Social Identity

Who are you? Listen to the latest thought-provoking audio content on social identity and hone your sense of self. Aired on premium podcasts.

How your personality shapes your politics with Dannagal G. Young

TED Talks Daily

04:18 min | 6 d ago

How your personality shapes your politics with Dannagal G. Young

"I'm a political and social psychologist. I study how people understand the world. And what this means for society and for Democracy. which as it turns out quite a lot. Some. People see the world is safe and good, and this allows them to be okay with uncertainty and to take time to explore and play. Others are acutely aware of threats in their environment. So they prioritize order and predictability over openness and experimentation. In my academic research study, how these two approaches shape how we think and feel. About everything from art to politics. I also explore how political elites and partisan media use. These very different says to engender hatred and fear. And how the economics of our media system? Exploit these same divides. But after studying this, I have come away not with the sense that we're doomed to be divided. But that it's up to us to see both sets of traits as necessary in even valuable. Take, for example, two men who have been so influential in my own life. I my late husband Mike he was an artist who saw the world is safe and good. He welcomed ambiguity and play in his life. In fact, we met through Improv comedy where he taught improvisers to listen and be open. and to be comfortable, not knowing what was GONNA happen next. After, we got married and had our baby boy Mike was diagnosed with a brain tumor. And through months of hospitalizations in surgeries. I followed Mike's lead. Trying to practice being. Trying to be okay not knowing what was going to happen next. It was Mike's Tolerance for ambiguity. That allowed me to survive those months of uncertainty in that. Helped me explore new ways to rebuild my life after he died. About a year and a half after Mike passed away. I met my current husband PJ. PJ is a criminal prosecutor who sees the world as potentially good provided that threats are properly managed. He also someone who embraces order in predictability in his daily routine in the foods that he eats in his selection of wardrobe. and has vicious wit, but he's also morally very serious with a strong sense of duty and purpose. And he values tradition loyalty and family. Which is why at the age of twenty eight he did not hesitate to marry a widow, adopt her baby boy and raise him as his son. It was PJ's need for certainty and closure that brought stability to our lives. I share these two stories of Mike Pj not just because they're personal but because they illustrate two things that I have in my own research. I that are psychological traits shape how engaged with the world. And second. That both of these approaches make all of our lives possible. Tragically though. Political and economic incentives of our media environment. Seek to exploit these differences to get. US, angry to get our attention. To get. Clicks. into turn US against one another. and. It works. It works in part because these same sets of traits are related to core political and cultural beliefs. For years political psychologists have studied how psychological traits shop our political beliefs. We've conducted experiments to understand how our psychology in our politics shape how we respond to a political stimuli. In this research has shown that those people who are less concerned with threats who are tolerant ambiguity. These people tend to be more culturally and socially liberal on matters like immigration or crime or sexuality, and because they're tolerant ambiguity, they also tend to be okay with nuance in the enjoy thinking for the sake of thinking.

Mike Pj Prosecutor Mike United States
Stuart Stevens was an uncompromising Republican  until Donald Trump

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:51 min | 6 d ago

Stuart Stevens was an uncompromising Republican until Donald Trump

"Stuart. Stevens, thank you so much for coming on the PODCAST. Great. Longtime fan first time caller. Will thank you. You know you sent me a DM on twitter asking. For me to to read your latest book and where could you where could you send it and I thought if Stuart Stevens is sending me a message about a book he's written I probably need to read it. The name of the book is it was all a lie and I am so glad I, read it because in some ways it was. It was Cathartic for me to read because you know it's so secret. I'm a Democrat will little left of center and always these suspicions about the Republican Party. But you as a creature, the Republican Party someone who helps set up the Republican Party to hear you. Just. Sort of. What's the right? What's the right word to describe? What you do in this book before we dive right in. Look I. started. On the quested ended with this book asking myself how is trump could happen? and. You know kind of the old saying that your high high-scoring English if you can't ride that, you don't really understand it. So for me, it really began is a very personal quest You know two, thousand, sixteen, a lot of people were wrong about Donald trump it's hard to find anybody was more wrong than me. I didn't think he'd win the primary win the general and I realized in retrospect a lot because I didn't want to believe it. And then I went through this period after his elected, a lot of my friends did like Donald Trump is it really the Republican Party? But I don't really see how you sustain that. if part of the realities of what trump is brought to us as a death of truth. I think being truthful is all the more important. And it on one of the things that really drew me to the Republican. Party. Was the concept of personal responsibility. which now we've become the ultimate victims. Party. So for me I just kind nutty idea that if I believed in, I turn responsibility, it should be the first one of responsibility. I. Didn't want to write. You know the trope of books in DC of if only they'd listen to me. I couldn't write that because they did listen to me. I couldn't sort of like going them. So that's that's what led me to write the book I think it's a combination of a Mayor Copeland of your. That is the word I was looking for, and I couldn't find it was it was may Copa on on page thirty, six at the end of a gets the first chapter. Is a paragraph that I think encapsulates what you were just saying but also the premise of the book you write, how do you abandon deeply held beliefs about character personal responsibility, foreign policy, and the national debt in a matter of months you don't the obvious answer is those beliefs weren't deeply held in the end the Republican Party rallied behind Donald. Trump. Because if that was the deal needed to regain power, what was the problem because it had always been about power the rest, the principles, the values, it was all a lie. that. Is when I read that I underlined it practically ripping up the paper and underlying underlining it because that's what I've been seeing and has taken my breath away about the Republican, Party in the age of trump. All of these things I grew up hearing and learning from Republicans have been completely junked. You're right. We were wrong. I. It's I don't think we've really seen a collapse of a political party A. The way the Republican Party's collapsed in modern American history and probably not American history. To me, the Republican Party doesn't exist political party now exists cartel. WHY DOES IT Exist? It exists to be Democrats. That's not a political theory. It's just a marketing principle. It's like asking OPEC with the higher good of OPEC. Sell oil what an Arco. Darker curtail say what are you guys really trying to do tried to sell dope man and you know what's the Republican Party is trying to beat Democrats. and. To know. Tower to no purpose I think other than power

Republican Party Donald Trump Stuart. Stevens Twitter Opec Mayor Copeland
Queen Afua Discusses Coronavirus, Grief, & 21 Day Detox

On One with Angela Rye

05:53 min | Last week

Queen Afua Discusses Coronavirus, Grief, & 21 Day Detox

"Welcome everyone. This is another edition of on one with Angela Rye as a masterclass with the Queen Herself Queen. Food. Thank you so much for being with me and invited me to your lovely space in Q.. So Much I. Just Love You love your work. So honored to be with you today. Thank you. I'm honored to be with you and just for making this time given all this going on corona virus forest fires. Everything else and here I am sitting with you seven days into mind. Your details. So let's talk a little bit about your journey. How you kind of came into this space I have my heel I sell books, and here am my sacred woman book here. You aren't expert on all things holistic wellness and healing. Can you talk to me a little bit about how you started your own journey? Well, my journey is what keeps me inspired to help others when I was sixteen years of age. I had chronic asthma. And ECZEMA from head to toe at rightous had bedridden PMS. Headaches I was as fell. Sick and tired of being sick and tired know what to do you know how to change it. And the doctor told my mother. Lived in a glass house, he's alert to every. That's all he had me and I had my biweekly objections to just manage. So I know by the time out of East in my twenties walking with the respirator. You know that's helped boggling my lungs were. And there was no way to get out of less I, shifted a whole nother new life. Well, I was invited to healing mistreat that changed my entire everything where was it? It was upstate New York, right? The first time I've ever been on retreat I was a mediator, a junk food eater everything's toxic I was eating right out of ignorance and so when I go in this retreat. The bus open the cartilage. The grass, the trees there should be a friends, but it will my image toxin. So then the ASS kicked in and getting off the bus and I started exe- scratching and weasing and left my medication home and I wouldn't so the cafeteria to put down my bags and I ask the first spiritual question ever. Was Am I. Going to do I'm out here with strangers and I was in a panic but I got my first message from my invoice. Grapefruits Lemons and oranges. Okay that's formula later on I found out and I had. T and that day that's all I had water. In, the midst of the asthma me quietly in this state I heard this loud voices wonderful man who's talking about herbs and the healing the nation. A master heartless at that time about fifty years. and. He talked about healing testimonies in miracles happen for people who did the herbs and took a natural lifestyle. Well I. Sat down that Nice still wheezing scratching I didn't hear anyone I didn't remember the giving presentation anything I was caught up. But that night, there was a fireplace, the fires going. It's come into my lungs not knowing a fellow sitting up because as Mac down you love to collapse. Everybody else was in their big I. was front of the Fireplace on the Sofa like now. That next morning I had my first detox I didn't d tops. Bathroom for about an hour music is drained out of my nose. Some came out of my eyes some came from my chest on my throat out of my mouth. And then all of a sudden the asthma stopped. and. The red. White of my eyes it's. Stopped where and then the itching stopped, it was A. Tornado that hit me and then it was a calm day. After that happened I said, wait a minute what's going on there must be some relationship. To what I'm eating and if I'm going to get well, I'm going to be sick. And I realized that I had the power at that moment to change my life. Dazzling never came back. I'm in my sixties. came. Back. And I picked up a book Dick Gregory cooking with Mother Nature. He became my mentor to his book. Took on his family nine children they didn't know me but I knew them. Went home. With membrane the next day the next two days now of a sudden. People were talking about algae to herb. War. Using Medicine Meditation Yoga often that I live now and teach others it was all new to me. When I went home, I went cold Turkey I didn't go through transition I didn't go from one level. I just went all that's called the detailer not begin. And soul debt was the shift, and then shortly after I got home twenty, one day detox. And Twenty one day. For the last two years. And then became certified opened up a censored life continued and the asthma the allergies left the Eczema left the PM less was a shock that live took two months no more pain and I was in the President I. saw my mind shifted to my thinking. I was very introverted. I didn't talk a lot but I was an artist. I was dancing a dance off to sing and that's what I'm wanting to do. But this he'll got caught quote me and I got caught up in. Yeah and that's what I do now.

Asthma Dick Gregory Eczema Angela Rye Headaches New York Rightous Allergies MAC President Trump The Detailer
Biden's Agenda for the Latino Community with Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia

The Electorette Podcast

05:13 min | Last week

Biden's Agenda for the Latino Community with Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode I have a conversation with representatives, Sylvia Garcia of Texas twenty ninth congressional. District. Discussed Biden's agenda for the Latino community and what we can expect from Bein Harris Administration including their plans to address income and healthcare disparities and the disproportionate impact of Kobe purpose. Of course, also addresses those criticisms of the campaign around whether their outreach to the Latino community is enough. So here is my conversation with representative Sylvia Garcia. Purpose Garcia. Welcome to the PODCAST. Well. Thank you for having me. If I I want to talk about the Biden Campaign I. Guess these are criticisms not doing enough to connect with the Latino community, and if you think that that assessment is fair or do you think that there's more work to do there? Were you know I think people are just so excited about the Joe Vying Kamala Harris. Ticket that everybody wants some light right there now in their neighborhood at knocking at their door, I mean, they're that excited about this ticket that I think there's some folks who who just feel like until they go come to their neighborhood, it's just not happening but but I know I serve on the National Latino. Council. For by now early supporter I know that from day one joe by his been reaching out to Latinos but I know that we can always do better. Anything that we could do to make sure that we reach more. Latino voters. Not Just in Florida not just in Texas not just in California. New York Arizona. New Mexico but everywhere across the country because if you look at any state these days we have Latinos everywhere we have them in Hawaii. We have him in Alaska. So I think what matters is knowing that that he has started his spanish-language press he started making sure that we we air as much as possible. Eh, he's gotten. The Latino Leadership Councils now in several states, I know I'm working on building up in in Texas because he wants to make sure that he touches the Latino community in especially also is Dr. Biden I think Dr Binding early on recognized Latino vote was and more importantly how important Bill Latino vote was that I know that she had a virtual event with with the would we call the commoditised synagogue Nestle. Which is Debbie Powell from Florida. Veronica, grammar from from Texas and myself were all three Judiciary Committee and people here called on ESCO mothers did judiciary it stock and Jill heard about it and wanted to do an event with us and we did, and now we're going to launch a commodity to commodity campaign to make sure that we impress all our voters that we got to vote until one mother to another. To remind work in our own mother network to make sure that we come out and vote to make sure that we make the change that's needed at the White House. So I'm excited. So one of the things I've found really impressive about Biden's response to that specific criticism is that he wasn't defensive and I think you know right before he visited Florida reporter asked him about. Whether there wasn't enough outreach to the Latino community and buying said something like you know I'm going to work like the devil to make sure that I listen and their vote. So he was open to the idea that there was room for improvement and I think both by an Harris are both consistent in responding without being defensive you know and they bring people to the table. There's a lot of work to do and I think we can always do better and I can tell you Scott along with surrogate were willing to do that. He's he's got a lot of people on the ground. Excited to do that. I mean I can tell you a story Saturday I. Don't do too many in person events, but they wanted me to go to a phone bank and I was assured that were social distance everybody's a math. And I went and the minute I walked in it was about Sylvia Joe Sylvia Joe. Any they know the job blindness running. They're excited because. It hurts them to see a White House that is about hurting people for us in. Texas. It's about what we've seen him doing at the border, but it's also seeing that they're not getting more help and more relief on for everybody on unemployment. It's also about what he's doing to Medicare and social security because that hurts our relief does on our lead us. So people know and they know the to make the change that we need they're going to have to get there in those phones. And? Of, course, the member of Congress I've First Ladies First. So that became their chance. Soviet Joe and I told him I said well, it's not just a joe as it Soviet Joe more contests. So I left him with at Madeira. Very excited. You're making calls and Were Spanish language of phone calls to low propensity Latino voters in Harris County

Sylvia Joe Sylvia Joe Dr. Biden Sylvia Garcia Texas Scott National Latino Latino Leadership Councils Florida Bein Harris Administration White House Harris County Jim Taylor Skinner Kamala Harris Harris Alaska Congress Representative Veronica Debbie Powell Arizona
Biden's Agenda for the Black Community with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake

The Electorette Podcast

05:25 min | Last week

Biden's Agenda for the Black Community with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode. A have a conversation with Mayor Stephanie, Rawlings Bleak Mayor Rawlings Blake served as the forty ninth mayor of Baltimore as she joins me to discuss Biden's agenda for the black community. Now, if you haven't taken a look at Biden's agenda for the black community, you WanNa hear this conversation we discuss this plans to close disparities in homeownership rates within the black community his plans to help close the wealth gap the expansion of the affordable care act and has extensive criminal justice reform plans including employing the Department of Justice to address police accountability, decriminalizing the use of canvas and the automatic expunge -ment of all cannabis use convictions. So. Here's my conversation with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake Mayor Rawlings Blake. Welcome to the PODCAST. So I WANNA talk about Biden's agenda for the black community because I was reading through that and I don't think in my lifetime that I've seen or proposal that's this extensive and targeted towards the black community and I wanted to be fair. So I looked through some other past presidential platforms and a lot of them aren't really archived. You know how he crafted this or you know, did he have help from outside organization or WHO's influencing him on this? The vice principal former Vice President Biden has a theory broad group of. Individuals who have been advising him and who care a lot about making sure that the the Democratic Party is right by a black people as well as he does right by black people when he is very hopefully elected NFC among about. Today's that's right. It's like fifty days or something I think with just kind of makes me nervous nervous excited both at the same time. And he's got economists that have been advising him as well as advocates and I think when you take a look at the plan many aspects of the plan, you see their their fingerprints on it that this is not for show. This is not something that is decorative on a on a website. This is something then can be implemented and we'll have a real impact on our community. Absolutely. Right. I agree with that and when I was just looking at the wording and some of the things that he hits on. Pretty. Deep right in an isn't something I would expect it to see us on the democratic side. You wouldn't see it on the Republican side even on the Democratic side, you know five or ten years ago. So that's something. Yeah. I WANNA go really deeply into every policy proposal, but there are few that I want to hit on some pressings. Building Wealth no health care and criminal justice reform. But. I WANNA start with building wealth because one of the things that he proposes is doubling the funding for the State Small Business Credit Initiative which doubling that to three billion dollars to assist small businesses and targeting specifically people of Color. You don't WanNa talk about the fact that you know that that's great but you know black people I think in the group of people of Color by people are thinker are usually at the bottom in terms of getting capital access to capital for building small businesses because there are other bias and other limitations that we face, we try to start small business you know. So have you actually address that those unique barriers to black people getting capital in starting small businesses? The first thing you do to address the barrier is acknowledged I can't tell you optus pointed I've been to hear our current president deny ignore the disparities that exist or by people in our country as when you start off ahead in the game and you have someone's willing to name it. And to a work to address it in also wanted to bring to your attention. It's not just the the the money for small businesses Biden Harris. Focused on African American women business owners specifically because as you know a, we are the majority of the businesses offices that are being created in the NBA minority community are African American women see address s like I said at first by identifying them and second step by step I I know there's going to need to be mentors are business mentors that are working to help these these small businesses achieve and when you have an administration that is sensitive, you'll be able to do what was done under the Obama Administration where there was a lot of support event to two businesses. You know a lot of those sports have been ripped up by the current administration so A. Definitely identifying the issues and pudding supports in place to close some of those gaps are the essential you're right. So we have to recover from the damage has been done from the current administration, but then you know things like this policies like this have to account for the fact that we're pandemic. I'm a lot of the businesses that by people have owned have probably been hit in hurt quite. A bit. So that's another place to start. Definitely I. Mean I think one of the things you you will hear a line that I've heard a lot. It's not. We're not trying to go back to where we were. You know this is about ripping up be You know the race face inequities that impact the black community across the board and making sure that we are not ignoring you. Know, the problems you've seen,

Black Community Biden Harris Stephanie Rawlings Rawlings Blake Democratic Party Jim Taylor Skinner Baltimore Department Of Justice Cannabis Optus Broad Group NBA Obama Administration NFC Vice President Principal President Trump
Interview with  Glory Edim

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

04:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Glory Edim

"Her second in policy, which we look forward to hearing more about welcome glory are you having me? Oh thank you so much for joining us in your kicking off our season two of the podcast series. So what a way to start the fall? Oh, this is incredible. I'm glad to be a guest I am a fan of your work. In addition to just enjoying the book itself, I'm a fan of what you've been able to accomplish with well red black girl particularly in the way of used the platform of of a literary network to intentionally highlight narratives that are often ignored or ones that disappear from her collective consciousness as to African descended womanhood, the beauty and diversity of our voices experiences I enjoy speaking to people like yourself and I often wonder how is this person get here? What was their journey like? Why do they do what they do? So you ready to get into it? Yes, I am. Act One call to adventure. As a writer entrepreneur, of course, there are paths that we take and processes that we engage in to get us to where we are today, and sometimes we do that. Emotionally, we have spiritual processes, intellectual ones, and so on. How did you become interested in doing the work you do today? Well, it was a long and Berry unexpected journey and I think it really started for me at Howard University by alumni really supported me feel seen in loves and space where black women aren't always valued our university boosted lifted me up. So it was there that I countered Zora Neil hurston and Tony Morrison and my Angelo, all incredible authors that allowed me to see myself more clear in allowed needs to really start to think about who I wasn't the world in the work that I wanted to do, and originally I majored in journalism and I minored in geology and I was always surrounded by just incredible people that motivated me whether it's my professors my best friends I just always had a beautiful reflection to someone saving mealy you can do this and whether it was reading pursuing journalism, I, always find courage is supported and I think that's the main takeaway from my spirit's is becoming not. Yet or do serve the festival and so many other names. It's having a support system being passionate and being able to identify what your vision is. Jahns I've been able to say without a doubt that my purpose to really be of service to other black women and help uplift them in a leary space yawns I gained so much joy from that. I didn't know that was what I was going to be doing when I was a freshman in college, but it just organically happened as I started pursuing my career. Network in meeting other people it just services evolved this beautiful way. So years later, we well red black girl but I know that seed was planted on campus our university I, like fat because and maybe this is just my own personal perspective of going to a Pwi a predominantly white institution that it's not to say that you don't have professors that encourage and cultivate you your skills, your interest but I wonder if if it's something about going to an HP, see you that it's like Hashtag black excellence all around and then you. Just really entrenched in that moment of Oh, you dig Tony Morrison to, and it's not like we have one week where we covered Tony Morrison then that's it. No, it's extends like it's like the whole life cycle like I think back when I was a freshman I taught at a school that was called the Maya Angelou Public Charter school and I don't think I could have done that anywhere else but in DC as a student at Howard University and those moments gave me again the sense of purpose of helping. Other children and working in space with other black students and working with black professors just around we twenty four, seven that I didn't have I didn't have a chance to second-guessed took away. Any doubt I had when I was at a randomly whites all as a high school student and then when I graduated I, just have the sense of I mean in. Regards like entitled to myself were that I felt like I do anything united feels token is any way because I knew

Tony Morrison Howard University Angelo Maya Angelou Public Charter Sc Zora Neil Hurston Writer PWI Berry HP
Kids on the Case

Criminal

04:53 min | 2 weeks ago

Kids on the Case

"Always. Just naturally curious like I've been a natural investigator, my entire life. This is Jessica Maple back in two thousand eleven. She was finishing sixth grade and starting to make plans for her perfect summer and what she really wanted to do was go to a policy debate camp, and then my mother said Hey Jessica I just got an email from the school and the county is going to have a junior district attorney camp. Jessica was annoyed that her mother assumed that district attorney camp would be anything like policy debate camp. She was twelve and I'm just like mom I'm not into this type of stuff. So I don't WanNa go and she's like will you're going anyway so Upset and Soleil went that first day. For Here's District Attorney Paul Howard has led camps for Atlanta's middle school students. Campers don't swim or canoe or make friendship bracelets. They spend their days, a police stations and observing criminal trials. They have to abide by the junior da Creed on the first day of camp, each camper is a shoot a uniform. We had this giant oversized kind of blazer was a police badge. We were khaki pants and Paulo's. So we are all matching and you know we had the district attorney come in and then some of the attorneys that he works with and they're saying, hey, everybody welcome to junior district attorney camp, and at the end of this camp, you guys are GonNa be like, district. Attorney's. Jessica loved it everything about did every day after her camp? Her mother would pick her up and Jessica would tell her who she met and what she learned. But one day she got in the car and her mother was upset and then she explained to me that someone broke into her grandmother's house and we don't know who did it. They took a lot of things and so she was really upset because that's actually where she grew up. She held a lot of memories there and it just was really upsetting to her because. It's just having someone invade a space that special to you is very emotional. When Jessica's great grandmother passed away years earlier, the family kept her house in the small town of Fitzgerald Georgia exactly how she'd left it. Until someone broke in and took everything her dining room set was gone her washer and Dryer was gone her sofa was gone. Somebody took her like Crystal Vases They took her record console the bedroom sets were gone. It was pretty empty. It just looked like somebody came in and moved out her washer and Dryer Washer and China. Yes and the oven too. Jessica says the police officer told her mother the odds of finding the person or people who did this weren't good. He sort of insinuated the family was at fault somehow, and the police officer was just like, did you guys give anybody a key because it just looks like somebody had a key because there's no force points of entry or anything, and it just seems like. That's the only thing that happened here. After. The police left Jessica and her mother stayed behind giving everything another look I actually went around the side of the house where the garage was and by the garage door windows, there were three little fingerprints I remember junior da camp was like, oh fingerprints this is definitely some evidence. So we can send this off to the guy and then we can find whoever broke into my grandmother's house. The I is the Georgia Bureau of Investigation Jessica's mother called the police and asked them to come back to have a look at fingerprints. And so I show that to them and they were just like That's not enough. We need at least like you know seven fingerprints. Entirely too long. And at this point you were thinking. I don't think that I can count on the police to solve this crime it's up to me. Oh Yeah. I was just like, okay. I have the tools and the knowledge on how to solve this crime. So now we're going to investigate this and figure out who did this because I'm pretty unhappy. My mother was upset my dad's upset. And I just want to get to the bottom of this. Did you say to your mother at any point don't worry. I've got this I'm on it. Yes I told her mom I'm going to figure this out and we're going to figure out who did this because justice needs to be served. Jessica began her investigation.

Jessica Maple Dryer Washer And China Attorney Paul Howard Paulo Georgia Bureau Of Investigatio Investigator Soleil Officer Atlanta Fitzgerald Georgia
Kids on the Case

Criminal

03:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Kids on the Case

"Always. Just naturally curious like I've been a natural investigator, my entire life. This is Jessica Maple back in two thousand eleven. She was finishing sixth grade and starting to make plans for her perfect summer and what she really wanted to do was go to a policy debate camp, and then my mother said Hey Jessica I just got an email from the school and the county is going to have a junior district attorney camp. Jessica was annoyed that her mother assumed that district attorney camp would be anything like policy debate camp. She was twelve and I'm just like mom I'm not into this type of stuff. So I don't WanNa go and she's like will you're going anyway so Upset and Soleil went that first day. For Here's District Attorney Paul Howard has led camps for Atlanta's middle school students. Campers don't swim or canoe or make friendship bracelets. They spend their days, a police stations and observing criminal trials. They have to abide by the junior da Creed on the first day of camp, each camper is a shoot a uniform. We had this giant oversized kind of blazer was a police badge. We were khaki pants and Paulo's. So we are all matching and you know we had the district attorney come in and then some of the attorneys that he works with and they're saying, hey, everybody welcome to junior district attorney camp, and at the end of this camp, you guys are GonNa be like, district. Attorney's. Jessica loved it everything about did every day after her camp? Her mother would pick her up and Jessica would tell her who she met and what she learned. But one day she got in the car and her mother was upset and then she explained to me that someone broke into her grandmother's house and we don't know who did it. They took a lot of things and so she was really upset because that's actually where she grew up. She held a lot of memories there and it just was really upsetting to her because. It's just having someone invade a space that special to you is very emotional. When Jessica's great grandmother passed away years earlier, the family kept her house in the small town of Fitzgerald Georgia exactly how she'd left it. Until someone broke in and took everything her dining room set was gone her washer and Dryer was gone her sofa was gone. Somebody took her like Crystal Vases They took her record console the bedroom sets were gone. It was pretty empty. It just looked like somebody came in and moved out her washer and Dryer Washer and China. Yes and the oven too. Jessica says the police officer told her mother the odds of finding the person or people who did this weren't good. He sort of insinuated the family was at fault somehow, and the police officer was just like, did you guys give anybody a key because it just looks like somebody had a key because there's no force points of entry or anything, and it just seems like. That's the only thing that happened here. After. The police left Jessica and her mother stayed behind giving everything another look I actually went around the side of the house where the garage was and by the garage door windows, there were three little fingerprints I remember junior da camp was like, oh fingerprints this is definitely some evidence. So we can send this off to the guy and then we can find whoever broke into my grandmother's house.

Jessica Maple Dryer Washer And China Attorney Paul Howard Officer Paulo Investigator Soleil Atlanta Fitzgerald Georgia
Unthinkable Trauma

In The Thick

06:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Unthinkable Trauma

"Hey welcome to in the thickness is a podcast politics race and culture from a POC. Perspective. HORSA and I'm Jerry Galloway. Rela. We have a very special guest joining us from Southern California Jacob Sobre. He's award winning journalist correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC and Hey a best selling author. Now, what's up Jacob? So good to be with you guys you know have wanted to do this for so long with you and I'm I'm just grateful to be here with you together I know he's a fan. He's a fan of in the thick fan. Yes. We love that we love fans of the pod so. We're going to be talking about an issue that you have called an American tragedy and this is the issue and the history of family. I don't even like that term because it's really families being ripped apart torn apart. In your new book separated inside an American tragedy you readers through a very intimate look into the policy into the families that have been torn apart and traumatized. You also talk to policymakers and government officials who ultimately were responsible for creating and really promoting this is stemmed separation of an estimated five, thousand, four hundred children from their parents at the hands of the government and I. Say. And still counting. Yeah and despite the fact that president trump signed an executive orders supposedly ending the policy of Charles Separations in two thousand eighteen, the ACLU alleges that there have been more than one thousand family separation since that executive order and more recently propublica reported on how the trump administration has used the corona virus as a pretext to circumvent the normal legal protections allowed to migrant children. So since March ice has circulated thousands of migrant children through hotel black sites making it virtually impossible for lawyers, family members and advocates to locate them and deported them in order to quote prevent the introduction of Covid nineteen into the US. Even though many of the deported children have tested negative for the virus. So Jacob here have reported on these issues for many many years. These policies you know predate trump. So before we get into the current iteration of this shit show, I wanNA talk about looking back into that history and actually. You great job of setting it and in a moment we'll talk about how it's touched of us. Really personally. But Jacob. From your perspective, talk to us about the origins of family separation and how the stage was being set for these policies way before trump entered the white. House. So yeah, you gotTa tell us how did we get here? Yeah. I think Maria. That what the trump administration did and we talked about ripping families apart family separation what to call this really what it was in the words of Physicians for human, rights and Nobel Peace Prize winning organization was torture at met the. Definition of torture according to the United. Nations it was government sanctioned child abuse according to the American Academy of Pediatrics and you know make no mistake. This is on the trump administration's hands. No administration in the history of the United States of America had ever attempted or done anything like this in a systematic way. But the fact that the trump administration was able to execute this policy was only possible because of decades of failed deterrent based immigration border policy by Democratic and Republican administrations. This will come as no news to you. But for people who don't know in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, the Clinton administration put into place their border patrol a policy called prevention through deterrence. That's why our administration has moved aggressively to secure our borders more by hiring record number of new border guards by deporting twice as many criminal aliens as ever before by cracking down on illegal hiring, which was designed went along with the first wave of border infrastructure walls. Fences what have you and the idea was that by doing that people who are migrating to this country quote unquote illegally would have to go on more dangerous or deadly journeys to get here and sure enough you know many people have died trying I e let them die trying. Let them die trying. That's exactly right. After the Clinton administration. We had the Bush administration which obviously created H S and expanded the border patrol exponentially dozens of agencies charged with Homeland Security. Will now be located within one cabinet department. With the mandate and legal authority. To protect our people, the Obama Administration obviously deported more people than any other president ever no matter how they are. No matter their reasons. The eleven million who broke these laws should be held accountable and we got to this place where we had donald trump is president saying when Mexico census people, they're not sending their best they bringing drugs. Crime, their rapists, often not the pictures of Jay Johnson walk through the same facilities that I saw separated kids in and look yes. The Obama Administration Limited circumstances did separate parents and children from each other and the reason that they did it was circumstances where you had parents who were perhaps violent criminals or dealing a narcotrafficking but they never did on a systematic basis Jay Johnson? The Homeland Security Secretary, or Cecilia Munoz from the Domestic Policy Council. Bowl said to me on the record in my book we could never do. What the trump administration did it doesn't mean the idea wasn't proposed. It came up, it came up in the situation of the White House but they never did it and the minute Donald Trump became president. This idea was on the table right about a Valentine's Day meeting and twenty seventeen and the officer Kevin McLean then the acting commissioner of Customs and border. Protection they wanted to do this from the get-go and now the results of of this policy are very familiar to all of

Donald Trump Jacob Clinton Administration President Trump Obama Administration Southern California Jacob Sobr United States NBC Msnbc Domestic Policy Council Jerry Galloway Jay Johnson American Academy Of Pediatrics White House Executive Cecilia Munoz Covid Homeland Security Kevin Mclean
Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

On One with Angela Rye

06:41 min | 3 weeks ago

Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

"Are you doing array is doing fantastic carrio. I can't complain I'm happy to be with you today. I know it's been a little difficult getting scheduled. You gotta go out here raise money and may cause and win the seat listen. Every day, we're working hard to get the drop down. We have a lot of work to do. Yeah. Yeah. Well, at know that it's you have your work out free but I also know you're willing for the job in addition to hearing about you just from being on the board of Clarkston CBC pack also Special Little Nudge from our shared in winter. Are you gonNA talk to desert I said my pleasure it'll be monthly. Enough. Still. Always happy to get to get an edge my real vaseline to case. My boss to. Answer yes, she is. So phenomenon spirit in always had. So the first thing I want to go to actually is There is a song that's out right now. That is urging people it really to me is like the modern doper cooler version of schoolhouse rock and it's. A song by a yellow pain who when guide Efron Cory who works with him? I was like Oh God. No, and then come to find out. That's your cousin. Yes. Yellow pain is your president as right. We gotta get him to do a song for you. Hear that. Song. That's just for you so I helped educating. About voter suppression by how the definite words I need one specific desert for Congress. I have to think of that. So this the whole song came about because I'm back home. After you know the Obama Administration ended worked on Capitol Hill and I was like okay I am going to take a break from public service because people think he'll staffers make a lot of money and we don't What's What's and I was on the higher end but girl what's Yeah One more time for people in the back. So, law school they night at Georgetown and I was like, okay. I'm going to work at a firm for a little bit pay my student loan debt down a good for a few weeks. Or years and Michael Copy shoes real now trip here in there. That was that was what I invasion high yellow pain is on. On your to. On. Your standard requires well, okay because we. INSTAGRAM's sophisticated yet you're right now in. One at a time but ultimately, death rate is told you how to make more money instagram this season. So exactly right I claim home I'm limited ground talking to people about what's happening. So when I moved back home the KKK March downtown. Dayton? That weekend and then we had tornadoes in a match shooting and I was like, okay we have to vote and we have to make sure people are in retention but everyone here on the ground in my family they know me from working in the Obama White House and so sometimes when I say things in Angela, you know this, we say things because they are you guys are politicals. It's sometimes doesn't reach them in the way it should and I thought well, my cousin, he conscious rapper talks about a lot of things and I was like I need you to talk about this song. I have a song about voting in my head it's going to be like schoolhouse rock but hip hop. Though and I think it can work. He was like I. Don't know and I was like, no you can do it in the months reidy fleshing out ideas how to save you call. I. Now we need a robbery in Congress. I can't rent. Over like yours, the concept you're, Ryan. Here's the lyrics. This is what we're going to say we have to talk about what happened in two thousand ten we have to talk about our have to talk about judges at the scene we have. That No. It worked out. It was great I'm so glad he. Goes raise lyrics this little bit you now hidden talent. Okay. So in addition to being a a Georgetown educated a lawyer, you also are the granddaughter of Ashir, crapper. Talk to me a little bit about what this means having that in your lineage also opted those are the things that ground us that people don't see and don't hear about since asked me a little bit about that. Yes. So my Popo is I called him now is from the deep South. So like beyond Daddy Alabama Louisiana, my maternal side is Alabama in my paternal side is Louisiana so. Shout to be onset I'm Louisiana both sides. Okay. So he migrated from Alabama, to Ohio, in the late nineteen forties part of the great migration like many black people go live in Chicago and Detroit and the path as to how we got. There was the our parents and grandparents came for opportunity and you know he dropped out of school when he was six years old because he had to work the fields, but he could never go back to school but. He still was able to reach the middle class work in a factory in real heatless taught me the importance of hard work and made me promise to go to school for as long as I could because he couldn't and that's why I continue. I went to the first family to get the undergraduate degree. Then I got the Masters Okay Papa be done. He was like Oh is that he can you go further. Pressure. He lived to see me graduate from law school, but it was a promise I made him. He'd he'd passed away from stage for a lung cancer but I will him through the White House so that was one of his last trips. Through the Obama White. House before Obama left in mayhem that promise that I will continue to keep going in idea but he taught me the importance of hard work and perseverance and that's what I'm doing. So I may not have the most money here is a congressional candidate I may not come from the wealthiest bag ground but I come from a background of hard workers in no one will be desert hymns

Barack Obama Georgetown Congress Obama White House Louisiana Alabama Obama Administration White House Instagram Efron Cory Daddy Alabama Louisiana Clarkston President Trump Robbery Michael Copy Dayton
Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

On One with Angela Rye

04:29 min | 3 weeks ago

Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

"Are you doing array is doing fantastic carrio. I can't complain I'm happy to be with you today. I know it's been a little difficult getting scheduled. You gotta go out here raise money and may cause and win the seat listen. Every day, we're working hard to get the drop down. We have a lot of work to do. Yeah. Yeah. Well, at know that it's you have your work out free but I also know you're willing for the job in addition to hearing about you just from being on the board of Clarkston CBC pack also Special Little Nudge from our shared in winter. Are you gonNA talk to desert I said my pleasure it'll be monthly. Enough. Still. Always happy to get to get an edge my real vaseline to case. My boss to. Answer yes, she is. So phenomenon spirit in always had. So the first thing I want to go to actually is There is a song that's out right now. That is urging people it really to me is like the modern doper cooler version of schoolhouse rock and it's. A song by a yellow pain who when guide Efron Cory who works with him? I was like Oh God. No, and then come to find out. That's your cousin. Yes. Yellow pain is your president as right. We gotta get him to do a song for you. Hear that. Song. That's just for you so I helped educating. About voter suppression by how the definite words I need one specific desert for Congress. I have to think of that. So this the whole song came about because I'm back home. After you know the Obama Administration ended worked on Capitol Hill and I was like okay I am going to take a break from public service because people think he'll staffers make a lot of money and we don't What's What's and I was on the higher end but girl what's Yeah One more time for people in the back. So, law school they night at Georgetown and I was like, okay. I'm going to work at a firm for a little bit pay my student loan debt down a good for a few weeks. Or years and Michael Copy shoes real now trip here in there. That was that was what I invasion high yellow pain is on. On your to. On. Your standard requires well, okay because we. INSTAGRAM's sophisticated yet you're right now in. One at a time but ultimately, death rate is told you how to make more money instagram this season. So exactly right I claim home I'm limited ground talking to people about what's happening. So when I moved back home the KKK March downtown. Dayton? That weekend and then we had tornadoes in a match shooting and I was like, okay we have to vote and we have to make sure people are in retention but everyone here on the ground in my family they know me from working in the Obama White House and so sometimes when I say things in Angela, you know this, we say things because they are you guys are politicals. It's sometimes doesn't reach them in the way it should and I thought well, my cousin, he conscious rapper talks about a lot of things and I was like I need you to talk about this song. I have a song about voting in my head it's going to be like schoolhouse rock but hip hop. Though and I think it can work. He was like I. Don't know and I was like, no you can do it in the months reidy fleshing out ideas how to save you call. I. Now we need a robbery in Congress. I can't rent. Over like yours, the concept you're, Ryan. Here's the lyrics. This is what we're going to say we have to talk about what happened in two thousand ten we have to talk about our have to talk about judges at the scene we have. That No. It worked out. It was great I'm so glad he. Goes raise lyrics this little bit you now hidden talent.

President Trump Congress Ryan Efron Cory Instagram Obama White House Obama Administration Clarkston Michael Copy Robbery Dayton Georgetown Angela
Acting Class with Will Smith

On One with Angela Rye

06:27 min | 3 weeks ago

Acting Class with Will Smith

"For. Is Nudity where field shooter this? This I'm one with Andrew arrived masterclass series. Where we only learn from the best the masters in today there is word, Smith. Might. Years. Really. Lama On sewer train he's like teach me how to act today. Yes and I am so excited that but I also thought that we could just engage in some harbour station earth. because I think it's important. So one of the things I really wanted to do with this is You know this this this moment in quarantine has given us space heard those of us were not workers for those investment not fallen ill to reset it allow ways your. Head. So I'm like you really WanNa make sure that I'm creating opportunity in space for people to do things that never done, but they've always wanted to do maybe you're. And so one thing that I can't say about acting. Is. I. I wasn't drama class. That's years drama. Okay. In my day are. August, Wilson's on. I wasn't quite honest Wilson. I'm not. Quite there. But I will tell you that what I learned over time will is. Acting from Rockefeller. Steps to seems to be like another layer of therapy for people that want to go to the advanced level and for me because I really enjoy conversing. From, host standpoint I feel like it would make me a better. To know. Acting connecting people in different ways. So where do you? What do you think they'll know absolutely so Let's first start with with a definition, right? So Acting. Essentially. You're. You're watching a person perform actions. So at the end of the day, that's that's all it is situations present themselves at a person takes actions. So acting is performing actions. So where do the actions come from the actions come from internal impulses that we had in our reaction to the circumstance bright. So what an actor learns, how to do is to simulate a good actor you learn how to simulate in an authentic way the reaction to the fantasy circumstances that have been presented. So in its simplest form in order to do that, you just study you watch you pay attention to human beings. That's a big part of acting you just watch what human beings do. And you, keep what we call a toolbox. And you just have a toolbox emotional. Perceptions that you can call on in any given circumstance. Right. So What what people? Bad Actors. Try to show the audience. What they're thinking and feeling and great actors internalize, and you just learn how to take yourself to the emotional space that the character is and learn how to relate you learn how to have compassion and understanding for some one who believes things that you don't believe. Right. So you you learn to understand what makes a human being do what they do So. That's really all it is. You look at the scene. and. You just want to understand and why acting would be good for you is you make an a make a living on your opinion. Right acting, you have to completely discard your opinion and totally open. Open yourself up to the emotional comprehension of someone else's plight no matter how despicable or foolish it may be to you. There's no such thing as a foolish points of view as an actor there are places you may not want to go there things like like for me it's like because I learned how to take my mind. So deeply into the thoughts and feelings of other people to play a character, I, don't WanNa play a pedophile. Right I don't want to understand that now. Right. Even like a film like Django. You know I was GonNa do Django you Y You Know Clinton, and I you know we met and I was really close on Django. And I hated that movie I hated, J. Push. The will sorry for this interim motors displayed on way with it again after you just. But listen. Django, I wrote A. Right, the about I was so mad at me, I WANNA know why do I have? No we we we can do. We can definitely talk about that for for me. First off it was it was it was willow. So I sat the family down because of the psychological space I was going to have to live in. To comprehend those atrocities willow was like you know. Daddy please don't. Daddy pleased on because she she knew what the time around the house would be if I was living in that in that psychological space and she was just She was like daddy pleased on I. Don't I don't WanNa live like that

Rockefeller Wilson Andrew Smith Lama J. Push Clinton
Ten Doors

Criminal

04:58 min | Last month

Ten Doors

"We know now that they were following us for about a month. Cry To our we did. Notice strange things happening. But when you're working underground you are. For most of the time, you're a bit paranoid you. You kind of imagine that everyone is looking at you knows what you're doing. And looking back off to the arrest. We realized that they were following us for quite a while. In Nineteen Seventy, eight, twenty, nine year, old Tim Jenkin was active in the political efforts of South Africa's anti-apartheid movement. The country had been operating under apartheid for thirty years. A system that institutionalized racial segregation. The word apartheid means a partner. and. The government was controlled by white minority. Tim Jenkin White. He grew up in Cape Town. So I grew up under the situation with everything was divided. So. spatially, cities and towns divided the white areas. Black areas. So we went to white schools. Were black schools in black areas. Everything was separated even buildings had separate lifts for White People. For Black People. Talk said benches, white people and black people and certain beaches with designated for black. People. Most of the beaches with what people So. I just accepted eight. Because I didn't know any better I just assumed that the way things were. And then. Maneuver Twenty one years old the to the K.. He says, everyone he met their asked him what he thought about the fact that he lived in a country that was so racially segregated. He says he was actually confused. But then he started seeing programs on TV. Shows that would never have been broadcast in South Africa about the consequences of apartheid and at first I, didn't believe these These films that I was seeing. I thought it was all propaganda. After awhile, and after reading books that I couldn't obtain in South Africa. I began to realize the started thing is something quite terrible. I'd be living. Positive it. Really maintaining it in the sense and not understanding. What's Black South Africans? was suffering. He, returned to South Africa, and started studying sociology at the University of Cape Town. There, he became friends with another white student named. Stephen Lee. And started cheering books that he had brought back from the UK. anti-apartheid. Books and political histories that were censored in South Africa. At. This time the most prominent anti-apartheid organization was the African National Congress also known as the ANC. Nelson Mandela was a member of the ANC. By the nineteen seventies, the organization was banned in South Africa that had been declared unlawful. Seen by the White Minority Threat to. Public. Order. They operated underground and Tim and Stephen had heard that if you wanted to get involved, you could try contacting their office in. London. So the two of US traveled to the. UK. and. Simply went and knocked on the door. and. It was quite an amusing. Incident. because. The person who received US Said please just sit down there and you'll be wasted. Then he went into his office and type something on a piece of paper. The piece of paper said. You should not come here. Please meet me at the cafe around the corner in half an hour. So that's what we did. Tim and Stephen met with members of the ANC several times. And they asked to be put to work back home in south? Africa, the said Okay you can go back and sit up your print shop. And we'd need to teach you various things like security matters, how to conduct yourself in the underground. And showed us a few other. Innovative. Devices for for distributing leaflets and information one of these was. The is the leaflet bomb. It's not really a bomb. It was really just. Kind of exploding device. That would kill. Hundreds of leaflets up into the air, and then they would rain down on a crowd target crowd somewhere. So we went back to South Africa. With this knowledge. And set up shop.

Tim Jenkin White South Africa Black People White People Tim Jenkin Stephen Lee African National Congress Stephen Cape Town TIM UK. United States Partner. Nelson Mandela University Of Cape Town London
The Ancestors Are Plenty and Petty with Alexis P. Morgan

Revolutionary Mystic

06:19 min | Last month

The Ancestors Are Plenty and Petty with Alexis P. Morgan

"Hello and welcome everyone to another episode of the Revolutionary Mystic? Podcast I'm your host. Mets Lee Alexandria. Joining me today. I have the privilege and honor of chatting with our guest Alexis P. Morgan. I am so stoked I can't even tell you. Just for reference right now were let's see. Moore in August twenty, twenty were stolen the middle of a pandemic and. Like. Alexis mentioned to me earlier. The world is like basically on fire and as a disabled person who is pretty homebound it is a very awesome opportunities today to get to chat with Alexis P. Morgan who I have a lot of in common with and like so much admiration for their work and I'm. Thrilled to get to connect with somebody who? You know understands and it's just it's refreshing. You know we live in a pretty abled world. We live in a pretty neuro typical focused were held. And so I'm really excited to get to talk to them and share their magic with you and. So rather been telling you all about who they are and what they do. I would love for you to hear it straight from them. Hi Alexis. Thank you so much for having me on. This is I think this is the first. PODCAST appearance I've done in a while. So that's exciting. So about Me I am twenty eight turning twenty, nine in a couple of months very exciting in the throes of the Saturn return which is. Home. I'm black and ice that I'm the child of indigenous mothers because my second adoptive parent, which is a story will get into in a second and I'll clarify what I mean by that. Is Indigenous and I'm still trying to figure out if my biological mother was truthful with my adoptive parents about my indigenous heritage, it's not one of those leg. My grandmother was like a such and such kind of situations It actually has to do with my paternal grandfather So you know we're figuring that out but in the mean time I say I'm a child of indigenous mothers to be really clear about a WHO I am in that regard m professionally, I am a writer, an artist and a sorceress. My pronouns are she heard they I identify as FAM- 'cause my gender is really weird and complicated. and has layers of Wu mixed into it too. So sometimes, it's just easier to be like yeah okay. This is folks do what they want and I'm also queer so and I have autism I was diagnosed at twenty seven which is funny because I studied autism for like four years in high. Slovenia with a thought that maybe I would have On something but Nah. but I did but I didn't. Add I'm also disabled I have a multiple sclerosis I was also diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis at twenty seven. During my birthday month it was a very exciting bursting. That see in a nutshell. Wow. Yeah. I just want to say like I love. The amount of representation you're able to bring for folks I. I know when I hear you speaking about who you are I'm hearing things that I I can really to and I also have seen like out there in the world. I. Know isn't really being said, and one of them is that you mentioned about how? You like had been studying onto them for some time and like how did you not know well A for folks that don't know. Much about my professional history I was a social worker for a long time and I had a long like eleven year long career and towards the end I was a teacher for kids with autism and I loved it absolutely loved it felt super at home and just like you didn't reach diagnosis until I was around like twenty, seven, twenty, eight I, think. It's just kind of funny like how it works out that way you know Ray Lake and like I think my so it's funny 'cause like in my particular situation, my first set of adoptive parents. Okay. So let me back this trailer up a little bit. I was adopted twice I was adopted as an infant and I usually call that set of parents by foster parents because it helps make things less confusing to the wider world. And just because I usually don't have time to explain my family tree with the. Diagram. Like New People. So I was. Of Infant, and then I was adopted again as an adult adoption by my mom she is my mom. So when I usually when I say mom speaking of her and what I'm speaking of my adoptive parents who were a queer couple I was raised by White Lesbians, which is who boy that's a Latin to wrestle with in hindsight but. I'm usually not referring to them, but sometimes I'll slip and I'll just call the MOM and everybody gets real real confused because I got like twelve of them lying around it's great. Twelve months I mean but when I was a toddler, I showed some of the signs of A lot of lake professional clinicians would probably deemed autism

Alexis P. Morgan Ray Lake Multiple Sclerosis Mets Lee Alexandria Slovenia Moore Writer
The stresses of parenting in 2020

Parenting and Politics

06:27 min | Last month

The stresses of parenting in 2020

"My name is Diana Lamont. Thanks so much for listening today. So I've been a little MIA. Around the podcast I have been around in social media but I thought that I would do at check in. Because I've unveiling things and I'm sure that you're all going through things So I just wanted to share a little bit about what I've been going through about what I've been thinking about as we. Inch closer to the twenty twenty election day because I feel like we've been an election season since November nine, th two, thousand sixteen. So today is August twenty, six, twenty, twenty, sixty, nine days away from the general election of the member third twenty twenty. I haven't been recording a lot as you can imagine. With covert and the children being at home after the initial rush I think of productivity. It was really hard to work fulltime from a husband to work full time and for us to manage. Know three meals, Jay taking care of toddler taking care of nine year olds making sure remote learning was happening. and all those things. So it's been quite challenging time. As I'm sure has been for many of you. So Yes. So here we are So I just wanted to share a little bit about kind of what What I've been going through my household and kind of the things that I've been working on. As some of you may or may not know I am an organizer I work as a freelance contractor for a few organizations and While ago I was working a lot on paid leave and BEF- after leave I decided to work on child care. So I've been focusing a lot on child childcare which has been on the news because of Cova did. A lot of childcare centers have closed in the United States. Mine included a my daughter's is a toddler and her daycare closed. They announced it back in May that they were not reopening again. So that was absolutely heartbreaking. Because we were very attached to our childcare center, you know it was a childcare center that my son had gone to. My son is now nine. So we known them for about seven years. So. Yeah. That was quite a shock and. It's not going to get better. Because a lot more centers mike close because there is no funding in those support for a lot of these centers that are small businesses in our communities so. So that happened. In June, we decided. that. We would come overseas so that our family would help us with our children so that we can continue working. Because working full-time. And taking care of three meals a day and taking care of learning. And keeping the children occupied. So we were doing it but. I think we were getting appoint where our mental health and physical were really. s- you know. being affected. And we were lucky enough that we had family. Who said you know we can help with the kids. So we came. So now I am actually France. Which is where my husband's family's from. And we've been here in July and originally we were supposed to fly back in September, but we actually have extended our trip. Another month. Again just because of childcare issues I mean. We can't work if both the kids are home the way we need to work and. We have were incredibly lucky that we have the support. So we decided to take it and. We've been working I have been working. A lot on child care which is ironic considering. My childcare has closed but actually know the issue very intimately. So It's really heartbreaking to know that there are so many people. That are going to have to close their businesses and so many people that are going to have to. you know find new childcare, which is really hard to do. If you're a parent, you know there's so much that goes into finding a childcare centre. As. A parent there. So many kind of boxes you have to check off right you have to make sure that the prices right. But also you have to make sure that the location is right that the hours you're right that the that you like the teachers that when you go in, you get this by where you feel that you are. Happy to leave your child air that your child is going to be taken care of, and they're happy when you go pick them up like there's just so much. to consider when you're finding a childcare provider. So Yes. So a lot of people are going through what I went through, which is you know their childhood unders closing a lot of people out of parents especially, MOMS, they're also. Deciding or being forced to quit their jobs because they don't have child care because they don't have flexibility. Because the the, there's just no other option, right so what we're seeing is that a lot of people mostly moms are going to end up leaving the workforce in my entourage. I've already seen I think to people that have said that they have resigned because of childcare which is also really heartbreaking. I, feel like this crisis going to set women back in women's rights and equality. Gender. Equity. Back a lot and that is a really scary thing.

Twenty Twenty Diana Lamont Cova BEF United States JAY France
Women's Equality Day with Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester

The Electorette Podcast

05:03 min | Last month

Women's Equality Day with Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with representative Lisa Blunt Rochester, of Delaware. She joins me to discuss women's equality and the importance of empowering other women and in the context of commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the nineteen limit. We'll talk about how we can learn from our past and create inclusive movements that lift up all women. Representative Front. Rochester. Made History herself and her two thousand sixteen election to Congress as the first black woman and the first woman of color to be elected to represent the seat. She was also a member of Vice President Biden's victory vetting committee, and we discussed that process as well as the strengths that Kamala, Harris brings to the ticket. Lastly, we talk about what moved her to run for office herself and it's truly a moving powerful story and I'm so. Thankful that she shared it. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with representative Lisa Want Rochester, or a Flint Rochester. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much and I'm so excited to be here in. This is what I think about the ratification of the nineteenth amendment and women's Equality Day now that passage was so crucial to what women have today and where we are today, but I can't help but imagine where we might be today had that movement. been more inclusive you know. Yeah Yeah I think about that because we have record number of women running for Congress record number of women in Congress, right I wondered like what can we do now? As we move forward to make sure that that we don't repeat those mistakes you know Jen I. think that's a perfect place to start because I think by looking at the past if you if you learn from it you can grow. It's interesting. I've heard people talk about this centennial as not necessarily a celebration but more of a commemoration in and it was a feat in to itself. I mean when you think about the effort and the the marches and the efforts that folks may particularly women at that time. But we also think about the fact that for women many women of color that the opportunity to vote really didn't come. into the sixties and so you think about as you said, what what could we have achieved head we been more unified then and you can think about that and dwell on it, and then say what are the lessons learned and I think the fact I got elected in twenty sixteen I came in at the same time is Donald Trump and I had never run for anything in my entire life and. You know it was a Delaware had never elected a woman. Delaware had never elected a person of color to Congress. We only have one seat and so at the time that I decided to run I had served in state government had run our urban league here I had lived around the world and raise my children but it was really the unexpected tragic death of my husband who went on a business trip ruptured his Achilles Tendon, after playing a game of basketball before work meeting and then blood clots went to his heart and lungs and it just it just shook me to the. Core, and I had to find my purpose still on his planet and you know wasn't until like a year later I was I felt like I was numb just kind of going through the motions and I, started noticing other people that were you know having challenges like in my own city of Wilmington there was a lot of they were talking about the the the gun violence and then I saw a dad and three kids in a supermarket in front of me, and he had to put a bunch of grapes because they were nine dollars in that lake. Shook me out of my own. My own sadness and I think you know Donald Trump capitalized going people's anger or sadness or you know the challenges they were facing an inspired native run not knowing who was going to be president or what I was going to be facing and I think after he won and we had the women's March I think that was a watershed moment because it showed the possibility I mean the diversity of the crowd from you know black and Latino Latina in a trans in Muslim and Jewish like it was everybody there together and people haven't led up since then and so I went in two thousand sixteen by Twenty Eighteen Emily's list an organization that helps women candidates which helped me. They saw a thousand percent increase in women's interest to run for office. So I do think we can learn from the past. I. Think. We can still commemorate and celebrate but we gotta take that and turn it into action and that's what's happening right now, and that's what gets me excited about this hundredth anniversary is that it's not just about Jay, let's celebrate this moment it is about how do we do the work and how do we? How do we change the course of history and and in people's lives? So yeah, it's an exciting time

Lisa Blunt Rochester Congress Representative Delaware Donald Trump Kamala Jim Taylor Skinner Vice President Biden Lisa Want Rochester Flint Rochester Achilles Tendon Jen I. Basketball JAY Wilmington President Trump Harris
Construction worker has near death experience that strengthened his faith in God

Core Confidence Life

02:58 min | Last month

Construction worker has near death experience that strengthened his faith in God

"What's going on? Charlie. Just. Try to stay stay cool with all his coburn stuff that's going on today but. Still working to stay engaged. tried. To retire a couple of about a year and a half ago, but make you dragging me back in. So still working in in enjoying life is really cool. Oh okay. Well, that's why you gotta stay in the game here. Don't don't bow out yet now. No Restoring Depression is not my my wife's go on. Tell you know. So you are an author you've got to books probably more coming and you a life story to share with US including some key moments in your life that helped you be the man you are today, and so let's talk about that. Let's first talk about your your your two books what are these books and one of the about So it's It's really credible. You, I'm I'm a civil engineer and I work on large construction jobs. You would never think I would be writing a book about spirituality and spiritual experiences. And things of that nature But I I just had some incredible life experiences in Grantham town. You gotTA write about this. So I did and the first book I wrote a published a couple years ago called always remember this moment. subtitled that book would be living proof of the power of prayer. and. It was about a near death experience. I had nine years ago. When I contracted a virus, not unlike corona virus called Sepsis and sepsis kills about two hundred, thousand people a year yours no known cure. There's no vaccine. Contracted, it went into a coma. For six weeks. and thirteen strokes. Was Not supposed to make. Literally was supposed to die. In a got to a point where all my body organ function shutdown. Lots brainwave activity. and the family had decided to pull the plug. Now my experience was I left my body. A had an out of body experience which I can talk about further. That was the first book. The second book that I just wrote released. Just. This last. February. was called I got this and it was about. Incredible experiences on construction job sites that you just wouldn't believe it happened that culminated in once again, all my friends tell me you gotta write about this stuff. This is just too unbelievable things were happening. And I can talk about those. You could literally pick out any chapter in the book and do a topical meeting on each one of those.

Charlie Grantham Town Engineer Depression Coma
How to unlock your potential, Modeling manhood for teen boys

Core Confidence Life

04:37 min | Last month

How to unlock your potential, Modeling manhood for teen boys

"Going on it? was going on how's IT GOING DENNIS? Appreciate you have me on man I'm so excited. For this this discussion this conversation and just love what you do my man. I appreciate that. Appreciate that very much. So tell everybody a little bit more about you. Other than what I just said because you know you can tell you better than I can tell you. Absolutely my man. So I I guess I'll give somebody a little bit of background, but I was born and raised in Baltimore Maryland, and I grew up in a family that struggled with poverty for generations and You know basically saw my mom struggle from paycheck to paycheck us all the people around me just struggling to make ends meet and at from my perspective I decided that it wasn't going to stop or that was gonNA stop with me. I didn't want to be stuck in. That same Rut life So I just decided to start making some decisions, which basically leads me being the first male in my family to ever earn a college degree. Okay. which then you know basically the the mindset behind all of that is a I was able to get myself out of a bad situation because my dad left when I was only I think seven or eight years old wisdom allowed me to become you know a kid that grew up in a single family household. Where my mom basically was forced to take care of me and my brother on the thirteen thousand dollar a year disability in cup. So it was a different type of situation different type of environment I basically felt as though only had three options, which is I feel as though a lot of kids that grew up that grew up in that type of environment they feel the same way but my options was either Goto the league right become oppression athlete it was either the other option was to be a professional entertainer. So a singer rapper dancer or something like that or so drugs right and chose option. I chose option one. I decided I was going to go to the league or wanted to basically play football and be able to go to the NFL and because of that dream, and because of that that goal that I had I became the first student in high school to ever earn a scholarship in just because history. So now my mission my passion is basically helping kids shed though self limiting beliefs and live a life that they're passionate about living I. don't want them to have that same thought process that I had when I was growing up. All right. That's great. Great background that you have spoken about their we'll get into a lot of those different things. So what what issues do you mainly speak about when you're in front of today's you would. mainly. Primarily just shed and self limiting beliefs I think a lot of the times we don't believe in ourselves what we can actually accomplish in life and I personally believe that we all are born with the seeds of greatness inside of us. We're all men to do great things and sometimes when you're born into an environment environment where maybe you're stuck in poverty or you know your surrounding area just basically tells you that you can only be one thing which for me, it was basically go to jail or be dead before you're even eighteen years old right If I WANNA help kids break that belief that that is all that life has to offer. Because there's so many different opportunities and things out there that kids can take advantage of to really increase their lifestyle and increase the the life that they wanna live. Limiting beliefs so You know we talk about limiting beliefs all the time and changing your mind frame and just how you think about things. So talk to us a little bit more about limiting beliefs limiting beliefs, and what did they do chew us. Absolutely, so a limiting belief is something that you believe about yourself. That is just not true. It's a box that you place yourself in that. That doesn't allow you the CA like to break out right. Basically leaves you confined inside of one individual section. What it does to you is it prevents you from stepping into your own greatness. A lot of times we limit ourselves with these. These thoughts like for me growing up was like I only had those three options, right? That was all I had. If I wasn't picking one of those three that I was just going to be a failure in in general where obviously thankfully you know as I got. Out of that environment instead to associate with other people I started to realize that there are other options available, right. So they're self limiting beliefs are detrimental to your ability to succeed in life because if you only put yourself inside a one box, then you you basically close yourself off to all other opportunities and all other abilities that you have within you to create the success that you want.

Baltimore Maryland NFL Football
talkin' 'bout Our Generation

talkin' 'bout Our Generation

04:48 min | Last month

talkin' 'bout Our Generation

"Those of you who are already part of the talking about our generation family. Welcome back for those of you or a new to our podcast. Welcome. This podcast is all about connections sharing caring communicating aimed at baby boomers me those of us born between nineteen, forty, six and nineteen, sixty four. We're about remembering who we were and what we've accomplished in what all that means. Today right now 'cause that conversation is really important. We launched last year on the fiftieth anniversary of Woodstock because that was an event that had a major influence on our generation. So we started with a series called the woodstock roads which are conversations with people who made woodstock happened, and who created that amazing magical woodstock spirit that still lives on in many of us today. Soon. We'll be airing our fifty first anniversary of Woodstock episode and we have a very special guest in store for you. We'll talk about that later in this episode but right now we invite you to listen in on our conversation with Lisa Law. Lisa has been a photographer since the days of Haight Ashbury probably even before that and she was also part of the hog farm that was responsible for feeding nearly two hundred thousand woodstock attendees. If. There is one word I would use to describe. Lisa, it's driven. If these were the days of the old West and we were heading from east to California. I would want Lisa driving the lead wagon in the wagon train. Join me now in my conversation with Lisa. You started documenting events in movements with your camera way before Woodstock back in the Christie Minstrel days the love ends in San, Francisco and Haight Ashbury. You were the witness. Through your is, we got to see a lot of the life from those times in the sixties and not just the musicians but the culture, the things that you covered were are conic I- I documented. Every part of my life and I was really lucky to be at the right place at the right time. I was there for the commune's for the. Haight Ashbury for Woodstock monory pop I just happened to be at the right place at the right time with her husband and while I was traveling around in my hippy bus. We have this big giant hippy bus fixed up in the second Alec I still drive it today. It's out of my driveway. I was able to have a dark room in the bus so I was always printing developing and. I was able to. Share those with other people and I felt it was important to show her how beautiful the hippies were in what their ideas were back to the land and natural childbirth eating good food and recycling, and all those values that are so important today were started in sixties. So let's talk about the hog was the hog farm commune. Farm is a Commun-. Of like people that chipped in and did. Helped up with a work. Great. The Hog farmers still commune. Have A ranch up in late in Ville. and. They still run campaign rainbow with Wavy gravy and Johanna Raw. Their commune lasted because. They. Really worked at. Her cat show there the they went to woodstock. got. What happened was? Wavy was. Living. Down at the bottom of this tale in Tonga with his wife and the pranksters with can Keesey came. And they stayed overnight with him. They were in the bus in the morning the owner said, get out all these people. And just at that point, there was a Fellow up the hill ahead a hog farm. And he had a heart attack. And he asked them if they would come up and slop hogs. So the whole group of. Wavy in his few people and then the pranksters all went up to the top of the mountain there and slop hogs. Okay. So they had some shacks they build some marsh actually had two buses that we're living in the buses and they all they would go out and get jobs. In comeback bring the money and they all live community

Haight Ashbury Lisa Law Woodstock Commun California Tonga Lisa SAN Johanna Raw Keesey Francisco Ville. Woodstock.
Sarah Jakes Roberts Talks Black Lives Matter, Voting, and Preaching During A Pandemic

On One with Angela Rye

06:01 min | Last month

Sarah Jakes Roberts Talks Black Lives Matter, Voting, and Preaching During A Pandemic

"Roberts with the. Fresh. Face. Ma'am. Thank you so much for doing my on one masterclass. I wanted you to teach me out of Bray. Breeds how to be when he? When you're in your? I've seen with my own I girl no. Not How you. Down the whole house and rebuild us again. This is not at all I think but. My team was like. You're not. Asia is ask her about how can have hope At. least try. And then maybe she can teach you. How to how to pray to but the main thing I want to do is just connect with the tax you the other day and I was just like. This you. I. One before this life bound now. One. Man I don't know either hope is soon at least I get to see you today though. Yeah. Yeah I don't know. What do you say to the people? Are Feeling overwhelmed by the not knowingness of it. All right like there are people who have decisions to make economically. there are those among us I think as well, maybe not especially in our community, but I relate to those who are in our community, the most who are used to go onto the church house warning and can't they shouldn't be. y'all have been wise about bad or other shepherds. Car Them we have not been so wise. But what do you say the folks who are? In fear about not knowing. Yeah. Unknown Gary For us all whether we are in or not. Certainly heightened, you know the whole world isn't will state of annulling I think for me when I have those moments of uncertainty. It really down to knowing what I know for today riots I even the model prayer Jesus give us this day our daily bread, and sometimes we don't know what tomorrow's GonNa look like or even six months Armagh grow. But right now who Note that engrossing sometimes boils down to like what what about all I don't know. They're not gonna be able to Netflix. A roof over at hid in when we live in the moment and the pharmacists. Creativity and opportunities that help us to prepare better for tomorrow I. Think the thief that anxiety it blinds is so much from the possibilities of what exists in this small work while something that hasn't happened yet or may not happen at all. So as much as I can I try to make myself be president. One of the things I just thought about this is more shading question are meltdown. Here is my shady question but in addition to. The people may not know there are there are those among us Who they know it all in one thing that comes to mind Sarah like. I watch this clip so many times because I just can't believe it so Kenneth Kenneth, Copeland had this moment where I guess these rebuke. I grew up in charge like in a Lotta ways like peers, a baptist, a Catholic moms the Catholic. In I started going cold you charge when I was sixteen. So get it. We a lot of stuff in the church this man for a respiratory illness. Rebukes Corona virus by blowing right into my like this. Like spit flying everywhere and I just have to know like. Have you seen versus viruses D. Donald talking about. How to be in this I on and? I don't want to be in this. This is what I will say I think even down to people who are still having church, right? In your point my husband ahead of our campuses really made a decision to not. You know us what we know could be God's provision when we could use our wisdom in state and into really preserve those moments when we need God for when we need God and to activate the ability that we have to make wise decisions. However to your point, there have been a lot of pastors who felt they had a different unction from God's to. Do handle things differently and I think part of one of the things that I've really been intentional about trying to do especially when it comes to the body of Christ, is even when I don't understand how someone spaeth may be functioning toward them is to not make a judgment about it. I, mean, a Kenneth Copeland has been ministry longer than I have been alive in a he's got he he has a relationship with God that made him. You know prophesy in act out in a way that some of us may not understand but I'm just really careful about making sure that I don't Mike anyone else's faith even if I don't understand it and that's not just for the Kingdom I think that as we seek to really have better interfaith relationship that though I may not understand the Muslims walk, I may not understand you know, Judaism fully, I may not understand Hinduism but to. Not. Make a judgment on things. I don't understand and to ask that he would continue to give them a method. We make a grave mistake when we make fun of things we should be praying about if we really think that there's something there that is all that is leading people down a path that God will give the leader with them in those following them with some so that we are intentional about not creating more division. That's me.

Kenneth Copeland Mike Kenneth Kenneth Bray Roberts Netflix Asia President Trump Armagh Sarah D. Donald
Alexius' Story

You Had Me At Black

06:29 min | Last month

Alexius' Story

"I'm Martina. Abraham's Linga welcome back to NATO I have to be honest with you before we started the show I rarely thought about giving birth my indifference turned to fear and anger when I started to understand more about the American medical system and when I became aware of the Blackburn in crisis specifically like most people I assumed if and when my time came to have a baby, I'd go to the hospital I began to fear for mine and my future children's safety and grew angry at the idea that had have to settle for care that's less than I desire. Deserve. I started to question whether I wanted to have children at all the beautiful thing about my journey with natal is that I learned about an entire community that centers blackburn parents and their babies. I'm now more familiar with a network of midwives, dulas, providers, and healers who affirm the dignity and beauty in black breathing and intimately value black-eyed. Due to the history of anti-black blackness in the obstetrics and gynecology field. Much of their work happens outside of hospital I'd seen photos and videos of women all white giving birth in pools and at home. I assume all hippy dippy white people ship turns out. I was very wrong. In this episode, we leave the hospital and step into the world of home. Births. We also dive into the work of Dulas, like Charlie, Louis anderly the owner of Brooklyn based practice nor shing seats Dula. To begin to understand the role dualist play in pregnancy and childbirth. Let's start first with the story of Alexis Him. Some Alexi I am a Smith AC- native where my fiance and I live currently right now I'm training to become a Hamburg worker and I'm proud to say the coast model and this is my natal story. So that was pregnant was extremely interesting is so aware because. I keep up period Alabama foul and I'm looking at it like okay. Says on today's late this is not normal like mockery combs all the time in the night before at noticed the The second day late I was drinking I was having fun. Don't think I will up just like, okay. Today's is enough women is so I went to dollar tree The dollars as at the the tests that you put a little drop singing in wait for the line changes to it. So I dropped the little year in air in the I got one lot I'll say, okay, I'm not pregnant at this point I'm convinced that there is no baby in there. I'm in the one line was just mother -cation. I'm not pregnant sats to those once I got the one line I was the instructions clearly say that you have to wait I think about three minutes once I felt they line I was like, okay. Throw it away. So two more days game. And I'm like, okay. Until my boyfriend at the time like, okay four days is enough. I'm usually on copy now something is not right whale. I couldn't say that this was like something in my body changing or anything of that nature because I knew what took place prior to me semi period but also needed took a plan B. in our secure. This was everything that was a Mama. So. On the fourth day are caught. Another just like is not here. He's like you can come to my job stopping at apprentice in you can come here to take it I'm like, okay. Cool outcome there to do this. So I went into the restroom appeared on the State Ama- body like. It almost showdown at started shaking him. So like all my guy, it says positive if this point I'm scared I'm crying he was like you know go ahead and take the second one is at the second test in it said the same thing. So once I realized that he really decide positive I'm just like, what are we going to do? What do you mean we gotta do you know we're gonNA. Have a baby like it's Okay Hook. He gave me a hug AMC that was the in Twenty Sixteen Alexis was twenty three and still figuring out what you wanted to do in life. She was young and just having fun with her friends and now Fiance Cortez babies and parenthood weren't even a real thought even though she made up her mind Alexis didn't feel ready to share the news with her family little. Did she know they were already in on the secret? The funny thing about the stories that my sister knew that I was pregnant before I'd eat in that because. She was snooping garbage game. In those tested I thought were negative were actually reading positive, but I didn't wait for them to finish position. So how long they home to retrieve the man the garbage gain in Norberto they were definitely positive days. So they had sports as total. They revealed that I was pregnant and I didn't even know I can remember going at you mom if this. Already tell. In I'm just the one at the table this like awkwardly trying to not eat the. 'CAUSE I didn't want my mom to now that I was pregnant at the moment. I want to give her time. Alexis needed time to she hadn't fully wrapped her mind around what it meant to be pregnant. She recently started working as a receptionist choices a reproductive health services clinic choices provides everything from abortion to HIV, testing services to midwifery care. Alexis had options. So yeah. I had the choice to continue on my pregnancy abortion is something that I do think that it's easy choice I'm pro-choice. So you know but I knew my situation that it wasn't GonNa be something that I wanted to do basically because my boyfriend at the time we have been together for a while in knew that he wanted to Kate I was associated but I knew as speaking about abortion wasn't any wasn't a topic for us. actually when I told him, he was like on with whatever you want and I'm just like Ricky Ready. So although choices offer termination services in that wasn't something that I decided to do I was able to meet individuals that would still provide me prenatal

Alexis Him Dulas Twenty Sixteen Alexis Blackburn Abraham AMC Fiance Cortez Alabama Ricky Ready Norberto Kate I Hamburg Brooklyn Charlie Louis Anderly
Cyber Safety, How to keep your identity protected using mindfulness and practical tactics

Core Confidence Life

07:11 min | Last month

Cyber Safety, How to keep your identity protected using mindfulness and practical tactics

"How you doing Sandra? Hi. How are you doing? Thank you for having been your show. So, matty here. Right absolutely. So we're talking today about identity and cyber. Theft here. So give us a little bit idea on what that's about what does identity theft what is cyber theft? What does all that stuff? Of course? Let me start why I started. Niger, any may be. Definitely will get into into whether they cybersecurity are cybercrime or identity out. That okay with you. Sure. So I was returning a many many years ago I was returning from these things. Colombian. So I mean, the plane were landing in Miami and the pound announces that Homeland Security. Were boarding the plane. I course to ask for a handed to the to the agent and at the time I, head out these. It was relocated recently to the US. Ns I had my passport to the agents. then. He's next thing I know I'm the only one that being score of the plane by the two officers. And enthroning to the room you the. Famous rooms. that. Are In airports in I, don't know what's happening. Out. I'm about to connecting fighting my husband's waiting for Chico. So ten hours later and handed back my passport and is revoked. Few weeks later I mean Venezuela my native country and I'm trying to process my. Mom to processing again, you sign I had a lot of support from Maya Turks from my former employer journey. So we are in to again and. It was interesting officials. They kept asking me about China. Why we're doing China. China who is your contact? Like I never been in China. beating know what they were talking about. Some how when? S Model China go to hold of my information and was smuggling women into the US using my identity. Yes. So humid slate, you know everything I convinced, of course, a smuggler I gave my new visa and a back home two weeks later and returning from Euro my job requirement to travel a lot. And as we are going to. Control. I. Give My passport booth. I'm right back into that room. Because I have to. The, real me over and over that for six years. Yeah. So when I going everything was Chinese I. Mean it was really crazy at nobody wanted to travel with me a united in my almost wanted to travel with me. and. Finally. made the citizenship, my aspirin I changed my. Everything Courses Okay and at the time I was working tonight not. Having in the industry for over Twenty Years Community? It non no it was identity. It was not in the news. He was not like every day right now at breach or cyber drive or this or that. Back back in that day in that time, it wasn't so I couldn't make the connection. So few years later, I changed my career and I join cybersecurity cybersecurity? Area. Industry. And I realized what happened to me, and what happened you know when someone takes your identity with Tony, personage you for their gate. and. You know eat my corporate career I did that I? was very passionate about. Training and education awareness and Allison Park job that I enjoy the most. So I wanted to Redo it at a bigger scale as I left my corporate all by did your original question about what is at Know when stolen takes something from you. And wince when they break into your life, and that can be very dramatic experience and it can be for many reasons financial reasons it could be for. Someone inside your company that has. Either made a mistake or by attention. Jober that is you and ninety. Attack you could be for like in my case, there was a vying for for that criminal to have my identity so he can use it for him. So there are many life happens. It's It goes on all the time. We don't always hear about identity theft on the news I might do commercials about it. You know when the advertising different products, but it's something that a lot of us don't even really hear about. So how does that happen? How does someone? Get your information. So you can happen. Through many different things that can happen through your social media, it can happen through your email can happen through when you give out your credit card in a restaurant. It could happen when when when you ride formation with with a doctor. Often, office I mean, there are so many ways. Jury information can be obtained. We share a lot in social media share. Many different things. That are personal and that that is one thing that can use. Of you do that. You know sometimes we don't hear the news a lot about identity issue i. think we should do a because there's a new victim, every two seconds. A new victim I mean someone right now? has just being victim of identity DOPP and there's different decrease appointed. You know sometimes we someone let's say takes your credit car. And data charges in your credit card and probably most have had situation and the bank context you. Just have to get a new credit car. Scare of it. So it's a degree of identity theft is in the financial. Hesitation of identity theft, but it is. Your credit car on and bought things on your behalf. But it wasn't as faithful as many other situations are obviously. More were personnel or or moines more invasive.

China Theft Matty United States Sandra Niger Aspirin Miami Chico Venezuela Allison Park Tony
Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL Pro-Choice America, discusses new book "The Lie That Binds"

The Electorette Podcast

05:47 min | Last month

Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL Pro-Choice America, discusses new book "The Lie That Binds"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate on this episode, have a conversation with the hogue, the president of Nero Pro, choice America, and he joins me to discuss her new book. The lie that binds it's really an incredible book and it chronicles how abortion rights of all from being a non-partisan backburner issue to a central 'cause champion by conservatives in the radical, right. This is really one of those books that I have to read twice. It's that informative. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with Elise. Hogue. leasehold welcome to the cast. Thank you so much. You're. So before we jump into your book, I want us to talk about something because I recently learned that you were from Texas and that really my inches because I'm also from the South I'm from Memphis Tennessee, and I was reading one of your interviews where you'd said that you wanted to leave Texas because Uber afraid that you'd be bored and that was something like totally relate to. Manila it was sort of. Knew that there was a being rolled out there and I wanted to. It be challenged in You don't both my own horizons, but also different people different people think and act and. I am so privileged grateful to have been able to do that. You know I have to admit, and you may relate to this as being from a have A. Of defensiveness when it comes to people bashing Texas, they're such amazing people. They're they're such amazing within their and during such good work, and you can't judge inspired leaders. You have to judge us by Jordan Molly ivins in grammar yards and Janice Joplin for goodness. Sake. Now. There's just and that's true everywhere where there's adversity, there are amazing women trying to make a better future to Tennessee. It's true taxes in needs recognized. That is absolutely true. I FEEL DEFENSIVE ABOUT MEMPHIS TO MEMPHIS. Amazing. You know have Bill Street. Yeah. There's some things that I wanted to get to and that's where I connected with you because I was like, yes, I understand that needs to escape. But yet you know having these strong ties to my hometown It's. US You know and I always say at in calm from a reproductive rights background at came to it, and part of that is my experience in Texas in watching Texans in particularly poor people in taxes in rural people in Texas I'm being the canaries in coalmines of these rearrested policies that use reproductive oppression disenfranchise. So I really love this book because I've read some bit of this history in different books over time, and you just put it together into end. So well, right and I. I think one of the things about the Republican. Party. That happens I think we have these debates in the media when people talk about it as we just accept the Republican. Party. As is right without kind of thinking about how they got here or the illogic of their kind of overarching philosophy because a lot of it doesn't really make sense. Right. But you know when you read your book, the Republican Party today is not the way that it used to be like it's not recognisable from. Prior, to nineteen seventy right you at one Haley. How they kind of cobbled together this coalition of these disaffected smaller groups. You know these Democrats, who weren't happy with the passage of the Civil Rights Act and know some religious groups. So what were some of these initial groups in that coalition? Awkward it was a little bit. The opposite, right that every every political party has factions. There's no question about it, but you know as as the sort of book opens, you do see Jerry Falwell senior, who, subsequently passed and Paul and at small set a really fundamental as they call themselves dominion. It S, which means they believe God gave digging into white men over systems, elliptical, economic social systems, and. Our. Country, whereas before they had to do very much Mansi in short all the sudden is rich move mad. The Women's Liberation Movement is really challenging total control over power systems in the country and they mobilized to political action fighting school desegregation and. It's a long long story. You see throughout the book is that. An establishment GOP, which you still have any conservatives who still had social liberals in fiscal conservatives, they were not finding enough to hang together in related. People who hadn't been voting band goals were building over ten. Maybe we should add up and there was crew rate and they got more and more halt on a constituency within their electoral coalition that increasingly represented a small small action in the country in their views and they. Title, they were making deals with the devil and they. You know what? If anything can prince is that the artifice around abortion which seemed great to that at the time and I'm sure we'll discuss. Because one place where were toweling. Stream minority and they knew they didn't have public pain on their side. So it was a constant balancing act and what ended up happening is these radicals increasingly over to the party with each subsequent election, and trump is the ultimate manifestation of that.

Texas Memphis Tennessee Republican Party Hogue Jim Taylor Skinner Jordan Molly Ivins Elise Manila Nero Pro Janice Joplin Hogue. President Trump Jerry Falwell America GOP Haley Women's Liberation Movement Coalmines
Interview With Phillip Picardi

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

05:59 min | Last month

Interview With Phillip Picardi

"So I, always folks introduce themselves We went yourself. Sure. My name is Philip Cardi I am a journalist. I was formerly the Editor in Chief of out magazine also that you've content officer of Teen Vogue and better now, I would more call myself the host of an holier than thou which is a new podcast from crooked media more accurately I am a work in progress. Yeah. You know I feel. So we don't know each other but I have been watching your. Rise or move further visibility over the last couple of years and It's just very impressive what you have been up to First of all, just as a stranger sometimes I I don't know sometimes in my own experience with work I don't know. If how things seem from the outside, but it seems that you're really Finding, some space for yourself how does it feel to you? That's a great question and first of all, thank you. I mean I feel similarly about you. It has been really nice to watch and observe, and also just hear people talk about you and speak. So highly of you. So I hope that you carry those folks with you when when you're conducting yourself because it's a, it's a really wonderful thing. Always to hear good things about good people. Guys that basically makes me burst into tears put. You know what? It's an interesting time. Of Reflection for me for sure and certainly, let you mentioned my moves towards visibility You know in a previous version of the life that I'm leading I was very hungry for visibility. I was very hungry for success and I was working in a corporation called Canasta Publishing House that valued people who were very hungry for those things. And Ultimately Cameron you know if I'm being really freak Franken I and I did I have written just a bit about this for it in different places but that search and that desire for success ultimately left me feeling quite empty-handed and empty inside really, and so this part of of my journey you know unemployment I was laid off in December from out magazine after the company faced a series of financial difficulties and rather Let's call them interesting business practices and an interesting ownership structure. And I realized that getting let go was the best thing that ever happened to me and so I have kind of been living that this portion of my life for the past seven months or so it has been earmarked by a move to los. Angeles, in the midst of a global pandemic. my fiance sorry. is a an emergency medicine doctor. So he flattened the curve out New York. He was working in Queens buttoning the curve. Wow. He helped to flat curve in New York and then we arrived in l. a. and then a week after we settled here it was basically announced that we would have to be going through some very similar measures all over again, that case rates were rising that hospital occupancy was nearing its like its peak. In. So yes. So it's definitely just been an interesting world wind of a of a year but a good time I think to be at home thinking about stuff just like you know that Kylie Jenner quote this is just like the year of realizing stuff so. Kind of where I am. I mean, I'm glad that that's how it feels to you that it's a good year of realizing stuff I for myself Actually no I have I have had a lot of space and expansion. This is the longest I have been. Not Performing for live audience. In. Pretty for this number. Twenty years. It's also the longest I have spent in a single place in at least ten. and so. I feel like I'm having like this sort of restlessness anxiety and. Of. Realize how much the constantly interacting with people through live performance affected how much I feel connected to the world but like social media does not make me feel connected to the world. Turns out. Even. Though it's like how I even though that's how I. Feel. I. Know a little bit about you. It doesn't make me if sometimes can make me feel connected to individuals but does not make me feel in the middle of a community. He's like what I'm really missing is the feeling of community because I think I can see what individuals are saying about like. Taylor swift's new album or the black lives matter movement or literally any topic but I can't i. don't feel like I can get myself in the middle of the pack. As really affecting me emotionally yeah. I mean I deeply relate to that. It is really hard to be isolated and it also made me realize how much I was craving. Platonic intimacy I. I lived through this pandemic with the partner. Obviously, he was working, but we got a lot closer and more honest with each other. Then really we ever have before in a way if really strengthened our our relationship and our bond and I'm grateful for that similarly though I spend three hours a day on the phone with my friends and. I didn't talk to my friends that much before the pandemic kit, but this need and this constant desire to be interacting with people and for closeness. I don't know I feel like that has been an important symbol to me of what I want my life and my networks to look like after after hopefully, we get to to resume being with people and being in community.

Taylor Swift New York Franken Philip Cardi Teen Vogue Editor In Chief Kylie Jenner Canasta Publishing House Officer Partner Queens Cameron Angeles
Calculate Your Value

Let's Talk Game with Tiffani Lewis

03:08 min | Last month

Calculate Your Value

"This morning as me and our three-year-old were about to do math I told him to get the abacus. Has Stall Tactics telling me about dinosaurs T. REX's digital Alex. Lions elephants in like. But not, today, we sat on the SOFA. And as unprepared to slide the beats of the epic is over. He said to me mom you Miss Your Dad I. Do I reply with a rhetorical yet affirmative of course I miss my dad in my head that's what I wanted to say. But I said in just listened. Yeah because he's in heaven I miss him to. Our son's three. My Dad was killed in. Nineteen. ninety-one they've never met. Not here on this earth. In the physical round in the spiritual realm I'm not sure what that can counter was like took that question away. We went on about our day we played. We ate lunch there was no further mention of my dad. It wasn't until put them down for NAP and I began prepping for dinner that a song came on. What we have is much more than they can see. I'm not sure what the trigger was. But it reminded me of being in middle school seventh grade walking around the track looking up into the sky saying if I could project site into the heavens. Just to see my dad. I know it sounds crazy. But that was my middle school mind. It took me a few years to grapple with the understanding of what happened. It was so traumatic. So instant. into the tears flowed tears of joy though because see our son was doing a math of his own. What I was focused on was the present value. The present value of how I felt at that time I was happy. I was totally not even thinking about my dad. But Isaiah. He was. Focused on. The future value. How I would feel in the future how he knew I'm not sure but he did. And, that's what I want to tell you today God is focused on. Your future value. Don't worry about the. Subtracting in dividing that you did in the past. Diminished value don't worry about that. God is focused on your future value. He's adding up all of your future value banking on you. He has bank on you so much so That he sent his son Jesus. So, much so that he sit his son Jesus. Many would say. It was a subcontractor as he hung on that cross. But I say. He was adding the value. Of each of our lives. Is No coincidence that the cross. Looks like an addition sign. because. God. was adding value.

Isaiah Jesus Middle School