state and local tax payers to provide the services to provide education to provide provide healthcare. My God healthcare had mushroomed. I mean in the six months from the six months six years from the Cobra legislation. That made it possible for illegal immigrants to enter the country. Eighteen year old women pregnant go to the county hospital have prenatal care have delivery post delivery postnatal care and the children were were of course citizens that to me was wrong. There were two separate issues. One was that the services were tremendously expensive and you had congress virtue signaling and more but at the expense of state and local local taxpayers. And I said you know something if you're going to mandate the services then you ought to pay for them as the federal government. I mean you're going to be hitting some of the same people but you're going to at least be spreading it all over the country and I said and what you're gonNA find out is if you don't don't do a better job of controlling the border it is going to be all over the country and in no time by that time already. We had no idea how many eight people were in the country illegally but we had a pretty good idea by the time I became governor. Two thirds of all the babies born born in California. They were born to illegal immigrant parents at that time. Time out for one thousand nine hundred ninety. The Pew Hispanic Center estimates the number of births to undocumented. Mothers nationwide was ninety. Five thousand the total number births in California that year with six hundred twelve thousand and for the state's Department of Health Services. I never did good in math but even I know ninety. Five thousand isn't two thirds of six hundred twelve thousand back to tape the estimate uh-huh of the illegal population living in Los Angeles alone was six hundred thousand which then exceeded the population of Washington Ashington. DC These were people who were frankly living shadows. That was wrong. I mean what you'd want is is immigration legal immigration where people become naturalized citizens where they are required to learn the language bridge and that allows them and their children to become first class citizens to become assimilated to be able to participate anticipate in both the culture and the commerce of their adopted country. And that wasn't happening time out. I Guess Pete didn't get the irony. Ah I the son of an illegal immigrant was talking to him in English back to tape. We'll get to that part in a little bit. But I think your statements on illegal immigration immigration from the seventies even as a senator into the nineteen nineties. It just seemed a little bit more heated at least from the outside. It seemed like. Here's a guy. Pete Wilson who has spent spent most of his political career dealing with this issue of illegal immigration ESPEC- typically as as mayor. Then as a senator now that you're governor of California California's recession you're like I'm pulling my hair out on this. I gotta do something bigger at least really make the issue bigger bigger than it's ever been at least for me politically. I was doing that early. If did you look back. Ironically considering what has followed the New York Times actually ran an editorial saying we agree three that it is unfair for state tax payers and local taxpayers to be stuck with the costs of federally mandated services. New York. Times time out. This is true but the editorial also warned about demonizing immigrants. which did I mention here back to take New York Times a lot of publications twenty five years ago? It's it's interesting. How much things flip around when it made sense make sense then when when did you first hear about was save? Our state then became proposition when eighty-seven sometime in probably early. Nineteen ninety. Four what did you think about it because again with a lot of what one eighty-seven proposed where things you had proposed a year before except asking the federal government to do so and suing for that. That's right you're better informed than most because we in fact did sued the federal government not successfully. Yeah so what did you think about one eighty seven then when you heard about it well I was not surprised I mean it was not the first time I had heard people complaining in fact one of the interesting thing is that when Bill Clinton having been elected president came to San Diego he held sort of a town hall meeting Out I think one of the television stations someone stood up in a question and answer period and was irate about the unfairness of the situation that then existed that people could come across the border and take advantage of services and that the state and local tax spares were paying for them and Bill Clinton's response was. I couldn't agree with you more absolutely right by. Golly we'll get to the bottom of that crowd-pleasing answer got loud applause. Accordingly reports nothing happened for a while and and then they had a change of heart publicly. No longer agreed with that questioner. Yeah with the one eighty seven campaign. It's interesting because you didn't actually endorse until I believe. September during the Republican convention the Greenwich to the State Convention and what urged not to buy my campaign staff. Why were they doing that? Well their attitude was we could tell from Not only our own own internal polling but also from a story in the Los Angeles Times that showed that with the exception exception of one issue. I can't remember which one it was. We were a ahead substantially ahead of Kathleen on every other issue issue and especially with male voters but with essentially everybody They said listen. You're ahead you'RE GONNA win. Don't don't do this because you're going to be introducing a new issue and so far it's been out of the issues covered in in this race. It hasn't been one and you will make it one and you know damn it. It's not your responsibility. You didn't draft after this thing you introduce it and so why in the world should you get into it. Run that risk. I said because I'm the governor of California Orange and it is something that will dramatically affect my state and the potential that we have is to finally get Washington's attention. Did you think one eighty seven seven would succeed in terms of like would it ever be initiated into law. Because we did. I did okay now. The only reason I ask. Because you said it's gotta get Washington's attention implying that at least it's an attention grabber but it's probably not going to accomplish anything legalistically just because it will probably be sued out of court. No and that's not. What actually really happened either? One of the things that annoys me is that one of the reasons to pursue. It was the plyler case timeout. Oh really quick. Player versus doe was Nineteen Eighty two supreme court decision to allow undocumented students to use public education in Texas and the opponents of illegal immigration in have long headed back to tape and it was a poor case and frankly Texas did a poor job of presenting their case and it was a Brennan indecision in a very different court than was then sitting at the time. That one eighty-seven came up. So I said I will tell you why this is an opportunity for us to get all the way to the Supreme Court and reverse plyler and if we can do that it will be the thing that turns the corner. You're on getting the Congress of the United States to understand that it is their responsibility as federal legislators to pay for what they are mandating on the states. Yeah so we're talking about one eighty seven and it's interesting you said that the campaign said don't do one eighty seven. We haven't even addressed the issue but in May your campaign releases the day. Keep coming at the keep coming. Two million illegal immigrants in California. The federal government won't stop them. The border yet requires us to pay billions to take care of them. Talk a little bit about Who who thought of the idea for that Ad? Well I think the idea was pretty obvious. Yes and I had a challenge of sorts. Not much of one in the primary and that was an issue then and my opponent the primary was on the other side runs. Ron didn't make much of an impression but you know timeout. UN's was against one eighty-seven and has spent a year since trolling Wilson on his website. The UN's review back to tape so anyway that was why we did it and to draw attention to the differences and what has happened. And you're you just pointed me in one respect. Okay that is you. I think probably because you were in high school then and later as a reporter went to the files and saw the same thing that I have read time and again about the grainy Phil well they keep coming was simply a statement of fact It was not pejorative but it was a statement of fact and the Grainy of film was I n s film taken with a night vision. Camera to graining. Yeah so you don't think that was racist no adult it was a statement of fact. What's interesting to me about that? Is I talked in my podcast talked to Barbara. I'm Bob Kiley. The consultants behind one eighty-seven and they said they thought it was racists that when they saw it there ause drop. I don't think it did our group any good or are 'cause yeah because now all of a sudden it's tied specifically civically to this idea of an invasion right. No racist a racist boy. It was racist than they said is probably going to help. Pete Wilson's campaign but it's not gonNA help Arkansas's now all of a sudden race has been injected into a conversation that was supposed to be about numbers legal versus illegal. So what would be your response to that. My response is if they were consultants consultants during their fees. Because in fact what I intended to do was to make it clear that this was a real problem and a problem of growing magnitude hundred fact at some point during the campaign probably several points. I said Ed if this does not succeed if we do not get the feds attention and peak them into some kind of responsible action Action then what is now. A problem for the border states will be one for all the states it will spill over I into the south health and then into the mid West. Yeah can you see why people think that adds racist though will take someone like myself or a lot of people whose parents did come to this this country illegally and then they see footage with the voice they keep coming almost as it's a bad thing so in the minds of some people that are like that they is us. So can you at least see why people think it's racist. You don't have to agree with that statement but yeah well I don't ever obviously and what I think that people. Oh who were here. Who are offended by that might think did not alter the facts and the fact word that there were also in California in a great many naturalized Latinos who were doing just fine who were building businesses? I mean the small all business owners and people who went into the professions. We're the ones who had been natural. The ones who were still living in shadows shadows were not they were not citizens and they were not going to be. Life was probably better for them here than in Mexico. Many any of them were sending money home. I mean foreign-exchange coming back into Mexico. was a major source of foreign exchange. And I thought frankly the Mexican in government was totally hypocritical. Because here they were creating situations and they've had resources I mean. They had a lot of resources. I was not looking to them for help. I mean I had very good relations with the border governors in particular with the governor of Bah. Aw Yeah at one point even thought that he might be in some physical peril he and his family and I called him and I said listen if that it is the case call me and we will engage in a rescue so if people were offended. That wasn't the purpose What what was the purpose was to get them to realize that there was indeed a problem and that it was gonna get quickly worse and worse? I this is the question. I've asked everyone that I've interviewed for this. Do you think at the end of everything here. We are twenty five years later proposition. One eighty-seven one yet one eighty-seven not only one but won by Orlando. Of course I'm talking about the bigger metaphorical picture. Did one eighty seven win. Well if you mean did it achieve its purpose no because because it was not thrown out by the courts now declared unconstitutional than Gray Davis decided not to appeal or reach into an agreement with plaintiffs. And said we're we're just not going to peel the NFL. Zor was the District Court judge and she after about a year. I mean we knew it would be suit would be filed all the next day after the election. Yeah that was not. That was not a surprise. It was an expectation. I said get busy because because it's going to be a court battle the thing that really enrage me though it was she allowed it to languish in her on her desk for three a year. Yeah when that happened. I anticipated that they would have been perfectly happy in her court and elsewhere to let it languish right past the end of my service anticipating that we had an offer from the Pacific Legal Foundation to take over the role of representing the majority of voters. who had voted for one eighty-seven so we petitioned and the ninth circuit for permission for them to be substituted for me? They denied that with one of the more fatuous opinions uh-huh ever rendered and one that I thought was in palpable bad faith. They said we think. Governor Wilson is entirely competent to represent. The people and I said so do I but I'm not going to be here in a year. You think those were all delays on purpose by her and even the ninth district. Yes I do. Why do you think they were delaying? Because they were politically opposed. But they're supposed to be impartial judges they are supposed to be so okay. So one eighty eighty seven obviously passes then get str- well however you want to describe it obviously objectively it dies in the courts because Gray Davis decides. It's not to appeal the case. Now we have California where now. Wait a minute okay. He didn't that was not what he decided through his campaign for governor he said I deplore it but I will abide by the expressed will of the voters until he didn't he had a change of heart. Yeah and the change of of heart resulted in what I thought to be a sham mediation. Maybe it wasn't on his part. Maybe it was heartfelt. But in any any case there was what purported to be a mediation I thought it a sham because frankly the attitude of people people on both sides was the same the respondents and the appellants. Yeah but the ninth circuit sanctioned. So how how would you characterize. Victor is then one eighty-seven the official lawsuit. Seven had gone all the way up. I think that it would have been overturned in by the Supreme Court. I was quite confident of that because it was a different court. Yeah so what did. Grave is due to one eighty-seven then how would you describe the eventual angel fate of one eighty-seven the eventual fate of one eighty. Seven is that the people were cheated of their day in court. Okay so one eighty-seven day cheated in court. Now you see California. Twenty twenty five years later and what has happened in. The interval was sampled in the campaign. In the last two months of the ninety four election in which there was the damnedest barrage of press coverage that I have ever seen in all of it. Negative against you and one eighty seven. Yeah Yeah of course up next the rest of my conversation with former California Governor Pete Wilson. That's after this short break. Hi I'm Mark Golsen I'm host of the real it's entertainment and culture podcast. We make here at the La Times if you like hearing about the entertainment industry with Pop Culture News and all the latest from Hollywood you you should check out the show. I talked with actors writers directors and producers. Plus you'll hear straight from our distinguished film and television reporters and critics. Subscribe up to the real on apple podcasts. Or ever. You're listening right now and we're back with my conversation with Pete Wilson. As you heard an episode three California's Latino Keno Legislative Caucus released a short film to coincide with the twenty fifth anniversary of prop one eighty seven done. But we want to say thank you governor. We'll send now on this twenty fifth anniversary of proposition one eighty-seven we have a roadmap for the entire country to follow a road map on how to fight back against racist xenophobic policies. And an opportunist leader one person at a time. Thank you Pete Wilson. Thank you Pete Wilson. Thank you Pete Wilson. Oh and happy anniversary so I asked me about the video. Twenty five years later Democrats Control Roll Supermajority of the Chambers of the legislature. You saw that video. I'm sure at that point where they thank you. Do you think it's fair. Or how do you feel that. So many Latinos directly of credit one eighty-seven and your campaign against illegal immigration as inspiration for them to enter political life to frankly become radicalized. Well I think that they were well aware as where the democratic professionals that. When you're out of office you're out of office? But the people who were you're willing and able to make a different decision on the part of Californians where the people who control the Financial Dole Capability who had the financial capability. Let's just look at what has happened to California sense and you'll see how it's affected many political legal issues in the first place. The legislature has become overwhelmingly democratic supermajority. Yeah and how. How did that happen? Well okay the first thing is that if you look at the two parties one has had the financial backing backing of public employee unions on the other hand though. We're talking about unions. But I'll give you the example of my cousins my cousins they belong there. Construction Workers Blue blue-collar Oliver Dad's came to this country without papers. All my cousins are basically they should be Republicans they do not like taxes. They do not like snowflakes six or not social justice warriors. All they think about the Republican Party is what happened in one thousand nine hundred eighty four they think about you and in their minds they remember okay a generation Asian ago. We were told that our people ourselves were destroying California. I don't believe that I'm going to vote for the Democrats even though I don't want to would be your response to my cousins who feel feel that way that they have been misinformed. They have been misled that they have been told by the Democratic Party that they are being discriminated against by racists. That's been the line. And that's there's been no. Subtlety and that is one of the things that I find beneath. East contempt to deliberately mislead people like your cousins who are good people but who have been taught something that is untrue true. They've been taught that they are surrounded by racists on the other hand though some of my cousins were undocumented you propose them not going to public schools and then people like myself Alf not being able to American citizenship because her parents were undocumented. So at what point are we supposed to believe you when you say we have been misled and I'm not saying races aces but with all that rhetoric you can see entire generation of people who came up with that families being undocumented like hey maybe we have an issue with Governor Wilson. Sure I can see that. Because that's that's all they knew that's what they had been told repeatedly and it's untrue but that's what they knew but you did want a to ban birthright citizenship and deny undocumented children from what live long. That's what I wanted. Yeah because what we wanted needed and what the people who had done it the right way wanted I mean no one was more than Latinos who had become naturalized charlize citizens. They resented others being able to cut to the head of the line will like my family. Yeah so then. What would be your response to our family like You're hearing this. You didn't do it the right way. You're ruining California your net either. Today that by the way is exactly the message that we put out out in the campaign with a spot that citizen silent one that yeah I remember. That's right else. Island was in San Diego a lot of statue of Liberty. That's what I remembered. It's how this country was build. American citizenship is treasure beyond measure. But now the rules are being broken. There's a right way. There's a wrong way to reward the wrong way is not the American Way Pete. Wilson has had the courage to say enough is enough the ad that we ran said that there's a right way and a wrong way to come to America so those of us who came the wrong where our families did. What are we supposed to take that from the one eighty seven campaign and you're talk about illegal immigration? Who are still? You're in California a lot of them now who are in Sacramento a lot of them saying hey right well what I said to them. The other day was when they would. They rather snarky message. Thanked me I said you damn well should thank me because if it had not been for my challenge that changed in the redistricting in California from a setup deal oh by the democratic committees in both houses of reapportionment that splintered lead Tino communities and put minorities readies into what we're democratic districts that reelected white male Democrat incumbents than they were there would be no Latino caucus to speak of. It would have a lot fewer members Timeout I asked California Assembly Speaker. Anthony Don about this his response quote. It's a new redistricting. That Wilson forced helped us get elected. You can bet that was not his intent. He continues to show that with his disdainful petulant. Petulant remarks back to tape. How do you feel about charges Donald Trump's campaign or issue on illegal immigration is just a repeat of what you allegedly did twenty five years ago. Well it's not the same in terms of tone. We made a concerted sorted effort and I challenge the members of the Latino caucus and everybody else in every time I have ever challenged them to find one word that could be construed as racism in the campaign four one eighty seven they have been unable to do so and they come back to the they keep coming. That's right yeah that's right. Well you know unhappily that was a statement of fact and in the the twenty years since then it has been proven at twenty five years since then that prediction has been proven true. And it's unfortunate. Listen we as the nation are the most generous in terms of welcoming immigrants of any country in the world. We welcome them because as we need them we value them. You know those who have come. From other countries in earlier waves of immigration have not always been welcomed. Welcome far from it. Most of them have most of them have not three of my four grandparents were immigrants to this country. I'm damn grateful hateful. They had the Moxie to come. It was not easy. My maternal grandmother came at the age of sixteen and Sturridge by herself. So so I not only am not anti immigrant never have been but to the contrary value the continuing doing energy Dr Guts. The talent that has been brought to this country by people who came as legal emigrants and the Daca kids. That's a little different. What do you think about the DACA kids? I think they came because they were children because their the parents hoping for a better life for them brought them the problem with Dhaka. Is it if you recognize the Daca kids and I would. The problem is is that once. You grant amnesty. You encourage future illegal immigration and that is what this comes down to. It really really is Ronald Reagan. Did it after he did it. He regarded as one of the well meaning but serious mistakes that he had made a timeout. This is a conservative urban legend. There's no direct quote by Reagan on this and both Reagan's son Michael and former Attorney General Edwin meese. Ace had denied Reagan ever expressed such sentiment back to tape going back to trump's tone. You don't agree with the tone that he takes. Well he is walked back from it. But I mean you know. He used the word rapists well unhappily there have been some. There have been murderers. There are bad people. I mean in and nineteen ninety-four using at least two year whole statistics. One of the series costs was incarceration of people who had did not only entered the country illegally. They had subsequently committed a felony that landed them in state presents. The number was one in I five at the time today. It's one in four Timeout California Department of Corrections records. Show that in twenty eighteen. The estimated foreign born population Asian in its facilities was just thirteen point. Five percent back to tape our. They're good people. Obviously most of the people who have come. Tom Are good decent people but there are some who have come the wrong way and he is focused on them. But he wouldn't disagree with that I. I don't think yeah well. He's also now trying to clamp down a legal legal immigration period as well. How do you want Californians to remember you when it comes to the issue of illegal legal immigration? Well most of them are not going to remember me. Maybe maybe not remember me at all and because politics is not exactly remember Johnson so someone will somewhat mostly historians final question and again I thank you for all this. What would be the message? So you had the message for Californians. What would be the message for Latinos like myself? We are now a plurality in the state especially those those of us who came either without papers or parents were here as illegal immigrants. What is a message that you have as a former governor of California will my message to Latinos in this date? Is that many of them. Most I would say are learning the hard way the smart thing for them to do is do not trust the judgment of what are now super majorities in the legislature and and a succession of democratic governors. Because and I sight as the evidence for that the number of people who are leaving the state and the number number of jobs that have left the state for many years now for decades my my lesson to them as the same thing that drove out a lot a lot of Republicans Californians to other states. Texas has been campaigning here for years. Tennessee and Tennessee. And all of the Western States Idaho Montana a lot of having a lot of them. Don't want Californians coming in but many have have we've lost over a million people as this article in the Los Angeles Times the other day documented citing the legislative analysts. Do you think one eighty seven Ventimiglia created the California today. It certainly helped. Yeah and frankly the California we have today needs fixing desperately needs. It's fixing because otherwise we're going to continue and you talk about inequality the people that are coming in. Eighty five percent of them are going to three three or four counties in the beary and those counties are rich. The rest of the state is not so rich given that the Latinos in the State Caucus Caucus are so super progressive. Do you think they're part of your legacy. They're part of the legacy they thank you. Well they thanked a a with a very snotty little commercial and what they need to understand is that for Republicans and independence and a lot of Democrats a lot more. Listen the vote for one eighty-seven by the way wasn't just Republicans. It was an awful lot of independence and a lot of Democrat. Is he nine forty one. In fact at one point there was a report I believe by the Los Angeles Times that a majority of Latino voters in the state. I think you're yeah. Story made that point were for it. And then at the end seventy three percent voted against it. Well heads because every day hey every day. They were being told that they were victims of racism. That is an ugly smear in an untrue smear that is is why I think it beneath contempt a lot of people when they hear this. They're going to be angry at me because they said you had the chance to interview. Pete Wilson and you didn't screaming cream in his face that he supposedly racist on the other hand. A lot of people will be also be upset at us saying you actually granted an interview to someone who said all these bad the things about you. They're wrong. I welcome the opportunity to have this discussion. And it's because I think that what is most important is that people do do understand that they are not surrounded by a racist and that a lot of people who disagree are not racist they are people who frankly have been made so uncomfortable. They've left the state. That's what this story was all about. And if they're going to be angry at you you know I would have to say okay this. You're the one kid in high school who stayed in class while all the others were cutting class for what they thought was in necessary. The Enterprise it took some guts on your part to do that not to be like all the others. Congratulations but then I'm the one who then create entire career out of writing against one eighty seven everything else so in some ways I thank you would. Yeah you sure. But it's high time you got over it really because has again when I hear about illegal immigration have to reduce it down to my dad who came to this country in the trunk of a Chevy and all the other people who I know who are undocumented so when I hear that people say illegal immigration ruined California I look around and I say we have pretty good lives and we've created. We've done everything that the United States asked us to do. How are we supposed to feel well? I would have to say this. There are a lot of people who are in that situation and I'm not happy about it they are. I'm not happy about it. I suspect and that's a tough problem but it's one that is going to change frankly as people my age and like your father. Is he still with sixty nine retired truck driver. He's a kid anyway. That is going to change. But we're going to have have to have a different regimen going forward and the people who came legally will be the first to agree and even some I think who became illegally. We'll see that if we don't stop this if we don't allow Amnesty's to occur in future then we we'll have a nation that has and continues to be generous in welcoming people who come legally and what we also ought to do is be a little self centered and if we need our truck drivers or what we need our nurses or what we need is some other category in which we are short of talent then we ought to say those are the folks that we ought to look for an auto welcome because this is not racism and and at this point in the conversation p turned the interview on me. Did you take heat from your fellow high-schoolers when they cut class and you didn't not at the the time it was one and done. There was just all this anger about one eighty-seven they walked how. I felt ashamed for not. Because I was against one eighty-seven obviously my dad was in document. All these other people who are undocumented but as I noted my story most of those people they never got involved in politics again. I would argue more than a few of them actually support trump it did become republicans. But maybe I got the wrong lesson because I was the one who turned into the rabble rousing activists that I've been my entire career except now at the Times I'm objective. It's it's a good thing for the Times that there are some people like you around and by the way The Times endorsement even though they disagreed. What do you think about Frank del? Olmo 'cause he wrote that at the Senate and he said. I don't believe Governor Wilson is a big I do believe though he is making a huge mistake by citing with one eighty seven which he he said was playing to the worst tendencies of nativist. Well Frank was a friend yeah and I had a lot of respect for him and I liked him a lot because he had a sense of humor to. We just disagreed on because you know and I and I understand that I listen. I don't hold hold it against anybody who disagreed and who voted against it and campaigned against it. When I do resent is the fact fact that a lot of people have knowingly portrayed me and others as races why does that bother you so much because it's not true it's an evil thing to tell people who will believe you ally an ally that is so fundamentally I mean it's got a it's got color your whole view. Let's just not right. Yeah I guess I asked because you're a politician you get all sorts of attacks from all sides gotta thick hide and I have managed it and I told my wife years ago before we were married. I said listen. You're going to hear things read things about me. That are not true. And not certainly not fair and you've got to promise me that you will never let the bastards search you that gets to me. Otherwise I have a thick guide. I can take it and I'll pop them back especially with the one eighty seven thing in particular because you you know you have your whole record but this one in particular. You seem to be very zealous of setting the record straight about yourself illegal immigration and one eighty-seven so it's it's a very ugly bleak smear and doers at the people whom I served in San Diego as mayor. I mean if you went back through the records you would find that that. There were Latinos on every city Commission Committee Advisory Regroup a hell of a lot of Democrats. A lot of them were pretty conservative. Democrats they used to call you. Pedro Yeah do you think people these Latinos up up in Sacramento obsessed too much about one eighty seven. Yes what they do. But don't you think they also took it personally. And that's what motivates them like the way the ICS ultimately what the politicians especially if their parents were undocumented if some of them were documented by their constituents they view it as an existential insult to who they are so it's almost like most of their careers. Politicians is to repudiate one eighty-seven and yourself whether I'm not saying it's fair and I think it's interesting. Well it's not fair and unfortunately it's easy because who the hell talks back. Beat sure did we were only supposed to talk for forty five minutes and this last as part was at one hour thirty minute mark of the original recording I didn't even include the long sides. He had about the California Teachers Association man but I appreciated the talk. I WANNA thank compete. And his longtime adviser Sean Walsh for allowing it to happen. And that's it for this special bonus episode of California the Battle of one eighty-seven. It's a collaboration in between the LA times and photo studios. Thank you for listening. If you haven't heard the earlier parts of our podcast. Please go back and download them an apple or wherever you get your podcast if you you like what you hear do give us a five star review until you're Francis subscribed. It really does help people find the PODCAST. You can find photos and more about prop one eighty seven at Ellie Times dot Com on if you're listening on a smartphone tap or swipe over the cover art find episode notes. This episode was hosted and reported by me who star Arianna and produced by abby interest. Chris wants in our engineers Mike Heflin at the Elliott studios our theme music is southside binding of the ost courtesy of national records special shadow to Marlin bishop. full-throttle studios meals for helping us make this podcast. Our Editors at the Los Angeles Times are Hector Becerra re Johnson Shelby Grad and Julia. Turn your next time.

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Impeachment Latest; California Fires

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

48:54 min | 11 months ago

Impeachment Latest; California Fires

"Defied candidates using an online dashboard get started at indeed dot com slash. NPR podcast from N. P. This message comes from on point sponsor indeed if you're hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your short list of Gordon Sunlen that seems significant as well exactly and especially because it would appear then that that would contradict as you mentioned Gordon Silence testimony opening statement that he raised concerns twice a wants to the SEC top lawyer and once directly to ambassador plans to say but this is somebody who is an Iraq war veteran purple heart awarded to him and this is somebody with a sort of story and defend our country our in all caps irrespective of Party or politics now I I'm just curious he also says in his but it seems that his concerns and and the way in which he raised them to the on the legal side of things did inform potentially that initial and in on that call and joining us now from Washington is Monica Elba NBC News Political Reporter who covers President Trump and the twenty twenty campaigns Monica the White House and National Security Council official testifying today that he was concerned about that July twenty fifth phone call between President Trump and the Ukrainian president and certainly the narrative coming out of the White House and it's important to note the colonel says he He is not the whistle blower or anything like that who initially reported this the criticism that were that was levied by the president's supporters in the GOP beforehand. Was that all this talk about that July twentieth join us do you have questions about this latest tick forward in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump this is the first the house is hearing from someone who says he actually colleagues from the NFC and the Office of the vice president we are all aware of what was said and quote that is according to vitamins opening statement so you can and why one of the world's biggest economies resorting to mandatory power cuts for millions of residents but first the latest Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vitamin in a here from someone of course that position is behind closed doors that he has released and several news organizations have obtained his opening statement so we know what he he has this is the first current sitting White House official from the National Security Council who is expected to really have quite explosive testimony right and whistleblowers because as we know the whistle blower was not actually on the call but the whistle blower obtained information from people who were so it sounds like he was listening on the call and raise those concerns so it's really a notable shift because as we saw sort of the parade of folks from the State Department from other areas statement that Vin Minna should say that has been released to the public and he goes out of his way to say quote I am a Patriot and it is my sacred duty and honor to advance career and who come from the military side of things so somebody who really is non political of course the president has mentioned is already targeting him and in call was hearsay but here we have someone who says he actually listened in on the call and just as a as an aside Monica I'm looking at a Finland's opening absolutely and and it's really a couple of reasons I think the first is that he's actually a current White House official and this is the first time in the impeachment inquiry that President Trump tweeted today quote was he on the same call that I was can't be possible while vitamin says quote I listened in on the call in the situation room with Oh quid pro quo and they continue to just simply point to that document but again here we have something that really really contradicts that and in terms of raising alarms bring to him as a never-trumper that's certainly not what what it sounds like the lieutenant colonel would have to say about himself as somebody WHO's I Ukrainian expert this is somebody who of sort of experience and training and in a sense of duty which I think is also a really really interesting way for him to put this so the president it's it's difficult to I tenth visit from the Secretary of of the national security defense counsel for Ukraine who came to visit Washington this was when colonel the reconstructed transcript that they put out of the president's call with the leader of Ukraine and July and claim that that paints a picture of what they call certain exactly what what he can do to counter this and one of the other things he he continues to raise on twitter and in his remarks is that they point to and says that Ambassador Sunland started talking to the Ukrainians or begin or didn't start at least reiterated to the Ukrainians that they that the president wanted an investigation into the Biden's and he says Vincent his opening statement quote I stated to Ambassador Sunland that his statements were inappropriate that the request to investigate Biden and his son had nothing in to do with national security and that such investigations were not something the NFC was going to get involved in or push so the president's supporters saying what key members of Congress saying so this has been a fascinating kind of evolution to watch over on Capitol Hill because the impeachment increase welcome to on point thanks for having me Magna so first of all tell us more about Lieutenant Colonel who is he and why is his testimony today so significant Colonel Madman with somebody who certainly was able to raise these and and really his chief concern according to his opening statement was national security and that he says is because of his decades repower full testimony just in the opening statement here but let's turn for a second monarch if if we can to the reaction that's coming from the hill for example what are the as a partisan witch hunt to use a phrase that the president likes to use but as more and more of these people have come forward and giving their testimony behind closed doors it's the craft were conducting an unauthorized impeachment proceeding refusing to give the president due process here and Senator Lindsey Graham saying else this is just the most significant things the two things just don't square right I mean specifically out of Vitamins opening statement he says following a July I take pride in the fact that our vigorous response to there being the Democrats underhanded tactics ended up making the House Democratic position untenable so so for the senators for example if this does go to trial in in terms of potential phases of the impeachment inquiry they are saying well if I'm going to be sitting juror things behind closed doors so now we have the news that that is actually going to it looks like take place this week on Thursday after a markup tomorrow Wednesdays sort of almost daring speaker Nancy Pelosi to do that because they claim that they're issue here is largely with process and you know they've argued that Democrats are doing a lot of these it wouldn't be appropriate for me to weigh in so we've seen kind of now the Republicans have to test out sort of different approaches and what they can say because of course reporters are approaching them everyday asking them for this but I think you know the other the other important thing to know is that for for weeks now Republicans have been calling for a formal vote on the impeachment inquiry coming creasing difficult for some of the Republicans to defend the President so many of them have even started to say I don't want to speak about that or in a saying and and be a staunch defender while also being careful as to you know as far as they can take this it's harder in the face of a lot of the striking testimony twenty twenty reelection campaign and the allies from the outside can also sometimes apply this pressure we saw even the president's son Donald Trump junior doing this on twitter or forceful in his rejection of impeachment inquiry when he wasn't necessarily doing so we we saw that that can kind of be something that comes also from the campaign the president's fiercest defenders and most loyal soldiers in all of this but of course he's implicated in this as well because he has had several conversations started many of the president's fiercest supporters especially you both in the house and in in the Senate really kind of criticize the entire thing so that also will be interesting to see because it kind of undercuts that argument a little bit if now this is GonNa be brought for a vote it's harder for Republicans to to take issue with the prospect ass continue to see that see them saying that and they're going to kind of press that and no matter what because that's what they're you know the president is saying and many of these Republicans have in meetings with Ukrainian President Dolinsky throughout the course of his administration and even the president himself president trump at a certain point said hey you should look kind of follow his lead or risk being called out by him right we saw this sort of pressure campaign from outside allies Who Wanted Senator Lindsey Graham to be more UH Republicans saying that this vote that they had asked for now just confirms what they still believe as an illegitimate inquiry right and I think you're going active all right so Nancy Pelosi House Speaker Nancy Pelosi designed deciding to put that impeachment inquiry and the sort of the rules around to a house a full House vote here but I'm seeing that reporting by myself and my colleague Carolee that there's actually quite a split over this decision in the White House or those officials who believe that releasing more information close those details he said he had no objection to that but that it was something that White House counsel would have to review and decide about whether they could actually do that and it turns out now in this her in the in the last week or so it sort of it certainly Republicans will have to kind of walk this fine line whereas they're trying to absolutely mimic what the present I could be able to continue to keep up those amendments and just to be clear to folks what we're talking about is the House Speaker Nancy Pelosi saying on Thursday the House will vote on a resolution president of some of this you know the appearance of any wrongdoing the vice president has said repeatedly that he only discussed corruption and other to formalize the impeachment inquiry not an impeachment vote itself because things move really fast I just wanted to be clear on that now Monica just got a couple of minutes left to go here warned all with Ukrainian leaders tells about that sure so this is another kind of fascinating element to all of this and we've seen vice president Mike Pence be really reporter speaking to us from Washington Monica thank you very much thank you so much for having me when we come back we'll talk about California's wildfires and why this message comes from an points sponsor indeed when it comes to hiring you don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist denying or cutting power to millions of Californians is seen as a way to prevent wildfires this is on point soon becomes a slippery slope certainly in terms of documents and what kind of precedent it sets in terms of House Democrats wanting to ask for more or anything relit related to this qualified candidates fast with indeed post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on qualified candidates and when you need the president's the White House the White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham responding very strongly to that saying quote Speaker Pelosi is finally admitting what the rest of America already knew that terms conditions and quality standards apply hey it's Medina Hassan host of NPR's lately USA every week good I believe he even said quote like Mike's Conversations you should look at Mike Pence's transcripts and so when the vice president was asked by reporters a few weeks ago whether he would be willing to we bring you a mix of reporting diverse voices and coverage of current and emerging issues that impact our lives let the USA is one of a kind featuring now the mere threat of high winds leading to vast wildfires has also led to plan power outages for millions of people lack of power means lack of water in some this is the real life story of extreme climate fragility and extreme infrastructure fragility together they present a new normal where cutting something about that that you reported specifically that the White House is continue to have it internal debate on whether to release notes on Vice President Mike Pence's call from calls what does that get us at the same time those close to the vice president Feel that this could be something that could help really kind of help clean or clear the vice the White House has really said we're not going to comply not hand over documents in terms of the subpoena aspect of all of this so they sort of argue if we release more of this information places and in the modern age cellphone towers off line mobile phone batteries drained down to zero making it harder to inform people who need to evacuate out of the Fires Way Oh fires but the fires are burning anyway what does this say about climate resiliency about infrastructure resiliency in America right now and we're going to start in Sonoma's California and joining us from there is mayor Amy Harrington Half of Soma understand is without power mayor Harrington welcome to possessing one of the largest economies in the world where the future is supposed to glitter bright except now in many places in California that are in the dark very and this is on point I magnetic Roberti California is basically a real life disaster movie right rush urban and rural interface in our county the town of Sonoma's although we have lost power is not affected by the fires out he sort of summaries of his contacts and we'll have to see if that's something that actually takes place or not we'll be reporting and tracking all of it well Monica Elba NBC News Political To hire fast accelerate your results with sponsor jobs new users can try for free when you sign up at indeed dot com slash NPR podcast advance of the you know the high winds that were predicted and so we've had often on power for you know about a week now okay and how has that stories from the heart stories that make you think and maybe even inspire you to Action Listen and subscribe now aspects Y in his conversations with ski and that he never discussed the Biden's he hit said that over and over again but really the only way to know that for sure would be for them to be employees and thanks for having me on so first of all give us the update what are conditions like in Sonoma's right now so things are calm sonoma's county power so about a week ago. Pge Our power companies started turning off the power prophylactically in cows and firefighters on the ground and seventy four thousand acres have burned already wow and how long has the tone of cinema been without states that have more regular extreme weather states that have hurricanes they turn the power off in advance of a hurricane and also you know one title is glittering at all so we want to hear from you what do you think of the fact that California utilities are shutting down the power in order to prevent comic justice issues as well as just impact on the economy a couple more more questions for you mayor Harrington if I could I mean I heard your example the comparison of of not and so I think now everyone takes it very seriously that they just need an emergency kid people are buying generators but I think again this goes to really medically fragile people would be taken care of and things like that you know now all of a sudden we've got all the parents in the county of cinema which is enormous and their kids can't go to school and they can't go to work so we have uh-huh luckily and we were also not affected by the two thousand seventeen fires here in the town Alma but in our county two hundred thousand people have been evacuated we have four the power being shut off which is causing perhaps causing some of these problems. Well I think that the issue is that it's very hard to hear belong from a basic utility is now one of the best even regular options to try to prevent human caused wildfires and this in the golden state itself a very large county it's larger than the State of Rhode Island where obviously in Agricultural County we have a lot of wine wine growing here so there's a larger to stop wildfires and yet the fires still burning well pg any as a power provider is outrageous and over and over before the power actually went off there were proposed shut off so it was sort of the sky is falling kind of situation where people didn't know if it was actually going to happen all these were figuring out as the lights get shut off what that means for us as a community I mean I'm reading from California News outlets that the current fire that's burning in Tacoma you know all evidence points that PG actually started that fire it started at one of their geothermal power plants and during how do people in Cinema feel that this is what it's come to in California that you have to kind of enter the dark ages literally for a period of a day or a couple of days in I mean I it seems for it must cause a huge amount of disruption well so on the one hand we've heard from others matic for for all the people that are removed so we're just doing whatever we can to help people those who have power helping those who down we'll pulling together color and a battery and you know a very powerful generator those people will be less affected long-term as we figure out what plans need to be made so I think there's a lot of you know out guaranteed dividends to shareholders so having a shareholder owned utility is clearly a complete failure and it's GonNa require now requires state level intervention during all of this period the last twenty years they should have been undergrounding power lines and updating infrastructure and instead they were paying it real leadership on behalf of the state to figure out what to do about that but you know this is a manmade problem which is obviously exacerbated by climate the power gets shut off in places that have a hurricane bearing down on them but I would say that the differences you just can't stop a hurricane the power as far as I understand in Califor- what you're leading was a great you know summary of what's going on here but you know we're not used to kids not being able to go to school for example so in addition to the things that we did plan for which is making sure that that some people have raised very vociferiously concerns that PG any in some cases they felt didn't give enough advance warning that the or enough lead lead up to not nationally which is people that can afford to fix this problem for themselves will have fewer impacts than people who cannot afford to fix it so for our immigrant fire workers live here you know can they have a generator can they afford to have their kids out of school I don't think so but for people who can and businesses who can afford to buy how to San Francisco California and JD Morris joins us from San Francisco he's a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle covering the power outages in the Kincaid fire specifically thanks for the invitation so GD Morris first of all you heard Mayor Harrington they're kinda get real in the middle of that my conversation with her anoma we were relatively unaffected and so we're willing to take evacuees here and we're all pitching in to help everyone but You Know Suma County Amy Harrington is the mayor of Sonoma's California Mayor Harrington thank you so much for joining us thank you okay well let's turn now evolved in a series of major disasters for the better part of a decade actually in twenty ten one of their gas pipelines exploded in San Bruno south of San Francisco Dan Equipment may be involved in a fire that is raging north of San Francisco right now while they're also blocking out people millions of people he also covers energy including Pacific gas and electric or PG and E. as we've been we will be talking about a lot JD Morris welcome to on point eight universities author of over thirty books mostly on the history and management of wildland and rural fire as well Steve Pine welcome to you for the city and the county as well I mean it sounds like things are probably hate to say this might get worse before they get better some of the killing eight people and destroying thirty eight homes two years ago in a California's wine country north of San Francisco here their power lines were involved in a series fire is now moving on to other counties it's blowing the other way so those people are being evacuated as well there's a plan shut off of electricity depriving me and also with us from Tempe Arizona is Steve Pine he's a wildfire historian he teaches courses on fire in the history of exploration and science at Arizona State of major fires that killed a lot of people and destroyed many homes as well and then last year one of their transmission towers was involved in the campfire which is California's deadliest and most destructive wildfire in its history so now that we've arrived at a point where there it's like the fire started from pg any device and then twenty minutes later they turned off the power in that area so what is happening the meeting of the State Regulatory Commission that oversees PG Ni after an earlier blackout this month about I think three weeks ago PG at a press conference just yesterday saying this problem needs to be fixed after the fires are under control the blackouts our top priority right now tonight and tomorrow because of new high winds and so you know people are sheltering luckily like I said the town range and Last question for you Mayor Harrington in the next couple of days I mean what do you what do you see for S- anoma across the state and I think there's a lot of frustration from the average resident all the way up to Governor Gavin newsom and even in Congress A and that's what this major investigation the Public Utilities Commission is all about making sure that we get under the hood so we don't have the scale of blackouts that were experiencing and we don't there's extreme frustration with PG and e. how widespread is that frustration right now oh very widespread and the thing to know is that PG has been heard from some of our representatives in DC yesterday about their frustration with PG knee well you mentioned California Governor Gavin Newsom here he is I have the damn excuses this mindset that's been advanced by P peachy that suggests that it's GonNa take ten years it cannot to get their act together lines underground what does that ten year referral to so that was a comment that PG CEO Bill Johnson made at a emergency cornea governor Gavin newsom there at the end referring to what pge says the timeline it'll take jd to what do maintenance on the lines orange is being shut off in places as a preventive measure to stop wildfires so there so it's like there's this is a solution for a human caused problem I I'm just we are and WBZ Boston. I'm MEG nobody and this is on point two major stories to try to understand today in a few minutes we'll talk about California wildfires cut power to two million Californians and their communication about that was really awful their website kept crashing there was widespread outraged how the implemented that and CEO said at that meeting that was called afterward that he California might be dealing with this for a decade more deeply about changing the conditions we simply can't respond fast enough vigorously enough and we never will be able under these conditions you can do but the California has always had the resources been able to call up enough to be able to build up its fire suppression forces enough to to hold the line or to argue that well with a little bit more we could now I think we've crossed the threshold three years you know it's one thing that no plant owned by someone else. PG didn't turn that off because they said the weather conditions did not warrant doing so and then that transmission line we can contain fires we can get to them early enough in effect project and urban style firefighting system out and the fire conditions that exist there with a really aggressive firefighting program. I mean the five largest fire departments in the country are in California also even if you don't live in an area where there's high winds if they serve if they cut off a heavy duty transmission lines now if just made that model of firefighting meaning the attempt for total fire suppression or what model you talking about that's failed remodel that that yes malfunctioned right at the time and place where Kincaid fire started the cause is still under investigation but it looks like they caused that okay so stevie Steve pint appreciate your have fires major fires breakout every five ten years you forget it goes away but to have this sort of rolling thunder of since here let me turn to you is this I mean is this the new normal in a world in California where we have people so that it doesn't affect so many people because one of the problems right now is that there are shutting off these heavy duty transmission lines that serve a lot of people oh place on the planet has that kind of concentrated firepower but three years of cereal conflagration so I I think it's pretty obvious that model has failed and you have to think you will on top of that and making it worse and and for a century or so California has bridge the gap between the number of people who live there and offering experiencing a new normal well yes and no California's built to burn and it's built burn explosively the countryside and I think for a number of reasons that a bad idea in areas that are prone to burn and in fact need fire so there bunches of things improve its system starts to do more targeted undergrounding starts to install devices that allow it to be more targeted with how it turned off the grid need a really active firefighting infrastructure but you also need to control the character of settlement we need to think of conflagrations now for three years it's clear that something something that it's broken that fundamentally the model is broken yes serving you it's like closing down a freeway the electricity can't get to you but then they didn't do that in Sonoma's county in the part of the county where the kate here's raging right now on Mare Harrington said it was a geothermal planet was actually not that it was a heavy duty transmission line in the area of Geo three encroaching evermore into that that wildlife urban boundary we've got climate change and we've got kind of what what seems to me to be ailing infrastructure here so as and almost everything people have done over the last two hundred and fifty years aggravated those conditions and now climate change is acting as a performance enhancer gone away we don't need to vaccinate anymore well you do we just forgot that and we were able to cover it up now it's all coming back and if these places as urban sites that are prone to burn in ways that we didn't think was possible it's like suggesting well measles this is all this is a national issue it's part of a larger really creaky grid that needs to be over so it's part of a major infrastructure in New Mexico lowest conscious fire was started by power line to Bastrop county fires outside Austin Texas Power Line Gatlinburg Tennessee burned from power line failure also very strong winds make it almost impossible to catch a fire that starts when it still small but the largest fire its size and its power and its sort of place in in the United States when things go wrong in California it pushes everyone's attention to it but and also be clear that power lines are not just a problem in California they're magnified there because the winds that lead to the heard from a lot of utility watchdogs who very firmly believe that. PG Ni has not been maintaining the vegetation around its lines historic friend vegetation around their lines to inspect all their equipment they're doing enhanced vegetation management now they call it but as of recently I think in late September ah you know to Steve Pines point here. Jd this has pge does it have a track record of of not doing the kind of lessons that California has for all of us about climate resiliency and infrastructure resiliency we'll be back this is on point Buhlmann we haven't thought about fire is being a part of that issue but now it clearly well completely agree and JD. Moore's I mean that's the thing about California because if it's quickly in the way that it should one of my sources yesterday told me that this is a decades long problem they have in the last year really done a big effort to try to residents in some of Los Angeles Los Angeles's wealthiest neighborhoods have evacuated their homes. La Fire Department Captain Eric Scott told Reuters and as Steve Pine said California's built to burn so when those power lines do spark in the high winds blow things go up in flames rather quickly so jd Morris Berg they were only like one third complete with the amount of enhanced returning that they wanted to do for the year so it's clearly a major issue here this is on point a Meghna Chakrabarti we're talking about California's wildfires and the plan did not respond but Vesey briefed reporters at a press conference yesterday in San Francisco saying that somewhere between two hundred and fifty thousand to six hundred thousand customers five hundred firefighters from the ground air battling those areas Pge utility CEO Andy Vesey acknowledges the frustration that many meaning potentially millions of people are still without power there's a lot of anger out there and we get it and we're not saying that it's unjustified but we ask again line maintenance above ground and we will talk to putting about putting lines of below ground in a little bit but what its track record on doing this sort of basic maintenance along its lines all I've heard and Steve Pine stand by for a second we're talking about California's wildfires in this case it doesn't seem like it's appropriate to call the wildfires human-made fires around the Kincaid fire and Steve Pine is with us he's a wildfire historian joining us from Tempe Arizona and go to Jeff Who's calling from Lincoln Nebraska Jeff on the air hi my comment is that wall. PG knee was satisfying shareholders they weren't repairing bolstering infrastructure and hearing Nebraska we have and please do not take that out on the people who are engaged in restoring your power it's dangerous work it's hard work and they're absolutely Californians are feeling with the company's decision to force large scale power outages and by the way we did reach out to P G E C if someone from the utility could join us whether PG should be transformed into customer owned cooperative but the big problem especially with what San Francisco is considering is what is that at Cisco has already offered PG need two and a half billion dollars to buy its power lines the mayor of San Jose the bay area's largest city is exploring where it's going yet and also it it's not going to change the fact that the system is in the condition that it's in the wildfire risk that works so there are conversations about you know having some sort of municipal ization as they call it or government takeover but we don't really know two hundred and fifty and growing there's approximately thirty three hundred homes that are under mandatory evacuation and we have approximately power outages that were supposed to prevent those fires and yet they are still burning in for example I mean we've been focused on northern California but also in southern California ways they did absolutely nothing and they were responsible indirectly for chewing up the landscape because they opened it up to a large scale logging and it was a logging slash the as yesterday that the getty fire in La continues to threaten neighborhoods on the city's west side what started out as a proxy fifty acre fire has now grown into our instead of profit it'd probably be better off Jeff thank you for your call Eighty Morris you have a response for him also that's something we hear all the time and I think that's why order of magnitude greater in size and lethality than what we're seeing now in the railroad I mean fundamental part of our infrastructure they were economically force them to clean up there were lawsuits of there were commissions there were laws passed there was a vigorous enforcement it didn't happen in a couple of days a you're seeing a lot of conversation here in California about whether there should be some form of government takeover takeover of PG any the city of St but railroads no longer start fires of that sort and if we could do it then we we can certainly take on the power companies and variance saying is what it is and so regardless of who owns PG knee of who controls it there is a lot of work that needs to be done to make it more troll the brains of their hosts much like podcast does to their audience listen subscribed to shortwave from NPR didn't for doing this and that is in the late nineteenth early twentieth century railroads were notorious for starting fires Fires a happy Halloween nerds this week. Don't miss a special spooky batch of episodes from NPR's new daily science podcast shortwave. We're going to talk about parasites that take over and billion for these really extreme climate change driven conditions that we're experiencing here in California Steve Pine is a big rethink of the the basic committed to work as quickly as they can't get your power back on well I'm joined today by JD Morris he's reported at the San Francisco Chronicle covering the power outages and specific gradually I got effective spark arresters forced the trains to burn different fuels diesel or electric thirty billion dollars potentially of liability from those disasters and they're in bankruptcy court to sort out that mess due to the rest of the system because then you would have kind of all of the the remaining Pge would have the same amount of fire risk but far fewer customers was the the primary vehicle for for you know boosting these fires and over overrunning communities and how right now the story has been one of the stories has been of Westerners particularly Californians building houses where there are fires but we're seeing as a result of Land Houston climate change that the fires are starting to go to where the houses are so the issue with power line fires is going to become national before very long ship model here necessary well I think we should we should consider everything you know as a fire historian let me suggest they're suppressed needed to the Wildfire costs that they were looking at from the twenty seventeen in two thousand eighteen wildfires that their equipment caused they were facing as for those victims or challenging that and now they're in bankruptcy court working out all the claims so the state has determined the cause and then they're in bankruptcy court figuring all they were belching sparks out of their smokestacks they were throwing faulty brake shoes I mean they didn't bother to clean up right and determined that PG caused every all of them except for the tubs fire in Santa Rosa in twenty seventeen but the attorney long okay well let's go to Nicholas is calling from Barnard Vermont Nicholas you're on the air hi had a Christian I was wondering if we're being entirely fair MM system work because of California's clean energy mandates I don't know that there is a real connection there I also do think that clean-energy mandates so that they can invest more in their system but I will say I I'm not convinced yet that there's a there a state I believe it's the only state in the United States with one hundred percent public utilities and we have our share of wind and straight line and tornadoes wins that type of thing and that ice accumulation and only during the worst of circumstances do they go down and I'm pretty sure if PG and he was committed the delivery of power railroads more responsible about their role in creating a massive fires in the eighteenth and nineteenth century here I'm fires in nineteen eighteen outside Duluth Minnesota killed about

California President Trump president NPR White House Monica Elba vice president National Security Council SEC Washington CEO jd Morris Berg Iraq Gordon Sunlen Gordon Silence GOP official Harrington Steve Pine
Trump, Impeachment and the California GOP

It's All Political

40:15 min | 11 months ago

Trump, Impeachment and the California GOP

"Hi I'm Greg Thomas host of the wild West podcast tune in for personal interviews with the world's top. Rock climbers surfers skiers ultra runners. And much more. If you like getting outside exploring you'll dig wild west. Find it wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to it's all political. The San Francisco Chronicle's political podcast. I'm Joe Gear fully the chronicle senior political writer and today on the podcast. We have the head of the California Republican Republican Party. Jessica Patterson I'm Jessica for about a decade back when she used to work for the MEG Whitman Campaign for governor back in the today. She is a pioneer of sorts. Here in California she is the first Latina to be elected chair of the California Republican Party in. It's one hundred and forty year history. She's the first millennial and the first woman to lead the Party and we talked to her on this day. When the impeachment inquiry into president trump began we talked to her about how that impeachment inquiry affects her ability to try to rebuild the Republican Party in California? A state state were trump is not very popular. And now. Here's my conversation with Jessica. Patterson just Patterson welcome to. It's all political political. Welcome to the city of Saint Francis. Thank you for having means right now. Let's let's introduce you because you're still what about six eight months and months into the GIG big as the head of the California Republican Party you first Latina ever asked to be elected chair in. It's one hundred forty years history of the party the first woman yes the first millennial yes you're and you're still thirty eight correct. I just turned thirty nine. You forgot best hair. I we will talk about on this podcast for the obvious reasons the and you grow up in your born Montebello. Yes born in Montebello Group had most of my childhood and Hacienda Heights. I moved back to Montebello when I was in high school. And and Your It let me say Latina The Patterson is not the it's your name. Your paternal grandfather grandfather was born in Mexico. Yes we're connection. Might Grandmother was born here but spent most of her childhood in Mexico. She's lived in Mexicali. Okay she's American born in total you know. Why are you Republican? So a little bit coming because a family is like Democrats Republicans correct or so when I was growing up. Both of my appearance were Democrats and when we moved back to Montebello. When I was in high school we would drive from Montebello back to Hacienda Heights writes every day the schools were better in in the heights and so That was kind of my first step into Republican politics and Policies were failing where we lived and it was run by Democrats. And so one day. We'd have to you Unlike like most people that are in the press world have seen some of the personal side of my life and you know that I come from a Catholic family. I'm one of five kids and and every day from the way to from Montebello to Hacienda Heights. We used to have to all five of us. Kids do a decade of the rosary each and and it was on those car rides when that is for people like you and I and my mom might not be that familiar with the road. So when you're praying the rosary three. It's a prayer that consists of The creed it consists of In Our Father Three Hail Marys Glory be a commercial prayer the mysteries of the Rosary. And then it's five decades so ten hell Mary's five times Along with those prayers and then at ten with a hail. Holy Holy. QUAINT and It's a pair that Catholics prayer. Pray and It's something that my mother was always very committed to and made sure we were as as well as a teenager. I don't think I fully appreciated it was just wanted to get through it and turn on Rick Dees in the morning. Who Was it was not saying Adecco? No he was not. He was burning people's buns but we get off the freeway off the sixty freeway in Hacienda Heights. And when you turn off hocine I'd go up to Colima on the corner of Hacienda. Kohima was a Republican headquarters. And so I asked my mom one day if I could orienteer- and you know both my parents were Democrats. They were a little bit surprise. My mom is this is incredibly faith. Built Woman and my dad to this day is the hardest working man on the planet. Remember woody that he did a blue collar jobs. My the Dow is a ups man for thirty two years and Just incredibly hardworking. You know he drove an hour to San Fernando and then his route Out was in Glendale. And then he'd drive back to San Fernando and then back to Hocine Heizer Montebello and so I'm just incredibly hardworking. Just did everything that he could to provide for our family and It was really their actions that led me and my other brothers and sisters to be Republicans. Super All your brothers and sisters are reporting under parents. My parents converted. My mother converted in two thousand and my dad converted in two thousand twelve. Wow Yeah okay. So what attracted you to being the like. You're sixteen fifteen sixteen years old. The person quarter. What was it about the Republican Party? Then because you were let's say you're Gimme a what year would that be sophomore junior. Yeah I mean you're you're ninety five is still very viable then and I think it was personal responsibility. We I remember taking A quiz in our high school civics class and there were several polls that lined up a fence and our teacher had us based on our our scores stand at these polls and this this quiz was How conservative or liberal? You're for and there was me and then probably three polls before you got to the next student because the personal responsibility individual freedoms those things were incredibly important to me and with the group projects and do do your own what is the and how much was the social. The social concerns would said that was a part of it the major thing. That wasn't something that was really discussed in our school and our in our house you know we went to mass. Every Sunday we did holy days of obligation ends. But you know the the social side of things wasn't something you know. My parents will help other people be a good person and There wasn't any real heavy subjects that were discussed like that. So we've been talk politics failure. Oh Yeah we well. We talked politics and my would form with at dinner table and my parents were always people that wanted us to come to conclusions on her own and they don't WanNa stuff dogma down our throats They really wanted us to come to our own conclusions. Have our own thoughts and that was something that was celebrated with no. I remember because when we first you alluded to that earlier where we first met when you were working for the Meg Whitman campaign you show me around east. La We're down there. He showed me the church. You got married and And we went to her own. Yes yes we did those delicious. It was delicious The so okay. So let's talk about the Republican Party now. You you have a major job. Tam You have a big job ahead of you. The the party is is there more people registered as with no party affiliation. California Kinda. Send the cleanser states as we like to say it then repairs Republicans Wiccans And the other challenges you president trump is the face of a party and I would reach a couple of things from this state. This survey came out it Few weeks ago U. C. Berkeley nonpartisan serving You know the two thirds of Californians don't approve of what the president's up to but he's also wearing signs or Manga Republicans forty percent of Republican voters said they thought it'd be a challenger to trump in the in the California search third primary Among voters under forty. This is the future of your Republican Party. Sixty two percent be good thing. And then among non white voters in the state fewer than twenty percent overall say they would not vote for the president next year Is the Republican Party in California that separate route from the president. I think that the leadership that I've always envisioned for the Party and what I try to practice every day is big tent Republican sprite I want anyone who identifies as being Republican to fill. Welcome in our Party here in California and that was something that was incredibly important. Portent me when I ran. And it's something that's been incredibly important to me as I lead. We want to make sure that we are going into communities that have been neglected by our Party party and their how they have been. They've been neglected by speaking specifically of Oh women. Minorities Latinos African Americans We've done pretty well with Asian voters and recruiting especially Asian candidates. But there's a lot of communities that have just felt completely ignored. Felt they've BEEN IGNORED BY OUR party. When I worked for Governor Schwarzenegger we had an office right here? In the belly of the beast and San Francisco is one of my offices and and You know when was the last time we did that. Probably then and so. We need to stop Giving communities to the Democrat Party. I don't believe that these people are voting for Democrats because Democrats are helping them to live their best lives. In fact every single one of those policies that they have enacted from Sacramento which show the exact opposite but Democrats have done is they have shown up and they have made people feel like they care about their problems so we as Republicans. I believe need to show up more. We need to hear what their problems problems are. And then we need to offer solutions to those problems. Because at the end of the day people have real problems. People have real problems that they want solutions till how would be an example of a solution that the Republicans have that's different. I mean because you've said we we cannot be the party of no which is the party is has has been would would be give me an example of something where the where the Republicans have a unique solution to a problem here in California right so I think the gas tax is a perfect example. Rank right we Put forth a transportation bill. Some women Vince funk dead at the same time the gas tax was being considered two years ago and and without raising our taxes. We were going to go out there and fix our roads using. I know this is a really novel concept but Transportation Asian dollars and when you read any of the reporting on it when we had propsects it was if you want your roads fix expend you're GONNA have to pay the tax. There was never a discussion about the fact that there was an alternative plan that failed in committee because Democrats have no other solutions percents besides raising your taxes and they didn't wanNA use transportation dollars so I think that's a good example. We've seen this homeless crisis. That is just become com. An absolute epidemic here in California and in cities that we love you. I love La. I love my dodgers. I hate to see what has happened. Bent that city and suburban citizen were absolutely you predominantly Republican cities as well. Yeah absolutely and one of the champions on this you know. We've seen it skyrocket in big cities like La San Francisco Sacramento and one of the cities. Where there's actually been a decline nine and a decrease in homelessness is San Diego and Mayor Faulkner has shown absolute leadership in this arena? So much so that people all over the estate have invited him to come to their city and talk about what they're doing with the shelters with their mental help with their addiction help with their job training to get get people back to being productive members of society. Not just in the state the White House has come to see what they've done Secretary Carson was here in prison era present Mayor Faulkner. Who has been a guest on the podcast? Yes he can. Maybe but he is the type of Republican who could win. I'm here I mean. He's winning and a democratic city but he is a different type Republican. He's pro choice. He's you know he talks about climate change or do Republicans have to the change their position on those issues you know that to appeal to a broader swath of Californians. I think that it's about the big tent. It's about growing our Party and and it's not necessarily saying this one thing but it's making us focus on the things that we agree on. You know I would. Rather have someone like assemblywoman Katherine Baker representing the Bay area up in Sacramento who votes with Republicans eighty nine percent of the time then someone like Rebecca Bauer. Arcane has nowhere near that which she but that was an bakers on the podcast. As well and you know that was A really sad situation because because here she is she represents a district I thought very well No disrespect a tan bargain But she was again pro-choice pro-choice Blah Blah Blah. But she lost because the election was nationalized People were voting. They they WANNA see any Republican probably in California Any Republicans voting trump etcetera etcetera. So again it goes back to the president. Where do you disagree with the president so I think one of the things that we have to focus on is being disciplined in our message right? Of course the Democrats want to talk about what's ever going on the national stage. They Wanna I wanNA talk about the president and whatever. He tweeted at three o'clock in the morning. They don't WanNa talk about being Fifty out of fifty in the nation when it comes was to business friendliness. They don't WanNa talk about being forty seventh in the nation when it comes to education. They don't WanNa talk about being the capital of poverty in the entire entire country or having twenty five percent of the nation's homelessness. They don't WanNa talk about the fact that I think that same Berkeley pull that you are referring to talked about fifty eighty three percent of Californians. Believe they're going to have to leave the state because it has become so affordable so as Californians we win when we're T- as California Republicans we win when we're talking about the local stuff. We're talking about the silly things that are happening. In Sacramento that are are affecting our everyday life. We went on those messages. So it's about being disciplined on those messages and we know they're gonNA WANNA take it to the national fight but what's happening here in in California is not a result of what's coming out of Washington. DC It's a result of what's happening in Sacramento. What are we supposed to do in the present? This is just a couple of weeks ago. He tweeted November third. He tweeted every year as the fight. The fires and such we just had devastating fires in southern California where you are up here in the bay area as well Every year is the fires rage. California's California Burns. It's the same thing And then he comes to the federal government to begin newsom form for for money. Help no more get your act together governor. You don't see close. The level of burn other states by the teams are working well and he threatened to cut cut off fiery to to California. What do you say to that you have to disagree with Adam? Take them to task on that right. I think that we are best when we are working together. You're and I don't think that the twitter war that goes back and forth is helpful to us as Americans as Californians being successful when I can't remember. It was tweeted out but I re tweeted it Seen the president and Governor Jerry Brown at the time governor elect elect newsom at the time leader McCarthy in paradise in Malibu whoring seen what happened. Everybody being cordial to one another working together trying to find solutions. That is when we are at our best and I think that Californians and Americans agree with that too I think they want to see their government actually working and so when the newsome administrations spend their time with fifty indeed different lawsuits against the trump administration and when the Washington DC Democrats are focusing all all of their efforts on impeachment when we still need to pass US MCA. These are things that I think. Californians and Americans the whole all want to see their government focus on getting the job done what is going to help me. Put Food on the table. Have a good school for my kids to go to jail and be in a safe neighborhood. But when the when the races are nationalized Catherine Bakers Like other like these house races over here. Shouldn't the party draw line about where we disagree with the president. Or I mean you've you've not. You've you've been exhibited excellent message discipline not not going near the president not so far but where do you draw the line so I think that we specific races. Those are that's candidate driven and the candidates have to define who they are Dr and what they're going to represent within each one of these districts and in California we have an incredibly diverse state And each district strict is very different Even in the urban areas we see different populations that would affect the way you might feel on a particular issue and so I think that is very candidate driven and for us what we need to do at the party level is to make sure that the infrastructure is there that they have the tools and resources is that they need so that they can be successful with delivering their message. So we're we should not expect to get in the middle of these these back and forth back You're listening to my conversation with California Republican Party Chair Jessica. Patterson we'll have more after a short break Eh. Contour from Cox has all your favorites all in one place and with the contour remote you can use your voice to fund them on live TV on demand and streaming streaming APPs like netflix prime video. And more see Cox dot com for details and now. Here's more of my conversation with Jessica Patterson. Okay let's talk about reaching another communities You again we'd said the first Latina Elected State Party Chair What about DACA? That was. The Supreme Court heard that this week Do you think that program should end as the you know as the administration in has said what what should happen to dock. We have two hundred th of the seven hundred thousand or so folks in the program two hundred thousand or living here. DACA recipients are living here in California which had happened that program so what's incredibly frustrating about dot situation is that the president has said. Let's make a the deal and A year and a half ago now the federal government and the Democrats were ready to shut down the government government over this. He came to them with what many people thought was a very generous offer regarding DACA and they wouldn't come to the table and so I think it goes back to that whole issue. I was the policy to the policymakers but I believe that people want government to work in. When people aren't willing to come to the table it makes it very difficult for real solutions to be retrieved? These folks should stay in the country. I think that the policymakers will come to a decision on what's is best but I think that everybody needs to come to the table. Hobart a wall in the US Mexico border. I think border security is incredibly important with a wall. His goal I think that the policymakers will decide with that border security. Looks like but I think that it's incredibly important. So let's this leg with the bay area. You're here visiting Of course to be on the PODCAST force first and foremost thank. You said. Great pandering there the but you're also fundraising and such and reaching out to young group Young Republicans. What do you do in the bear? We know since Baker was voted out. There are no Republicans here this is like and its till you get the Douglas Alpha McClintock. That's those are closest Republicans. Here how do you bring back the Republican Party in the bay area which which has a history of some very strong Republicans in the past What do you do if of a Baker can't win here? What do you do so so I start by not using the word reaching out or outreach because that to me implies that you have to reach out that you're not in those community yeah and I'm not going to talk about the bay area specifically but in general With these communities that have been neglected by our Party we have some amazing amazing organizations and new. You know about grow lax roller on what they are they are they identify Latino Republicans and at the local Calama the local right and they've been very successful young elected Latinos elected at local level. Maybe two hundred hundred thirty or so at this point But the the challenges as soon as they get because those are nonpartisan elections but when they get to be to put an our next their name then only one has one in and six or seven eight year history of the program. But it's but it's A. It's a smart way to build a farm system for the message. So organizations like grow Krolak like the Marian Bergerson Series California Women's leaderships association. Those two organization focused on getting women who are Republicans elected Recently recently we've put together The Republican Alliance which focuses on African Americans getting elected in so at the party level. Aw for us to be successful. I believe that we need to make sure that these individuals who are already leaders within their communities. You're correct most of them have not had to run with. That are behind their name. But they've been voted on by the people in those communities they have legitimacy and they have a stake AAC within that community and making sure that they are trained and armed with the tools and resources to deliver those messages. I think at the party level. We've done a poor job of that. We've done a poor job of talking about what's happening up in Sacramento and how it affects your everyday life. I'm in Sacramento about once a week. AAC and I walk around that white building in people speak in a different language They talk and bill numbers they talk about. Authors and Co Authors and committees is an amendment and how votes are going to go down on the floor and who's going to lay off and it's just like what are you even talking about you go down to Costa Mesa or calabasses passes and they've no clue at eighty five is Some Uber Drivers. Don't even know what eighty-five it and the people in the community have no idea that that is going to affect the cost from everything from hauling dirt off of your yard pro- pro- Project to the next Uber or lift that you get into so making sure that those communities are supported these individuals who have already engaged within these communities that they have the tools tools and resources that they need to deliver those message. You know when I was running for chair one of the things I ran on was new message new messengers and we need to make sure that they have those resources so that they can deliver those messages because the face of the party looks very different. You talked about some of the headlines First Woman First Latina first millennial ambassador and you said that would disagree. Really your competitions. Frank Travels Allen Basin hair the chairman of the pass journey. Yes I would. I would not deny him that it was his zone right but we have an amazing board. You know our State Board is twenty three members almost half of which are women. We have for Latinos on the board. We had to openly openly gay men since I've been the chairman we haven't African American. We have Taiwanese immigrant. Ask Our vice chair. Have a kick ass Punjabi Indian American Erkin Attorney whose you probably see all the time on the news. Harmeet deal But I mentioned this. Not because a single one of us ran on being the first anything mm-hmm but the diversity of our party it doesn't stop at the chairmanship the diversity of parties within our leadership and so we have a huge the job opportunity to show that the California Republican Party is in a new day. And that's a good thing for a party. It's a good thing for brand and it's a good thing for engagement in California. It's all around our state would Let's like Governor Newsom Would could he have done. Here's our here's our big softball woods. What can be done differently in his first year? And what would a Republican have done. Different could've done better. The podcast is not that long. We can extend the time if we need to fair that so I think there is quite a few things that he could have done One of the things in I'm going to give credit to Governor Brown on this Vetoing SP twenty seven. It was clearly under this talk of overlooking that one limbaugh weekend sack is what's going on S. B.. Twenty seven is a bill that came through the California state legislature. which would require Make new new requirements that are not in the US Constitution or in our state constitution to release your tax returns in order to be on the primary ballot. We we think we widow who those directed to the courts. Got Sued you were you. Were that will lead plaintiffs in this. In in the The court said this is ridiculous. Idea well we haven't gotten a ruling from the State Supreme Court yet. The Federal Court did Grant Preliminary injunction on it so vetoing. SP twenty-seven like his predecessor did It was clear from the Legislative analysis that their legal counsel this spill Wisconsin Unconstitutional Constitutional. And then. They didn't even they didn't even bother to check the state constitution and see if there was any Anything that is in conflict with the state constitution so the arrogance overreaches just ridiculous The death penalty moratorium. We had a repeal of the death penalty on the ballot in two thousand sixteen and it failed. The governor said that he would respect the will of the people and then he put a moratorium on the death penalty just months later exactly so. It's things like that. So it's an organ par. What about on housing? That's the newsome That came in promising We are going to be. We need to build and we can build three and a half million units over. You know failed on every single one of those goals yes it's not it's it's Islah happening. What would republicans of what would you do differently? I think that we need to see some roll back on some of the Hurdles that the California state legislature puts on building houses and I think there is an absolute failure to do that. There's no incentive for the people that actually build houses to build more housing to lower the fees that developers have to pay whether it be in San Francisco or or Banville or were yes or roll back some of the environmental regulations that they have on it All of those things come into play and it's incredibly unfortunate. Another one that that I see is when he talked In a state of the state and we was talking about stepping back from the high speed rail and then he got pushed back on that and back on board the high speed rail. I mean by all accounts. It is so far over budget. It is You know from two areas that I don't see that we have that much traffic traffic where it's going to ever be able to pay for itself. It's just it's just a a solution in search of a problem which I think that the California for new Democrats and California legislature and governor continually try and look for. I mean we have so many problems here. We have so many problems. You don't have to look that hard mark to want to fix a problem. The let's talk a national politics. WanNa get your take on a couple of talked about it and we're talking about more The those curious who do you think would be the toughest challenge among the Democrats running right now. against the President I would probably say Vice President Biden was. He's a likable guy I think that he's a very likable guy. And who do you think that would be the biggest route who would be the toughest not who would be the the the the easiest win for among the front runners cafe John Delaney. I thought I thought you might be saying John d'alene just a sandbag smell. I think Elizabeth Warren because I think one her policies are so incredibly extreme and I don't think she's likable when he did not likeable. What does that mean so I know I know? Our feminist listers will be saying That seems like it's anti female now. it's anti unlikable people and we all don't like unlikable people unlikable and there's nothing about her to me that's warm and I think that that's something that's important I think think that you get the sense from Vice President Biden that he cares about people and you get that comes across. When he's talking about things I I don't get that I get kind of an elitist Type of attitude from Senator Warren. And it's just it's not. It's not someone when I connect with in Hobart like somebody's rising the polls. Here's of people to judge. What are your thoughts on? He's he's got the likeability factor for sure I think that there has has been some You know failures as has mayor in his city That people talk about sometimes but he's certainly a likable guy. And it's it's all it's always interesting to watch because it's such a rush to the far left and these extreme socialist. It's not you know. It's not the Democrat Party that my parents were part of their more centrist. Very different party than They had that they were a part of an on in DC impeach. I wrote a column today in the chronicle. I'm sure you read it on the way the echo what did goodness It was about how Impeachment impeachment stock in beside this race. Twenty twenty that's going to be decided by the kitchen table issues around. What do you think it'll factor here? We get mixed messages. We say you know the N.. RCC comes in and says Oh you know this national republican congressional political arm says. Oh this is this. Is You know the the House members of you know they. They're supporting according Pelosi Blah Blah Blah. Do you think how does it factor here or a will now. I think that it does play a role in things. I think. Think here in California. I think we're seeing that pendulum and people really want their government to get to work. And when you have distractions distractions like this. It seems like the real work that kitchen table stuff just isn't getting done And I think people get very frustrated by that and that's how it will play. Do you think that goes to the Republican base. Does that win over swing voters. Who Does that effect? I think it does get us to those swing voters. We need to do our job at the California Republican Party of making sure that we're engaging in all of these communities around our state and so we have to show that we have viable alternatives to what the Democrats are. You are serving up. But I think that when you're given the choice and now you really do have a choice in there is a viable alternative love. Then you can say listen. I saw what they gave us for the last two years and I'm not a fan. My life is not better because of anything that they've done whether it's in Washington DC or Sacramento. And now. I know I do have a viable choice. There is a distinction between what the parties believe the solution Lucien to our problems. And this is the way I'm going to go so I think it gives us an opportunity and you're confident that the president did nothing wrong With his his believers call all with the crane was perfect. I don't I honestly don't know you don't okay you don't falling that stuff at That's I haven't seen this stuff this morning. Okay nobody nobody no previous than to this morning. And we're recording this on the first day of the congressional I mean Cory what we've seen is everybody that has come through so far. Her were wasn't even on the phone call so didn't have any first hand knowledge of it and it I mean I think they said like multiple times no quid wait profile and all of those different things and Devin nunes also California Republican Leader of the Intelligence Committee He. He talked about several debunked Theories he said Ukraine was re responsible for fixing the election. Stuff like that did. I don't know if you saw duty dancing. Your and trump okay Anything else with the big ideas we should look for in the future of how you you and your crew are going to be reshaping the California Republican Party of tomorrow. I think a lot of it. You know it's not going to be these long bomb assez it's GONNA be two to three yards and a cloud of dust and it's GonNa be incremental. It's going to be. We're making sure that we're developing and building the infrastructure picture and growing our party in. It's going to take new routes to do that and I think that Were right where on the right direction for that. The money is rolling in at a the higher pace that you were. You're an expert fundraiser. Before you ran for Party chair tell us give us some numbers there about where where you're at and where you were. Yeah so we are. Aw One million dollars ahead of where we were at the same time in two thousand seventeen which the terms of a fundraising so being a million dollars ahead. Same same time in a non election year twenty seventeen. That's great. We got started three months later. we've raised more money online from January to September. Then we did all of two thousand eighteen we'll UNLI- tribute to such your phenomenal fundraising skills. Of course it's part of it so a couple of things with the larger contribution with our major donors we didn't have a fundraising program that exist outside a Sacramento. We have recruited recruited Regional Finance Co chairs around our state that have committed to raise or give two hundred and fifty thousand dollars or more and then when I'm in cities these Different cities every day. I'm including my finance meetings and going and making the ask on the The online line side of things were communicating to more people at a greater level. WHO's an yeah? I've left to so in August of twenty eighteen eighteen. The California Republican Party sent out fifty thousand emails in August of Twenty nineteen. We sent out one point three million wo we've doubled doubled our email list since I was elected in September of Twenty nineteen we Santo three point. Five million so we're talking to people a greater amount of the people at a more consistent pace in so every opportunity that we have to ask for money we do so we have something like eight thousand six six hundred fifty brand new donors to the California Republican Party since I was elected. And it's out there acquiring new people engaging gauging them we have a fantastic data and digital team that we brought in from the national level. WHO wanted to be part of what we're doing here in California Comeback Doc and they have put together what we call the cares program and it's an APP based program and Care Says California Republican engagement system So we have connected with something like eighty thousand new people that will be donors. Volunteers and organizers all around our state and just the last two months so we're doing more on the digital side of things and were getting out there and talking to people face to face a lot more. We're building our neighborhood team leader program. We're making sure that were showing up and we're not leaving it to just the air wars we are getting there on the ground. TV commercials and such were so One request if you know some people may say adjust. That must be very difficult being the head of the Republican Party and California's Super Liberal State. You know you have people like trump. Would you say to them. I would say hey that every single day in Sacramento California Democrats are doing things to make our lives more difficult here. They're doing things that are making it so so much easier to say I'm GONNA errors. I'M GONNA MOVE TO UTAH. I'M GONNA move to Idaho and we have to stay here and fight. We have an amazing scene. We have a great state and California. Republicans are offering solutions. That haven't been there in the past and we WANNA make our state that golden state that it wants. What's just comparison? Thank you for coming here we will you come back again comeback. Come down to visit you in la or will meet and sack. That sounds good. Thank you for having me. It's all political as part of the San Francisco. Chronicle podcast network network. Audrey Cooper is our editor and chief our music our theme music that we have his cattle call that's written by Randy Clark and performed by Randy Clark and boatswain. If you'd like this show subscribe rate and review it on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen for more great journalism like this subscribe ascribe to the San Francisco Chronicle at San Francisco Chronicle Dot com slash subscribe. You can find me on twitter at Joe Garre fully thanks.

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AT#669 - Best California State Parks

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

52:48 min | 1 year ago

AT#669 - Best California State Parks

"The bags bags on a roll and read. It's real good passport. Tara traveler episode six hundred sixty nine today. The amateur traveler talks about mountains and missions and ghost towns pitches and tall trees and trains as we talk about the state parks of california. Welcome to the metro traveler your host chris christianson. Let's talk california. I'd like to welcome back to the show jeff gulfs who's a retired national park ranger. He's been on the show before talking about joshua tree national park work and has come back to talk to us about some other parks jeff. Welcome to the show thanks chris. I love listening to your programs and it's great to be back and we're not talking the national parks this time. What are we gonna talk about. Well you know you've had podcasts on canada's unesco. World heritage sites kind of group and some of the u._s. park system. We're going to talk about some biased third-generation californian but the probably the finest state park system in the country and that's california state park system which preserves the diverse cultural troll natural heritage of california so basically we're going to take a big tour of california y my first generation resident of california having moved purity very very young age but i have some bias as well at eddie mentioned unesco world heritage sites one surprise coming up later because one of them is a unesco unesco world heritage site but how are we going to approach this you had in mind we'd group these. We're not gonna talk about all of them right. Because how many are there. There's two hundred ninety three a properties. We'll just put that all two hundred ninety three. I have been to alter ninety-three all ninety that no longer a state park properties on mentioned that real briefly clean a bit but <hes> i did want to kind of start out with something people may not actually realizes that the state historic landmark system california one thousand nine hundred seventy s store glenn glenn marks are managed by the california state park system. I did not know that okay well. Actually 1055 of fish. I see this one thousand ninety seven because there's markers at to different sites and there's a semantic thing where there's a one fifty five dot one two three four and five and multiple sites arts and stuff like that but these are those bear historical lamarcus you see along the highway marking historical events and people including native american sites hispanics landings montgomery's first flight twenty years before wright brothers. Dan san sandiego <hes> so i just want to mention that the state park system also administers that program. They haven't published a book lately. They're still available book out there up to about about one market number one thousand twenty you can get tells you all about the markets and where they're located so i just want to put in for the state park systems plug for that managing that and for those people who don't know us usually a roadside stop and a paragraph or two that you can read about why this site is significant so not can't spend quite as much time. There's there's you can for some of these other parks that we're going to talk about right and the other thing too is there's ninety places. There are no longer the state park system including the very first california california state park yosemite well okay. We understand why that might not anymore. Okay things like xerox state beach. Each up at the san francisco went to golden gate squaw valley's with the u._s. Forest service and <hes> los angeles or olivera street used to be a stay store went to the uh-huh to the city of l. A. ninety those out there that are just no longer in the system but definitely administered by others having said that the state system is classified in thirteen different areas state parks state beaches. Stay starbucks the whole gamut there and <hes> i thought we would take them kind of by themes in start at the northern part on the oregon border and go all the way down to the southern border with mexico okay and so we wanna tell people this point. Pause get a cold drink. Get a comfortable chair and let's get going. Let's start out briefly with one of the easiest ones that's they also have their six state museums state parks out most the state capital the state capitol itself museum. There is the california indian museum which houses a wonderful collection of all a native american heritage in the state. It's actually <hes> at another unit called service fort. We'll talk about in a second but they're actually building a new museum across the sacramento river on the westside to housing house in the collection not sure when that's going to go but you've got the california museum and i think a lot. They'll talk about the railroad museum. I love documentary. Museum is the best if you're a railroad fan at all or willing to become railroad fan highly recommended. We've got a post on the website that i'll link to about the california railroad museum but it is not just a spectacular museum in terms of the depth of its collection in but also some of the historic like the oldest steam engine from california railroads and things like that great museum absolutely a lot of these pieces we will probably mention. You've already got podcasts out onto so one must who aren't familiar with this town of lock l. o. c. k. e. in the delta below sacramento. The state parks has a museum liam there. It's kind of an old gold mining on the river port town which chinese influence not well hurt but really worth a good stop outside you. Somebody is the money museum in there. You will find the thirteen pound gold nugget things one of the largest that i know of in the money museum in then down down closer to l._a. In town lancaster just north of there is the antelope valley indian museum and that also has a unique collection of indian artifacts is a pretty architecturally old home. It's just it's a wonderful looking billing and lancaster some high desert country in california that a lot of people aren't picturing when they're picturing california yeah our desert and that's the one great thing about california too. Is we got everything you want. I mean we've got the highest peak in the continental forty eight the lowest place in the continent the beaches mountains and they're all represented in california state park system. That's kinda neat about it. Let's get into history because i know we're both history buffs and starting with the native american history. We've got a couple of sites in california. One is called indian grinding rocks and another called was asama roundhouse and these were both inside of us seventy indian grinding rocks at the bedrock mortars there and of course a roundhouse is a reconstruction of a native american around house at stare down further south by santa barbara's to chew mash painted cave on this is really a very small little park but it's a cave that obviously has chiweshe native american paintings and she can climb up into and see the one that's kind of hard to get to and has to be done by reservation is over by the hatch apy and this is the passed between bakersfield and the california desert. I wanna get this wrong. I know at tomo connie park and it's a native american side with petroglyphs victory lifts up up in the hills and it's by <hes> tour guide only you can't just drive up. There's no gates drive up to you so that if you're ever passing between las vegas and bakersfield you're going right by there on the fifty eight i have done that route knew nothing about it. <hes> spanish error of course california three of california's twenty-one coastal missions are represented represented inside the park system in gin starting up north. We've got this anoma mission and i think of the missions in nearby courses to petaluma adobe which was general vallejo's home of course valeo also had part of the cinderella mission there dan closer to where you are santa cruz mission and also we'll just a little bit east of there is san juan bautista now. The mission itself is not in the state park system but the town is all historic buildings buildings because the mission itself is still an active church. I suspect as one of the reasons for that but yeah. It's an old western town at least that part of the town where the mission sets. Let's is got the old livery stable and a couple of hotels and things so i always used to love to go over there as a as a young kid and butting history buff and also also while you're at the mission you'll see that they put it in a very unusual place or very unfortunate in some ways. There's a hill that goes down from there. That is the senator asphalt so you're right ice here where they built the mission about ten feet from the fault and even though they built it in the late seventeen hundreds it's still there so it taking some damage damage during some of the earthquakes but it's still around and one of my favorite things was the police chief the town thirty four years ago whatever it was and i was there as a kid to used to walk around western attire with a six shooter on okay great so next stop going south is of course monterey california the first capital and all historic buildings there and i know you've done podcasts on that so i won't have it done a podcast monterey. I very sensitive that's episode. I want to say like three or something like that. It goes way way back. I need to do one again because it's a place that i happen to love and on the new california tourism blog that i have california travel media dot com. I have a guide on monterey peninsula that features some of the history there but not all of it. There's quite had a lot there so but you're talking about the colton hall for instance where california's constitution was made the old customhouse robert louis stevenson house as the number of the different nodes theatre. I theatre can't get in there and he managed <hes> to the theater. Unfortunately spanish landing the first video church chapel okay so much history in monterey and it's pretty nice looking place also so big fan of monterey peninsula well then the next mission going south l. slow and that quite next mission but la prima mission which is more down towards halfway between maybe monterey and san luis obispo. I can't picture which one that is. I suspected has another name that i know it by. That's not the mission san. Antonio is it no that's another one okay but there was a couple between abyss despu and soledad on that gun presidio santa barbara downtown santa barbara will in you see the missions in the string of missions. We should say a little bit about this. 'cause 'cause. I had to study this in fifth grade history here in california so i've got to tell it because i had to learn it but i probably did osama osama batista. I suspect he says what was your mission. Sam venture. You have to study <hes> california missions in the section in school where you study california history and the california missions are where the first permanent settlements of the spaniards as they come up from baja california into alta california and they are a day's horse ride apart from each other in a string going from in california from san diego right there the border all the way up to cinema. There's there's a few sometimes that go in lender or towards the coast or whatever but there's always another one along that route the route between the el camino royale the the king's highway the connected these and so the friars under who nipple sarah who is <hes> saito nipple now but a very controversial figure in terms of how the native americans were treated there and i'll let you look up that basically founded these missions to try and bring christianity to the local <hes> indigenous population but they're also then became the the center for the town's so the presidio in some places in the mission in many places <hes> became the colonel for wear we are the towns developed a few missions now that aren't someplace where there's a town a- but almost all of them are are. There's a town that built around them just to digress even a little bit further. There's four assis- assistant zia's attached to the missions the ranching properties that belonged condition and there's four of those in california and a lot of people don't realize that i think it's three but there are three spanish missions in in california over by huma arizona on the california side there today not ending. You said the coastal ones okay. That's right 'cause there's actually other missions in california l. A. -fornia spanish missions and those were over <hes>. I think most of them were pretty much in ruins right now. If you can even find one i don't have any exists it's been plowed under but the there was three over on the california side across the river from huma interesting so el presidio of santa barbara which is presidio towns. I think that's where you're forts and so a presidio has had soldiers in it and not all of the missions had a presidio the monterey certainly did san francisco did and some of the other major towns would have had a presidio and santa barbara being one of them and then further south is actually a battlefield l. site the san pascual battlefield which is north of san diego and now actual battlefield siphon the mexican american war. That's in the state park system and the last a spanish one is old town san diego which is a wonderful place that does it yeah. It really is not just for the mexican food. Although you take for that alone it is this that but yes well preserved portion of san diego in terms of the spanish heritage. They're right right next to interstate so it's not hard to get there. No no then i think the next error would be the gold rush era so lot of sites in california corny represented in the state park system one starting up north shasta the gold mining town of shasta as a well preserved town just west of writing there is this coming for the south along the sierras plume chirico in the empire mind malakoff gold mining sites north of sacramento in the sierra nevada xxx. Some of them have still have the old mill sites <hes> like the mohawk mill it plumage tharika excellent places to go learn about the gold mining aaron californian and and when you say a mill that'd be a stamp mill i'm guessing snap mill so someplace they would crush the rock then to get at the golden side okay absolutely and of course the biggest one of all marshall gold discovery where marshall founded gold on the river for sutter said we would talk about later which is sutter's cutters mill will sort of sport actually but the marshall gold discovery is actually the oldest property in the state park system set aside in eighteen ninety so it's kind of their oldest unit right now saying you've had programs on bodey the wonderful historic bodey mighty booty yeah and this is a ghost town kept in a state of what is the traffic arrested decay yes so they don't let it fall down but they don't show repair it and and you can still see the school building so there's an old gold mining town in fact i think they've just reopened the mine relatively recently last i'd open the mill the the standard mill okay escort. You can get a tour through there but you can still see the lessons on the desks in the school and the plate still on on the table in some of the buildings covered with a layer of dust and it's a fascinating place in the high desert area to the east of of the sierra east of yosemite right next to mona lake beautiful place to go. I love taking photos in bodey similar to bodey and a little more accessible in a little more stores open and things as columbia yoga mining town by sonora this year had i was a kid i had neither little more touristy and of course nearby israel town 1897. You haven't had a chance you can actually. It's a stark park where you can hop on a train gopher train ride uh-huh. That's only maybe ten miles away from columbia so yeah. That's a great thing to do. I did those together and in the real town there is also a museum there <hes> where they have some of the historic trains beacon established. They're still keeping them running there as well. <hes> that's worth stop. Although the museum is only open certain our hours by a tour and check the hours before you go to rail town ends in the last one when little known is planetary to canyon what's special official about plastic cannon. This is just north of los angeles use the oak of the golden dreams and this goal was actually found in california i in eighteen eighteen forty two and that oak the golden dreams is still there one of the spanish friend of the landowner a relative landowners snapping into the tree and guess what he found and that was eighteen eighteen forty two before eighteen forty nine but did not trigger the goldrush like the finding it's yeah. I don't think we're out on allen. Sinn there could be you might say the military forts just a couple of them. California ford humble up by eureka were young captain ulysses. S grant was station a very depressed young captain to quit the army <hes> after he was stationed there and went back home and and minded the store for a while gosh. There's a reason for that and i love your guy went to humble state so i i know that area very well and <hes> but it does it's isolated up there and foggy in when you're talking about an area of california that is temperate rainforest so gets a little rain up there very green beautiful area but a little too far from home for him but this is before the railroad too so it's far from home when you're up there in the before the civil war the next fourth dimension is russian for for us on the coast north of san francisco at the power the further south russian settlement expansion settlement with the russian architecture and the church church. It's there. It's really a beautiful spot but that's also on of coastal windy wet area to beyond. If you didn't have to take california history there in fifth grade you may not have known that the russian trappers basically came down the coast from what was come shot guy and the bering sea and alaska alaskan all the way down into northern california going after for seals an auditor is in such the last four then would be forced to home which is on what's called the grapevine past interstate five going from los angeles north <hes> what's nice there as they do a lot of military reenactments of calvary and let's we'll also may <music> out of known. The cavalry had a camel corps. Yes there was a movie about that disney movie about that in the seventies. I wanna say yep. Hi jolly was is brought over to help train. The camels in the chemical ended up in fort to hone to for a period of time so a good place for stopping right there in the grapevine pass and i have to admit i have seen science and i have never hops h._e._w. N._p._s. on netflix sometime go oh into the state capital of sacramento because there's so much their old town sacramento old river town. All the historic buildings were there. Which is where the railroad museum is than male museum is <hes> sutter's fort which was the home of fort a john sutter and of course also there i mentioned was the indian museum director together most i would realize the governor's mansion in leland stanford or railroad fame his mansion or both state parks contouring in downtown sacramento in a little a bit further out from sacramento is a town called woodland in the woodland. Opera house is a fully functional nineteenth century opera house. It's one of four left in the state. They do performances there. If you're into opera catch that one out some of the other historic places just in general in california up north in weaverville is one call to josh josh house j. o. s. s. say taoist temple in is gorgeous. It's well preserved over one hundred years old. It's just a beautiful beautiful temple and but it's a little off the beaten track jack london's home near sonoma isn't state park system. The rider and i don't know if you're familiar with marconi any in marconi wireless stations well his his place on the coast by point reyes. The marconi is actually a conference center in the state park system. The state system also also has a dairy ranch. North santa cruz called wilder ranch. That's preserved a working dairy ranch. It's interpreted. I don't know how i haven't been there in years. I'm not sure how much the barnes learns and the and the cows and chickens are all still there and i. I'm guessing still probably obviously to do the interpretation. They still have things going on there. The biggest one in california that everybody knows about next would be hearst castle down on the central coast which houses the largest collection of european antiquities and california and it's just at her home and it's beautiful. I remember as a kid they used to have wild animals zebras and they did and stuff like that so there anymore but <hes> yeah yeah they're gone yeah. It's it's a monument to what money can buy <hes> but it's beautiful but this is somebody who would import whole ceilings from some church in europe and then have his architect builder room around or it is interesting and of course this is william randolph hurst from the yellow journalism from the early nineteen hundreds inland from hearst castle is a town called allen's worth in its colonel allen. Were stay stark park. It's listen to larry county. It was a town totally financed and governed by african americans. It's a little off the beaten path from ninety nine highway ninety nine and highway five. They're into larry but <hes> the towns preserved in it was entirely an african american community night highly suggest people take a chance danced. Stop in and see that place couple of the last places now down l. A. will rogers home in santa. Monica is in the system and a place called watts tower. Whoever ooh watts towers probably the smallest state parks unit. It's only point one one acres but it's a cultural arts park that preserves is the watts towers that were created by these artistic towers created by simon rodeo and last place historically. Most people are not familiar with california being being a huge citrus state. The citrus industry is represented by the california citrus dana solich park in riverside okay and you can go there and see a working orange orange trees yeah and making that orange juice and take what you see with you so hopefully they still allow that but it's a neat little place talks about the citrus industry which was one of the huge moneymakers in california california course as we said has all sorts of things including recreation asian and not to be outdone or the lakes and california so one of the small slakes that i've always liked is a place called ben bow lake up one to one going north substan- francisco to the oregon border and has a really cute historic ian right adjacent to it. I don't know if you've ever seen that going up to one on a stop. In stead bendigo oroville north of sacramento tallest earthen dam in the united states clearlake which is a huge natural lake is to report it to be the oldest natural natural lake in north america now. I'm not saying red eye. Somebody's gonna have to you but clearly a part of that is in the state park system other reservoirs include folsom lake johnny cash fame folsom prison right next door folsom lake saint louis reservoir <hes> south of where you live there on the past ray in the central valley valley millerton lake the foot of sears actually used to be a national park service area before it was turned over to the state of california so they both directions the other lakes cast silverwood lake perez and southern california one that people don't really think about too much is assault and see in the desert shirts. Spy palm springs right. It's to be about one hundred twenty two summer. It's all one of the lowest places to be about two hundred in thirty feet below sea level in it's supposed to be the largest lake in california and i'm guessing that's somewhat natural even though artificially created and there are other lakes have recreational areas lakes. We can't forget lake tahoe so much do around lake tahoe donner memorial real which was the fateful campsite of the donner party traversing new sierras <hes> south has added sugar pine point which has opulent mansion when the people of money used to have mansions on tot lake tahoe summer homes the helmet mansion that sugar pine point is were seeing south of that one is the deal bliss. It has the highest elevation lighthouse in the united states rubicon point light. I'm guessing that's because it's on a lake. It's not technically what did you think of when you think of postal lighthouse which is probably why gets his highest elevation starting at sea level. That's advantage <hes> well. I guess <hes> ships crash on lake tahoe to take which is a beautiful blue green water bay and why they called emerald. It's a national natural landmark as well as having a home of itself called vikings home which is a norwegian designed to state wasn't a tourist or seeing that then another a little spot just south of there is grover hot springs which is a natural hot springs that you can go soak in as part of the state parks a lot of rivers in california or represented in the system in the south yuba the auburn for rafting zambrano both by bidwill qaluza stanislas is represented at the caswell memorial memorial said is represented by the hatfield mcconnell and then one that i don't think a lot of people go to is on the colorado river. It's also part of the gold gold mining era but picacho state recreation area. It's just north of yuma dirt road to get up befall colorado river picacho. <hes> has a peak there some gold mining diggings but it's really pleasant state park on the colorado river only state park on the colorado river recreation unwise the last thing would be state vehicle recreation areas. These are nine years in california. Will you can off highway vehicle recreate dirt bike shooting buggies. You see handrails everything up north from prairie city by sacramento hollister hills which is down by where you live. This beach has oceanic dunes which is the notes sand dunes and the newest park in the system. Actually is in the desert side pretty much right on top of where ridgecrest just had their seven point one earthquake this last which i feel that it's called onyx ranch down by the mexican border <hes> next day ends abrego state park has katina wells and what i liked about academia whilst they got a place there called the pumpkin patch and that's these conglomerate rocks there on the i'm writing sure if that's a correct term conglomerate but there's right right there. They look like pumpkins all over the desert floor and it's really a neat place to go visit. I wanna give a special mention just for you to a state recreational area called candlestick point. Okay has some significance to you. It doesn't need so that's the shoreline there. The san francisco bay were the giants to play at candlestick park. Yes i've spent many a cold evening in candlestick point thatcher you like that one so let's get onto the final group which is basically the natural areas one-third of california's coastline is in the state park system from pelican state beach up on the oregon border south to order field state beach and the mexican border at least seventy different beach each properties. I'm going to just kind of highlight a couple of them. Starting up north humboldt lagoons these are lagoons separated from the ocean by the beach itself patrick's trix point is a wonderful little state park patrick's point being the primary point there the walk around the point and the trails there south of their stinky only wilderness. This is really really hard to get to you. It is remote one lane slash two lane road out to the ocean up northern california there. It's considered the remotest in probably about one hundred inches of rain a year. You can only get to. I think it's bear gulch which is where the road ends and from there. It's all willingness taken under the park by backpacking macarthur which is at fort bragg. It has the glass beach which has glass which is basically historic orc dumping in the ocean. That's been turned around her into our trash and making it into something something the art forms are made from that south of that is schooner gulch which has one called a bowling ball beach in his word. I was looking for concretions. These the round rock engineered ball all beach the half moon bay just over the hill from where you are for the south natural bridges in santa cruz. What's neat about natural bridges is the monarch butterflies return every year there. Oh i didn't realize they had monarch butterfly growth in natural bridges interest that they come back to one of the places in some sure or south of that is seek cliff and what's interesting about sea cliff is. There's a cement ship that used to be pure there. It's the old s palo alto which is a world war. One oil tanker cbs it never really saw any use and it was salvaged is made totally concrete and they put it there for peer for dance stuff like that well. It's in total ruins now l. but it's kind of neat to see author intact for years and that's the beach where i would've learned to body surf. That's one of the nicer beaches in this era still chilly because you're still northern california beautiful beach that's inter- new brighton and sea cliff beaches. I <hes> went on during my college spent <hes> internship. They're back down towards monterey. Outside of monterey is still more state beach which also has a cop grounds point lobos. Just south of monterey has willy museum. I don't know if you've been into that or not. Point logos is got to be one of my favorite state parks. It is usually crowded these days and if you don't get there early you're going to be working out in highway one and walking in but it is a stunningly beautiful and south of that is julia pfeiffer burns or big sur big sur coastline on highway one. I most people don't stop at but there's a little the one to south dakota limekiln state park ruins of an old lyme kill production. They're interesting well. Andrew malaria state park there opposite the road road opposite highway one from five big sur's also vernice yep and that's on the beach down closer to san louis obispo. You've got us and if you've not up into the state beach it's just quaint little seaside towns this historic buildings and just a strip of state beach there that is really wonderful. I'd be south hearst castle so good place possibly have lunch there and for those that are familiar driving the one on one highway one zero one north south once you going south leaving san luis obispo. Let's blow coming down to just north of santa barbara as soon as you get to that little past there and you turn. There's the ocean front you. That's gaviota state beach where the one oh one could reconnects with the pacific relieves the the civic depending which way you're going south. Santa barbara's carpenter you state beach in this was interesting toes of the oil. It's a tar beach is that <hes> had a friend who used to summer there so i have taken oil off the bottom of my feet with lighter fluid before at carpentry and where you might be standing you think is on land. It's when you put your foot. It's going to tarnish so my caution warning. There is be careful uh-huh well in the one you skip just a little further. North <hes> is moro bay <hes> state park there with the great big moral rock <hes> also a great place. I've got an article talks about central coast great place for sea kayaking the very secluded bay very sheltered bay there behind moral rock which is a great big rock on the coast of california. You know you're right because that's a great segue to the next one because the other rocks that are sticking out his point magoo which is between ventura and los angeles and point dume which true to big granite rock sticking there in the coastline that you can hike around obviously santa monica state beach is well known to the end of route sixty six one that people me not be tour of his dockweiler state beach. I do not know this. What's great about this. One is you sit under the partner passive l._a._x. But yeah you sit there. You're sitting there on the beach and the and the jets are just taking off pretty much right over your head rather unique beach to be at and particularly if you're in aviation creation. It's a good place to spot planes. Huntington state beach obviously surf city and famous furthest surfing kaplan california and the last one. I'll mention is crystal cove gun orange county and this is a state park that has a beachfront cottage community that was developed in the thirties and you can actually rent these places out and staying gene. I'm for periods of time. It's just cute unique. Little artistic thirties ramshackle put together each toward houses being coastal. Oh can't not mention but lighthouses in the state park system has point cabrillo of mendocino point montera in pigeon point in san mateo the lighthouse field there in santa cruz and of course point sir at the big sur also in the system or various marine reserves where you can go scuba snorkeling or scuba godiva from a couple in the bay area albany and emeryville down to just south of hearst castle cambridge state marine park. It's the only state marine park we have okay so. Let's take a look at some of the scenic parks starting up north again. Castle creek's granite spires on the side of interstate five just before you get to oregon further east from that one is assume maui lava springs now. What's interesting about this state. Park is the only way you can get to it is by boating into it. There are no public roads into the state park so everybody boats over their camps and you've got these springs coming <music> outta the laba because it's right next to mount shasta of shasta lassen spectacular from there and just down the road is mcarthur burney falls which is famous for ford falls very picturesque waterfalls angel island in the bay area formerly national park service administered the entire ireland talks about about the native american heritage to the military to an immigration station it was there the western ellis island but different because it was predominantly asian emigrants and therefore not as welcome and closed for some period of time enclosed immigration we were completely closed as a country immigration to asia for awhile south aware you are castle rock which is a sculptured sandstone wasn't right about that. They had the skyline to the sea trail so it goes from there to big basin all the way to see an mentioned big base in here in a second mona lake tufa. We talked about mona lake over by boating earlier the two columns that are there. It's yeah calcium carbonate. I think predominantly structures occurs to three times my height sticking out of the lake there down southern california red rock canyon not to be confused with the red rock canyon out of las vegas. California has his own red rock canyon. Oh i'm sure is also just shaking next to ridgecrest saddleback butte. This is kind of out of lancaster area there palmdale. The area. What's interesting is that used to be called. Joshua tree state park and changed the name to confusing which austria national park so it's now called saddleback back view because of the butte that's also there but it's also has the the josh retreat senate to malibu creek state park famous for movie sets such as match in if i'm not doc mistaken i heard that may have gotten impacted by the last forest last summer i would not be surprised if you're in that area almost down by the border queen macah rancho which is the laguna mountains uh-huh between san diego and the answer abrego desert and of course answer abrego desert california's largest park over six hundred thousand acres. It's also again one of the hottest ottesen one hundred and twentieth summer. It's also the driest apparently only receives about two inches a year. It's not only famous for the desert but it has desert bighorn sheep and it was just became the first international dark sky community in california and i should mention that the pacific crest trail which is the hiking trail that goes from mexico to canada <hes> spans about two thousand six hundred fifty miles goes right through anza borrego desert state park interesting and we actually have an episode on the pacific crest trail. If you go way way back in the archives now california sanders fault it's represented by tamala spe north of san francisco and then little one call india palms next to palm springs a- and you can actually go out there and walk in the san andreas fault will be sunny india poems. I think tomatoes pays basically all water at that point where it comes to land so mountains california's full mountains sorta beauts. Just north of sacramento has the falcons <unk> plug in it is stated that it's the smallest mountain range in the world shortest world. I'm just reporting what i've read. I don't know what that means exactly okay. It's basically basically a volcanic plug. Okay mount saint helena over buffs anoma there was robert louis stevenson state park where he had his honeymoon cabin beautiful spun bob beautiful spot mail channel pious on the north part of the san francisco bay and mount diablo on the east part of the san francisco bay both giving you beautiful views reviews of the bay yeah yeah and even mount diablo. You can look up the central valley all the way over to the sierra. Let's take a break here and here from a sponsor and that's my travel credit card dot com. I think it's clear that if you've been listening to amateur traveler that i love travel but i don't love paying for travel or at least i don't love paying extra for travel so that's why each day i helped pay for my travel just by buying my groceries my gas and my gadgets for a number of years now. My wife and i used travel credit cards for our daily expenses. Then every year we reap the rewards by using the points we earn to pay for airline tickets and hotel rooms. We get extra benefits along the way like airline airline credit cards that let us wave luggage fees hotel credit cards that give us a free ninety year travel cards. We use let us avoid foreign transaction fees when we travel overseas overseas which also saves us money. We pay these cards off every single month and that's the smart thing to do that way. Other people are paying for our travel instead of the the other way round. If you don't know where to get started you can go to my travel credit card dot com and we've picked small number of great travel credit cards that i personally recommend commend including the best starter card right now the card i reach four. I is from chase but if i find better cards than we'll update my travel travel credit card dot com with our best picks so check it out and let me know where you go with your points south of you you again. Fremont peak fremont raised american flag there in eighteen forty six when he was passing through providence mountains out here in the california desert mostly known. I'm for mitchell caverns which is one of the few caverns in the state park system eight have one of my favorite places these days. I'll be there tomorrow santo state park. It's could be the coldest day park at twelve degrees below zero nine hundred seventy two. It's also the highest state park at ten thousand eight hundred and four and the easiest way to get there as a take the palm home strings tram from palm springs street up to the mountain station and you're in the state park and i will give it a disclaimer that i'm one of the directors on the tram authority there by the governor so <hes>. I won't put in a plug for that powell mountain. Just north of san diego has the appellate more mountain telescope so last couple of things in the state park system or the plants and animals dimension a few obviously the redwoods. I was wondering if there okay starting jedidiah smith which is the northernmost the del norte coast prairie creek redwoods up in humboldt. What's great about per. Creek is the occurred. It's they're just driving through news. L. grazing out no meadows humboldt redwoods state park. Has i believe if it's not there. It's in redwood national national park which is their next to each other has a tall streak two hundred and sixty nine feet one not so familiar as standish hickey. I am not familiar with standish icky ones ago now. It's just outta legged california and the reason why i want to mention that is because standish is named after the families myles standish yup the family <hes> donated land and what's interesting about that is one of my dear friends just retired as a california state park ranger gave a shout-out. He's i think he's like the forty the second myles standish direct descendant from our station talk as a state park ranger <hes> he was arranger their next year at <hes> castle rocks so kind of shout out to my buddy miles calaveras big trees which is over in the sierras and this is the most i believe the most northern sequoia groves so the sequoia right which vs or different species in the coastal redwood trees sequoia being the largest trees in the world and the coastal redwoods being the tallest and largest mass of body massive body and we also have the well this one is a little more controversial understand. The oldest trees in the world now depends on there's about bristlecone pines. I was not in a state park system. Believe it or not i was looking okay isn't gonna cover them but they are in india national park the white cone bristle matusa the oldest one there but actually not the oldest living thing in the world and that's not in the state park system either but the creosote plant grows this outward in rings circular things and so their root system coming from the same root system. They've actually got one now. Just lost lost my train onto what it was called but it's out in the mojave desert by lucerne valley and it's considered to be the oldest living thing interesting but back to the redwoods though can't miss out on next to you portola and then south of that big basin big basin redwoods state park is one of the crown jewels the state park system. It's the oldest state park officially it was established in nineteen ninety-two and it is the redwood state park that go visit henry towel next door to it that is actually my favorite big base news wonderful. I agree with you. It's a lot harder to get into. It's not right off the highway like henry. Call all as and what i would skip and and people get in trouble with this is in san francisco people talk about the u._s. Park muir woods north of san francisco would rather do either of the two the jeff is talking about here down by santa cruz either baser henry call you're going to get much less is crowds and just as beautiful trees size wiser bigger parks so you've actually got more places. You can go to muir. Woods is pretty confined with. I guess shuttle bus systems now which which is good. It's it's. They're definitely making some positive changes there yeah yeah i grew up camping. I i live like where you grew up. In big basin list of scout weekend once a year to big basin just a little bit south of that is the forest of nicine marks out of santa cruz and that was the epicenter of the nineteen thousand nine prieta earthquake will your giants giants were playing the <hes> the cross bay the as yep yep but that's the epicenter for that plants just california's specific plans as zale years ears are up in the israeli state reserve by arcade up and humble county on the mendocino coast. You have jug handle which has pygmy forest dwarf cypress and pines which are dwarf because of the marine effect. They're just stunted. Versions further on snowmass coast is the rhododendrons the cruise k._t._a._r. U._s._c. rhododendron mm-hmm park down by san luis obispo. They have a park dedicated. The coast live oaks los osos oaks. We can't forget about the antelope valley california california poppy preserve now anybody was watching and this is the spring of two thousand nineteen. I'm talking about here. Just a few months ago. The blooms the desert blooms this this was the place to go see california poppies and bloom and i do not recommend is one visitor that you land your helicopter in the middle of it to see the balloon exc so so the final plant california varieties are torrey pines in the pines before we leave the redwoods i i mentioned the beginning of the show that one of the one of the state parks that was not entirely correct three of the state parks but all redwoods state parks and their del norte jedidiah smith and purry creek are part of a unesco world heritage site along with redwood national park so all they're up in the way way north on the coast in california and the coastal redwoods there so that is a unesco world heritage site and sign it. I was there for the dedication. I was going to hold state and i was lady. Bird johnson johnson grove when they did the dedication the world heritage sites. That's always been a special memory to be to torrey pines. Probably the country's rarest pine is located on just north of the city of san diego on the coast at torrey pines state reserve and the only other place in the world is on santa rosa island part of the channel islands off the coast got conclude with animals to the animals in california elephants seals yup and in the wave oh <hes> state reserve in his other places in california but that's the prime place to go view the elephants seals and the tulio elks kinda mentioned lopa perry creek but there's actually a two state reserve in the central valley out of bakersfield well the other place i would say for elephants heels is i was surprised not a state park but that is the elephant seal beach just north of hearst castle yep part of the california coastal national monument so there's just so much to senior california. I know we're running short here. We would long just a long time ago yeah yeah i know he did but california's such a diverse place culture i mean it's just a minute u._s._a. With cultures and things like that. I just wanna say always check open times of the parks. Most of the parks are gonna have days fees charged for vehicle day. Use only this generally no charge for walking or biking into the parks in the historical parks and museums will probably charge a day use fee and we'll see things ranged between five and twenty five dollars and there are many different annual and special passes passes the state park system has so if you're gonna visit a bunch of check the prices of the ones you wanna go seen probably the buying the cheaper camping at the parks. That's going to be a separate fi and a lot of these parks you mentioned do have campgrounds so can fill up so fast upsides for all the information on museum times hours things like that. Just come to california. There's so much senior and jeff. I forced you to pick the most interesting historic park. I'll go out and see old town in sacramento with the railroad museum okay. I think that was a quick answer. The most surprising historic park probably locked then that little towns telling you on because it's just the town hannah separated from the river by a dyke so if that dike ever goes is ten is actually under. I don't wanna say sea level but it's definitely under level your favorite state beach. I'd have to go with just for sentimentality new brighton in sea cliff because i i started working there great answer incorrect. It's pointless. Put uh-huh now. Those are like all all three of those beaches sentimental than it really was and the prettiest spot in the state park system. I'm and i'm going to answer that one just because there are still many places i mean from asha maui to castle craig's the redwoods and i've always been partial to the redwoods so maybe i'll lean towards a redwood park but just just so much scenery you how can you put down to one the redwood parks if you haven't seen the the california redwoods. I really do want to underline that it yeah. It's just a bunch of trees but it is. It's very beautiful very scenic very calm. That's a well especially if you don't go to muir woods which is the national park and you end up at one of these data on a trail in big basin or even just the regular walking in henry cole or up and one of the three that are the unesco world insights in news. This is definitely something that i would on. There's a regular listener one other piece of advice that people need to go to california forty per carry plenty of water. I would say save script exposure. This on insects and things like that actually watch where you're going with infants. Tell people if you're gonna go trillo hotel going out so you can expect to me back by a certain time. It's just safety safety in short at the club. We just come out of medical study competition among among because even bigger chelsea's lead under that based on the data yours yours ale to answer of the golden with his collection less than a fifth of your chance taking a self. Thanks so much so we i know that the listeners of his show are of amateur forget interest purchased. Thanks so much insuring embassy. Could you go onto every single state kark in the state and thanks for becoming thanks chris in news of the community. I heard from jeff gulfs recently who was just the guest on this show and jeff said he enjoyed listening to the podcast. We did recently on lima peru. I wanted to add a couple of comments. Besides kuske oocyte sidetrip could also be taken to the nasca lines and the practice national reserve. I was surprised that the covenant of san francisco which houses over twenty five thousand thousand skeletons in the catacombs beneath the building wasn't mentioned you mentioned floral. I was amazed at all the beautiful landscape little corners or island island city parks. Apparently it's a competition. Among councilman somewhere even supported by advertisers who had their names nicely landscaped into the park. One final mention should be museo de oro the gold museum with its world renowned collection of pre inca gold cheers jeff's. Thanks jeff with that. We're going to end this all jeff all the time show if you have any questions and email to hosted amateur traveler dot com don't don't forget if you need a travel credit card to buy travel credit card dot com and as always thanks so much for listening. I want cajon. Pass a bill cosby ah.

california california state park san francisco united states sacramento sacramento river oregon santa cruz san diego monterey san luis obispo los angeles railroad museum joshua tree national park abrego state park jeff gulfs california indian museum national park ranger santo state park
California Wildfires Latest

Environment: NPR

03:50 min | 1 year ago

California Wildfires Latest

"Get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply this message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races other things are fast like Xfinity X. by that's three hundred cities where people singing the car poorly Delta doesn't fly just bring people together they show we're not that far apart delta key on the North Bay fires swept through a residential suburban area there was a lot of criticism rightfully so that these alerts came too late for people caused fires in the past and there's a real frustration with this bankrupt company and how they're handling these shut offs and their overall safety record that's NPR's Eric Westervelt. The streets looked like rush hour every was just packed with people in a wooden say panicked but an orderly but stressed out evacuation police were were three million people in large parts of counties in the northern part north of San Francisco and in parts of the bay area as well so sometimes you know the big fear they can toss embers a mile or more and this is a city that in two thousand seventeen lost twenty two people when a fast moving blaze support for this podcast the following message come from Delta Delta flies to three hundred cities around the world driving around you know announcing on loudspeakers saying simply you know get out now in Spanish and English going around to apartment complexes really getting people scene well I'm an evacuation center in Santa Rosa that's been filled up as police and fire sort of dramatically expanded the number evacuated from too fire prone areas as a preventive measure again in that abundance of caution has that complicated the evacuations it has. I mean powers out to almost a massive wildfire continues to rage in northern California's Sonoma county fueled by strong winds and dry conditions tens of thousands of residents have been ordered it from their homes from the end all the way to the coastline. NPR's Eric Westervelt is covering the fire and he joins us now hi tell us where you are and what cars quickly leaving you know as the authorities drove around. Pge The major utility Northern California has deliberately cut power much recovering from that two thousand seventeen fired still a city where those memories of that fire two years ago or are completely fresh everyone was we saw we're getting there and so now in many ways the fire police are are being out of an abundance of caution expanding the numbers evacuated from the city that really is the the entire northern section of Santa Rosa early this morning there was this eerie an interesting scene at four in the morning with complete darkness firefighters are now working hard to get a bigger containment line and expand that percentage and you know as I mentioned these incredibly strong winds overnight in this morning that's ought to heed these orders as the winds whipped up the fear that this kincaid fire could spread this fire that can kate fire knighted Wednesday evening ethic lights are out and it simply makes things more difficult more complicated and there's a lot of anger at PG and e. they've got a shoddy track record of safety they've caused the equipment is it gives us enough to know what it's done yeah this this place is burned some thirty thousand acres so far it's only eleven percent contained l. who's reporting with NPR producer Elizabeth Baker in Sonoma's County California. Eric thank you so much.

Eric Westervelt NPR Delta Delta Santa Rosa Northern California North Bay Sonoma county San Francisco California Elizabeth Baker kincaid Sonoma producer kate fire County California thirty thousand acres eleven percent two years
Third-World California

The Classicist

25:42 min | 1 year ago

Third-World California

"<music> hello and welcome to the classicist podcast. I'm your host. Troy senic here with Victor Davis Hanson the Martin L. E. Anderson Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Victor. We're going to have one of our occasional conversations about or mutual homestate California. You still live there. Of course I don't which is a occasionally cause of sorrow for me and then I read one of your columns and it just flushes that romanticism straight out of my system awesome <hes> the one that precipitates our conversation today you wrote for National Review and it's entitled America's First Third World State now now. I've read the piece I lived in the state. I know exactly where you're coming from here but let me play devil's advocate on behalf of the people who have had neither of those experiences in are just hearing this title in our maybe saying to themselves. Are you telling me that of all fifty states. You're saying that the one with Palo Alto and La Hoya and Malibu and Tahoe or at least half of Tahoe and Napa Valley. You're telling me that this cradle of of wealth innovation is third world. How can that be. How would you respond to that well. I think we had this conversation five years ago. When I wrote an article called the other California orange the argument I used then was one third of the nation's welfare recipients twenty two percent of the state population below the poverty line twenty twenty seven percent of the population born in a foreign country highest array of taxes and lowest achieving schools or worse great infrastructure. I think except for Mississippi and my argument then was well what you describe that paradox is the phenomenon of coastal culture. That's affluent most billionaires of any state highest per capita counties in income versus the Interior but I'm not sure that that ex Jesus works anymore because it's it's been five years and I think what I was talking about. If you're looking for outbreaks of typhus or hepatitis infectious hepatitis a potatoes or tuberculosis you actually find them in cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco and sounds and if you're looking at power outages or threaten power outages are announcement from Pacific Gas and electric the public utility that by the way is declared bankruptcy that it won't be able to service its customers for variety of reasons. That's in the coast as well the applicant sectors that you detail and Dan when you look at housing I live in Fresno Southern Fresno County which is officially the second poorest part of California and its per capita income's about thirteen thousand dollars a year like Appalachia but when I go into my hometown I don't see the streets lined with buses buses where people are living when I go to work and Paolo Alto San Mateo County. I think the per capita income's about one hundred and thirty thousand ten times higher I see along El Camino Real Allen from Stanford University of these huge Winnebago's and buses were people I guess are renting beds because they come in and out of them all day long and they sort of parked there then they move my point. Is that homelessness which is a third world. Phenomenon is pretty prevalent on the coast. The wealthy California not just the other California so my point in the article was by any barometer of medieval diseases are the inability to keep electricity eddie on in a reliable fashion or the necessity of thousands of people we have half the nation's homeless in California up three hundred thousand people to go live on the street or live in their cars. That's in California throughout the state and <hes> that's pretty scary when I look at I just got back from Greece and that Kinda prompted the article because the Greek freeways as when I lived there in the seventies and the eighties were pretty premodern but now they're Swiss and German built autobahns and they're wonderful make tonal right through mountains and that I I got there in nineteen seventy three and at that point California's freeways look quite Greece's do now now our pre ways look at Greece's of nineteen seventy-three. I just drove five hours up to northern California and it was almost like Odysseus trying trying to get home. There was all sorts of you know there was cyclops zoos and sirens and everything but the point I'm making it was pretty hazardous and this is why the point I wanted to raise with you because there are there are about forty million people in California so that works out to basically one in every eight Americans living in the state and I remember you saying on one episode years ago. The one of the paradoxes of California is that it attracts all these people at the state government seems intent to make get unlivable for a population that size that they do business is they'd be satisfied with a cap of about twenty million in one of your big arguments in this piece and ironically this is how how post-war Democrats like Pat Brown used to think about California is that one of its core needs one of the key ingredients to any future success is better infrastructure so explain. You've already explained that a little as regards the roads but just he's that argument out for us and what causes consequences have been the failure to do that. Well the week California works. This is it has three north south and it's a north south state. It's much longer than it is wider and it has three major freeways the one on one on the coast and then the ninety nine in the east and the five in the interior they overlap and places but they were originally pretty good freeways they had when we had seventeen eighteen million people they had four lanes and large part of of ninety nine. China's still four lanes. All of I five is outside of Los Angeles four lanes and outside the metropolitan areas. One one is still for lane so my point is you added. Twenty people without changing the infrastructure were we talking nineteen seventy-one about the California water project in the Central Valley Project. We would say that they were the most sophisticated water transfers engineering products and the history civilization you look at the California aqueduct was brilliant but it was never designed without. It's logical expansion in a deputation of tertiary. The third level downs to suffice for forty million person California so we go go from one year. Existential drought were long Di people or on rationing they don't bathe until the next year were we've got so much water. We're leading fifty million acre feet out in San Francisco Bay because we have no where to put it because we never expanded or finished and system and so we are living wien an third world infrastructure and boy when I go into Paolo Alto and I I drive by the neighborhoods where I'm told the Google and apple and facebook executives live I see all these Atherton Menlo Park Timber Woodside and Portola Valley Zillionaires the average gated homes but the roads are just despicable their potholder dirty. When I Walk Down University Avenue it's full of homeless people and and <hes> I can drive in places and Stanford were I'll see islands that have trees and grass will be homeless people camping in there and so it is a third world country and that Third World Ism has gone as I said earlier to the other California and it's a product of sort sort of California's infrastructures struck stuck an amber while we have twenty million more people and it's not just twenty million in more third-generation Californians of all cultures and background? It's to a large extent twenty. Seven percent of the population was born in California pointed that means we have a lot of people that we need to a cultural weight and make sure they know English. They understand the basics of American citizenship ship. Many of them are from Asia and many more from Central American Mexico many of them come without legality. They don't come and measured fashion. They don't come with critic skills. They don't come with a diploma or English and they don't even come with legality and you put all about Anna. The mixture in hyper progressive state has given up hope on that melting pot and adopted identity politics sanctuary the city's salad bowl then you've got the. I say you have the ingredients for California that we never envisioned under Pat Brown. It's the the front line of this <hes> immigration challenge for California by that I mean that's where people who are not week equipped with a birth certificate or they're here illegally. They go to get something they need to operate a car and because the I'll give you one example will the federal government after nine eleven said within a finite time any state that allowed people to have an alternate license without ide- requirements payments I e illegal aliens then would have to have a real I._D.. So we now are telling Californian's like other states. Come next fall well. If you don't have a real I d you cannot fly translated that means say at the Fresno airport that has three flights a day to Guadalajara Mexico and they're always packed these people who are flying for the most part not U._S.. Citizen and most of them are here illegally so they need need to get on that plane and they don't have passports so they go to the D._M._v. and they say I need to get my real I._D.. Will the D._M._v. says the federal law says you have to have a birth certificate which many of them don't have or you have to have a passport which none of them have and then you have to have to prove of residencies power bill or phone bill and then you have to have a social security number which most of them don't have so. How are they going to get a real real real real I._D.? That distinguishes them from a regular California license which distinguishes them from a a license granted to people that are here illegally and the answer is is I found out when I made an appointment and then leapt two hours later is that a lot of people just take pictures of stuff in other words. They'll get a birth certificate from someone else. Cutting pays put a piece of their her name on it or they will get their residents and they'll get a W.. Two and change the social security number and take a picture of it or <hes> Xerox <hes> and then they go to the D._M._v. and they're told no that's not going to work you have to have the original copy and then people say well. That's not fair. Then the person at the windows has let me go get my supervisor and most of it is conducted in Spanish and you can imagine when it's one hundred five degrees in Hanford or really and that that same I'm office is still giving is swamped because it's giving licenses. They're all licenses to illegal aliens first because to get a real I d you need a prior fire California license so you can imagine what that does and when you compound the fact that the Democratic Party the Progressive Women Sees The D._M._v. is a way of registering people to vote even though the people who are on their license roles are illegal and they're supposed to distinguish wish ill illegals who have driver's license from legals and we're told that at least in the case of seventy thousand the last election they were accidentally accidentally on purpose <hes> conflicted and we had to fire the D._M._V. Director apparently and now there's reports that maybe a million people voted in congressional districts that were not Hanging in thousands of very poor people in offering them parody in the American dream and because that's so noble we don't really care about the means necessary to pull it off. That would be the best. Take on the worst. Take on it would be we. WanNa make sure that there's less than seven congressional fifty three congressional districts that are are Republican. We got rid of eight of them. Get rid of them all next time and we don't have one state official whose Republican and we have a super majority in the house and <hes> these simply I should say in the state senate and this is a good model and maybe Nevada and Colorado Colorado New Mexico and Arizona and Texas can follow it and therefore this chaos that I described at the D._M._V. is not seen as chaos oss. It's seen as a kind of inconvenient but otherwise commendable way of bringing a lot of people cross the border that are going to change the demographics of Electoral College in a positive way for those in power. I'd also note your observation in the National Review piece where you you say that there is one. I'm pretty functional brands for the D._M._v. in the state and it's a as you render it as sort of quasi secret location in Sacramento. That's just one <hes> <hes> I found that out by talking to a legislator who kind of winked nodded and said that he just goes to this private little place and he doesn't stand in line because I was whining to him about I wish you had to stain and then I looked it up. When I got home when there's actually a story in the Sacramento Bee that it does does exist and people were outraged about its existence you <hes> you mentioned earlier and you've mentioned in past episodes sort of the cultural contrast that you see if you had the cord north from the central valley up to Silicon Valley or South and Los Angeles and there has been especially in the past decade tercel a growing argument that Californias so immense. If you've got a huge population the states the size of Germany there's arguably because this is more an art than a science somewhere between a half dozen and a dozen kind of distinct regions that and the argument runs that this is a society that is simply too complex complex and too diverse to wrangle in two one st and so we've seen increasingly dramatic reform proposals people talking about breaking it up into smaller states or people people talking about writing a new constitution are you to that point where it seems like absence some big fundamental institutional change. This is not going to get any better yeah. I don't think it's going to get better in my lifetime. My hope would always always be that in matters of illegal immigration that the Hispanic models sort of emulating the Latino <hes> the excuse me the Italian American model of the early the twentieth century but that was predicated on abbreviated immigration spurts not continuous ones by point as for assimilation integration and intermarriage to work. You can't have a million people coming across the border illegally without a high school diploma English just too much it taxes. This is the powers of assimilation to so much that doesn't work but so I don't. I'm not very confident. If you were to split the state in two I think there would be a more conservative mostly Latino state in the middle and I e from Bakersfield to Sacramento and and you would combine the Sierra Nevada which is very conservative and maybe all the way in the west side up to the foothills it wouldn't be nearly as rich as the coast wouldn't have Stanford for Caltech it wouldn't have apple or Google etc but you would not be passing legislation about transgendered restrooms or Straw soon to be banned or against the law to have your dog chase a Bob Cat. It would be more elemental stuff. The powers to high gas is too high. There's not enough housing. We've got to build better roads. It'd be much more pragmatic. That might be good. I think what we're doing now. In California were telling during the minority population we give you guys open borders and we give you guys plentiful on audited <hes> social programs uh-huh and entitlements and we protect your relatives friends family members from deportation when they're residing illegally through our sanctuary city program and therefore your representatives have to get on board with us in not building affordable housing regulating gas and oil out of existence shutting down the timber and Mining Industries and having these boot Boutique Green issues that's what you signed up for its very condescending attitude and somehow that has to be broken and I don't know how it will be because as soon as a moderate or conservative legislator who self identifies Latino <music> something they feel that he's in an end grade or he's not he's not following the party line but until we have a viable conservative or centrist Centrists Latino political movement we're not going to see much change simply because about forty percent of the population now self identifies as Latino probably seventy percent of them are Democratic voters so final question <hes>. You've had a tremendous amount of success this in your career. You've distinguished yourself as a scholar. You've distinguished yourself as a public intellectual all that to say you're not someone who's caught in a mobility trap for you can't just pick up stakes and leave and I venture to say that if Victor Davis Hanson announces tomorrow that he's relocating to Texas there's a welcome party waiting for him at the border but for all these parts for the California border for all of these frustrations you remain Victor Davis Hanson of Selma California why we know it's funny. That's the topic of conversation than my wife and I have because we live in this three thousand. Thousand Square Foot Victorian farmhouse it was built in eighteen seventy with a three acre yard and then we have forty five acres of farmland farmland and I'm sixty five and she's fifty six so we're not as young as spicer. We don't have any help at all. I mean I do all yard worked in all the maintenance and she does all the interior cleaning and cooking and she works full time as a professor and I worked full time as well so we're saying maybe we should relocate and then we we start talking and I don't think either my surviving children want to live here for variety of reasons. They marry other people from different areas of California. They're not attached Central Valley to the same degree <hes> so we ask yourself. Why are we doing this and I guess the answer comes comes that <hes> a couple of things one is. I don't want to be the person six generations of sell something that I wanna give my children the chance to make make that decision the way I had that chance and so my great great grandmother built this House when I see pictures of her every day. I'm looking at one right now. That's so it's kind of lethargy or traditions. The other thing is that <hes> I found a way kind of it to insulate myself from things that we you and I have talked about over the years and by that I mean I kind of feel this is like a small little farmhouse in North Africa about five hundred A._D.. When the vandals came and by that I mean there's a lot of people that I went to high school with that are Mexican American and the WHO are my closest friends and and they're all politically centrist or conservative and if anything they're more conservative about the border than I am I saw when I had dinner last night with one I went to first grade with. They have the same concerns that I do and then to. I kind of know the sheriff's sheriffs. I know some of the larger farm families I built a about twenty years ago. I build six hundred foot stone wall around the the whole compound and within. I tried to make kind of a Greek gardens or have a pool and beautiful yard and and I have a six foot and a half wall so when I walk out of the wall I'm out in the real world where my neighbors are engaging in chop. Shops and shootouts and cockfights invites an illegal activity in there and we have a lot of but within my compound if you have five of these Australian in cattle dogs Queensland healers and you're pretty safe and I mean that literally because what's one of the shocking things about it is I live in one of the highest crime <music>. I'm rates. I think Fresno is one of the highest maybe for San Francisco property crime rate areas per capita but when I talked to people who are very wealthy that live on the San Joaquin River and places like Stockton Fresno very affluent areas or I talked to my daughter who lives in Santa Cruz. I talked to even people in Palo Alto. I hear these horrendous stories of break INS and vandalism. I'd never had any of that in the last ten or fifteen in years and I don't know whether that's because the local sheriff's like to do their paperwork in my yard or on good terms with the lot of people but so far on the last time we had a serious break in I think was fifteen years ago pretty scary but they haven't had that lately but otherwise. Why is you know. I'm just not to ramble too much but there is an advantage. I don't socialize with other hoover scholars because I'm here you know when I go to Stanford <unk> working all day from six to eight in my office to get all my business and then when I'm here nobody ever comes over to my house. We don't go out to dinner enter with other couples so I get a lot of work done but you know it's a one hundred six today here and I'm going to hang hang up and try to go up on the roof and figure out what in the world is wrong with my use. Internet and my landline is out as usual when it gets hot and I'd much rather be at Stanford today or up in the mountains so I don't know. How long is this going to Laos but I guess the final answer is I just don't WanNa be the first Lincoln at chain that that broke and I have some competence that things are going to change and I really don't believe that what a person's ethnic background or color or whatever the superficial identity politics stuff is matters at all? I have no problem with the fact that my community used to be when I I was born into it about seventy five percent Scandinavian. This was a Danish each town kings work next door with a Swedish and now it's about ninety percent Hispanic. I think that's great. My only worry is that I'd like the culture to remain remain the same and by that I mean <hes> honest government in efficient government and I I have some competence that second and third generation Mexican American former immigrants follow in that tradition and that they too are not tribal as we think they are when we read about the left left-wing the Democratic Party and so that's my hope but we'll see what happens I could be shop tomorrow by a guy stripping a semi in my yard or I could walk out my house literally to get the Mail on a stray dog bite me and I'd have another decision as I've had two or three times where to get rabies shots or not but right now. I think that's the reason I stay well. We'll choose as I'm sure. Our listeners will to embrace the more optimistic of the forecast. You've been listening to to the classes podcast with Victor Davis Hanson. Remember you can read Victor's work to finding ideas at Hoover Dot Org as well as pick your Hansen dot com and if you enjoy the classes please to show on itunes for Victor Davis Hanson. I'm choice Senate. Thanks for listening. This podcast asked has been a production of the Hoover Institution for more information about our work. Please visit Hoover Dot Org.

California Victor Davis Hanson Los Angeles Hoover Institution Fresno National Review Pat Brown Sacramento Stanford Central Valley Stanford Google China San Francisco Democratic Party Palo Alto
California Pushes Back On Trump Administration Over Emissions Standards

Environment: NPR

04:27 min | 1 year ago

California Pushes Back On Trump Administration Over Emissions Standards

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity. Some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like Xfinity X. by get get fast speeds. Even when everyone is online working to make WIFI simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply the trump administration and California are squaring off again in a series of tweets this morning president trump announced. He's ending nearly fifty years of precedent. He's revoking California L. A. FOR News Authority to set its own emission standards for cars and trucks the state has long set tougher tailpipe standards and the federal government to help combat air pollution the moves moves. That's up with likely to be a long legal. Fight could derail a year's long effort to produce more fuel efficient cars. NPR's Nathan Rod is covering the story he joins us from I studios in California. NPR West and nate. I just want to start with reaction from California leaders that we've heard elsewhere in the program the state's Attorney General Lafayette but Sarah that he plans to sue. What else are you hearing yes. We're hearing a lot of basically not happy reaction from people here in California people here in California. We've known this is coming for a long time. Trump's been threatening it for years as part of a bigger fight between California and this administration over national fuel economy standards. It's the EPA Environmental Protection Agency is rolling back a set of aggressive national standards that were put in place under President Obama which essentially aim to push automakers maker to build more fuel efficient cars thing is California really likes those old standards it helped make them and it's told the trump administration that it will use its waiver the one that trump now says he's going to revoke to essentially keep them in place here in California and in the thirteen other states follow California's lead obviously the big underlying concern here is climate change transportation is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the US here's California Governor Gavin Newsom in an interview with NPR appear earlier today the hot getting hotter. The drives are getting drier than what they're getting wetter. This is serious. Mother Nature's now join the conversation people are waking up to this reality. If you don't address the issue of transportation you're not serious about addressing the issue of climate change but the president's argument is that one st shouldn't have the ability to essentially really dictate where the rest of the country is going to give us the history here. How did California get this waiver in the first place so this waiver has existed since the creation of the clean clean Eric Nearly fifty years ago. Remember California had terrible air pollution in the sixties and seventies that darkened the skies here in L. A. It was seen as a public the health crisis by Democrats and Republicans so the state created its own regulations on auto emissions at predated the Clean Air Act so a national lawmakers were we're making that act. They decided to basically allow California to continue setting its own standards as long as they were tougher than the floor set by the feds on California's done that ever percents now. I WanNa talk about why the president is making this move now. I mean you said that. This has been going on for a long time so what's going on well. The president is in California now raising money for his reelection and we all know that California in this president to never miss a chance to take a jab at one another fighting over Climate Change Angel Aggression Homelessness. You name it. timing also maybe related to the legal challenges that everyone knows or coming. I spoke to an environmental law professor at the University of of California Los Angeles who said that the trump administration definitely wants to kill this waiver once and for all so they might be pushing this forward with the hope that these legal fights it's reached the US Supreme Court sooner than later given that we have an election coming up now the auto companies they four of them had signed on voluntarily to the California the standard. What are they saying. Now you know auto companies here are kind of stuck in the middle. They want one national standard. They don't want to be building cars with one standard and California and another in other other states. That's not good for business but California officials. Today are also pointing out that the world is moving towards cleaner cars. They're sharply criticizing this move by the trump trump administration as a step backwards an era of climate change and one that stifles innovation here in the US. That's NPR's nate rod at NPR west. Thanks so much. Thank you audience.

California NPR Trump president University of of California Lo US Nathan Rod NPR NPR West Governor Gavin Newsom federal government US Supreme Court EPA Environmental Protection A Obama nate
Elon Musk restarts Tesla plant in California, disregarding order

Audioburst Editors Picks Feed

00:24 sec | 4 months ago

Elon Musk restarts Tesla plant in California, disregarding order

"Tesla CEO Elon. Musk confirmed on twitter. That the company has restarted. Its California factory a move. That defied local government orders involving measures to contain the corona virus. Musk Sant he would be on the assembly line and asked that he be arrested with authorities taken into custody. The plant in Fremont employs ten thousand workers and has been closed since March twenty.

Musk Sant Tesla twitter CEO Fremont California
Lights Out For California

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:30 min | 11 months ago

Lights Out For California

"Jesus Davenport serves as the general manager of the North Coast Co op. It's an organic grocery store in Arcadia California little town of around n. p. r. areas where lines go through a lot of vegetation and where there are not people around immediately spot the fires and batteries and making preparations there was one thing that kept going through his head this is ridiculous and we shouldn't have gotten here but they are here thousands of acres to burn in fact that is what happened with the so-called Campfire last year PG and E. Equipment was blamed for sparking the fire which killed nearly one hundred people other power companies across the country investing in technology to monitor their power grids and immediately alert them when powerline was in distress and even shut off power to those lines PG just didn't it also didn't invest in keeping shrubs and trees trimmed along its power lines and pg any is especially vulnerable and support for this podcast comes from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation helping NPR advanced journalistic excellence in the we simply dropped the ball and wasn't doing the maintenance they were supposed to be doing and wasn't doing serious Grid Monitoring Seventies people often receive very little warning like Jason Davenport Manager of the grocery store in northern California who suddenly had three hours to save thousands of dollars worth of for the moment is the blackouts cutting off power to hundreds of thousands of people and businesses across California and because the weather and wind can change so quickly judo age severin born directs the Energy Institute at Berkeley's Haas School of business his power was just out for two days and as he was stockpiling food and I mean for California businesses and residents going forward and of course what Jason did in the three hours before the blackout in Arcada Hi and Wendy in a lot of California right now so PGA has been shutting off parts of the power grid to avoid starting fires but that has meant millions of Californians losing power risk some of PG knees equipment is old and prone to throwing off sparks in fact PG started more than a dozen major fires just like that in the last few years it is dry so there's just a lot more risk that they're going to start fires that can turn into major fires at the same time as PG's equipment was aging and shrubs we're growing over it severances the climate was changing creating a greater risk of fire so a spark that probably would have just flamed out in seconds a decade ago might now 'cause he got an alert from the town blog that said the power was gonNA go out PGN IPE California Power Company was shutting off the power to the whole town to avoid fire Gary and frozen food and prepared food in the whole grocery store was going to go bad and Jason had three hours to figure something out what went through your head when you sometimes for days and also businesses like the North Coast go up how much warning did you have it's just a few hours the power outage was going to mean that all of the meat and found out you were going to have to shut off the power we need to get to work this is the indicator from planet money I'm Stacey Vanik Smith California blackouts PG starting fires a seven because it covers so much land so many square miles much of them very sparsely populated means they are covering a lot of rural very thin margins. Jason says the costs were pretty formidable but all of that food going to waste would have been much worse if you're looking at it purely by the numbers produce and prepared food so the first thing Jason did call every employee he had even the off-duty workers and ask them to come help the second thing severance

Jason Arcadia California Jesus Davenport North Coast Co general manager three hours two days