Wellness

Listen to the latest on healthy living tips, the importance of keeping fit and how to manage the lifestyle you want, from audio aired on leading podcasts.

Belly fat may be linked to a higher risk of early death, regardless of overall body fat

KYW 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 4 d ago

Belly fat may be linked to a higher risk of early death, regardless of overall body fat

"Getting rid of that belly fat couldn't just make you look better. It could make you live longer to access belly fat, maybe a bigger danger to health of in fat elsewhere in the body. Research in the B. M. J examined a studies of more than two million people fat stored around the abdomen was associated with the higher risk of early death, while larger hips and thighs were associated with a lower risk.

B. M. J
Interview with Khalil Zahar, Founder of FightCamp

20 Minute Fitness

05:45 min | 4 d ago

Interview with Khalil Zahar, Founder of FightCamp

"Guys that's Martin from shape. We're here right now in San Francisco Studio and unconnected to aid today on with the founder of fights cab Saha. Could you why don't you deduce yourself? It'll. Yeah. Awesome. First of all, thanks a lot for receiving me on the PODCAST. Martin. So my name is Lil- I'm the CO founder, CEO Camp and weekly started Fi Kim about a year and a half ago. So. If I is an interactive corn boxing gym, it comes with everything you need to start boxing and actually follow videos that are built by the best trainers of all the west coast they all fighters they all have obviously a tremendous fight expands but they're also great fitness instructor general for the listener on on our show that has never seen. It's what should be should be mentioned punching back and a pair of gloves. So what be? Yes. So it comes with a free standing bag. The best standing back on the market with a pair of didn't win leather gloves made an approved by fighters with a workout Matt, a pair of with be called quick grabs and the special sauce is who? Motion trackers that you put into quick wraps Ma and detract your hands a thousand times per second trek speed and my my punches. How many punches I'm doing per minute of what should I expect? Yes they tracked the type of country throw the measured the speed of the bunches basically build your output profile from one round to the other. What about impact? Not The impact is really the velocity. Okay. The of your hand and which actually throwing and how does like the coaching look like you were mentioning that you have coaches of all over the place and should I imagine like watching them like on my TV or iphone ourselves for me? Yes. So it comes with an APP you can the. Myriad on a large screen TV or you can watch the workouts on an IPAD whatever you prefer, and then from there, it's Kinda like all you can eat buffet. Really. So if you're advanced, you can jump straight into the advanced workouts right away we go and deep into the complex combinations. We'd practice footwork and the workouts very intense. Otherwise, it can literally start at the very first time. You've you're you're throwing your first punch. So we have what we call the prospect where it takes you from zero boxing experience teaches you to six inches and then at the end of the prospect path which. is about a four weeks program you actually know how to six months probably you know how to stand you know the basics Balkan it's mostly regular boxing the offer classes for a time boxing mma Nelson actually were focusing on boxing at the moment but we're having a lot of internal conversations around providing kickboxing as well as a kickboxing in multi, really as a as a an expansion and so so who's like you you're right now is it really like what you just mentioned on the beginners or is it like somebody that's been into boxing all their life or hundred, seventy, four for you Guys. Yeah, it's really seventy five percent beginners, but it's actually very interesting to see like a lot of them are now not beginners anymore So you know we kind of took a bunch of them. You know through the program you get to see videos online and on the social media and they're getting very proper form on have the basics of boxing. Of course, they don't have the in ring experience right visit steely it's a home virtual experience. Yeah. You can't really compete against somebody else right right. So Yeah, you actually can compete but on up put and precision you can't compete on. Actual defense offense. Of course, you're not going to get him. You know and does like a class look like, is it one on one coaching tailored to me or is it like a big class like pedal tone style or yet is really a group class? So it's you'll have usually the video stream will be divided into not that it's divided on the screen per se but vary between having the camera centered on the coach, and then you're getting bureau that is very dynamic. The camera moves around in the class and focuses on the participants taking the class live at our studio in Newport beach. For for me, you know like me having like an iphone like my supposed to put up my iphone like somewhere like on a on a counter, and then look at it while I'm like punching out on my back or how should I mention it? Yeah. That's a very good question like there's not a lot of people use it only with the with the iphone unless they're traveling aren't as they're actually using it in a gym gym or their apartment Jim the vending most people digging each day my cable upload, the Stream directly on on a big screen. TV. Your accent. Yeah. Oh we have a portion of our users. We actually are doing it on the night pat about Apple TV, that works as well Yeah. You can mirror exactly. You can use apple TV to mirror the the stream directly on a big screen TV as well. That's definitely the best experience you're getting very loud sounds and music. You hear the voice really really properly, the nose of the bag doesn't supplant the voice of the trainer lifts. Your stats are displayed very big for you. So like you're really into it, you feel like you're you're being tracked in. Really part of a group experience and it's both IOS and android os mostly s right now. Saying. It's only on ISLA, its and so why are people doing it Do they just WanNa, get a workout and they are not happy with you know like an experience like Peleton or maybe the half a pedal tone and want to supplement it with something else or do they actually want to get into boxing learn those skills forward let's say self defense. Yeah it's interesting. So. Like calm, we have two types of customers. The first type of customers really just will always intrigued boxing They want to do it because it's a work of that Jesse get something out of it even though you would stop working out after a year like you would still acquire the skills and those are self defense skills. You know a lot of people are mystified by you know. How to actually throw a punch and Hudson do properly. So that was one of our customers the other portion of because there is actually coming from the idea that boxing is the best workout to get in shape and the discovered the fundamentals and techniques through fight Cam. So the first reason they joined is for fitness purposes really assuming that boxing is the best workout out there the. Other portion come straight because they want boxing, but they can't attend to have a busy lifestyle. Their young parents hitting the gym is increasingly harder would a busy schedule? so that's the other proposition that they really resonate with and

Boxing Martin San Francisco Founder Apple Newport Beach Instructor Matt Fi Kim Co Founder Hudson Nelson Jesse Ceo Camp JIM
The Quickest Way to Form Healthy Habits that Stick

The Chalene Show

04:59 min | 5 d ago

The Quickest Way to Form Healthy Habits that Stick

"In two thousand and seven researchers at Oxford. University started looking at the brains of newborn babies and what they found was pretty Dang interesting. What they found when comparing the brains of newborn babies to the brains of adults. Was that adult had fewer get this fewer neurons in their brain than newborns did kind of interesting ha and that was very compelling for the researchers they wanted to. Why would babies have more neurons? If obviously, adults are more skilled and smarter et Cetera they can do more and they wanted to know, okay. What was going on in the brain? What they discovered is a concept that they now call synoptic pruning. Okay and here's just a really layman's way of understanding synoptic pruning. It is our synapses think of them as if you. Don't use it. You lose it. Our synapses are a fancy way of describing the connection happens between two neurons in your brain. So it's as basic idea that your brain if it doesn't need those connections, they they kind of fade away if they don't get used to frequently they disappear if you will. So let me give you a more tactical example this. So let's say that the country the world is in the middle of a pandemic and everyone goes into lockdown and you decide to every day of the pandemic to go roller skating. Now used to do it as a kid, but you haven't done it in years and years and years. Well, what happens is when you're a kid you, you could do like shoot the duck and you could roller skate backwards and can do all these really cool things and you were very, very confident on your roller skates. But now you're an adult and you're putting on your rollerskates again, and while some of those sit ups, are there the connections that used to exist between them have either weekend or they fallen away? But you star roller skating every single day for like six months. And your brain begins to strengthen these connections. So it's not only physically are you getting better at it? Mentally you're getting better and the more you practice the stronger those connections become in those connections start to get faster and more efficient. So when the first time you through on your rollerskates, you're like, Whoa Whoa it felt like it literally felt like the first time even. Though you've done it for years but now you're throwing your roller skates and your body knows how to respond when you start to lose your balance. It doesn't make you nervous. The brain builds these stronger faster connections and you start to develop skills much more easily it feels second nature. In fact, you're no longer thinking about it. It's a biological process that happens in our brains. And it's these biological processes, these synapses, these connections that allow us to make habits the type of habits where you're not even thinking about it you're just doing it. It's the same process that happens when you're in your car, you're driving somewhere, and then suddenly you're getting off an exit and you're like, what am I doing? This is my exit. This is just the exit that I normally get off on your brain wasn't even thinking about it though synapses were happening without you even being aware of them. The synopsis are so strong that you don't have to think about it. You don't have to discipline yourself to do these things. They just happen an example of that might be brushing your teeth and example that might be robbing. Your is in the morning example that might be sitting up in bed and opening up your phone. An example of that might be before you go to bed you get coffee ready for the morning. These are things you don't even think about you just do them over and over and over again. And the more we repeat on the stronger those synopsis become the question is, how do we get ourselves to the point at which we've repealed it? So often that the connection is there, the synapse is strong and we no longer have to rely on discipline or thinking about it. We've developed a habit a habit that is strongly connected in a pathway in our brains. The answer is something bj. Fog Habit expert in Stanford University Researcher Calls Implementation intention in other words stacking one habit on top of another pairing a new habit he wants to develop with one that's already been established. One that already has the synapses connected hardwired. We all want to develop healthy habits. We all want to have those habits that make it easier for us to just get through the day and not have to. Rely on discipline and I have to remind ourselves or to beat ourselves up. When we forget to do something, we want these habits yet we've been told by the media, buy books by authors, Experts that habit is the act of repeating something over and over and over again, you've probably heard the myth that it takes twenty one days thirty days to form a habit

Oxford Stanford University Researcher
The Massive Impact Work Has On Your Health & Why NOW Is The Time To Change It

The Model Health Show

05:06 min | 6 d ago

The Massive Impact Work Has On Your Health & Why NOW Is The Time To Change It

"Today we'll be talking about one of the most overlooked health issues that has been affecting our entire world and it's been overlooked long enough and I truly believe that right now is giving us an opportunity to actually change this. So, we're going to start this with a Meta analysis of four, hundred, eighty, five studies, and this is published in occupational and Environmental Medicine. And found that job satisfaction is one of the strongest influences on mental health issues. In Our world, most notably for depression and anxiety. The study noted a relationship also between our job satisfaction and physical health issues like gastrointestinal issues and cardiovascular as well, and this is echoed in several other studies including study that was cited in the Journal of chronic diseases. Taking into consideration array of risk factors and of vocations and an array of income levels uncovered that the lack of satisfaction in the work that we do is a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease. Why don't we talk about this? Real health and wellness is dynamic. It comes from so many different things. It's not just about food you can eat the perfect. Personalized, unique blood type buddy type, every type diet. And go to work and spend half or more of your waking hours of your entire life hating what you do or being unhappy go into the place that you go every day or doing the work that you're doing instill still develop chronic health issues even if your diet is perfect, even if you're hitting the gym all the time, all of these things matter. Relationships matter our sleep matters. All of these things go into the overall code. The human that you are. and. This issue. More than any other time in our lifetime is something that we can change what's happening right now with the job market and all of the turmoil I believe is offering up an opportunity for us to change this because many people are working themselves in his sickness and don't even realize it. It's happening and they don't realize that it doesn't have to be this way now we're going. To discuss, there is a modicum of course of doing what you gotTa. Do you know getting the bills paid but we have to move beyond that and this is the opportunity to do. So we're GONNA talk about how we can actually do that today as well. But I want to dive a little bit deeper here because I scratched the surface in some of the issues that we see. The results of another peer reviewed study and this was published in two thousand fifteen finally direct link between job satisfaction and psychological distress as well as physical disorders. Now according to the researchers satisfaction with the nature of work that was doing was the strongest predictor for psychological distress for sleep disorders, headaches, and gastrointestinal problems what. You don't hear stuff like sleep problems caused by. Dissatisfaction with the work one is doing. The data exists, but this is something that we brush off really think about this. Again, we think somebody's illness quote comes out of nowhere where there are so many different factors like they eat. Perfectly they're exercising all the time. And we have to take a broader view of health now and take all of these things into consideration. And that's what I'm encouraging us to today. Another study. This was from researchers from the Ohio State University say that their work shows that happiness on the job or lack thereof appears to have the biggest impact on midlife mental health. One of study authors noted that and listen to this is really interesting. And having a scale very satisfied satisfied to completely dissatisfied. They discovered that quote seen with the majority of people are either very satisfied or satisfied with their job, but we find that even they subtle distinction between. Satisfied and simply being satisfied has significant effects on your health. I would say our studies, main findings are you're likely to have worse health if you don't love your job rather than if you hate your job So did you catch that distinction? People who are just kinda getting by tolerating what they do, and maybe they're okay with their job. But if they don't love their work, not loving your work, not loving the thing that you do every day is far more of a predictor of negative health outcomes than if somebody absolutely hated the job. So that little subtle distinction of actually enjoying what we do every day is the strongest predictor of our health when it comes to the work that we do.

Occupational And Environmental Journal Of Chronic Diseases Depression Headaches Ohio State University
Becoming Better Grownups with Brad Montague

The Chalene Show

05:10 min | Last week

Becoming Better Grownups with Brad Montague

"So Brad thank you so much for joining me today I'm really excited to talk about so many things that have. Like the way I had planned on us having this discussion, bring you to the audience has really changed because the world has changed I guess my first question I would ask is, what is it that you solve for the world? You start with the biggest of the big. I guess. So I mean, that's the hope always that somehow were all being views and to realize that you already are being views in some way. That you don't think is remarkable because you've been doing it all along at least that was what it was for me. I didn't realize that encouraging people and telling stories and loving people around me was such a big deal, but it's the biggest deal. So the problem I'm trying to solve is to constantly. Love better in invite other people to love better to. The thing I've learned the most I think in listening to so many interviews with you reading your book is I never hear you mentioned? Money I. Never Hear you mentioned how is this going to turn into a business and that's something I want to learn to do better I believe I follow my passion and my purpose, but I do also always think to myself. Okay. But is this going to be worth it financially like is it GonNa be worth my time financially and I just never hear that. From any of the endeavors I know you've pursued in, we're going to get into some of those. But for example, when I hear you say something like that and our listeners are hearing you say something like that. They think that's great but. I just lost my job and I don't know if this industry is gonNA come back a while love and I want to show up in that way but I also have to focus on keeping a roof over my head. How do you balance those two in? Do you think about it or is it just an abundance mindset? I think it starts with wherever you are so whatever job you have Becomes, a space to love people better wherever that is I've worked plenty of jobs where the lesson I learned was I'm not good at that like I'm not supposed to be doing this right now. But in that space, it wasn't a wasted time I learned how to communicate. I learned how to work with people who've greatly different from. You pick up things along the way. And the moment for us. All is the moment that we're in. It's the moment that we're in and how can I bring my best self to this moment or what do I have to learn this moment would have to share in this moment. When you shift to that, you start to realize you always have something to offer. And to the world around you has something to offer as well. That's a constant opportunity to love and it ignites something in you where I'm definitely have been finding in myself when people that are in my immediate orbit that the more that you kind of focused on how you can. Operate from a mindset of not I'm going to do this for Love I want people to love me engine I. Want Them Ause we operate sometimes Wanting. To be loved when the best work comes when you operate from love like we do things, we do work for satisfaction sometimes like do this, it's GonNa make me happy. Yeah. When you're with somebody who works from satisfaction, they already are at peace and are so grateful to be where they are. There's just a freedom. It's dazzling like I've experienced that with the woman who worked I live in a really small town. Willing to work at the post office and is like watching Michael Jordan play basketball like seeing her just love people taking packages and mail and their long lines. But she knew my kids names, she knew. Everything about people in the community where packages were going where they might be headed where we've had problems. And when we through a parade for her. Was My way of showing. Well, we got a bunch of kids to line up and just surprise the post office one day and he was at her birthday or juice. The parade. And I'm in a marching band outfit. ill-fitting marching band outfit. We go in and I say Okay Dana come on out it's time for your parade. Everybody's here to celebrate you and she was very grateful what she said I have worked to do. I love her. And I just thought that was so great like yet thank you I'm so honored you would do this but I'm already. Happy this towner. Love and the people that

Dana Brad Michael Jordan Basketball
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | Last week

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Magic Spoon, A Healthy Breakfast Cereal

20 Minute Fitness

04:09 min | Last week

Magic Spoon, A Healthy Breakfast Cereal

"Gary Welcome to the show. Hi, thanks for having me. Well, can you describe to our listeners what magic spoon radius of course magic spoon is a breakfast cereal company that I launched in April of two thousand nineteen. So just over a year ago and we are recreating all of your favorite shout who'd sugary cereals but without the sugar essentially. So imagine whatever your favorite junk cereal was an I imagine it worth more protein and less carbs zero sugar actually legitimately healthy for you. But with the and texture of all those sugary cereals, we we all loved growing up, right? Yeah. I had to look actually at the nutritional labels off both magic spoon and then fruit loops. A popular child with choice of of many, and I can see both serving of about one, hundred, ten, two, hundred, eighteen categories, but magic spoons. Macro makeup is completely different I'm seeing that it's fruit loops gets like eighty five percent of their calories from cops out of which about half come from Shoka match gets nearly eighty percent of its calories from fat and protein. How do you achieve that? Correct? So we've basically got a similar Carolina recount. We've swapped the protein and carbs around and we did riot by basing our SERIO ON A. Blend of protein slits, we primarily use a milk pudding ice lit as well as a way protein concentrates and use that instead of the wheat flour or corn flour rice lower than most classic serials, and then rather than sweetening with thigh high fructose, Corn Syrup, or perhaps akin sugar we use a blend of natural sweeteners that are essentially zero calories. So specifically use Stevia and monk route and three those in a specific combination allows us to get as close as possible to that sweet tasted sugary cereals without actually putting sugar into the products. I am because I was curious because I'm certain food scientists and then I saw you know like you have a blend of fruits, Steve Young at Lowe's and the nets reason to really achieve that that flavor or is it something else as well? So that's the sweetness the flavor itself. Ingram comes from natural flavors. Basically Ryan's depending on ever. We have a obliterate flavor, for example, some of us. Are Real Blueberry powder in that Labor, and then will actually get the colors from fruit and vegetable juices used in very small quantities. So not really adding any sugar but are You know some of our flavors resemble US beet juice, beet extracts read flavor fritzy cereal Spirulina to get a blue collar on our blueberry cereal. For example, the different gradients are different purposes but in general everything's entirely natural. Even. Though of course that doesn't mean very much nowadays but premium high-quality ingredients and high in protein sugar, a would not expect that actually when you look at like a package off fruit loops that they can be actual flavors in it. So it's it's quite impressive and you also have an oil plan with within magic spoon riot. Can you talk more about that direct? So he's a blend of. Highly Sunflower oil, and then avocado oil. Basically, you didn't oil to bind the colors in the flavorings to the base of the cereal and we wanted to, of course, was high quality. Fatty Acids rather than just like sure low-quality seed oils and so high elects unclear. Oil pretty different from regular Orlando it fatty acids and those are the same sort of saturated fats that you find extroversion. And of course, avocado oil very healthy as well. Got It and just going back to the sweeteners, and now that in recent years, the had been quite a few studies on a variety of different sweeteners and some of them half a good and some have a negative impact on one's microbiome worried as long fruit steve here on LAS, stand on that. Do you now that? Yeah, they're good impact which is why we chose them. So Chicago halls are generally very good. So bunch of using things like A. Recruits all tell which can have a negative impact on my own, but also caused just looting and general or stomach aches and a pretty large portion of the population. So we want to avoid sugar alcohols for that reason, which right meet means ingredients are more expensive. So obviously, stadium for are more expensive than a lot of the other sweeteners that might still be natural but he come with other issues, and so we wanted to avoid those issues, which is why you chose these three. Got It. So

Ryan Gary Welcome Shoka Chicago Stevia Carolina Steve Young Ingram Orlando Lowe
Dealing with COVID Anxiety

The Psych Central Show

05:42 min | Last week

Dealing with COVID Anxiety

"And welcome to this week's episode of Psych Central. PODCAST. I'm your host gave Howard and calling into the show today we have. Dr, just lean shot wall. She is the chief medical officer and Director of Mood Disorders Program at Sierra Tucson, a premier residential, behavioral, Health Treatment Centre Dr Chow while welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. I'm delighted to be here. We are super excited to have you here today because you're also an anxiety expert and many people who aren't used to feeling the effects of anxiety are because of covid. So I WANNA start with are you seeing people that never had anxiety? And stress issues before suddenly developing anxiety disorders because of the global pandemic. I am noticing that there are a lot of people who noticed anxiety type symptoms and since they've never really experienced them before they're really taken aback and they don't really know what's going on and so I feel like one of our big duties at this time is to help people become more aware because I think once you can name the beast benefits a lot easier to tame the beast and I think a lot of individuals will have a hard time if they don't know what to call it or what to do with it. The psych central podcast has been on the air for almost five years psych central dot Com has been around for twenty five years. So we are well versed in mental health advocacy. And for the most part, it's always sort of been in its own little corner. There's the people that have a mental health issue or a mental illness, and they understand it. There's people who developed one or have a loved one who develops a mental health issue or mental illness, and they're searching for information, but by and large the majority of the population. Was Not discussing this openly we've seen that changed dramatically in the last six months where suddenly it's sort of mainstream news about how adult that never had any mental health issues before are suddenly a suffering from the symptoms of depression anxiety stress and on and on and on. It's a lot of people talk about anxiety like it's a pathological thing. I really try to. Explain to people how anxiety is normal. You have to have the neurobiological fear response to see safe as a human being like you are going to the Grand Canyon and walking over the skywalk. The fact that we don't just climb over the rail and try to jump down is because we do have a biological response to anything that's not within the normal human experience or. Scope if you think about having a snake your chair, you want to have an anxiety response so that you can quickly panic and run and what will happen. If you don't have that fear responses, you will die because the snake will bite you or you'll have some pretty negative consequences of that. How can you not having society when you're being told all day on the? News that you need to take all these extra precautions to just be safe to not fall sake to make sure your loved ones don't die. That is something that just normally will cause some degree of anxiety the difference between that type of anxiety and what can be called a DSM anxiety disorder ends up being that it becomes overwhelming to the point that you can't function. And what we start to see people who may have had a higher level of anxiety before were being able to do things to help themselves like going to the gym to work out or going for a run outside or spending time with loved ones all people they're coping skills have been taken away, and that is where you start seeing that they now fall into more that clinical anxiety. Disorder category if you look at most mental health conditions, they are on a spectrum and it just really depends on how far along the spectrum you are. Today could be that today it's a disorder, but a week ago or two weeks ago wasn't quite meeting the criteria. One of the themes that runs through the sake central podcast we try to explain that mental health and physical health actually. Are. They have a lot in common meaning most people have good physical health. Most of the time you can still get a cold. You can still get injured and that's a very temporary problem but you can also have, for example, diabetes, which is severe and persistent and lifelong mental health is the same way I. Think a lot of people think that you either have good mental health or. You're mentally ill and that there's nothing in between do you believe that because of the pandemic people are starting to realize that everybody has mental health and that you can have the equivalent of of a cold which in in this case is stress and anxiety or panic do you think this is helping to educate people that we all have mental health and anything can trigger bad mental health. I think reading a lot more content about that in very popular channels, Navy your podcast, or me this our world. But other people for whom this is not their world. We are seeing them talk more about mental and in my own World I try not to talk about somebody having just mental illness I think about mental health on a continuum. You can do things every day to improve your mental health and you can do things every day that may not really be serving well, the kind of food you e the places that you go to the people you spend time with each of those things can help build up that mental hell.

Anxiety Howard Grand Canyon Sierra Tucson Dr Chow Medical Officer Director Of Mood Disorders
Friendships at Work and Beyond with Shasta Nelson

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

07:21 min | Last week

Friendships at Work and Beyond with Shasta Nelson

"I've been studying friendship now for twelve years really specifically, I passionate relationships in general but I found myself looking at US some studies coming out talking about specifically at a time for women, how significant their friendships were to their health into their happiness, and yet I was looking around at all of us being so obsessed with the parent child relationship and the romantic relationships, and like we were buying thousands of books and we were like, who am I if I don't have these relationships and it was like that was just like the we think of them as they the kind of things we need in our lives and yet the research shows that those things. Actually aren't always that great happiness and our health and traditionally haven't always been that way and that our friendships that Matt make such a difference I found myself kind of in that space where I was looking around being like, why aren't people talking about this more? Why aren't people doing research on this? Why are we not finding resources for people and that's really what kind of just put me in that space I wasn't because I knew that much about it was because I was. Asking the questions and just trying to find resources for people people I was working with and stop and ever since then I've been reading and devouring and learning, and listening, and teaching, and writing books, and speaking, and gathering up, you know most of its with women and This book puts me a little bit broader. I'm doing more co ED, which is actually very cool too because I've long felt that men I think this is one of the reasons why they die younger than women. And and I think this is why I think men need. I don't think it's a women's issue. I think it's a human need and so I'm really excited to be talking about it in broad terms to but yeah friendship is like the thing. The thing and you actually have a ministerial decree. Don't you approaching this from a really sort of holistic perspective yet my training as a got a massive divinity and I used to pastor and so it felt like a big veer off the road. But when I, look back on it, I was like that was where I was doing marriage counseling I was training small. Groups here Emmy, as a pastor, you're asking the question, how do I bond community what is community and how do people belong and and really thinking through when somebody walks in the door is visitor what does it mean to actually participate belong and so yeah I've in many ways have always been about community and wanting money all of us to feel that sense of. Your belonging and unfortunately in churches, not all of them but unfortunately, in most churches will you can experience that belonging, but there's a lot of. That, you have to believe a certain thing to belong or you have to behave a certain way to behave behavior. You have to appear a certain way to you know and that kind of never rubbed me right either. So it's really just how do we all as humans get that need to feel connected met and ways where we just feel accepted for who we are. So yeah, that's been a life passion. An and what made you want to tackle the workplace side of it then? Yeah, that's a good question I. so here's the thing. My second book was titled French Missy, and that one was talking about how most of us when we feel lonely and as a word that most of us don't actually even use the name very well. But when we feel like we want something more most of us, it's not we want more interaction or that we need to. Know more people that we need to make new friends. Most of us that we need to, we need to have closer relationships where craving intimacy were craving more meaningful relationships, and so I was noticing that a lot of us when we felt lonely, we were like, Oh, I need to go make friends I need to meet people and I was like, no, you actually know enough people you don't feel known by a few and so you need to let go. And when I teach what deepens relationship one of the three things that deepens relationships is consistent time and shared experiences and repeated interaction and I this won't surprise you at all. The number one thing I heard is I don't have time for that I don't have time to be that consistent I can only meet her for lunch once a month or I can only see them once a year I fly out there or I just don't have time to be on the phone I just over and over and over I don't have time. And I've thought, you know I could do my darndest to like into one more hour week and and that's not going when you see the numbers collectively of sixty one percent of US feeling lonely on a somewhat regular basis I was like I don't think I can talk you into one more hour and that's going to make the biggest difference I. Think we need to tackle. You know work is like two adults. What school is two kids. This is where we're spending time with people where we're interacting. We're making our biggest contribution and I was like, why don't we talk about putting friendship and our whole life as opposed to trying to fit it in his personal life bucket with a thousand other things and to me this is really answering the question of how can we? Get more of our emotional social needs met in the biggest part of our lives in that bucket. So it's answering the question I don't have time. Well you do. Doing. Yes exactly. But but I think a lot of people feel a little weird about that. Right? I mean first, we're accustomed to thinking of life in separate spheres but you one is where we can have this this vulnerability, the intimacy with people in our personal lives. You, know we feel a little bit weird about that in in the workplace is, is it okay to be vulnerable and intimate with people at work? Yeah. Absolutely. It is and it's so interesting because we are uncomfortable with it when I was doing the research about thirty percent of esther like. And yet when asked, how many of us lot a friend almost of us are like Oh. Yes. Please in at work like we're not sure it's appropriate but we want one and also it is it is whether we like it or not. It is the number one place adults are making their friends and so that is happening and the much bigger question is it is happening we need it to happen. What we need to do is talk about it more and teach healthy expectations and set this up so that it's best for the people involved and for the workplace and the research shows it is absolutely. Paramount, not to are not only to our individual health and happiness but to the organizations of who we work, which is really fascinating. I mean there's twenty years of research I mean we're talking. Decades and many many different people studying it in a variety of different ways who say if you have a best friend at work, you are the best employees for the workplace you're more engaged you have better treat the customers better. You're less likely to leave. So we're bringing our turnover costs down. You call in sick last year fewer workplace accidents. I mean, you just look down the list and the people who? Have a best friend at work. Absolutely show up and feel more engaged look forward to Monday morning the Monday morning in air quotes and feel like they wanna feel support it and they feel safer brainstorming they feel safer taking risks they feel safer showing up with the ideas and those last few ideas are examples of vulnerability in the workplace and to your point a lot of us are like. Well, we picture people. Telling personal drama and just being all these heated one last night and we picture `vulnerability and we have like these fears the pop into our head immediately and I do teach incremental slow vulnerability when we're talking about disclosing and I teach how to do that and healthy Safeway But more importantly, vulnerability is what we need in order to brainstorm. It's what we need to say, I, actually don't know the answer to this or I actually need help with this or. Not just diversity inclusion is vulnerability. It's like let me I don't want to just have you be a token different person at the table I. Actually want your differences, the impact art answers here and your story to change what we're trying to do and how you're experiencing this and I'm all. When we actually list everything we want for the workplace and how we will be better together it takes an incredible amount of vulnerability to to do that.

United States Emmy Matt Paramount Esther
What Is The Pe Diet

20 Minute Fitness

05:27 min | 2 weeks ago

What Is The Pe Diet

"Everyone is Martin from twenty minute fitness I'm here today connected with Dr Ted Niemann Dominate, and why don't you tell liberal listeners about your work and book? The P. Will Hi Martin Nice to meet you just call me Ted first of all. So I, I'm Ted name I'm a primary care doctor and I've been in practice for about twenty years up here in the Seattle area and I have a mechanical engineering background, and so I'm kind of like a just a huge Geek. A nerd kind of a Geek mechanical engineering background went to medical school and. I ended up just being obsessed with optimum health and I realized that the difference between the healthiest people I saw and the least healthy people I saw really just came down to diet and exercise. So all day long in these patient visits icy this huge spectrum of health You know one minute I might be seeing someone who has just amazing body composition and their incredible health, and they might even be an elite athlete and then the next minute I see someone who's just frail and decrepit and falling apart and has millions of problems and it eventually occurred to me. That the only difference between these people was really just diet and exercise over time, and if your diet and exercise is optimal, you just slowly get better and better over time and if it's not, you just slowly get worse and worse over time and then you know fifty years down the road you see this massive spectrum of health from incredibly healthy to incredibly unhealthy and I've just been obsessed for twenty years with exactly what is the mechanism between Diet and exercise driving health outcomes in exactly what you have to do to get the positive adaptations instead of the negative ones and I've you know I've just been all over the Diet spectrum I was raised vegetarian I went to Loma Linda University in Southern California, which is this famous blues Mecca were everyone's plant based So I've I've experimented with Air Free Diet from Vegan and plant based to, of course, oil spectrum of Paleo. Kito. Carnivora. You name it and everything in between, and then I eventually realized that all of these diets right about something and the answer is in between and the secret is finding out what's powering each and every one of these diets and making them more successful than. The Standard. American. Diet and that's really how I came up with this book. The P.. E. Diet, which is sort of the unified theory of macronutrients You know that's at least it has been described right so so how does like the P. E. Diet look in a nutshell what makes it different from say pay euro at the Ketogenic diets or you know all vegetarian diet for example. So what I did is just zoom way way way way way way out to the fifty thousand foot view and just looked at what is eating and I realized that plants are. Auto troops and they make all their own food and then animals are Hetero trips and we only exist because we constantly injust other living organisms. So plants are at the base of the food chain for all animals they're making all the food for animals and then animals are just either eating plants or animals that have themselves eating plants. What plants her doing is two very specific things. Number one, they're sucking minerals out of the soil, which is nitrogen for protein and and about a dozen other minerals that are crucial for plant and animal life, and then they're using solar. Energy and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to create these high energy chains of carbons with high energy bonds, carbon hydrogen bonds, and that's all of your dietary energy either carbs, fats. This is all solar energy stored is chemical energy. So I realized that you could divide your entire diet up into protein and minerals which getting room soil and energy, which is these high energy, carbon chains, carbs, or fats that plants creating from solar energy, and then I, sort of looked at all of human history in this evolutionary Lens. I realized that if you look at hunter gatherers, they have this. Incredibly. High Protein Diet. It's thirty three percent on average protein. If you look at worldwide hundred gatherer macronutrients and hunter-gatherers, they have an easy time getting protein they just go out and kill an animal and eat the whole thing you get plenty of protein and minerals but you're always a little bit starving for energy right? Every animal you know trying to get enough energy to be successful, and so you're always looking for extra energy to add to your diet. You can get the protein and minerals, but just killing an animal and eating the whole thing but you're looking for. Extra Energy and what humans have done is we have always used technology to feed ourselves. We don't have teeth and claws were not particularly fast or strong on. But what we have is brains, and so we built tools, we use tools to feed ourselves. We use technology to feed ourselves. We had stone tools with break-up in skulls for branch and long runs for married at fat energy to our diet. We dug up tubers, add more carbohydrate energy tour Diet. We figured out how to throw weapons and create traps in hunting in groups, and we all of this technology to add. More, energy to our diet

Dr Ted Niemann Seattle Loma Linda University Martin Ketogenic Southern California
The Working Mom Advice I Wish Someone Had Given Me

The Chalene Show

05:46 min | 3 weeks ago

The Working Mom Advice I Wish Someone Had Given Me

"MOMS, who are trying to build a business and I want to share some of the advice that I wish someone had given me when I was building our businesses. I, hope the orange and that's just my opinion is just my advice in its advice I wish someone had given to me and I think that you are entitled to raise your children the way that you want to. But I want to give you some sound advice that will help you realize that you're the person who's in charge of doing that. So my I tip for you is to know that lots of women have kids, lots of mentors, Bill businesses, but it is a very difficult thing. To do both and anyone who tells you otherwise is lying or one area is not going so well. My suggestion is to be as selective as possible about the person who you decide to follow their mentor ship because you'RE GONNA end up following their tips and advice, and if their children are as much of a priority or if they're not raising their children, the same way that you prioritize yours, you may end up getting business advice that is detrimental to the priorities that you have for your own children just keep that in mind. Next. You should spend as much time and money. Developing, your skills as a parent. As you do your professional development. It's crazy. We will not bat an eyelash spending two, thousand dollars five, thousand dollars one, hundred, dollars, two hundred we'll take the courses we will take the workshops and the trainings we will go to the seminars. To be a better business person but it's like when was the last time someone bought a parenting book like you should be reading parenting books I'm still reading parenting books you should be listening to parenting podcasts. You should be willing to develop that skill just as much as you are willing to develop the skill that you have for your business. Next, do not use the excuse to quit your business because you've got kids. Like I just WanNa make my kids a priority. Now you can make your kids party I'm just saying don't use them as an excuse because you absolutely can kill it. In. Business be apparent. You can be an incredible mobbing incredible father, but you're gonNA be crazy asked disciplined like discipline like no other. So just say I wasn't disciplined enough to do both that's fine but don't blame it on your kids that you're quitting your business. All right. Next put your commitment to your kids and your partner put it in writing because what will happen if you don't. Trust me. Trust me. I can tell you this going to happen. An incredible opportunity is gonNA come your way and you're GonNa think yourself oh my gosh. Justice one time. I'm going to do this or you know what? This opportunity will never happen again, which is scarcity mindset and you're gonNA end up saying yes to something because of the money or your ego. Or your lack believing that a better opportunity isn't gonNA come your way cousins it is it is GonNa come your way and God is going to reward you for holding out and staying true and honoring your priorities don't say yes because you ego. But I am telling you from personal experience. It's really really hard to do unless you have this in writing because it's real easy to say justice once or this is never going to happen again. So put it in writing whether it's family kids doesn't matter. Next, a child should never be made to feel like they're an inconvenience or second-place priority to. Your Business. Now listen I'm not gonNA play until you like. That Mahmoud definitely would be like we can't do that today I've got this presentation I've gotta do or. Make statements like that. I did not things the advice that I'm giving you are things I'm telling you I didn't do I've made some of these mistakes plan telling you a child does not feeling that way. See you gotta catch yourself and you have to find other ways of getting things done prioritizing and explain to your children because the last thing you want them to do is to resent the fact. That you're building a business you want to live your life is a Shiro. Be An example for them. Do not use the excuse of I. WanNa Give My kids everything that I never had as a justification. For Your, Work Addiction. Or making your children's spoiled brats like giving your child everything giving your child everything only gives your child the experience that they can provide for themselves. If you're buying your kid a car if you're buying your kid all these things, how are they ever? GonNa Learn that they can do that for themselves. All you're doing is teaching them that they can't provide for themselves and to be gone every weekend to never be with your child and to say that you're doing you want to provide for your family i. personally think you just need to examine the truth in that statement ask yourself it's really in their best interest. Also you've got gotta be patient crazy persistent ungrateful because no matter how much structure you create expect about two percent of the time for things to go as you planned. So. If you've got kids, you cannot wing it. You cannot win it in terms of your parenting. You cannot win it in terms of Your Business I'm sorry you chose Children Andy chose to have a business. So God gave you the gift of both and it's going to be harder for you. Too. Much is given much is expected. It's going to be harder for you. You'RE GONNA, have to plan like crazy and things are going to be flipped upside down in life is fair. That's how it goes. Also encourage you say, no to opportunities at compromise your child secure attachment to you. This again is my opinion, and that's just if your parenting

Partner Shiro Mahmoud Andy
Pelvic Floor Therapy with Melissa Dessaulles

Babes and Babies

04:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Pelvic Floor Therapy with Melissa Dessaulles

"Would love for you to tell us to start just a little bit about yourself and how you got into all of this. Absolutely. So I live in on the west coast basically of Canada. So in British Columbia I've been I might sometimes they physio because in Canada we refer to ourselves as physios but I'll try to physical therapists came. I've been physical therapist for fourteen years never thought by calling would be talking to people about their vaginas. Or like peeing and pooping, and then I had a baby out of China and That was seven years ago I had my first and I would say that as kind of snow, I was like smacked in the head with all these things that time seven years ago. No one even talked about this. So even as a physical therapist, it was not on my radar very active I was very fit I thought I'd Kinda just strong power through this and I was totally raw onion. So it was when I started getting help that I thought this is really important and ever since then that's that's all I've done that's what I do now. In my clinical practices, see lots of. You know. OC. Men some women and you're right mostly pregnancy and postpartum related issues but lots of people that have never had babies to. Have Two kids. Now I have a seven year old daughter and a four year old son. So you're probably a lot more prepared with the four year old then pelvic floor. I would say that it was less like I wouldn't say the birth that. And I would say my mindset about it was different I in. In. At least this time feeling prepared and I wasn't so overwhelmed by what is this GonNa look like and I knew what to do after I. Felt a little bit more confident and afterwards when I was having weird symptoms like peeing or pressuring my Vagina Felt. Weird. It wasn't so scary as a golf course I'm having this based on what happened and here are some things that I can do. So, I would love to kind of dive into a lot of the misconceptions because when people think public four health, the one word comes their mind key goals or K. goals. How do you say it? I say. So. In I think that there's tons of misconceptions about that as well because there's a right way to do it but there really a wrong way. Well. You're right. It gets a lot of it gets a lot of talk but I think a lot of people don't understand what it truly is. I always explain the public floors very similar to other muscles in our body, and we know, for example, are biceps because we can see it all the time but every muscle in our body, let's use the by for example, needs to be able to go from like a relaxed position to a tight position. Okay and it spends its day doing all all movements in between there some when we when we do things like lift something heavy to set past the titan when we go to bed at night relaxes and the pelvic poor, very similar when we do things like the cause pressure cough or sneeze or lift something heavy or jump, the pelvic floor needs to respond with tension, but it needs to tighten like and stop us from the beginning p. But when the pressure is gonNA. Stop coughing redone are jumper what we put down the heavy object pellet worshiped relax so it's very similar in that way that it has to tighten and relax it does this behind the scenes it's very automatic. That's why people don't know much about their pelvic for. US doing a Keitel is our way of controlling those muscles and tightening them a win. The pelvic floor heightens the holes close. So kind of the P. Tube and the and the NS clothes and everything s bottom up. There's no name for relaxing the pelvic floor though so Heels tightening. There's no name for relaxation. But as you know from every other muscle in the body, both are important. No muscle in the body wants to be high all the time or it doesn't. Work very well if you came into the clinic Mosa. My neck is so tight like is would that be you wouldn't be coming in writing about that it would be giving you problems and I think that that's one of the biggest misconceptions is that. All symptoms are result of weakness, and so therefore, we think we should just be tightening tightening tightening. But sometimes again, if you came in with pain in your neck, you'd probably have tension in your. If I told you to keep tightening, you'd think I was crazy. and. So when we keep tightening and tightening autour perpetuating the problem

Canada United States China P. Tube Keitel
Conversation with the head of mental health startup Frame Teletherapy

20 Minute Fitness

05:20 min | 3 weeks ago

Conversation with the head of mental health startup Frame Teletherapy

"Hey Candle. Thank you for coming onto the show they are having me. Yeah. It's certainly being a crazy period of time right now at the time of this recording, we're not only facing a pandemic, but also simultaneously a heatwave and wildfires here in California one could say is little bit much right now and in this little surprised that we're feeding a little bit more. Stressed and anxious than usual. I'm saying this because we couldn't have found a better time to record this podcast about Tele therapy and your business frame. Maybe you can tell us what frames all about. Yeah. So I am the CO founder and CEO Frame the mental wellness platform that makes it easier to connect with therapists mid different ways both in person and digitally we actually Offered to core services on our platform the first one is for people who I've never been therapy and just WANNA, learn a little bit more about it and for them we offer our digital discussions which are livestream conversations between licensed therapist and volunteer participants that you can watch anonymously from the comfort of your own home. So it's like a veteran or how should imagine. It. So basically, what we do is we wanted to create a way for people to see what happens in an actual therapy session. So it's completely free product. It's available to everyone in the country and these conversations mirror what a real therapy session would be like in real life. So we've on boarded in trained licensed therapists from all over the country they we pick different. Topics, and then we bring on volunteer participants. These are real people who share their real problems on camera and you can listen and we actually built a custom platform so that you can actually watch lives men. There's interactive tools where you can submit questions in therapist answers them for you at the end of the recession or if you WANNA watch on your own time. We have a content library of the past recorded sessions. Wow. That's great unlike just to give us an idea what what sorts of topics being discussed on their great asset because you again, I really wanted to create a product that sort of educates people not only on what happens in therapy the different types of therapies even work with also about the different topics and so. We really try to pick topics that are relevant to what's going on right now. So obviously, we launched actually during covid where a new startup and obviously it was a really hot topic right there to talk about working right home adjusting to life. We actually did a lot of topics around people who are losing their jobs during Cova did and now we shifted to. The black lives matter. Movement we we did a series on racial trauma and how it's affected different people from different perspectives, and now we've been really focusing of recently on burn out and how people are really sort of just feeling. So achieved and down about the current situation in the world in how you identify Burnett, and how you deal with that, right? Yeah I can. Totally imagine that with many of us actually working from home right now and not taking any vacation burn notice on the horizon for many of us exactly, and then we actually have a second service on a platform of for those that are ready to talk with therapist one on one we have a therapy matching service and we actually will match you as a therapist. Based on your personal needs. So you end you come onto our platform you answer ten questions we give you six options of therapist matches, facilitate free intro call. So you can call a couple of get a sense for me. Thank you connect with best and then you scheduled to our platform you do the video sessions or a platform and you pay for farm. So it's A one stop shop for therapy and how does like you matching algorithm matched me like what what do you like through those ten questions in how does that look actually on the therapist end? Yeah. So we spent a lot of time building out the matching algorithm. My co-founder sage grazer is a licensed therapist so that really helped but while we were building the product. We actually brought in about ten to twenty therapists and we interviewed them and we got a better sense for how they screen for clients in real life, and we use those inputs to help build our algorithm but I think another important factor of this is that you algorithms can't fully predict chemistry. So just like a dating APP, you go on multiple dates before you find. Your soulmate, and so we really wanted to create that experience as well. We're not gonNA just pick a therapist for you. So we really focused on getting the right types of therapists in front of you, and then we want to empower our users to pick the therapist and we're getting a lot of anecdotal feedback that saying I've actually called three or four of the. Therapists on the lesson. This one happened to be a college athlete and so was I. we really connected on that and those are just things that you're not gonna get an intake form on them out organically when you're having this conversation because it's really hard to judge a therapist just based on his profile resume, right? So I, I can totally imagine that you know approach. To Kinda Dede's a few therapists to find the right fit for me. Exactly and it's really about therapy is different than other doctors. You know when you're getting surgery, you kind of want to know where the doctor go to school and how many surgeries have been done when it comes to therapists. It's really about who do you feel most comfortable talking to I. Honestly. Couldn't even tell you where my therapist got her masters for around and you know I've been to some of the most you know world renowned therapists. I've waited six months to see them and you don't necessarily click with them. So it's really just about that. There is that sort of live interaction that you can. You can only feel for when you're talking to yourself rights.

California Cova Burnett Sage Grazer Co Founder Co-Founder CEO
Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?

The Psych Central Show

04:19 min | Last month

Does Law Enforcement Need Mental Health Care?

"Gabe Howard calling into the show today we have Gabriel Nathan. Gabriel is the executive director of eighty-seven recovery. Diaries and they produced a film series called beneath the vest first responder mental health and features police officers, EMS personnel, dispatchers, fire service all individuals talking about trauma and complex PTSD Gabriel. Welcome to the show I. Thanks for having me. It's great to be here. Gabriel. Today we're going to be talking about law enforcement reform and I know that you have a lot of thoughts on the subject first of all before I really get into the. Weeds of the question would I have found is whenever you are taking a position that is critical in any way of law enforcement or attempts to raise questions even about the way law enforcement agencies do anything. It is extremely important to establish your own bona fide because anybody who steps up to challenge law enforcement is immediately regarded with suspicion. Paranoia is dismissed as a quote Lib tarred Troll anti-cop Antifa, whatever I'm none of those things I am someone who for the last twenty years has been an advocate for slain police officers and their families through editorials commentaries in newspapers I've attended over ten police funerals in Philadelphia, down to Maryland. I have done a lot of advocacy work for law enforcement in regard to mental health of first responders. I'm very well aware of the suicide rate for police officers. I am someone who knows law enforcement culture. I am someone who has a respect for police officers and what they do, and so I just want people to know that I am doing this from a place of love and concern and from a position of someone who believes ardently that they're absolutely needs to be changed and radical reimagining of law enforcement across the board. Thank you Gabriel for say and all that, and I agree with many of your points and I wanna point out that you were a recent guest on another podcast I have the pleasure of hosting not crazy and you had so much to say, well it it's built over into a second podcast. I strongly encourage all of our listeners to head over to central dot com slash not crazy and check out that interview. Alright. Gabriel to get started. You believe that in many ways we're recruiting the wrong people and that a lot of our problems start early even before police officers get into the academy. Yes. Look at the people who go into law enforcement. Okay. A lot of people decide they WANNA be cops when their children, they're watching shows like cops they're watching shows like law and order they're watching the weapon movies even as far as Hill Street Blues I would say that this problem started with Hillstreet Blues, the opening credits of Hillstreet Blues. I, love the music and then the garage door opens and the Plymouth fury is in the garage with red lights bursting out of the graduates exciting, right so who is drawn to that Profession Action Junkies? It's people who want that adrenaline rush and then we put them in situations where they're in a constant state of hyper arousal they're always looking around they're doing the head swivel. Someone's GonNa hurt me as someone GonNa, shoot me. In a twenty five year career most police officers never fire their weapon. Never fire their weapon once. Many. Many police officers never pulled their weapon and yet that's the kind of human being that is drawn to that profession and I have had people tell me well, we pull in people who are really resilient well is that what you're doing or are you pulling in people who are craving action and are not necessarily maybe the most empathic people because a law enforcement agency can't function if a police officer responds to a call and then starts falling apart emotionally because they can't process what they saw. So maybe law enforcement is either consciously or subconsciously trying to pull people in who maybe don't have that kind of empathic response. That's not who I want riding around in a patrol car with a firearm and the power of arrest.

Gabriel Nathan Officer Gabe Howard Hillstreet Blues Executive Director Maryland Philadelphia
20 Minutes About Traditional Chinese Medicine

20 Minute Fitness

05:50 min | Last month

20 Minutes About Traditional Chinese Medicine

"Welcome back to twenty minutes fitness. I'm Kessler and you're listening to your favorite podcast for health and fitness science and technology. Today we're airing the second part of my conversation with Dr Marcus Gado, a leading Chinese medicine practitioner from Europe who spend close to a decade in China learning the ancient Art of traditional Chinese medicine also referred to as. If, you haven't listened to last week's part one of our conversation. You May WanNa poss here and listen to it first so that you can learn about his background and what he believes, he can teach us about our own emotional wellbeing and healthy nutrition in today's podcast who we will continue the conversation and cover how. Six to guide how we should exercise sleep and even have sex. Yes. Heard correctly the how and when of sex also plays a role of healthy living in ancient Chinese wisdom. So beware that today's episode is pg rated because of that disclaimer why Chinese medicine has been around for thousands of years? It is really just at the cusp of being scientifically looked at an understood it is usually fascinating topics we. Wanted to share with you, it is hard not medical advice by any means nor endorsement of the scientific validity or efficiency of any of its practices or interventions. Having said that we do try to stick to only the things that have already been backed up by signs, and you can find a full list of studies and Research Without show notes on twenty minute dot fitness. All right. Let's have at it. Or let's move on to to sleep I. Think the third tip is get plenty again seasonal steep was is that mean? Yeah. If you look at animals, they're way more Richard Eight. Some analysts even hibernate in summer and social we we shouldn't be sleeping the same amount of hours throughout the whole year and well, it's good general of funding to get at least eight hours of sleep in the wintertime nine or ten hours is fine and in the summertime if you're feeling really energetic seven or six and a half if you're feeling great is actually not the bad for you and but the Chinese say that. Especially, the early Stephen in modern sleep research confirms this that early steep, sexy, more beneficial because you're getting a lot more autographs wrong excreted in the hours roughly before midnight and so the Chinese advocates between nine thirty and ten thirty, and then of course, old biohacking stuff you know keeping blue light our heading your house of very dim lights getting you really into this calm evening mode and have no ben at a TV and don't eat obviously before you go to directly before you're gonna go to bed and instead off the Chinese medicine advocates to have some green team your cup of tea because it's so. Call me you down activating the Perez pathetic nervous system. It's advocating for a bit of movement no meditation before you go to bed or even even taking a hot foot. That's a great little trick that you can fall asleep or joystick colts he keeps you up take a hot foot and research has shown that down hot foot actually heading the black by heading this hot water your feet. It increases the circulation periphery in your feet which saw in our regulatory process lowers the corporate body temperature, and we'll have a lower temperature it signals to the brain. Time and so these are some little tricks that the Chinese advocates and in another great one is actually funded fool study here Naski and others in two thousand seven they had two hundred thousand subjects in Greece against epidemiology but again, food for thought day found a thirty seven percent reduction in cardiovascular disease of people who regularly had a Siesta who took a little nap at night thing that study was quoted in a wide receiver is really interesting book I that everyone should read yeah. That's the guy from UC Berkeley, Matthew Walker that's right So So yeah a lot of these these things that they that they already figured out and keep the probation is a big one, right Here's another statistics who has National Health Center for statistics in nineteen sixty, two percent of American slept less than six hours while in two thousand four, it was already thirty percent. So generally speaking we're not sleeping enough. So wildly you WanNa just your sleep in obviously the day is longer than summer so you could also stay up a little bit longer but the country in the wintertime you shouldn't feel bad on your cells you need nine or ten hours of sleep a really give your buddy that go with the season skull was the dynamic of nature and let your body hibernate Chinese proverb says no losing a night of sleep as followed by ten days of inconvenience. Never never sacrifice after sacrifice sleep and sleep a little bit more in winter, and then you can stay up longer and have more energy into following summer. Again, let's just quickly touch on the fourth a little hit or tip to stay healthy in twenty twenty I picked this one because I think it's contrary to what we believe in the West and does the about exercise movement excise the Chinese things that moderation here again is key. So we shouldn't be doing chronic cardio over having really high pulse rate on training for ultramarathons but instead we should go on strolls and walks and we should exercise buddy while the do it in short intervals and with a high intensity. High intensity interval training or just even intensity training where we doing body weight exercise in keeping a muscle mass obstacles casino the Muscles Pretty, much ski organ of Longevity. You can draw a line of lean body mass versus fat mass and an pretty much. It's with old people get and it gets difficult at your old to build and maintain muscle story you WANNA regularly. Exercise. Your buddy but you don't WanNa chill your body lacked we like to do in the West aware that where it is even for a lot of people, it ends up being addiction like an exercise addiction but

Dr Marcus Gado Kessler Europe Stephen Richard Eight China Perez Naski Berkeley National Health Center Matthew Walker Greece
The perfectionist, people-pleaser, and all-or-nothing mentality with alcohol, with Georgia Foster

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

04:50 min | Last month

The perfectionist, people-pleaser, and all-or-nothing mentality with alcohol, with Georgia Foster

"Self proclaimed alcohol self esteem anxiety reduction expert, and a clinical hypnotherapist, and today we are to no one's surprise talking about alcohol. Specifically, we are getting into the emotional issues that can come up when alcohol is used as a coping mechanism. Hello Twenty twenty, the different personality traits that come with drinking including the perfectionist, the people pleaser and the inner critic. Finally, we're discussing why the all or nothing. Mentality that comes with dieting also applies to both food and alcohol why it's so detrimental, and then why cutting out alcohol completely will not really solve all of the issues of the casual drinker and then Georgia is giving us some practical tips on what you can do to both get out of the all or nothing mentality when it comes to drinking, and then what you can also say to people if you're more of the people pleaser mentality. I WanNa know more about how you became a self-proclaimed like alcohol self esteem and anxiety reduction expert and a clinical hypnotherapist. show. Well I I'm fifty four now. But. Many years ago when my late twenties I had. One could set with breakdown. Berlow. self-esteem. Overweight. Pretty miserable attracting the wrong guy and I was very aware that I didn't like myself so. I, Ran, away. To a health bomb went to the travel agent and I said the travel agent I want to go on holiday on my online. I WanNa, know who I am. She can look to a bit of a widows and I said. I need to go somewhere where there's no cocktails with is no crazy kind of food that will make me feel more crazy. So the worst place, one place in Australia. In Queensland and I flew on a plane up there and I lived in this in the middle of a rainforest a two weeks where we went into. Therapy basically and I've never done anything like this before. So but what was really interesting about being in this environment? was there people who really beautiful enslaved some rich had beautiful families and I could walk out why they were there because. Everything. That got you know slim bodies money. And it turned out that we all have. Different lives but the same thing was that we over crap about ourselves bicycling. So I left that not knowing the answers but understanding that I wanted to find them. And I came across a book. Add Up to share this particular. I'm theory with with with you at this book. Really literally an Cliche. But it changed my life. My mother is a therapist and I open this book and wanted to know malls. So I went to California and I studied this incredible psychology theory. And then my grandmother's British. So our went on to London and I trained to be clinical hypnotherapist and that kind of. happened organically because I met a friend I was in those days you call that a secretary working. In. An office and I met this woman hugh had been hypnotized to help her give birth. The pain control, but that's interesting. and. So I just. Something about it kind really productive. My my is so I applied for college in in Europe One of the biggest college. And I trained to make the Clinton therapist. And so I decided that was going to. It was like falling in love. It's a really weird description but. I realized that it was something had to do just. But along the way when I was training I was working with friends on wasn't charging anybody and were getting really good results but I was combining it waived my psychology training. And then the college in Botany back to become a lecturer for them. So used to teach in the universities hypnosis for many years and. I. Just as I soul. Students blow some I was hypnotized myself and getting some great results and unrealized one of my problems was. Because, I didn't like myself. I thought was because it was a bad person of considerable people thought. It was. A permanent stress in my life

Twenty Twenty Georgia Australia Europe Hugh Queensland Botany Secretary California London Lecturer
Are Social Media Friends Real?

The Psych Central Show

06:07 min | Last month

Are Social Media Friends Real?

"Doctor Bono welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. It's my pleasure to be here. Well, we're very excited. Obviously social media's everywhere social media's here to say, why do you think that it's such a hot topic? Well. I. Think. Part of the reason it's become a hot topic is because it has become so pervasive in the culture if you look at the stats from the Pew Research Organization or other groups that collect data on this in overwhelmingly large number of people are on social media and are using it frequently, and it's also something that is relatively new and so with something that has become so much a part of our culture in our day to day way of interacting with one another that has posed a question too many people of to what extent is this actually affecting us and is it having an? Impact on other things that are occurring such as increasing rates of depression and anxiety and other forms of mental distress. We know that both of those have been increasing simultaneously over the last decade and the question is well is one of them causing the other and I think a lot of people have become curious about that. One of the things that I always think about whenever these conversations crop up in the media is that it seems like every new thing is bad for us I remember when the Internet first started I'm that age so I remember before the Internet and then after the Internet so the Internet Starts at the first thing that everybody talks about. Oh. This is going to connect us like never before this wonderful, and then it only took a few months before everybody was like the Internet is horrible. There's it's just filled with pornography and fighting, and this was all before social media and then everybody hated the Internet. Now the Internet is back to being powerful and social media is what we hate. Do you think that this is just a trend? Just a theme that everything new at first is exciting and good, and then immediately becomes bad and then it will balance out. It's the nature of almost anything. In the world that nothing is entirely good or entirely bad and often what captures our attention initially is the novelty in the exciting parts and other really cool features of something. But inevitably, over time we come to realize that it also comes with some negative things. It's not used appropriately. So yeah, I. I do think that initially our attention is drawn to the positive things but it's just like anything else as you say with the internet or a hundred years ago or more wind cars I came onto the scene they were initially this really cool way to connect people and do your business more efficiently and more. Effectively, but we realized Oh wait a second. If cars are not used under the appropriate conditions and they procreate circumstances, they can actually be really harmful. So the solution has never been. Okay. Let's get rid of this thing. Let's get rid of the internet or let's get rid of cars but let's think about how to be wise consumers of this and I think that that is where we're at when it comes to social media I don't know of any psychologists were saying, let's get rid of social media but instead let's bring awareness to the fact that if it's not used correctly, it could have some harmful. Effects on us, and it's worthwhile for us to bring attention to those things I really like what you're saying there. No. One of the other themes that comes up all of these conversations is social media is bad because it's addictive. I. Think. It's pretty clear that social media can be very addictive. So kind of don't want to discuss whether or not it's addictive. Let's assume that it is addictive. Why is it so addictive part of the reason why social media so addictive is because there's so much uncertainty about what content we're going to be seeing as soon as we log in and that's something that economists and. Psychologists and neuroscientists have known for a long time that part of what makes anything addictive is the maybe factor that maybe when we go on, we're GonNa see something cute or funny or something that is irritating or frustrating or we're going to see are crazy uncles political post that's GonNa make us really upset and it's the same reason why people become addicted to the slot machines in Las Vegas because maybe when they pull the lever of that slot machine, there's GonNa be a big payoff but maybe there isn't and it is that uncertainty that curiosity that keeps people going back more and more it's the reason. Why people addicted to slot machines but not vending machines in both cases you're putting money in, but it's the one where there's certainty of reward. You know that you're going to get that bag of potato chips at the vending machine but you don't know if you're going to get a reward at the slot machine and it's the same underlying mechanism that keeps us going back more and more to instagram or facebook or snapchat because every time you log on, you don't know what you're gonna see even if we know intellectually it's a waste of time that curiosity and the uncertainty keeps us going back more and more. A lot of social media platforms refer to your followers as friends. We have so many friends on facebook for. Is having a lot of friends or followers on social media is the same as having that many friends in real life it's not really the same thing because for a lot of people, they'll tell you that they don't even know all the people that they haven't even met in person all the people who are following them or who they are quote friends with on these platforms. We do know that from a psychological perspective arguably, the single strongest predictor of our happiness has to do with the quality friendships and relationships that we have with other people, but we're talking about. The three dimensional people you spend time with and who you develop an authentic relationship with and on social media very often those relationships are very superficial and they don't get much beyond a like or a comment or share or re tweet or something, and that's not really the basis of a long lasting relationship with someone who will be there for you. If you're going through a rough time and you need a shoulder to lean on if you're having a really good day and. You need someone to sort of help you extend the positivity and share that happiness with very often those followers and quote relationships on social media are just too superficial and it's much more worthwhile to develop and invest your time and effort in those relationships that are with the people who you're interacting with more meaningfully on a day-to-day basis.

Doctor Bono Pew Research Organization Las Vegas Anxiety Facebook Instagram
20 Minutes About Traditional Chinese Medicine

20 Minute Fitness

05:16 min | Last month

20 Minutes About Traditional Chinese Medicine

"Hey, Marcus welcome to the show Tame Martin well I have to say I've been really looking forward to it because we've known each other now for well over a decade and while you had taken quite an interesting path of going real deep into Chinese Madison starting and you know actively practicing this while ancient on over in Europe and anyways I've been really wanting to do this show on Chinese medicine because over the past few months we've covered quite A few interesting topics you on the podcast about the microbiome new tropics, cavalry metabolic health, and so forth. NFL Lot of the conclusions that we're drawing in our recent age seem to have actually been practiced for thousands of years in Chinese medicine, and that brought me back to you. But before we go deep into this topic, why don't you first tell us a little bit about how he got into Chinese medicine in the first place? Yes. Sure. So Basketball and tennis when I was a kid a teenager and frequent injuries and went to all the doctors a bunch of Western medicine treatments that didn't quite help and then I ended guy practicing Japanese acupuncture. So they just using really really thin fine needles that you almost don't feel and I remember going up to his office and could barely. Account on her car is my Nieto's started so bad at its second cute rain in them and then, and then you just put a bunch of needles somewhere. I hopped off his bench. Like if nothing was. Like nothing was wrong and I remember it took forever to get up the stairs there and all that just up down. was made quite an impact on me re that that was like immediate immediate. That must have left an impression and you tried like well, traditional. Western. Medicine to treat your knee at that time just conventional stuff your painkillers, etc.. Physiotherapy all the things that they give you go talk none of them were orthopedic specialist none of that worked now, not only for some things that works and then and then this guy is. By. The way you play affected. Enough such bad acne base and your low energy levels and that you'll always cold that is just the branch of the same route. So it's all it all kind of linked together with the same root cause and. Then, he gave me a bunch of herbs in two months later up in this really cystic acne was really bad doing a lot of western medicine things that it took quite a toll my health to at the time 'cause. He's injections or quiet. They're messing with your system out there drying you out your spacious clans and older glance pretty much everywhere, and so there's a lot of side effects and he gave me a bunch of herbs so to Vivian Natural Dumb. That made my help me keep my back in away and made my Kimble's significantly reduce and so. That's what hooked, and then I always wanted to become a doctor. So I had a high school degree. So I got a scholarship and the fine print scholarship that I could pretty much use it anywhere and so was thinking, do I go to the United States in Germany? China. Server. Since then you know I was interested in Chinese medicine also and and that's actually where we met. Yeah. So I got, you know I had a had a spot at a German university medical school and didn't go and instead you we went to China to be. Teachers for a few months, and while while teaching their inner, we didn't have much to do teaching. So end around I went around there's over four thousand, but they call integrative medicine hospitals. So it's Chinese medicine and Western medicine together combined in different departments. Of course, everybody does what they're good at but are essentially were together and a lot of time on these speak laments in China in one of those muscles and then I signed up at a Chinese university instead of the German one and I study what they call Jewish, Jehovah Chinese, medicine, and Western medicine combined with the focus being on the Chinese medicine side. And I completed that study it's a five year degree mostly in Chinese language. Muslim classes were essentially chinese-language in the beginning it a little bit of English classes in a Western medicine intended teachers kind of because they're English was so bad. In Chinese anyways even though we were like international and that was in. Beijing right. That was on Beijing five years in Beijing, and then I went to Hong Kong for another five years where we met again. At the end, I did my phd in what's called evidence based Chinese medicine over using modern scientific methods like clinical trials, Placebo, controlled randomized control trials, and instead of giving you experts at drunk we're using for example, in ancient acupuncture protocols or in my case was elbow pain it's like a two thousand year old extra puncture point protocol that they've been using since at least two thousand years per elbow pain and re looked at it was the is out son of modern science and understanding how that stuff works but we are playing these ancient principles. The Same WanNa do for you today was these five health tips or twenty twenty TM health. Cultivation, wisdom, that's what they call for staying. Healthy. So I, WanNa give you a few tips and ahead of quotes from the ancient books, and then I also pulled up a few research studies that kind of backup, what they're saying or giving another perspective on it. So we re using these ancient time tested principles, and then we're also looking at them. You know some the lenses of scientific method world of mearns,

Western Medicine China Beijing Cystic Acne Elbow Pain NFL Europe Marcus Painkillers Nieto Martin Basketball Kimble Mearns Vivian United States Hong Kong Germany Tennis
Undereating and Reverse Dieting with Julie Ledbetter

The Chalene Show

06:13 min | Last month

Undereating and Reverse Dieting with Julie Ledbetter

"If you've been struggling with a plateau if your weight just doesn't seem to budge and you've been eating less and less and less if you have lost a lot of weight and now you are so afraid of returning to normal and you're continuing diet and you know you just can't sustain that. Today's guest is going to be incredibly helpful today I have on Julie Ledbetter. What's really cool about Julian I didn't even realize it until I went to interview her today is that Julie is a former student of mine, a marketing student, a business student, and what I love about her story is like many of you. She had a personal experience that she got worked through herself and she turned that experience into a business that helps others. Julia's the host of embrace your real. It's a podcast that I think you. Guys are GonNa love definitely subscribe. She teaches women how to honor their bodies have a loved their bodies and how to phase their diets, understanding how to reverse diet the negative side effects of under eating and how to free themselves from body shame limiting beliefs and the rollercoaster of dieting. She's a former WB F F bikini pro athlete turned lifestyle and health. Mentor. You definitely want to check out on instagram. All of her contacts are in the show notes without further ado. Let's talk about reverse dieting would Julie ledbetter. Julie thank you so much for joining me today I. AM super excited to talk about this topic. Yes me too. Thank you so much for having me. I'm excited to share any sort of valuable knowledge for your audience. Will we have a lot in common but I don't even know maybe you do maybe you don't how do we connect I mean other than instagram you know I don't know. I know we follow a lot of the same people but I was just looking back and in Twenty Sixteen I actually purchased your Virtual Business Academy. Back, when we first started our business, we actually started in twenty thirteen but that was when we're really looking for like virtual online, how to like higher personal assistance and virtual assistance, and so I initially took that course and then I think from there I know we know a lot of the same people I was in the mastermind with Lewis House and a Lotta people in common in California there. So I. Yeah I love I. Just love following you on Instagram I mean that's where I really like become a fan and loved the content post and not that this is an episode about instagram but I'm always telling people if you really WanNa make your mark. Just be known for one thing for a little while, and then he can branch off and do all the things like you do such a great job of I. Just know if I'm going to see your content that it's GonNa make me feel good. It's going to help me understand my body and I just think you do such a great job of that in fact. I. Love You even talk about hair and the mental side of nutrition and the you share so much of your story. So for those people who haven't been following, you aren't familiar with your story. Tell us a little bit about your own history with Diet and exercise. Yes. So previously I mean I struggled with an eating a body image disorder for years of my life I. Can Remember even in high school struggling with it being on the cheerleading squad and just feeling the pressure of being in front of people and being that you need Graham number three that I am such a perfectionist and people pleaser I felt really out of control and a lot of areas of my life like family life and so I think I took that out on. Wanting to control my diet and wanting to control my exercise, and so really you know under eating over exercising was the name of the game for a long time of my life, and then going into college still not really knowing anything when it comes to nutrition and training, and so just doing what I saw in magazines, which was endless amounts of cardio restricting my caloric intake. and. Then from there, I met my husband after I graduated college. He really was the first person to number one as a boyfriend at the time kind of ask me honestly, if I had an eating disorder and that was the first time that someone really had bluntly asked me especially someone that you know I was dating at the time. Can I ask how do you remember your first thought when he asked that question where you defensive? Yes. Very defensive and very like why do you care this is not something that you need to know about type of pushing it off but then something inside of me was like, okay, he's actually asking from A. Place of love and it was like inside I wanted everything in me to be better because I was so like just feeling. So consumed by at all but yes, I remember having mixed feelings like this is crazy that you're asking me bluntly on our first date but this is also like total divine thing and so I felt safe in that time in you know he was one of the first people that I actually said Yeah I really struggling I don't know what to do when it comes to nutrition. I feel. So out of control in my body and I feel like I'm constantly trying to control and it's just not working in my favor and I was just exhausted mentally physically my hair would was not growing my you know my skin was constantly breaking out and I felt bloated all the time and it was just like there is things in my body that were not working properly and so I'm so grateful that he did ask that because that's what he studied in college he studied health and exercise science and sports nutrition and so. He was very, very interested in helping people in terms of nutrition and he really taught me I mean everything that I know when it comes to nutrition he taught me so much in training I was so scared of weights and only doing cardio endless amounts of cardio and restricting my caloric intake so low. So he really got me into like, okay we gotta you know that you need to start. Eating protein because on our first date I had a salad and I'm like pushing aside the carrots and chicken and he's like there is a severe problem with. So

Julie Ledbetter Virtual Business Academy Julia Lewis House Graham California
Should You Switch to Fish Oil with PRMs?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

02:57 min | Last month

Should You Switch to Fish Oil with PRMs?

"Fish oil is rich in the omega three fatty acids, EPA and Dha and most American adults don't get the recommended amount of these nutrients from their diet and officials supplement is one way to help fill that gap. Fish Oil is also used in higher therapeutic doses to treat and prevent. Variety of health conditions including heart disease, auto, immune disorders, arthritis, and even depression. There are a few different mechanisms of action here. Omega threes are anti thrown Belichick that means that they reduce the tendency of blood to form clots and they're also potent anti inflammatories. To how do they do all of this? Well, Omega threes are enzymatic converted in your body into various biologically active molecules and those then orchestrate the body's inflammatory and immune responses at the cellular level. There are a lot of different types of these active compounds including Prostaglandins I, cost annoyed and leukotrienes. Pro Resolving mediators or PRM's our newly recognized category of these active compounds. The three main types of these are protections, resolve ines and medicines, and the fact that three PRM's start with p. r. and M. is actually quite handy. Now, in some medical papers, you'll see these compounds referred to as s PM's which stands for specialized pro resolving mediators, but that's not nearly as handy under Monica device. So I'M GONNA STICK WITH PRM's. Like their name implies crow resolving. Act to actively resolve or turn off the body's inflammatory responses and I want you to remember inflammation is not necessarily a bad thing. It is part of the body's immune response and in the right place at the right time, it serves a very important and valuable function. Chronic or excessive inflammation on the other hand can start to create problems and that's where the PR come in their job is to switch off that inflammatory activity once the immediate threat has been dealt with, which allows the inflammation to resolve and healing to begin. Some research suggests that in diseases that are characterized by chronic or inappropriate inflammation, there might be some sort of disruption in the body's production of these. PRM's and other research shows that supplementation with omega three fatty acids like those fish oil can increase the amount and the activity of PRM's in the body. But if our body makes PRM's when we take Omega three, why would we need to take them as a supplement? Why indeed?

Belichick EPA Crow
Apolo Ohno on The Weight of Gold

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:44 min | Last month

Apolo Ohno on The Weight of Gold

"Okay. Apollo short-track speedskating legend Olympic Hall of Famer Serial Entrepreneur Commentator New York Times bestselling author Oh in this guy so crazy talented and disciplined that smack in the middle of his athletic career in two thousand seven when he was at the peak of his powers he didn't just compete in. One dancing with the stars when I saw the trailer for the HBO Doc, I knew immediately, he'd be a great person to help break down the issues that are explored therein the mental perils of elite athleticism because this is a guy who was raised by a single dad who took his dream all the way to the very top and when it was all over, he had to figure out not just what was going to come next but actually who he? Was Fundamentally, who he was as a person off the rink. So this is a conversation about what it's like to have a passion with the shelf life, the mental health repercussions of the Olympics, and the toll placed on athletes and the pitfalls of prodigious success at a young age more broadly it's about why we sabotage ourselves and how to break this habit, and it's about deconstructing those preconditioned believes that we all have about who we are and what we're good at. Apollo gives us a lesson in mindset and intention how to use it to our advantage and what it takes to break the mold of what is possible and my hope is that this conversation will help you form. A more holistic idea of who you are and. What you want to offer the world I hope it encourages you to see the strength and vulnerability and and also the power and asking for help but more than anything I. Really Hope it breaks whatever illusion you have about one in. Is and what an Olympic athlete is not. So here we go. This is me. and. Apollo. Truly. One of history's all time. Great. Olympian. Man Thanks for doing this course I appreciate you making a trip out here. wanted to talk to you for a long time and when I saw the trailer for the new documentary weight of gold I thought this is the opportune moment to reach out. So thanks for making yourself available I'm glad you did. And thanks for letting me take a peek at the dock premier. We're doing this on July twenty nine. So it premieres tonight everybody's going get to be able to see it by the time this comes out and it was it was really. Moving for me. You know I certainly wasn't an athlete of of your caliber, any of the athletes portrayed in the movie. But. This is an important subject that I've talked about quite a bit on this podcast, which is making that transition from being essentially a professional quote unquote amateur whatever that means. into becoming a civilian and the mental health implications of what that's like and when I look at your career or look at somebody like Michael Phelps or showing white whose documented in the film as well. The outsider perspective is that these people all slid pretty graciously into a civilian career path and I think that perception belies the truth of just how difficult that is even for somebody like yourself who's done it very successfully it's a traumatic process for anybody who competes as an athlete at the highest level. Yeah the you said that very well, I think the transition that. Olympic athletes face is. It's just I. Don't WanNa use the word unique because I believe everyone goes to the phase at some point in their life. Right. So as you dedicate your career, your path, your energy your time toward one specific goal and thing that really made you feel give you confidence. and has external signaling whether you're making more money or you're getting a raise or you're progressing and people are celebrating you in the Olympic world you kind of only really celebrated once every four years. So if you've got multiple Olympic career. Call it two or three or five, and some case for some of these athletes. You're only told you really good when you're at the Olympics and although that you know that you've got other qualities and attributes about your personality that could potentially be transferable across in career paths. I think that you don't really feel it right? You feel like, for example, in speedskating, we go in circles like for a living I did that for like fifteen years bitterly working on the same things on a daily basis and it was beautiful and I chose that path. And then I use this a lot you know that. We have the great divorce happens right. So my first true love. No longer can I you know have this person in my life it's there but I've moved on and there's more structure and so Olympic athletes, there's no subsidization. You know there's no subsidy from the government. There's no. RISE NO SALARY PER SE to be a part Olympic team and. That's the beauty sport because that's how you do it because you love it and you do it for all the other you know Ansari reasons aside from progressing in your career but there definitely is a very strong mental transitory challenge that exists with all athletes and only really felt that and notice that I was deathly afraid of it. I had heard about it but I didn't know until many years into my retirement from competitive athletic sport.

Olympics Olympic Hall New York Times HBO Michael Phelps Apollo Speedskating Ansari
The Midwifery Model of Care with Sarah Stetina, CNM

Babes and Babies

07:49 min | Last month

The Midwifery Model of Care with Sarah Stetina, CNM

"I would love to dive into. The training and education. So I know that there's different kinds of midwives but in order to practice in Illinois, you have to be CNN correct yes. Currently certified nurse Midwives at the only legal provider in Illinois but there's more than just two midwife types and that's kind of what makes midwifery kind of confusing or there's a lot of misconceptions about midwifery because there's so many different entries. So the first obviously as nurse Midwifery, that's what I am, and it made the most sense for me to choose nurse Midwifery because like I said I didn't learn about midwifery until was already in nursing school. So it made sense to go on and get my master's degree and specialize in midwifery, and so that row is a master's degree. It can also be a doctorate degree and it's similar to a nurse Practitioner which also masters program but you you have the same education to a certain point and then they branch off until your specialty. So you could be a needle natal nurse practitioner. You could be acute care nurse, practitioner, family nurse Practitioner. Nurse unnecess- or a nurse midwife. All of those things are kind of in the same level. Just our specialty that that varies. And so that was my education. was going to finish my masters degree doing clinicals and didactic and. Doing births and all being clinic and office visits and learning all the skills, and then you have to sit for a national. Certifying exam. And Pass that to become certified and then you have to apply for licensure in your state. So there are other routes there's also certified midwives which are Also. Take US certifying national exam. And may go through an accredited program, but they're not nurses I and it's not a masters of nursing degree at summit where free degree that isn't legal in every state. There's certain states that allow certified midwives and then the third is the certified professional midwife, which is also certified by a national exam and there are midwifery programs for CPM's or certified professional midwives. But they're not recognized every state. I, think it's up to like thirty two states now that recognized CPM's most of them work. In out of hospital setting wall nurse midwives typically work in hospital settings, but it can vary depending on the state. and certified professional midwives spent a lot of time in an apprenticeship without of hospital midway experienced midwives learning that in addition to their. Schooling. So very comparable it's just the model pathway that you want to enter midwifery. And then there's traditional midwives which maybe don't take a certifying exam don't. Have a license and have learned midwifery from being passed down through generations, and that's how midwife midwifery kind of started in the United States. And there's a lot of wisdom to be gained from traditional midwives but. The country doesn't usually recognize them as. Legal providers. Yeah do would you say that there is a lot of misconceptions around education as a midwife Oh yeah. I think a lot of people think you don't know what you're doing. Oh Yeah. I, think a lot of people don't realize they compare us with Dulas. People ask me all the time oh you deliver babies no. When I tell them I'm like, oh so like a Dula and I'm like well, no. And they're you know it's so interesting. Once, I learned everything about midway free. You just assume that everyone else is going to figure it out to which obviously is not the keys I was in nursing school didn't know what Wise Ray but that campaign in the nineteen hundreds that kind of. Discredited midwives which was led by the. Physicians and Medical Association to get people to him birth in a hospital. The kind of told the story that midwives were dangerous and an educated and not safe, and that is a really successful campaign because it is still prevalent in in the way that people think about midwives today and so I'd say whether you're CPM Siham, 'em or a CNN. Or choosing those providers most of them are very very educated and have a lot of knowledge and our experts at normal physiological birth. and. Midwives nurse midwives. In particular can we can prescribe we can order imaging, we can do lab work, we can manage normal guy any staff so whether that's a PAP smear. Cycles birth control throughout the life span. And I don't think people realize that we don't just do pregnancy and birth you can come see me for anything that you'd go see an ob for for the most part, and if it's out of my scope, I'm going to refer you appropriately in in there are levels of of scope of practice but. Yet for most. People you can see a midwife for pretty much everything related to reproductive health, right which leads us to another misconception. Because honestly I didn't really know that before. My introduction midwives was my sister when she was pregnant with her oldest who's twelve now. She didn't plan on using a midwife. She had some crazy thing happen. With her insurance, dropped her because her doctor mixed up her medical records and then they went take her and she got pregnant. No insurance started looking at alternative methods and found this midwife. And ended up doing an at home birth in that was my first. Experience seeing a birth and just fell in love with that and she ended up having all four of her kids at home. And I also dislike fell in love with her midwife she's she was doctrine Venezuela she studied birth the Amazon she came to the states started this practice and very wise. Gosh, she's so amazing and And so it's cool because then became a delay gotta work with her with some other berths to. But before that. Also, I. Yeah. You just you picture a midwife it's a home birth. It's You know. And that's all they do is birthing right and obviously now that I know it's like. I'm going to. Be Used mid wife's for the rest of my life. I'm like in menopause you know what I mean. I can still go to them not just when I'm having a baby you can have that relationship based care that really holistic approach in every aspect of your healthcare pretty much, and we're trained as a nurse midwives trained in primary care as well. So basic primary care, your annual exams, even just a asthma management simple things we are very capable and entering. To to manage as well and for for the the myth that midwives only do home birth that's really prevalent. I. Tell people a midwife and they immediately assume that I'm delivering babies at home which there's nothing wrong with that obviously uses your head a wonderful home breath but you can buy midwives in literally every setting whether it's home birth centers, hospitals clinics. Federally, Qualified Health Centers Academia doing research. You know we're we're everywhere that a physician might be

Nurse Practitioner Family Nurse Practitioner CNN Nurse Unnecess United States Dulas Illinois Asthma Medical Association Wise Ray PAP Siham Venezuela
20 Minutes About Hacking Your Metabolism

20 Minute Fitness

05:35 min | Last month

20 Minutes About Hacking Your Metabolism

"Why don't you introduce yourself and told our listeners a bit about yourself as far as human benchmarking for having very happy to. Peter. So lady bid about the let's start with lumine what he doesn't. Actually do so with built is probably the first real time feedback on attrition. So to think about what you have in terms of solutions to help you manage fishing today, you have diets have nutritionists and you have a lot of. Online and you have several tools to help you understand your microbiome and so forth. But in a way, there is no real feedback loop that can help you on a daily basis reflects in see what you've been doing well in what you haven't been doing well to change your nutrition to support your healthy metabolism, which is actually lumens. Go Rhino, we developed tool. Looks, in basically analyzed the CO two in your breath and by doing that, it assesses whether your body is currently using facts or fuel or cards for Jill. It's a different paradigm batteries. It's basically understanding. Okay. Are Calories being burned but what is the fuel source is actually feeding? Those was calories that you're burning whether when you're working outdoor, not just to live. Driver body and based on that metric by picking on a daily basis, you breathe into the device you see what's happening take a lot of father data points that the that we get if it's from integrations to Google fake help kids. And other devices and we provide you with a daily personality advance. So it really tells you how many macro issue should be having. We focus mainly on carbs. What is your capacity to absorb carbs in the right way today how many carbs you should be eating, and once you follow that plan and you come the morning after and you take a measurement you see that you manage to start to make make a change you wanna see body burning fats in the morning. So this is kind. Of a not in a nutshell how would somebody's metabolism differ from one another? Like do we metabolize cops differently? So there are many many differences between people but generally sticking a healthy body image, polically flexible body will wake up using fats mainly for fuel because assuming you haven't been eating for the past six hours, you've been fast six seven hours because you've been sleeping your body. That's night time is the time for the body to make that transition to fat-burner and so if you're waking up. On Burn probably means that you've been eating well, not too much in the past few days probably enough carbs that again, not to launch in the past two, three days sleeping well also gets your body to do that transition lack of stress and vice versa. So if you're not sleeping where you ate very late at night, she break alcohol or you blocked her body ability to do that switch to fat burning because alcohol anthrax allies in deliver in. So all all the fun stuff in life but. The that are damaging stressing to your body will get you to wake up on carbon. You'll morning, which is something you want to be fixing. Yeah. Of course, particularly bad metabolism are completely inhibiting actually your metabolism Wyatt's by livers forcing alcohol exactly at the body treats alcohol as poison base. Yeah. I'd. So it will I tend to that than metabolize alcohol, and this will have to process will happen in the liver, but the liver is also crucial for fat metabolism right so produce energy from fats. That's. That's where you need your liver to functioning right and so I kind of have a good idea when a wake up. Okay. Did I have too many cops maybe the night before or like some other bad behaviors maybe not enough sleep. What about throughout the day like what kind of can I expect like after having had lunch for example, right? So so swimming, let's say that your lunch with. Rich with carbs you should. You would see a spike in shift towards CARB USAGE which is okay. That the insulin is secreted the sugar gets into your blood and from the blood to the cells themselves, your cells will be using sugar. So so it's not just something we measure after after meals we offer are used to measure APPs for meals to see their metabolism is flexible. So candidate make that shift from fat burn to two cards, but still also different opportunities different. Than moments during the day that you can actually that metric can be also super insightful. So if you want to see if you're you're ready for specific a high intensity workouts you have planned. So so understanding if your body is using fat cards at the moment, because your life is in stores are full or because he just ate today or your post meal that's where you. WanNa see your body on carbon before an intense workout after workout, you can also see that shift to fat burn if that was learn again. So there are more opportunities to to take measurements you can. You can assess your fasting regiment. So basically, you're doing time restricted eating or any type of intermittent fasting the body can get into the Baltic stress in that process, right? Some kinds your body is not efficient. It's not the more you fast necessarily the better in. So we help people identify the point where they're they're fasting is not really efficient. Any more because everybody is now releasing like agenda shifting to burn even if they are not really, they haven't eaten anything. So that's another opportunity in another point in time where that metric be super insightful people.

Google Peter Baltic Jill Wyatt
Stigma in Christian and Asian Communities

The Psych Central Show

06:19 min | Last month

Stigma in Christian and Asian Communities

"Of the Psych Central podcast calling into the show today, we have Dr Esther Park, who was a board certified child adolescent and Adult Psychiatrist Dr Park Completed Her psychiatric training at the La see USC medical center and has more than seventeen years of outpatient clinical experience treating adults and children Dr Park Welcome to the show Oh it's such a pleasure. Thank you for inviting me. Well, we really excited to have you here because we want to talk about the stigma of mental health in the Christian and Asian communities. So let's jump right in why is there stigma mental health in many Christian circles? This is an area where I'm very familiar I grew up. My father was a Presbyterian minister, from Korea, as first generation Korean. Moving here to the United States and I was born here. So I'm a US barring korean-american. So I got to see just what it's like to grow up in a church actually Korean church I believe that the stigma comes from misconceptions, a lot of misconceptions about healing in general general healing of physical problems and especially mental healing. So for example, maybe seventeen hundreds, right? Where severe mental illness just gets to frame. Yeah where they're having nations and bizarre behaviors that used to be looked upon as demon possessed, and so from those generations and centuries until now it's still has kinda trickled to this modern day of if you have a mental illness and you can't quote unquote, shake it off that something's wrong with you spiritually, I'm reminded of the Salem witch trials. And Twenty, the majority of people believe that was just an extreme overreaction based on on so many factors but fear being primary one, and now here we are in twenty twenty and I I recognize that that we're not burning anybody at the stake but it's interesting to me that that we're allowing sort of this misinformation or there's misconception and this fear of mental illness Dr, are thinking when the. Average person in two thousand, twenty completely understands that letting fear and misinformation drive are thinking all the way back in. Salem wasn't overreach an overreaction. It feels like the same thing just with less dire consequences except of course, if if you're a person living with mental illness or mental health issues and you don't get the treatment and support that you need to death is a very real possibility. Right I, totally agree. It's just a different form now, just more maybe acceptable form today how people are being viewed or treated whenever they're struggling, and then that causes people to not share their struggles. Do you feel that the average Christian feels that they can't seek help because it salt their faith or is it deeper than that? Not about insulting their own faith, it's about like if I help. And I find out that I really have a diagnosis or I'm really experiencing something real. then. That's GonNa to prove that I am not a person of true faith or my faith is weaker than others and they're very fearful to discover that sometime. So there's a great deal of denial and a great deal of I can just beat this with my faith. All I have to do is pray or all I have to do is go to more worship services. So I think those are the reasons why rather than a direct insult to the faith professionally, I would say why there's a stigma there's such minimal knowledge ignorance about physiology and medical background and even psychology even the entire field of psychology there is another misconception. Just based on the fear that that is not of God and they think that psychologists or even the theorists of the past are not aligned with God and they just kind of alienate them or marginalized them as opposite of God or atheists, and so I found that very intriguing because I grew up even I think my own dad would talk about Freud or other famous theorists not there of the devil but like they're influenced maybe and did not trust psychology and maybe people don't even try to go to a psychologist for fear that Oh they're going to change me and if they changed me, I'm not going to believe in God. I might talking really extremely in terms of like what the thinking but deep down inside there is so much fear in going to a psychologist. They don't know that these are actual neurologically based struggles. For example, major depression severe anxiety disorders polars your friend. Yeah. These are disorders of neural transmitter imbalances. And they can be treated. On the other hand on the spiritual level, I'm a firm believer that many have inaccurate standing about what we call the Gospel or the good news. They don't know the message of the Bible I think they misconstrue so many things and just pick and choose what they think the doctrines. And then apply it to certain things. For example, have you ever heard of the word legalism? legalism is it term based on the law? So example, there are laws of God or there's these traditional laws interpreted as laws of God, and you must obey them, and that's the only way to please God or get blessings. And therefore, if you don't, you may get punished if the mental health issue is considered as a punishment than they may be experiencing Oh, I must be punished. This must be a consequence of a pass wrongdoing. So it's totally, it's the misconception starts to

United States Dr Esther Park Psychiatrist Dr Park Dr Park Salem Korea Usc Medical Center Severe Anxiety Freud
My Time Machine

As We Move Forward

02:36 min | Last month

My Time Machine

"Who is not imagined at one time or another what it'd be like the time machine. Time is a fascinating concept, the idea of moving either forward or backward from the present moment has most likely occurred to each of us at one time or another. Quite possibly, the only time in our lives when this idea does not have appeal would be the very beginning of life for that brief period following our entry into the world appearances and behavior tend to confirm that our only goal is satisfaction our needs of the moment. As we get older, we become accustomed to wishing we could move their time especially into the future it is called play into the healthy part of a child's growth and development. We play at Greenwich Activities Like School. House and other pursuits that we've seen our world or on television or in the movies we might act out roles as cowboys and Indians cops and robbers, soldiers, pirates, or professionals such as athletes dancers. Each of these and numerous other activities make us dream about having your own time machine to take us to some point in the future we wish we had achieved right now. Adult in our lives eight in our participation in this time machine dreaming by asking what we want to be when we grow up. This dreaming occurs in the normal course of our lives. When you look ahead to things like summer vacation a family trip time camp as well as Christmas and birthdays. We can project our thoughts ahead and time dreaming of things like college or starting our careers marriage and having a family. When I first saw the movie back to the future I realized my fantasy time machine would not take me to some imagine future time. Instead I found myself wishing I could go into the past for me. It is not wishing I could go into some period in the distant past that I thought would be better than what I was experiencing at the present time. My dream for a time machine was one that would take me back in my own life to the time before had made a few decisions in my life I admit I have wanted the chance to make several decisions differently based on what I know. Now, none of these changes come from any deep regret over how my life has turned out. There are simply a few times when I would like to have had the chance to choose a different direction. As we move forward, we may want to consider that in life. We have a marvelous time machine. We have the amazing ability everything that has gone on in the past and a learned valuable lessons. The past has for us as we move into the future with hope and anticipation by seeing our movement through time. This way we can come to embrace every moment in every experience has it comes along. Life therefore is the amazing time machine. We have each been given, maybe learned to enjoy it more and more each day.

Greenwich Activities Like Scho House