Photography

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The Filmmakers Dilemma  Dark Skin Tones

This Week in Photo

05:35 min | 6 d ago

The Filmmakers Dilemma Dark Skin Tones

"April of little some interesting or different today for the this week in photo discussion among with my friend. Chris Fenwick If you have anything to do with final cut pro, you know this guy he he's one of those people that knows final cut pro and editing in general from the inside out backwards and forwards and all that and he's We'll get into that but Chris reached out to me a couple of the about a week or so ago and pose a really interesting question us. He said, you know what? How do you? How do you color ballots for darker skin tones? He was having problems with that and this was this was on the heels of the whole Simone biles controversy with Anti Liebowitz and. All that back and forth of they should hired a black photographer to shoot her or should the photographer shot heard? No or Annie's people? Should they have known how to process and color correct for blacks hint so anyway. So we decided to jump on and have this conversation just talk like you know two people that like this stuff and see if there's a solution or maybe there is no. Solution but Chris, which is these elite editor Ed slice editorial and I'll put the links to all of his stuff in the show notes and the the description for this episode on Youtube but follow him over there. But check out this discussion is pretty. It's pretty interesting. We'll be pretty interesting from the standpoint of just what's wet in the in the real world of color correcting for other humans. We go. Here we go starting to. All right. Chris. Renwick. Welcome to this week in photo man how you doing. Mr Johnson I'm doing well. Yes it's good. The I'm doing really good. You know what we were talking before we started recording. and. I got I. got a page just from chatting just. Before recording. Yeah Yeah where you do your hands. Okay. But always you know you're you're a wealth of information. You're humble about it. Obviously, which is why you get invited to speak at conferences and all this other stuff, and you'd probably have more work than you can deal with. But let's I want to segue into that stuff that that I talked about in the teas color balancing for darker skin tones, Black People Brown people, etc. But before we do that, tell us a little bit about Chris Renwick in slice editorial. In the world and how are you helping keep spinning? I don't think I help keep spinning all. Right. Now. That's that's that's frightening I I'm an editor and I tell people this all the time and they say Fascinating. What are you edit? I added a bunch of stuff you'd never want to watch. It's it's not that it's not that exciting. In the corporate communications corporate branding space. There is tons of work to do most people realize that whether it's photography or video or editorial like I do But frankly most of the stuff I work on, you'd Never WanNa Watch. It's not that exciting. It's a matter of fact I think the people that I make it for you know they're struggling to get their employees to had chip you know but but but the bottom line is it's a living and I've always said that to satisfy your own creative you know thing that you have to do. You're better off. I mean it's good that I don't rely on my job to do that and I'll. I'll tell you. That if you. If you try to be, you know to exude your best you know a Steven Spielberg George. Lucas. When you're doing my job, you're going to be a pain. Because you're GonNa have all these great ideas. I'm not saying the not good ideas, but they're not right for the project that you're working. And so You're better off. You're always better off serving the project and. Most of the stuff that I do, it's ahead he's talking and might be a graphic over shoulder that. Explains what he's talking about but I don't need seven different angles in tight close ups intention like no I don't need that and so if you WanNa do that you should totally do that. But doing on something you're producing and not that you're trying to get paid for. And It's it's just kind of a pet peeve of mine. You know you just keep keep your creative thing to to wear. It's a being asked for and I turned stuff out. That's what we do. It's not not really exciting but like I said, raise the Bill Corp video pays the bills you know keeps keeps keeps the Earth Spin and keeps spinning right there. That's absolutely absolutely and I'll tell you three a four days after Governor Newsom shut down the state of California were based. we were in production. and. We were in production because. On I kind of reminded everybody that we work with especially in the office that our core competency. is to. Help people disseminate information. That's what we do. We help people communicate, and even during a pandemic people have to communicate, and so we came up with some workflow ways to do that and I've talked about that on other shows maybe to talk about it here but it's not what we really came to talk about. But but we were I was working on Tuesday. I delivered my first client video before the week was up

Chris Chris Fenwick Chris Renwick Lucas Editor Simone Biles Annie Mr Johnson Ed Slice Bill Corp Governor Newsom Youtube California Steven Spielberg George
Backup Is Not a 4-Letter Word

The Digital Story

05:14 min | Last week

Backup Is Not a 4-Letter Word

"If, you've ever seen Dustin Hoffman in the movie the graduate. You'll recognize what I'm about to say. He received sage advice for his career in just one word now remember this was the nineteen sixties. That one word plastics? Will I have just one word that should be at the foundation of your backing up an archiving strategy automate Absolutely automate. So I'm going to be covering a few techniques today but at the heart of the process for your backing up in archiving and I will make a distinction between the two you need to have as much automation as possible. If indeed, you're truly going to have a system that is up to date in liable and all that good stuff. Now, in my case, I have I cloud in dropbox I cloud grabs, files of that are on my neck or that go into photos, and that's a lot of files I have the big plan to two terabyte plan and all they have to do is pay the. Bill once a month and I'm good to go. I don't have to think about it. Any further than that in dropbox grabs files out of specific folders again, just takes care of it. All to do is pay the annual fee and I'm good to go there as well. Now, you may choose a different service but I encourage you to bring as much automation as you can into your backup plan because the more automation you have the stronger your plan will be now before I get to my five tips in addition to automation I, just WANNA share a note on the difference between backing up in archiving, they are not synonymous. Backing up is what you do during the project to ensure that you don't lose your work if you're working on a wedding. You probably not going to get it all done in one night or in one sitting. So you back up so that when you come back to your wedding, you know you can just pick up and go. But as something weird happens, you haven't lost your project. But when you're backing up, you're not backing it up in the final state you're backing up a work in progress. Archiving happens when the project is over. In case, you need to revisit it for whatever reason. Now, archives are the final version in general you don't save all the incremental backups that lead to the final version you say, the final version itself. So archives are the final version. They don't need to be as quickly accessible as your backups, your backup she want right there on the flash drive or wherever you happen to be using. Their the works in progress archives the final version a writing. Now regardless of if it's an archive or backup, you need to have a system, right you need to have a system for managing both from this point forward I'm going to use a more or less interchangeably, but I want you to understand that archives are longer term backups are more works in progress. Right here are five additional thoughts to consider when endeavoring. To. Preserve your work. Okay. This start out with the classic three to one rule. I'm sure you're familiar with this and if you're not, you're going to be in just a few seconds three, two one. Well, what does that mean it means three copies of your data one primary copy into backups. Two types of storage media local drive you know network, you know whatever happens to be two types of media and one copy off site or in the cloud in the cloud qualifies as offsite three, two, one, three copies of your data, two types of storage media and one copy off site or in the cloud. Now, I do both offsite and in the cloud. So I have a copy of that goes to my home, right my. Primary. Copy is here at the studio I have it backed up on a hard drive here. So I'm actually like at four something like that, and then I have most of that data in the cloud. Well. So I like both offsite in cloud, but you know one or the other the thinking being that you can be as fastidious as possible backing up your data if you have it on a hard drive next to the computer. And something happens at that particular location, rather be theft or some sort of natural disaster or whatever. Then you still lose everything. So off site is important because chances are good that you know something that ten miles away on a server hundred miles away that if something happens to your locally that you're offsite copy will still be accessible case with three two, one, three, two, one, three copies, two types of media and one copy offsite. Number two don't erase your memory cards until three two one is in place. This is something that have advocated for a long time. Or at least consider your memory cards, one of those three

Dustin Hoffman Theft Bill
Interview with Brooke Schultz

The Candid Frame

05:47 min | Last week

Interview with Brooke Schultz

"Creativity is more than just having talent. It's about making a choice to utilize whatever talent you do have. That's a lot easier to say than do sometimes because self doubt and insecurity can service considerable obstacles. It didn't start that way because as kids we created without such distractions sometimes I think we spend a lifetime trying to unlearn all that stinking thinking. For Brooke Schultz her love of photography is more than just about making memorable portrait's families but helping other photographers to leverage their desire to be creative person. Using her workshop center podcast heartful with Brooke. Celts, she does just that. This was a conversation that very much looked forward to as it provided a special moment of positivity during some very dark times. This is e body and ex and welcome back to the candidate frame. The KENDRA frame thriller Nice to have you Thank you so much for having me a buyer your next. Are you know Marshall is often about more leading a creative lifer leading fruit for photographic line, which is all about just being creative in your your podcast in a lot of what I picked up from you focuses on that as well. So I thought this might be fun time not just the learn about your work but just to have. A conversation about creativity. Let's do that as much as I wanNA learn about you in your work I think. Having a conversation like this, like this is always always good to have someone. Yes. Thank you. In one of the things Dow was kind of interesting was this idea of giving yourself permission to be creative. And having been a man I you know I always taken it from the male perspective because it's the only choice that Hap- But. It's interesting in terms of something that I heard in terms of what of your episodes speaking from a woman's perspective especially, a woman who is. A wife, a mother, and in terms of sometimes the guilt that some women feel who are under the circumstances about making the choice to be creative from the cells in in terms of seeing it as something that selfish. And thought that was really interesting and it's not something that I really have had an opportunity to really discuss specifically of touched on it. I. Think at least a couple of times on your podcast I thought that would be really interesting way of starting in the conversation so. Talk to me about that. Wow well, I'm curious to know. have. You ever experienced that like a guilt feeling for being creative or is it just like I'm creative and I need to kind of work through the creative process but not so much the gill in terms of other aspects of your life most of my guilt is been not doing mea. Not so much that I felt like I was depriving. The. People in my life something as a result of making the choice to be creative. No every you sharing that because I think it's speaks to what women currently experience in a cultural sense that to be a good wife mother or just women in general, you are expected to do it all do it all perfectly and don't let anyone see you sweat dining and Especially to be a quote unquote mother you're expected and it's kind of like this seeing that runs in the background I think of just give yourself entirely to your children and any time that you spend away is somehow. Demerits or like a is taking away something very valuable from them, and so that's been something that I've had to really consciously. Reprogram in my own belief system to believe that the creative impulse is a human impulse and regardless of our roles whether it's a mother grandmother, you don't professional creative person or just someone who enjoys taking pictures or whenever you're creative outlet might be that those impulses are human that any humans in your care whether it's children or otherwise are going to be benefited by that creative impulse in my watching you be creative. Did. You ever feel this before you were a parent or is something that seems they've. Become especially pronounced after every given birth to kids. I think it's definitely more after having kids kids are so needy. ME. Need you all the time and especially as. In my family and many women as a mother, you're the primary caregiver and so you're the one that it falls upon to fill those kids needs all the time and my kids are really little. They're seven, five, four and three months so. You know they they need me a lot and so walking that line and that tension and dance between how much they need me and what I need. Myself is a really interesting one to walk and I think all of us walk that one way or in creativity because we have other obligations besides just you know sitting around getting inspired making creative work you know. So it's attention that everyone can relate to but I think it's especially prevalent in mother had.

Brooke Schultz Marshall DOW HAP
Interview with George Varanakis of The Portrait Masters

This Week in Photo

05:51 min | Last week

Interview with George Varanakis of The Portrait Masters

"Welcome back to another episode I am your host Frederick Ben Johnson today. Once again on the hot seat, I have my good friend. Mr George Very. You may have heard his name in the industry. He's he's got or had fingers in all corners of the photography industry that didn't come out right but. Just. Men involved with everything photography. If you don't know his name, you probably have been to an event that he's been. Behind. Trains on. All that stuff. So George here talk about. What are we talking about the Porch Masters Live? This is your last greatest you like you just like attempting really hard projects and. Hitting home runs apparently. So this one was obviously. Cova head and we had our original conference which was going to be in Phoenix Arizona September ninth through the twelfth we had to make a big decision and it was okay. Do we just not do anything this year or do we try to do our virtual conference if you will I don't really love the virtual name I was like call it digital conference that's just me but yeah. We made that decision and moved back our dates a little bit. So we are September first of the twenty third three days we've got so much content some amazing content. We're doing things a little bit differently than I think what a lot of lot of the. Virtual trade show conferences. You'll see out there in the photo industry or just overall We went out this a little bit differently in that we prerecorded everything and not like prerecord Webcam or zoom kinda thing we prerecorded like shootouts and we had people at our studio We had people at Peter Hurley Studio in New York shooting, and so we've got these amazing shootout through Canon Sony and pro photo. We've got keynote speakers like a tab of the coffee from her famous Bravo show. She is one of our keynotes and she's just incredible Her brother show was Tabitha takes over. We've got mark seller. WHO's one of the most amazing photographers on the planet. You he's done countless numbers of covers for Cube, fair the role I think he's got he's done over one hundred rolling stone cover so I'm really excited of our lineup and we're GONNA do this in a really fun way. It's GonNa be really fun over the three days that we're doing this. We've got kind of a trade show section. We've got a content section. We're GONNA be giving away a ton of stuff and that sue it Nikki closer will be live here in the studio Kinda just introducing a all the classes sue out was just decided a couple of minutes ago. WHO's GonNa do for closing keynote keynote live so we're so most of it is prerecorded, we will have live host, but the content that's come out of this is off the charts I'm really excited. In you when you say you're talking about sue brice. Right, yes? Yes right. These Subaru you should put it in front of her name. Yeah. you WANNA have you set the stage on just a portrait masters for the folks that may not have heard about the conference? What what so Thank you for inviting me to the last one I was I was there in Arizona. Last. Yeah. It was. It was that's the word. It was a blast. Folks that may not have heard of the conference described what what this sort of you know the the soul of the conference is intended to be win it's real versus now when. Virtual or digital doesn't it seem like that was ten years ago. Does right. It's I feel twenty years older I, know. Like as my hair. So the Portrait Masters Conference, it's really a boutique conference in that we have only we cap it at five hundred people We have only nine speakers, one stage, one room. There's no breakout classes we really tried to simplify it and we wanted to give people inexperienced that they never forget. So we added so many different things to this conference that you won't see at other places. For example, we put shooting days in the. Trade show. So some of which are sponsored can have a couple of shooting base Pro Photo will have a couple of shooting bays and basically, and we do a bunch of our own. So basically, it's a model backdrop lighting and you just go and shoot and people went absolutely crazy fort when we when we launched it at it, really we kind of created like a Disneyland photographers almost where you could go in. You could talk to the vendors you could shoot, you could touch. You could feel kind of the things that we love about trade shows. Right you have that opportunity to to touch feel products but also like you could read a camera camera body from any of the vendors, the camera houses and Kinda go around the show and and shoot the networking part of it, which this is one that suit came up with but a red ribbon for someone that hadn't been there to our conference. Before if you're wearing a red ribbon, it was to show everybody else. Hey, come say hi and their brand new they don't know anybody and it was. Just, it ended up being such an incredible experience for people because you go to a trade show, you thought the Portrait Masters amazing show that you wanted to go to it's it's an expensive ticket it's eighteen hundred dollars, but it includes all your your meals, and some other things that we we do. But for the Red Ribbon, it's just amazing 'cause I've I saw a dozen times people just may be sitting by themselves or walking by themselves and other attendants would go and say, hey, how are you come sit with me and and it was just that networking part that that really kind of came out of it, which is really cool.

Red Ribbon Mr George Arizona Frederick Ben Johnson Peter Hurley Studio Subaru Cova Tabitha Phoenix Disneyland Nikki Sony New York
Growing Your Photo Business with Dixie Dixon

This Week in Photo

05:39 min | Last week

Growing Your Photo Business with Dixie Dixon

"Able to welcome back to another episode of this week in photo I'm your host. Frederik. Van Johnson today I have the honour and pleasure of sitting down with the illustrious Nikon shooting. Dixie Dixon, she talked about world. He's got he's working on what letter here we're GonNa talk about Nikon and all that good stuff dixie welcome to the show. Are you doing amazing thanks so much for that great intro I. Appreciate it. It's all true. It's all. You're awesome. I'm excited to be here today and chat with you. Cool. Well, let's talk about stuff. So you know we've just you know full disclosure you and I did an interview before over on the sky loon behind the scene podcast that I also host but I wanted to invite you onto this show is well because I want to. kind of slightly different direction and. Introduce you to this week and photo audience as well as the behind the scene audience if you subscribe to behind the scene search for it and go subscribe to that one too. So Yeah. Good stuff. Who is Dixie Dixon? Ukraine. So I've seen your name in fact. I. was just doing a livestream with a friend of mine who's also a Nikon shooter and I said I gotta go I. GotTa Hang Up because I'm getting ready to talk to Dixie Dixon and he's like I was like, have you heard of Dixie Dixon? He's like Have I heard of Dixie Dixon. It's like, have you heard of Prince? So. Tell us how did you get from where you were to being kind of a household name in the in the photography world? I appreciate that so much. Gosh it's been a really crazy adventure. I've had photography jobs. So I started out shooting the cheesy little league pictures shot with film actually was the Nikon F G camera, and so we'd be doing all those cheesy soccer ball like posing with a soccer balls and Just, the team photos and stuff like that, and then I ended up joining the yearbook staff and my image ended up making the cover of the yearbook. So for me, it was like a way to get out of my shell a little bit. I'm very much a sort of an introvert. So it was sort of felt rebellious and helped me get to know people and communicate and have fun and so that for me was like a moment. Wow maybe I could actually do this for a living. So I ended up going off to college I would have loved to majored in photography, but I really thought. Maybe I should figure out the business so I can actually figure out how to make a living doing this. So I ended up studying. Entrepreneurship at TCU and fell in love with the business side and then I ended up studying abroad with a world renowned fashion photographer I literally googled fashion photography study. Abroad. And there was one program through Syracuse University. So I got to go and study with Jeff Licata and listen over in London and Prague and do my first big fashion shoot, and that is when I really fell in love with the fashion photography side of things. So yeah, it's fun adventure I felt like it was yesterday but it's It's crazy how fast time flies and I got a job sheeting TV show and it just all came together. I have so many questions like I'm I'm curious how it works from. A lot of a lot of the twitter audience. Sure as the same question like the. One one path to success as a photographer seems to be fashion right? You got to be a fashion slash commercial photographer. You gotta be that person walking on said and you're in charge and you know the House music stumping in the background and models are doing their thing. There's a wind machine. Blowing. And somebody's up there like stevie nicks with the white thing. So how do you? How do you get there like what's what's the path from leaving school in entrepreneurship going through the internship and seeing how it's done from behind the scenes to building a brand like your brand and being sponsored and representing brands like Nikon? Yes. So it's been I always feel like as an entrepreneur you think you're just GonNa, go a nice gradual progression upward, but it's like. It's an interesting. It's an interesting journey if you will. There's ups and downs along the way. I. Mean my first few years I was shooting everything I was shooting weddings and portrait's and product. If anyone called me to do a shoot I knew how to do it. I said Yes to almost everything yeah. Just to just to pay the bills and whatnot so I ended up up to different websites My fashion website and then my commercial website I mean my wedding website and portrait website. So basically, when people would reach out and they wanted portraits, weddings, I was sent him to that website, and then all the fashioned stuff on my fashioned website was all three work that I had shocked my portfolio. So ultimately, you have to show the type of work that you WANNA be shooting. So I was wanting to shoot the fashion work so you have. To, go out and shoot that work, and then you're gonNA, eventually start attracting those type of clients. So then I started shooting for modeling agencies, they would do like paid portfolio shoots for their models. It started out as free portfolio shoots and then they ended up paying me to shoot their models for awhile and do that quite a lot and then that led to like two boutiques and showing them my work and ask him if I could collaborate.

Dixie Dixon Nikon Van Johnson Soccer Stevie Nicks TCU Ukraine Twitter Syracuse University Jeff Licata London Prague
Nikon Z5 Review

The Digital Story

04:50 min | Last week

Nikon Z5 Review

"So, one of the things that attracted me to the Nikon see five was the nick or twenty four to fifty millimeter f four to six point three Zoom Lens that you can get bundled with the camera. Now, both together are one, thousand, six, hundred, ninety, six dollars. So that's not exactly pocket change, but it is less than some of the other full featured full frame cameras on the market. What I really liked about this compact twenty, four to fifty millimeter zoom is that for a full frame camera, it really is compact. In fact, it has this mechanism that reminds me of a Pentax Lens that I have that we new twist it all the way it actually pulls all the way into the body. The knows all the way into the body, and then when you want to use it, you have to twist at the other. To release the lands and then it does at zooming thing from there. So the Nice thing about it is that when you're packing it or putting it in a case or something. It really is fairly compact for a full frame Lens Ns alight as well. So my thinking was that this tandem would be a good full frame option for hiking and travel. So I decided to put the theory to the test with eight mile hike to crystal cove in South Lake Tahoe. Now, before I, tell you how that went let's take a closer look at the specs for this camera. And again, we're talking about the Nikon is e five murless camera. Okay. Here we go. The first one is a four point three megapixel seamus sensor with x speed six processor. So. That gives you ISO sensitivity. The way up to fifty one, thousand, two, hundred. Now they say in their marketing materials quick shooting at four point, five frames per second. Most of us would not think as four point, five frames per second as fast bursts. Okay. Not Anymore not after shooting with some of the cameras that we do. So there is the first area where you go. Okay this is not top of the line, but it's probably fine for travel for landscape. You know for hiking for things like that right it's a really nice censor by the way I love the image quality that it produces. Now, the auto focus system has two hundred, seventy, three selective points. In. As a hybrid system that uses both face detection and contrast detection methods and I would say that the autofocus is quite decent every now and then I was surprised when it took it a second to figure something out that didn't seem that hard to me but overall pointed I pressed I captured and it went very well my hit rate was quite high. I was only using however the twenty four to fifty millimeter Lens. In fact, I'll talk a bit more about that in just a few minutes. Now, it has a nice three point two, inch, one, million LCD screen that you know goes up and down right it doesn't swing out it's not fully articulated, but it has the up and down articulation which I actually prefer for most things unless I'm going to be using the camera for video for photography I like the up and down tilt a lot better the screen. Is, quite. Nice, it also is a touchscreen and you can operate the camera from the screen itself if you wish, and then has a three point, six, nine, million dollars, electric viewfinder, and it is a quite good I, like the view, the electronic, find her a lot. It's interesting how often though when I'm out nature I, find myself shooting via the LCD screen as opposed to the electronic viewfinder. Just because I, like those different angles I really do however when I'm doing electron viewfinder photography and I'm looking through that. From. The Nikon I like it. I like what I see I like the readouts on the inside. It's really easy on the eyes and quite pleasurable. Now one thing that we do get even though this is not top of the line. Camera in the Nikon lineup is we get dual SD memory card slots in their st memory card sauce which. Some of us, prefer to the the newer standards and they both both slots support you H S too. So they are high speed and there's two of 'em there and I would say that as one of the really nice features of this camera.

Nikon Pentax South Lake Tahoe
Rob Knight and the Gnarbox

This Week in Photo

05:52 min | 2 weeks ago

Rob Knight and the Gnarbox

"It's a quick chat this time with my Buddy Mr Rob night over there he has some experience with a little device call of the NAR box. We're GONNA be talking about that and kind of what his overall impressions are with the device, taking it in the field around the world and. Sort of putting it in interesting situations. Rob Night how you doing man? Hey, man I'm GonNa thanks for having me. Yeah. Yeah. Good to have you. Yeah. We got to Chattan. We you and I got to chat about this thing the non locks, which is which is a little device if people that may not have heard of it. It is a hard drive. This is actually a full computer in here it's going to display. It's got ISO got a battery on their for power in. It's got a input for St Cards and CF cards and I think that's a that's simply on there as well and USB see on there. So you can actually plug another hard drive into this. So it's main purpose and you correct me if I'm wrong because you're more of an expert on this and I am its main purposes if when you're on the go to ingest your files where there'd be video from a drone or still camera or whatever into the device. It does a check some on those files to make sure what it copied over is is there. So it double checks shirts there? And then it allows you using their software because the devices WIFI using their software you can go through and start calling and sorting and labeling and key wording and all that stuff directly within your tablet or your phone while you're still in the field that I get it. Right is that is that what it? Yeah that's about it. I mean in short, it's a little computer. And you use your ipad or your phone as the interface for it. Although version two, which the when you're holding up, it does have four buttons on the on the front that go at the LCD. So you can't operate it without attaching it to your phone or your. IPAD, which I really liked as a big improvement over the version. Yeah. Yeah. It's a cool device in the I talked to will, Afrikaner he's the CMO over there. He was taking me through the device and I mentioned that it feels like its military spec like if something that you'd be issued a military and he said it was actually built to military's Beck. So it is. It is a device that you could theoretically find in someone's backpack in uniform. What what are your experiences with it? What do you think without without me leaving the witness? You Tell Me What what rob nights experiences with the Nar box two point Oh sure well. Like you mentioned it is built like a tank and. There's a few things I love about it since my cameras use SD cards I, think that's great The other thing is it's so well weather sealed that I can actually put an st card in it and close it and it's weather sealed while I'm downloading and backing up my data. That's really cool. I've taken it to places like Peru, February back when we could go anywhere and I'm literally living on a riverboat on the Amazon for a week and I didn't want to take my computer down there. So instead, I'm backing up hundreds of images day using this and plugging in an external hard drive to it. So one of the big differences between this and other similar things is just that as I plug in my hard drive. My little portable drive. This will run the drive and download to it. all at the same time. If I want download a copy to the Nar box and to the external drive at the same time, have two copies. I can do that too. It's. It's very flexible as far as that goes And then you know sometimes you I I don't like to do a lot of work in the field usually especially, if I'm in Peru on a photography workshop the last thing I want to do is take time away from my clients and sit in front of my computer for hours. When I could be. In Peru. So I'm not doing a lot of work, but you know sometimes you get your, you're doing a shoot and you just know you got that one shot. You can use the Nar box apps on your phone, connect the phone to the Wi fi on nar box and and I can download images right into light room I can I like you said you can. You can add ratings that kind thing So if I want to, I, can put things right into light room and they're on my computer when I get home. And that's pretty awesome. What That's been my sort of typical use case I was I did some production work off a friend of mine my buddy Eddie tap on a video production that we're doing and we spent a week. On location doing. Like I was telling you a little while ago before we were recording six hundred, twenty gigabyte as d cards, worth of video in the morning and the same in the afternoon when the light was good and so I would get go back to my hotel room between Hook up the Nar box downloading everything to are are working hard drive. So at the end of the day, everything's all downloaded and I know it's there and we can format guards and start back over tomorrow that was a huge benefit and things. So rugged I can put an D. card. Okay. We're shooting here we're moving to the other side of the location I'm GonNa Plug in Nasty Card, Set I one thing I I should talk about to with the APPS. They, basically, there's so much. It's improved over version one with this that. I, I? I just ended this and does this. it's a colliding new product for I it completely. Yes. One of the things that drove me nuts with the first one is that you have to hook it to your phone or your ipad to work anything.

NAR Peru Rob Night Mr Rob Chattan Beck Hook Eddie WI Amazon
5 Years with a Photo Diary

The Digital Story

06:34 min | 3 weeks ago

5 Years with a Photo Diary

"Think one of the interesting things about a diary like this is that you can measure how quickly life changes. It's one thing with your memory to go. Yeah. You know remember back a few years ago. We used to sit around and do this and that, but you sometimes weren't exactly sure when that was or. What Would it look like an all the sort of things? A photo diary has a date and it has a picture and it has text and it has all the stuff that you need to fill in those gaps so that when you look at the photo diary entry, then you go oh yeah. I remember and then the other details come to you. This is very helpful for not only remembering things but when people ask you, Hey, when was that we did or that or what did we do on my forty fifth birthday or? All that kind of stuff you actually have information available to you. Now, I'm going to talk about the actual software in the second segment. So we'll get to that right now I'm just going to talk about the idea of a photo diary itself. One of the things that I do like about them is especially compared to something that you would write down I mean this is electric. This is on my phone on my IPAD and on my computer all my computers. Is that a searchable so it makes it really easy to find stuff and I think that's one of the things that's important when you're doing this kind of work in especially when you're trying to retrieve this kind of work is going. All right. You just enter birthday two, thousand, seventeen or something like that and You can find what you're looking for pretty quickly. Now, I also find them useful for me knowing what cameras I'm using, what settings I'm using actually put a lot of that information in the diary and in fact. When I started it back in two thousand fifteen the idea was for me was to take an iphone picture of something that I was shooting with a film camera because obviously film cameras don't record any meditate at all. Then that way I would have date than that way I would have temperature and things like that. I would definitely have location which was very important to me, and then I could go ahead and fill out notes about what was happening. So that was the original concept of this. That's what got me going on this however once I started doing it, and then once I started looking back on what I had done I was going this is far more valuable than just adding meditated to analog shots I'm glad I did it I'm glad that I figured out the system to. Get me going on it but like so many things in life it evolves to something completely different over time and in my case something better, and that's something better is what I'm going to be sharing with you right now I know a lot of you don't care about fell photography and that's totally cool. So I'm not really going to talk about that aspect of it, but I did want you to know that that's what got me going on this and then led to what I'm GonNa, talk about today what I thought I would do just to give you a feel. For the kinds of things that I enter I, picked five entries and I could have picked thirty five entries to share with you but I just picked five to give you a feel for these things. Now, each one has a picture. Each one has a fair amount of location data time all that kind of stuff, and then I usually put a caption with somebody give you five of them and then we'll talk a little bit more about maybe the value of a photo diary in your life as well. August sixteenth two thousand sixteen. Giants Baseball. I packed the contacts one, thirty, nine q for some street shooting in San Francisco on our walk to at and T. Park for a giants game. Four votes were going Zach Max Jason and myself. We took the larks per ferry over to the Barca Daryl. Strolled for a mile to the ballpark and then return to Lark spur of the giants ferry after the game, the three boys, and I had a great time. So, that's that's where the entry ends I'll tell you a little bit more about it. So Zach Amax, my sons and Jason is their friend who even to this day is their roommate. So all three of them are living together down in Santa Clara California they all have different jobs there in Silicon Valley, but this was back in two thousand sixteen. And the reason why I start off with this entry is because they're just so many things that aren't happening right now we're in baseball season we can't go to a baseball game. I'm not sure I would want to take the ferry to the embarcadero. I would have to think about that in that whole experience that we had that day and that evening you know all crowded together at the ballpark. hanging out with all these people watching a ballgame that right now just feels. So in the past to me, and that is interesting to you know look at the photo and read the entry and think about that really cool day that we hadn't by the way I got a photo out of that shoot that I just love of the three of them as we're walking down the embarcadero. The shot of course, I shared it with them later. And they like the shot so much there's actually hanging on their wall in their house So it was a great day and is one of those days that I hope that we get to have again December twenty seventh two, thousand, sixteen, the apple photos book at Barnes and Noble I was killing some time downtown waiting for the battery to be replaced in my iphone six S.. So I, ducked into our local Barnes and noble bookstore to see if the apple photos book for photographers was in stock much to my delight. There was one copy left. So I did what any photographer would do I faced forward and took a picture of it.

Giants Zach Max Jason Baseball Apple Barnes Zach Amax San Francisco Santa Clara California T. Park
Interview With Brandon Thibodeaux

The Candid Frame

04:02 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Brandon Thibodeaux

"If you've been working through through through this time, you know at the beginning of covid. Tanit I thought this is the end of my career I don't know what's going to happen and I was I was busier than not have been since moving to Houston relatively speaking within a two month period and I'd say just within the past two months or so the trailed off where the too dismal. It hasn't been this slow for me since since I started no four freelancing. So yeah. This this period of time has been definitely one of reflection of sandwich which way the whales can we go from here? Yeah. Some people that I've talked to they seem to be starting to work again. At everything is still kind of tentative. When you think about all the liability like I? Had A job today in got one tomorrow, which has been rare in the past couple months him back to back but. You know the corporate liability. If you go on assignment with the Wall Street Journal in, you haven't already done this they they require you to do a zoom meeting with. Their security staff to go over P em, proper. Omaha. For caring for yourself the photograph in. There's hazard pays with a lot of publications right now if you have to go indoors or do anything risky, but it seems like it's maybe starting to trickle back. But there was there was a period where like I said we were in Mississippi for two months at my in laws my wife works from home and we stayed with her her mom Milton Mississippi. Mainly because I had no reason to be back in Houston. Yeah a mowed grass. Farmer. John honey days keeping productive. Absolutely. It's A. Devil's. Workshop. Where were you shooting for yourself much or you were there a little they reside in another part of the state from where a photograph traditionally in this. By with this new body of work of. Starting to break the seal on Louisiana there about an hour or so from that region and. I took some time to go at all around there and if nothing else discount to new locations. So yeah where we even again to go out there. Sunday. I'll. I'll do a bit more that one of the things I wanted to ask you yesterday because you're you're you're born and bred Texas, right? But you photographed for a while in Mississippi and I've never really lived in the south I visited there and I was kind of curious to hear about how different is the culture between Texas and and Mississippi? United their side a long standing debate of whether or not to include Texas in the South A. Really is it's own thing in even more. So now that I think half of California's moving here. Certainly rise in the resume rent rates in Austin. You know it's it's a remember the New York Times, the one little anecdote for the new. York Times had this article about language and the idiosyncrasies of people, speech and terms the terminology based on on regional identity. And funny. My area of southeast Texas Beaumont author all the words ad say. Feeder road for access road or you know or I forget what some of them were all mine lined up almost exactly with my wife's region of Mississippi there might have been a few things off like we say aunt instead of anti or something like that. On. So I always found that a little maybe that was meant to be wishy enough spoke the same language or something.

Mississippi Texas Houston New York Times Milton Mississippi Covid Texas Beaumont Wall Street Journal Omaha A. Devil California Louisiana John Austin
Interview with Michelle G Hunder

This Week in Photo

05:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview with Michelle G Hunder

"He welcome back to another episode of this week and photo I'm your host, Frederik van. Johnson this is the first streams last recording that I'm doing on the service twitch dot TV. I was GONNA say new service twitch DOT TV, but it's not new, but it's new to me so I have the honor of having Michelle. With me she's one of the more prolific photographers streamers that are on twitch, and she has graci-graciously offered up herself to be interviewed as well as giving me some tips and tricks on how to operate and navigate in the world of twitch. It's an interesting World Michelle G. Hunter. Welcome to the podcast how you doing. Good thank you so much for having me. I'm really good. I'm excited I was nervous leading up to this interview don't before I've done literally hundreds of interviews. Over the span span of a decade or so. But this one I was nervous work because this is a new experience this is a new world. Yes. So so far we dive into the world of twitch. Tell me about Michelle who is Michelle Jihad? Or a photographer, your husband's a documentarian like what is going on down there Yes I live in. Melbourne Australia. I am a professional music photographer I've been shooting for roughly ten dis, almost ten years. I've been married for the same amount of time. So intended. To. Gorgeous dogs that my life will allies. And to be honest I think like you know when you talk about who I am like a lot of my identity is very much wrapped up in what I do. I. Really. Being amusing photographer as my life I've thrown everything into it. I absolutely love my job. It doesn't feel like work like it feels. Like I have the best job in the world and I work with amazing people and I'm constantly inspired by the people that I work with the work that I get to do. And yet I think it's you know the last couple of months of has really thrown a bit of a spattering the work for me personally because because i. feel like that because I. Identify with what I do. So intimately, it really has changed my life and had to find. A, way to I guess. Put. All of the energy that I was putting into my life and my Korea into something else because I wasn't able to shoot and I'm still not able to shoot. Sorry, that's way twitch gaming and I started streaming five months ago and it's it's honestly a incredible. So yeah. Over you've taken over with a you like I'm I'm relatively new to it. So I'm like trying to find out you know who's who and what's what and all that stuff and your name keeps coming up over and over again in when people talk about you even when you're not on the street may refer the reverence that they attach to your name is like when fans talk about beyond, say you like the beyond shame Of which like how did that happen? How did you get that status on the service I? Definitely don't save I so like that I made I. I Guess Sin Vive like I like to support other people said I pop up in other people's strains all the time. I have time to do that at the moment. So I, guess that. Lends itself to making genuine friends and making genuine connections with people. I think I. Also, I have a decent social media following on other platforms I was able to bring. Like a I guess a relatively decent amount of papal arbor with me, sir. I wasn't ever street I wasn't even doing the hard yards and streaming to one or two people which a lot of people have to stop doing that hang on two seconds. My dog was. Crying, he wanted to be let out. So. I. Always had a decent number on still building that audience every day. But yeah, I, I definitely don't want to be taking credit being like the biggest. photographer. Strain were on the platform or anything like that. This this table, the debate. People like shoes. And this is about the guys that have been here for a very, very long time and I would take to take any credit away from the people that have been here. For since two, thousand, thirteen, striving and Being, on the platform for five months. So I feel like the people that have been here for a long time really set the groundwork. For for people like us and also anyone that started in the last few months also notice it. Those guys have really welcomed us with Arben really helped just like showing the ropes. With things like the twitch photography, tame and. Yeah just made it a really welcoming an amazing platform that I am just stoked to Bain vote into the honest. There's so much to it too.

Michelle Michelle G. Hunter Johnson Dot Tv Frederik Van Melbourne Michelle Jihad Australia Bain Arben Korea
5 Easy Ways to Edit Movies Recorded with Your Camera

The Digital Story

05:43 min | 3 weeks ago

5 Easy Ways to Edit Movies Recorded with Your Camera

"So for a while, I was wondering about the actual need of having all this video capability. With are still cameras of course you know that's a little biased me saying that right there because they're just cameras but around the world, a lot of folks are really looking at these things to shoot video. And then Oh yeah they take pictures as well and that is a real thing. Studies are showing that the manufacturers are saying that's what the demand is. So. This is being driven by the consumer as well as those that design the cameras and then I started thinking about my own work and how often I do fire up the video mode on my Olympus or on my Fuji Film Camera and I it's a real thing. Isn't it? And then I think getting. From listeners and they're going you know especially now when we're sheltered in a lot more can't go outside as much and. Are exploring new features on our cameras. One of the features that they are exploring is making videos and than sharing them with people, you know most photographers and most artists have a variety of different interests and some of those interests are very nicely explained of by making a video about how to do this or how to do that. Is Essentially what I do for a living, right? So. So. Why not everyone? Else's? Well, why not? I was looking at you know this sort of conundrum that comes up with you know okay. Capturing images as one thing. And you know taking video is another and then getting decent sound is another and then once you get that video and has some decent sound. What do you do with it? I mean, do have to go out and spend two, hundred, ninety, nine dollars to buy final cut or. By adobe of video editing software or can you use something that you already have the do the basic things in the basic things are really what most people need at the very top of the list is trimming because a lot of times when we're shooting video ourselves, which we do most of the time, right? You know the production crus- somewhere else in there we are. We've gotta take care of everything ourself. And trimming is the big deal right because you know you start the video. and. Then you know maybe the camera tripod or whatever, and you know you gotta walk over and then you get in front of the Cameron Start Talking doing your thing and then when he finished saying what you're, GonNa say then you gotta walk back to the camera turn off. Well, you know those bits on both ends and even if you're doing handheld stuff, right press the button all that while there's usually some rigmarole that goes on then those bits on both ends are the things that need to go away in fact. If we just get rid of those bits on both ends. We already have the meat of a pretty good video right there. So trimming is something that everyone needs to do everyone needs to trim, and if you're not trimming, then do not share your videos with other people right? Unless they're just you know something fun like an iphone video or something like that. another very common request is being able to add videos together like video bits together to make one movie. people also like to be able to add a title. Or some sort of graphic to their movie you know. So all these things are really nice to be able to do to to take it from just a clip to something that's a little bit more of a presentation, and then when you've done that, you know, how can you share it? I mean, can you export it into a file format that works Nicer Youtube or works Nicer facebook or whatever you happen to us to share your video. So these basic tasks do not require you know final cut ten or another expensive video editing up there are APPs upset you probably have on your computer right now that can handle most or all of these things, and that's what I'm going to talk about right now I have five of them for you. And I'm going to start out with a quick time and quick time for the Mac. Now, quicktime used to be for both windows and Mac, and then around two thousand, sixteen or so. Apple stopped officially supporting quicktime for windows even though that latest version that latest windows version seven, point six or seven point seven actually still works on windows ten so but is not officially supported. So I'm just going to talk about it for the Mac right now, I do have windows APPs to that we'll be talking about we'll talk about quicktime for the Mac but the player, not even quicktime pro but the modern player that every Mac user has actually does a pretty good job of trimming movies of stitching clips together, and then you can even move them around when they're on the time line and I don't think. I. Realize that you can do this. You open the video clip that you shot with your camera. You know you go to edit there's trim right there, and then there's also a command to add clip at the end and you go. Why can I add clip at the beginning? We don't have to worry about that. Just add the the clip at the end the second movie. Because once added, then you can click on it and move it around. You can move it around so you can move it to the beginning.

MAC Adobe Cameron Olympus Apple
Taking Off! with Aircraft Photography

This Week in Photo

04:59 min | Last month

Taking Off! with Aircraft Photography

"Welcome back to another episode of this week and Photo GonNa Treat for you today I'm speaking with John Thou-. He's down in southern California and he's doctor for slash illustrator who's WHO's made his mark taking amazing photographs of some amazing aircraft, and I'm excited to talk to him John Welcome to the show man how you doing. Frederick I'm doing great. Thanks you know you you you are very welcome. I'm excited dive into this 'cause you as you and I discussed our pre interview. Air Force, x Airforce Guy Air Force combat photo journalist used to take pictures of these planes haven't been in any of these planes the. No the only aircraft that I've flown in a U. H one in you know. Huey right. So photographers used to fly around with the doors open taking pictures of rocket launches and stuff like that. But I never had the opportunity to get in a fast burner. One of these guys. So a jealous. Don't be totally jealous. We've been around a whole lot of them, but I gotTA. Tell you post nine eleven that change for us to, and there's there's a lot of that I, the majority of my flight time in the amazing aircraft been really warbirds We've done some stuff with the air force where were in Casey one, thirty, five and I say. I say we that is not the royal we I it's I know we're talking about my catastrophe but my two sons have been a very integral part of slick pixels and we've been photographing with knee since they were. Gosh. Publishing were about eight years old each and so that's That's been a part of that. So when I say we, you want everybody to understand I'm talking about the three of us in that respect. But yeah, with the fast with the quote on quote fast air. We have not had that opportunity as much as we would alive. Civilian stuff and and some transports in some dice photo platforms but anyhow, don't be too jealous. AM still jealous though I mean. To be around those aircraft and and shoot 'em how we got you into this. Line of photography, what was the path that you that led you to the runway? That's a great question. So as a kid, my dad was a pilot private pile even though we had a commercial rating as as my grandfather was really my grandfather that I flew with primarily He was kind of the head electricity out at point Mugu and so in addition to his Gosh in addition to his pilot's love for aviation as piloting skills in world war two, he had flung be seventeens. Primarily stateside So he wasn't he was not on combat missions at that time, but anyway it at Magoo he had one of these things was to help with the air show every year. So from about the time I was about seven years old I was at I couldn't get enough point. Know I was out there and a garage in wonderful navy stuff and air force stuff and whatever every single year and. My family would always go out one day a year, and then I talked him into taking be with him and and I kind of go out there with him and he had set it up to where I was sitting with the pilots and going back and forth with the whether it was the blue angels or whoever needs set me up with some vendor on the flight line that I could go get lunch and I pretty much have the run of the place all weekend from the time of as eight years old. So that's what started it. I had a little Brownie camera that belonged to my mother that. You know there's actually GonNa, get a book I have coming out later this year there's a couple of those little shots still back in those days they used to they used to fire live sidewinders during an airshow and. Again today was pretty great. So how did you manage to avoid enlisting or signing up and going going top gun? You look like you could have been the top gun pilot. What happened I love that you say that Man I. Come in addition to photographic. Ask by the way I, did go in and I talked to a recruiter on more than one occasion. At the particular time I was going through I know now that I got what turned out to be a bad advice. I was told that I was too tall for fighters and I know now that that was not true I'm about six one. That's you know. So while I had sat in a t thirty eight felt a little cramped got a couple of buddies who do this professionally that are bigger guys than I did just find so. At the time I think they were looking for cargo pilots looking back on it sure the colleen and done that. But you know with my art career that had started to take off a bit and one thing leads to another I realized. I. Couldn't do both, and so I've done a lot of graphic design work in support of the military as well. So done doesn't work as a civilian contractor that way. So that's that's kind of how it ended up. You know at a God had different plans can I tell you but it's definitely the the road not taken for me.

Air Force John Thou California Frederick Point Mugu Huey Colleen Casey
Best practices for shooting with a view camera

LensWork

05:17 min | Last month

Best practices for shooting with a view camera

"Not that I want to take all of you down another trip down memory. Lane. But I wanNA talk a little bit about view cameras which was the camera of my youth talk about Gear Acquisition Syndrome I. Think all of us who were interested in pursuing fine art photography in the middle of the twentieth century automatically turned our attention to view cameras because well, that was what ansel Adams used. That was what Edward Weston us that was what all the great photographers used. Except for cardiac or sawn and some of the Magnum photographers but I think a lot of sort of. Discounted that wing of photography is not really the same thing as fine art photography they were more photo journalists and they needed the speed and flexibility of thirty five millimeter equipment and good for them. But for those of us who are interested in, say, for example, landscape photography. Of you camera was the camera of choice but let's admit that hardly anyone uses a view camera anymore and I think for probably pretty good reason they are incredibly Fussy to use lots of little controls, lots of ways to mess up lots of ways to kick things slightly out of focus you can't use them quickly they demand that you use a tripod and they're difficult to set up and it. CETERA. So there's there's slow. They require precise camera manipulations critical focusing on the ground glass. They force you to slow down that that's really think the issue we live in the age of speed and quickness and multitasking, and all the rest of that view cameras force you to slow down. But you know that can be a virtue. As a matter of fact, there may be lots of virtues to view camera and we be able to borrow some of those virtues and use them with our new Yippee skippy digital tools if we really want to. For example, there's nothing that says you have to shoot at twelve frames per second burst mode you can slowdown. Slowing down gives us the opportunity to look and think and with a view camera. In fact, you don't have a choice you have to slow down and look and think, and I think that can actually lead to better photography. And again to compare that to today's cameras where it's all about burst rates and autofocus and instant posting to your social media firehose. I'm not convinced that all of that leads to photographic virtue. At least not when it comes to. Fine Art photography, which is supposed to be about depth of feeling and understanding and being able to share something. That's a little more significant than the glance of social media which I've talked about before. So I don't want to take more time today. But I. Guess. I would some all of that up by just saying that just because the camera is manufactured to be fast Doesn't mean we have to use it. Fast. So here's a few things that I think. We can borrow today from view camera techniques that might be perfectly applicable to digital cameras and the kind of photography we do today because of the virtues of the way it changes the way we work the way we relate to the things that are before the camera, etc the first and most obvious one. is the dark cloth. When you photograph view camera, the image on the ground glass is relatively dark, and so the only way to really see it well is to use a dark cloth and you pull it over your head and you cover the camera and yourself in this dark cloth, which separates you from the world, not only physically but to some degree. Psychologically certainly visually, and you can look at the world from a very narrow perspective when you use a dark law. Now in truth I'm such a trained view camera photographer that when I bought my first digital cameras in early two thousands, I use them with the dark cloth because it was so difficult to see those little teeny tiny LCD screens on. Those early cameras and they were so dark that in the song I couldn't see them at all. So I just used my view camera dark cloth and I found it at great way to not only see the screen and make sure I was composing correctly and all that kind of stuff but the psychological aspect of putting the dark cloth over my head. was such a transition in my internal chronometers. that a I had a a a switch of psychology from looking at the world to photographing the world that had been trained into me for thirty years with a view camera and I found that was a useful tool even though I was now shooting with a digital

Ansel Adams Edward Weston
A Conversation With Rob Feakins

The Candid Frame

05:09 min | Last month

A Conversation With Rob Feakins

"First off. Welcome to the show from joining my pleasure. I. WanNa start off with your career before you photographer and filmmaker when you were into marketing and Tell me tell me about what led you into that career. Yeah. So when I was in college there were there were no ED schools or schools for for creative people there probably art center back then but I was on the East Coast and I was in English Major. When I got out of college I thought, I would probably be I wanna be documentary photographers slash journalist because I was interested in photography from high school on. As a member of the Camera Club in college, and there was a dark room back when we were dealing with film and whatnot. and. I was doing a few journalistic pieces for the Dartmouth magazine of different people and I really liked that combination photography and journalism. So I got out of college at what to do. I went down back to New Jersey Right GROWNUP and I slept on my brother's apartment, which was above a garage and I slept on a sleeping bag for close to a year on his floor and I got a job as a as a journalist for more the Morris County daily record, which is a big kind of suburban newspaper in New Jersey and I started to you know because. I was low on the totem pole was going to PTA meeting meetings on a hot July tonight being the only person in the audience. But I got a nice little piece where I used to write about the manufacturing jobs and business jobs, and I kind of tried to turn into like a human feature piece. So I would write about the world's largest ecclesiastical garment designer. Was Morris. County. So I did in article on that and then there was an article on I did on the guys who did the macy's fireworks parade were in Morris County and so back then that. Their entire sales were once a year for the July and that was kind of an interesting business article but it was tough going. You know I was again I was sleeping on my brothers floride a sixty four Volkswagen bug that was breaking down and someone said to me you know you could be a copywriter in advertising. Nice. What's that and so? They told me what it was a copywriter in advertising talk about old school this how I put my portfolio together, there was a huge stack of national geographics in the basement of his or in this garage Saab go down there I would go to the national geographics in I would clip out photographs that I thought were appropriate in right headlines to them. And taped the photographs to the bond paper in Rhode headlining copy beneath the road some campaigns and put a book together and guide offer at Ted Bates as a junior copywriter which doesn't exist anymore to base fun to backer joined back Spielvogel than they went out of business years ago. But they were a big agency back then and I thought Big was good. The United Thought you know whether baked or solid they'll. They'll be good agency and then I was there for about a year or two when I stumbled across a one show book and I saw what worked could be in advertising and I was kind of blown away. I was Kinda like, wow this tremendous work. This is really what good work is. What what did you see in that work that you weren't seeing where you were I thought the thing that struck me even back then was that the best work for me wasn't necessarily the most clever or most clever headline but it was work that made me think differently about a brand or made me think differently about what they're trying to communicate that I actually Kinda learned something from the ad or the commercial and I was totally struck by because I was in a huge package goods agency and there was no attempt on many of those accounts to make you think differently about the product versus tell you how efficacious case it was. From then on I try to do very different kind of work I got into the did get into the one show about a year or two later than I, think some the first time agency have been the one show since they could ever remember in I slowly clawed my way out of that agency to other agencies and then found my way too shy in Los Angeles around Nineteen in the mid eighties, and that was amazing to me because that was the first time I felt like I had been with a company or a group of people that were just. Everybody was everybody was just impressive. I mean the receptionist was impressive and later on became the head of our buying they just hired people regardless of position who were thought differently or incredibly intelligent. and. I loved working there I worked there for. Close to ten years of not more, and I really enjoyed there in that was. Probably, you know I think a lot of guys who go to shy day or worked at shy can look back at those years is maybe their their heyday right in any event. That's how we got into advertising

Morris County New Jersey Morris Dartmouth Magazine Macy Volkswagen East Coast PTA Camera Club Ted Bates Rhode English Major Los Angeles Spielvogel
Two New Bodies and Upgradingor Not - and more

PetaPixel Photography Podcast

05:22 min | Last month

Two New Bodies and Upgradingor Not - and more

"Now that the Sony a-7 seven s mark, three's been released I've got some thoughts about it, and if you listen to the show for a while, you know that I used to own the originally seven s a body that while pretty darn amazing was not perfect I mean we're talking five plus years ago or so my old friend Paul Giro's sonar is in somebody I've known for a long time since way back when I was in. College and he was a photo journalist in Phoenix Arizona not only gave me the push to launch this podcast. He also introduced me to the murless world without his encouragement. It might have been a few years before had serious experience with murless and if you forgotten the story or just haven't heard it, I, ordered the Sony a seven ass the a six, thousand incredible Zeiss fifty, five, millimeter, one eight, which is unbelievably sharp and Sony's Seventy Two Hundred F. Four all amount, not only that they day after they arrived I, shot the Utah State High School Football Championships with them a day. Later that was crazy I also brought my Nikon d four s with me but I don't think I even took it out once I shot the games with that tiny town little a six thousand which I still have and guess what I still got the shots I needed I have done. Significantly better with the deforest of course, but I wanted to put the Sony gear through its paces and that was definitely a good way of testing it. The A six thousand was great for action and there was light aplenty. So I S O wasn't an issue ISO also not an issue with the a seven ass where it failed of course was in shooting action though it's just not made for that. We're talking the original a seven. Ass Sony design their various lines of murless bodies to be purpose built. You know the a seven are was for resolution the a six thousand line was the gateway drugs I called it into mere less for Sony the a seven is your all around camera and the nine for action. Of course, the seven ass being for low light shooting and video or was since then they've Kinda all matured and they kind of dabble capably in each. Other's areas I like that a seven ass but I didn't love it. You know it could see in the dark and that was pretty darn amazing. But for what I was shooting at the time, it just didn't cut it. So I got rid of it. I had my defoe ass after all and later on at the D. seven fifty and then later came the as seven asked mark too which was way better. I didn't get one. Though and now finally the a seven asked mark three a body that if you're shooting in crappy lighting conditions a lot, let's say mainly, this is the body that you want. Sony. As we know has been absolutely killing it for years now. So at this point, you just can't go wrong with a Sony and that's coming from Fuji. Film. Guy If you need and that's the operative word here need full frame and DSR's are dead to. You go Sony I mean you just do if you want a pse crop, you go Fuji Film, take the savings on not having a buy full frame glass and then you just call it good and good the a seven ass is not great. Great is the word you're looking for it has a twelve megapixel backside illuminated sima sensor. Okay. That's where I probably lost something. You guys right it's still has a twelve megapixel sensor will. Yeah. The goal isn't massive resolution. It's light sensitivity. So you keep the mega pixels lower and with each iteration of these cameras, you can not only shoot in lower light. Those images are going to be less normally you're just not going to see a twenty four Megapixel, a seven S. model for at least five years or more, and honestly they could wait a decade and we'll be just fine I. think the very next one the. Mark Four, which would probably see in two to three years from now, at most is going to be sixteen Megapixel, you just wouldn't go higher than that. If you're GONNA want low light sensitivity and smooth nice noise free for the most part images you go higher in the Megapixel and all of sudden that's all mostly out the window besides who needs all. Those mega pixels when people are increasingly viewing your images and video on a smartphone or tablet rather than a computer. So there's that. Now what is new in this body is that has incredibly fast readout speeds a native ISO range of eighty on up to I s O. One hundred and two, thousand, four, hundred that's unbelievable and that's things to the new. Processor you can also capture four K. video at up to one hundred, twenty P and four K. Sixty P ten bit for to two with no pixel binning or line skipping and sixteen bit pro res- raw out the HDMI port up to four K. Sixty. P.

Sony Mark Four Paul Giro Nikon Utah State High School Phoenix Arizona Fuji Defoe
Interview With Sue Bryce

The Candid Frame

04:27 min | Last month

Interview With Sue Bryce

"Before. You came to California where you living in a New Zealander or Australia I is born and raised in New Zealand in threes and Sydney before Cava. Said kind of this kind of heat unusual or partly our regular. From. Okay. But. It seems like we've gotten acclimated because you've been down at least four years i. Usually, you down there. In annella. saw. One of your first presentations created live. That's I came on Komo raiders. Probably a lot of people did I buy? That's what two thousand twelve Goes by too quick. Oma Gone. But first off welcome to the show, it's good. It's good to have you. Ever. Wanted to talk to you for a long time. So this finally things are actually came together to finally your story is fascinating and Dive deep into that they can turn. I know that you started your your. Business out of your garage, but before that year during we touch. It's interesting to me that if that photographer for whom he will working for had been more of sort of mentor encouraged more than he did you probably will stay there. Ride. From the business for But those kind of interesting because I think there are a lot of people are in that in that place where they toil the idea. But because of water for whatever reason they never they don't make the leap until you do what you think was should holding you back from going out and trying to do it yourself. So let's be really clear. I was employed as a photographer. So the reason I said I would have never lived was simply because I didn't want to run the business like I wanted to the photographer. I didn't even care about sale managing money or people or drama, or decisions or responsibility. I just took the photos inlet. And I got paid four hundred dollars a week to do that and I built my folio and I hit this incredible job. But as I started to tuned city four, hundred dollars a week was just not getting more and might go friends at the time ten thirty or bought houses and I could not buy a house with four hundred dollars a week and I. Remember, just thinking well is not a rune for me to grow in this through TC toffee studio. I am by nature just WanNa be I would have just stayed employed, but I needed to make money. So I thought thing self-employed was the only way to do that to keep a big imagine and have more control over the work that I was getting and. That just took a long time that. I'd love to learn and the confidence realm and yeah, that took a really long time but I would never have to i. just wanted to be a photographer in to this day even though I build massive business, I, still think I just WanNa be a photographer man. Still come up. Yeah, everyday. Everyday, I think about it. It's story was that you gave a half your business to a friend who helps you by sort of doing heavy lifting the eating want to do with respect to the business end. When when that relationship ended, you went to Australia and he started again and again struggling because you are not able to you know you weren't on, you're unable to sit herself marketer yourself and press. It wasn't the MAC thing of my stop. It was the direct receiving money I had a block around being able to receive money for my craft, and that's what a hint to get through food because I keep putting people in front of me that would do the deals for me. But whenever I touched, it would go to bed because I felt so low and my values. So I started to myself value that twin at changed. Everything changed for me just the ability to tell somebody what I was with without the fear of them thinking I wasn't good enough. So that was that was a big journey from a bit out on my own.

Australia New Zealand Raiders Komo California Sydney Photos Inlet Cava
But Is It Real

LensWork

05:46 min | Last month

But Is It Real

"I've been working this last week with Lens Work Alumnus Jack Curran because he and I are teaching workshop this weekend as part of the out of Chicago in depth virtual seminars that are happening this weekend and in preparation for that workshop, I've been spending a lot of time working with Jack Looking at his work and in particular looking at a lot of the before and after images, what the camera captured versus what he made in Photoshop Light Room in order to create a little bit of artwork from sometimes a pretty bland camera capture and that has me thinking about photography's tenuous relationship with the truth and what we do that is to say the power of what we can do with software. I I came into this idea about photography's tenuous relationship with truth when I visited. Yosemite for the first time in the early nineteen eighties to attend a workshop. Of course, before I had absorbed everything that ansel Adams did in terms of Yosemite and I. I was so inspired by the Yosemite that he presented his photographs and books that I. Thought this is this is fantastic. Going to be a wonderful opportunity to go see the place for myself. But I have to say that when I arrived in Yosemite what I experienced standing there looking at half dome and El Capitan and a Cetera was not at all what I had seen in ansel Adams photographs and I realize that he had made something in his artwork. That was not real in the sense that if you were standing there next to ansel Adams and looking at what it was that he photographed, and then comparing that to his eventual photographic artwork, you would realize how much difference he had created through the craft of photography and the aesthetic choices that he made when he was processing his film and his prints. And I became aware that there is different kinds of. Photographic truth I guess is the way I would call it. My first reaction was to be a little disappointed because. I thought I was going to see something spectacular that only exists in a photograph and so I kind of felt like had been a little bit hoodwinked. But. The more deeply I thought about this in the subsequent decades the more I've come to realize that there are different kinds of truth and one kind of truth might be what I characterize as the physical truth or maybe more accurately the camera truth. That is to say what the camera sees is one thing and that's one kind of truth. And that's the kind of truth that we really insist on in documentary photography and in evidentiary photography and those kinds of things. But rarely do we see that as part of fine art photography? The great challenge that all of us fine art photographers have is not to merely make a copy of what the world looks like or even to accept what the camera tells us and the film. Tells us that the world looks like. But rather work we're interested in different kind of truth. And generally speaking I use in my own way of thinking anyway, the term emotional peak that that's what we're looking for is some kind of emotional peak. We don't want to have every day life presented to us because we can see that for ourselves every single day, what we is something that's a more extraordinary experience we want an emotional peak. So we want think of ansel Adams in Yosemite. Again, we want that high contrast, absolutely spectacular cloud moment of unique and wonderful weather with everything sort of. Dolled up for the artwork. Of course, there are photographers who want just exactly the opposite of that. Think of Lee freelander and Louis Baltin some of that end of the scale of fine art photography but in terms of the more publicly acceptable. Ansel. Adams Edward Weston, those kind of people. That kind of photography is more geared towards some sort of emotional peak. And generally speaking that's achieved by. Pushing everything a little harder than it really is. When the camera captures it that is to say, it's generally we're gonNA push the contrast a little bit we're going to. Increase the. Vibrancy of the collars so that they're more read those fall leaves than they really appear in real life. So it's kind of a hyper reality if you will. And the purpose of that kind of hyper reality. Is I think to. Prompt in us, an emotional response that. Probably. Well. Biologists and physicians and whatnot could explain this better. But I think it has something to do with the release of endorphins and all those feel good hormones that we have in our human system that give us a little jolt of excitement and hyper reality in terms of experiencing

Ansel Adams Yosemite Jack Looking Jack Curran Edward Weston Chicago Lee Freelander Louis Baltin
Conversation With Cheryl Walsh

PhotoBiz Xposed

06:34 min | Last month

Conversation With Cheryl Walsh

"We're going to jump into this interview with Cheryl Wash in just a second, if you are hearing this announcement doesn't mean you are listening to the free version of the podcast that means you won't be here in the full interview today was show. So if you want to hear more printing in house had generate siles from your fine art photography had a mock it. You'll find out photography and find buyers for your work. If you want to hear more bet all of that grab a pre-membership, he can trial it for thirty days for one dollar of red photo basics. Dot Com Ford Slash Tri. Photocopies X DOT COM slash try sign up, get full access to the interview with. Today plus get access to the full back catalogue and everything else that goes along with premium membership. Hopefully, I'll see you in this soon. Isis it's time for Andrew. Special guest. The time fine art photographer gets thrown around a lot in our industry. In some cases, it feels like the photographer is purely looking for liable to place on their work that files to successfully deliver an idea message on emotion. Today's guest is a portrait and underwater fine art photographer and she does not fall into that category. Her photography has a dream like appearance featuring floating goddesses that appear to be more like masterful paintings than photographic. She says, I shoot dramatic underwater portrait's that are reflective of overcoming troubles in my life. She only photographs in our pool and she maintains full control over her work by doing all the printing herself. Time was divided between high school, senior photography and fine out underwater and portrait photography. But now it's one hundred percent underwater photography and she's earned way too many awards to list here that include to mention just a few international portrait image of the year winner of the coveted wpri Grand Award two thousand and sixteen triple massive distinction from WPI. I'm talking about, Cheryl? And I'm rat to have a he with his now Cheryl. Welcome. Thank you so much. It's my pleasure when you hear about Y- I, guess you photography business does it surprise you that you are where you are now? Oh, absolutely. Yes. Yeah. I'm a middle aged mom with a minivan. and. That's Kinda how I think of myself. The rest is sort of all been you know fill in the time. A to get the sense on I'm not sure these dotted at photographing seniors and then failing to the underwater photography at the white went. Yeah. Yeah. I started out like a lot of photographers do knowing I wanted to you know to make a living with my camera tried a lot of different things tried weddings and babies families, and and very quickly discovered that my passion was for these seventeen. Year olds who were not quite adults yet but not children either, and that's the only time in their whole life. They get to be in that kind of inbetween place and I just loved working with them and capturing them who they were not based on Taga Fi trends but really truly an editorial style who they were and I absolutely love doing not. So that's where I put my focus. And in the process of that I sort of fell into trying underwater photography with a senior with her prom dress on and the very first time I. Did it. I realized that this was going to become a problem. I really liked it a lot and Kinda got hooked. Yeah. So. How different was that I image will those first images compared to what you're creating did I I would say like night and day but night and day are both times of the day. So they have something in common. No my work when I first started looks absolutely nothing like what I'm doing. Now it's certainly evolved completely you know I from a technical standpoint and then from an artistic standpoint, I have a pretty clear voice in my work. Now that I had no idea I was even going to want to have from the beginning. I said in the intro there and I read I. Think it was in you'll bile summer online. That's you looking to overcome troubles in your life. What kind of troubles are you trying to escape for a more to hide or to mask? Well at one point, I was very heartbroken and you know kind of depressed about that and I couldn't seem to make that feeling go away. And I certainly didn't want anybody else feeling that way. So I thought, you know the feeling isn't going away I might as well move forward with my life and just do what I can. So the least I can do is create artwork that brings a sense of calmness and peacefulness to the world. So that's where my focus was I didn't want anyone else to feel bad. So why make depressing work? So I may stuff that sort of light and escapism. Just to give people a few minutes to sort of escape from the world and get lost in something. Beautiful. Like that. Do. You feel like you're doing that when you In images that Ukraine today. Actually, you know I got through the last like four years or so I really worked through that situation and And really happy now and very fulfilled and find sometimes it's harder to make artwork when unhappy and distracted with other aspects of my life. Yeah. So have you actually noticed a difference in your photography now that you're actually feeling happier I do yeah I really do a lot of its storytelling has most all of my images are based on stories and just the stories themselves have changed. So the focus of what I'm doing has changed and now I'm working on a project that isn't even based on on a story that revolves around me in my life. It's sort of a whole separate set of photographs and I'm excited about that. I'm excited about doing something that's different. So

Cheryl Wash Taga Fi Grand Award Ukraine Andrew
Wildlife Photographer Moose Peterson Discusses Maintaining Passion and Focus

Photofocus Podcast

03:53 min | Last month

Wildlife Photographer Moose Peterson Discusses Maintaining Passion and Focus

"When you and I started techniques merit it was based on this idea we had we wanted to go beyond the skills that it takes to run a business or captured image. So today's guest is the epitome of the kind of information we hoped we'd be able to share with our listeners Moose Peterson is in the house he's a photographer. Educator producer but most important of all at least to me, he's a fighter to protect our wildlife heritage and there's a line from his mission statement on his website that I wanna read quote the goal of our work is to preserve our wild heritage in reaching this goal, we worked towards educating the public as well as other photographers close quote. And that's what I love about Mussa's work. Here's another aspect today's interview. It's kind of fun Moose and I share a lot of mutual friends, but we had never met until photoshop world year or so ago now finally meeting and talking at the show is another example why I always remind all of you attended many conferences as you can and it doesn't matter whether they're live or online. The point is that every time you go to a Reference you build your network. A little bit and you expand. So we're GONNA talk about how Moose uses his skills as an artist to educate and a light and photographers in the public into one of our greatest assets protecting the wildlife us. So most this is going to be the cue for your lips to move welcome to beyond technique. Let me tell you I was having a hard time not cutting in during the intruder to mention a few quips but thanks for having me here. Very much. I appreciate it well, feel free to quit away after a post interview. Lanao that I've got permission to move my lips believe me I will. Deal. Thrilled to have you I mean you talk about a photographer on a mission? Your work is stunning. What you stand for is is so awesome and we're just so pumped to have you on the show and we want to kick it off with our favorite first question tell us about your background and how you develop your passion for photography you got where you are today. While you know. Especially the. Is. Hard for people to. But I my being wear 'em today is. The greatest chain of happy serendipity that you can imagine. It wasn't like one day I said I'm going to be a photographer and that's what I set out to do. It was I was very fortunate to have parents who took me out. I was I did spend time. I it's been eight time inside which is why four walls and I never get along I. St- was in the Sierra as a kid, my dad and I would do five hundred miles a year backpacking. And it was. It was just the cavalcade of things. My sister are very gifted commercial artists. So I learned color stuff from her my dad was. Really, was you know into light? So the home was lit. Solo things just part of. Growing up and then. When I was. Just about third grade nine years old or so ten years old. My cousin a real brilliant guy. Just got his Nikon F and a two, hundred, four and he. PUT IT in my hands well, it just everything just kept going from there. And I wish I could take credit for the whole thing. But I can't it was just the way life unfolded. And I'm very fortunate and blessed because it. It keeps doing that for me even today.

Moose Peterson Mussa Producer Nikon Photoshop
Out of Chicago  IN-DEPTH!

This Week in Photo

05:46 min | Last month

Out of Chicago IN-DEPTH!

"Able to the back to another episode of this week in photo. I. Am your host Frederik van Johnson today. I'm sitting down with my friend and fellow Chicagoan Mr Chris Smith Chris and I. Talk about the latest out of Chicago Conference and how that win is pivot virtual all that stuff, and then how how he's planning to move forward in the future amidst this whole sort of sea change in the conference space. Chris. Math. Welcome to the show man how you doing. I'm great. Thank you Frederick great to be here. Thank you very much. Is Good to have you on man I'm excited to chat with you for a lot of reasons, some of which will become clear during this conversation but Yeah, that's a cliffhanger. So. Say to chat with you so. For the folks that may not have heard of out of Chicago the conference, what is out of Chicago give us the quick. Elevator Pitch Origin Story of that conference. Sure. So out of Chicago originally was my blog like I think has been like eleven or twelve years now but eventually, we started doing conferences in Chicago. This would have been the seventh annual get together conference downtown Chicago where was this eighth year I don't know but but that was what we did for a long time and then. You know we've. Seen over the years that coming in person all the way to Chicago because people would come from around the country around the world to it that we found that it's better to go. To the destinations where people want to shoot. So we've started now our conferences are around the country we're going to MOAB and Acadia National Park this year and Death Valley next year. So all sorts of different places and really have gotten a little bit away from doing the downtown out of Chicago Conference. But this year we did it online instead and it was fabulous and basically the response we got from everybody was don't go back to how you did it before this is awesome that we can do it. In our pajamas from home, and then you know just just get to see all the general things because because originally the conference was kind of all different. Genres I mean you've been an instructor in the past and we would have portrait people Lindsay Adler, we would have people you know doing landscape we had kind of everything lots of street photography, and now instead it's like, okay, we're GonNa go to the botanic. Garden. And we're just GONNA do flower and garden photography or we're going to like I said, Acadia National Park and when we're doing. Landscapes in creative nature photography. So so that's kind of how we've changed. But yeah, everything's totally different for everyone now right. So yeah. So everything's really changed the last couple of months. Yeah, and it's sort of it's a I. think that change was coming anyway you and I've had offline conversations sort about the state of the of the photo conference in Education Online Education Industry and how that's converging and The old school conferences are the attendance was going to getting lower and lower, and now after this latest adventure with co vid Can't conferences are getting getting canceled and moving online much like yours did yours was able to pivot a lot easier than some of those bigger conferences in my from my external opinion. And you correct me if I'm wrong largely because you'd already built sort of this next generation conference that wasn't, Hey, come check out these massive array of boats that that people spend gazillions of dollars on. Downstairs go to the education. You're kind of flip that on its head. Can you talk about that a little bit sure. So I mean when we decided to run our first photography conference, we were running it and I had never been to a photography conference before I'm like, I don't know what would you do it a photography conference well, you'd go out and shoot. You'd get to hang out. With the you know all these people that you follow online, it's like a really great networking opportunity and yeah, we'll teach them classes too but it was really different especially like a set like eight years ago most places like you come you watch one lecture then stay in watch another lecturer then watch more and go home or whatever, and then go to the trade show or whatever. So What we built was really based around shooting, and so we did a lot of the street photography and the downtown architecture photography in Chicago but. But by switching it that way, it made it a whole lot easier to go virtual. Well, that's kind of ironic because we're doing the shooting but it we didn't have this huge big infrastructure behind. We're just a very small company. I have a few people to help me run it and they're awesome by the way and. Is. A great team that I have and and we were able to it was unbelievable when this all hit and we didn't cancel another conference. We weren't planning on doing this normal out of Chicago conference. We were going to do something that was just architecture. which we weren't able to do of course but. But instead. We said. We've got all these instructors. We had seventy instructors at the thing I said I've got a list of. All these people we could email them immediately, we can ask, Hey, do you WanNa do this while in the best part of it was that they were all stuck at home and so they're like, yeah, I got nothing better to do. So all these years. Yeah. All were like excited about it and I mean it was really it was really meant as something that we wanted to do. But it was also a benefit foot benefit for our instructors who had to cancel all of their workshops I mean, that's I mean that's their livelihood is going around the world teaching, and so we did this instead to help you know cover some of those costs for them that they that they're

Chicago Acadia National Park Chicagoan Mr Chris Smith Frederik Van Johnson Instructor Education Online Education Ind Lindsay Adler Frederick Death Valley Lecturer
5 Ways to Spice Up Your Pix Life

The Digital Story

05:43 min | Last month

5 Ways to Spice Up Your Pix Life

"Much has been written about the evils of your Acquisition Syndrome often referred to as gas. And the US. It is a real thing for many photographers. But my personal view of this election is isolated more to spending big bucks on cameras and lenses. What about those smaller purchases that bring us true joy and energize our enthusiasm for photography. I'll make my anti gas case on today's tedious podcast I. Hope You enjoy the show. I don't know if you've ever done this but I'm going to admit you right now. That I have okay. Now fortunately is just you and me so you know no one else will. No I've never I've never admitted this anywhere else before. And this is the truth I'm telling you the truth right now. So but just from my mouth to your ears right now have you ever Set. A new camera or an accessory for it. On. The table in front of you while you worked watch TV listen to music you know just. said it there It wasn't in use. There was no particular reason to do this. Other than you just wanted to look at it and admire it's beauty. I've done that. Honestly, I. I have done that more than once. To cases that come to mind right now, the first one is the Olympus pen. F. In its handsome leather half case Oh. My Gosh. What a beauty So pretty. The other one is the Fujifilm x one hundred V with its aluminum grip? Yeah. That's pretty two different cameras you know the my pen F is a silver Penev. Got Some really beautiful silver lenses and I get this brown leather half case with a matching rhys strap. Really Nice and then my ex one hundred V is the all black model which I really liked for the Fuji Film. And it has this aircraft aluminum grip really really pretty. Really Nice. And when I look at these things sitting on the table in front of me. While I'm watching TV, while I'm listening to music while I'm browsing the web doing whatever the heck. I do at ten o'clock at night. It makes me WANNA go out and take pictures you know I go i. Can't wait to get that camera my hands and go do something. And that's the idea that's the idea and especially right now that's the idea. To be excited to have enthusiasm to you know want to go do something that you actually can do pick up your camera and go take pictures when we're a bit stale feeling that stale how can we spark this kind of joy? Without digging our credit cards for a fifteen hundred dollar charge in my trick as you've already figured out has been through new accessories and techniques, and you may be surprised to know that I have five of these. To share with you this week. Okay. So let's let's get started on these little things. This is my anti-gas list. Okay. Because they don't qualify they don't call not one of these qualify. For Gear Acquisition Syndrome and you can argue that with me but I'm not going to yield on this on already. Here we got and I'm GonNa fool with you on the first one the first one's. GonNa. Mess with you right out of the shoot. The first one is a new Lens. Coin what you just said, right a new lens but a vintage one. Yes. So it's only new to you is been around for a long time. Yes. You could spend twelve hundred dollars on a new state of the art optic no problem. You can spend more than that if you wanted. But scoring of vintage beauty for one hundred dollars or less. Can Be just as satisfying in evokes a far less guilt. In the images that this glass producers can truly inspiring because it seems like each lens that you find on Ebay or craigslist or Oetzi or your local camera shop each vintage lens that you find has a different feel to it and. Go. Wow. This is really Kinda neat and sometimes in the world of digital optics everything sort of produces the same super magnificent results right which is great. Until you know a thousand frame of the same super magnificent result and he got I really would like to see something different. A new vintage lens can do that. And since most of US shoot murless or have a meritless camera, they adapt these lenses adapt. So well, meritless cameras. It's not even funny. You can get an adapter for like fifteen bucks at works. Great. You have this manual Focus Lens you take some pictures with it. You're going. Wow, this is really interesting. This looks different. It's different operating is different looking through the electronic viewfinder with it's just different the way around and it can be very motivating very inspiring. It can push you to photograph things that you might bypass otherwise just because turn out interesting with this particular Lens.

United States Fujifilm Rhys Craigslist Oetzi
Interview With Polly Irungu

The Candid Frame

05:29 min | Last month

Interview With Polly Irungu

"I WANNA start off just talking about your beginnings you immigrated with your family from Nigeria. So right? From Kenya Kenya. Oh my politics. Wermer my head but. Everywhere that is for sure. Everywhere. From Kenya. Yes. Alright. But yeah, you're just four years old and he moved to Kansas Yes sir why Kansas you know still don't. Know My dad had family host family set up. You know before he came to the states. That help to get situated in everything bat began groping, Kansas. which granted at Mike all the fifty states but you know for me at least I was able to grow up in a pretty diverse community I grew up in a very additional Kenyan upbringing dishes. I know how to cook are related to. Kenyan So you know there's that you know for me it's like okay spent Kansas. But then there's like my mom's oldest twelve. So we have relatives in like Missouri. CHICAGO. Spread out across the Midwest also an west coast, and then in Canada's I was able to. have. All that in my upbringing I was against which was nice. I grew up in Los Angeles and my parents. Republic. So There were Dominicans here, but they were all over the place. It wasn't like. In Miami or New York where you have a real concentration. A. I was really aware of my otherness because I would mean people would look at me and assume that I was just I was African American and Latino expect me to speak Spanish and they will look the they always just what like Way Right women was at a similar experience for you. You know honestly it's been easy for me. Yeah. Because you know as later as I got older when I was still in Kansas and I hung out like other Africa. It never felt like African enough. But some points because. Came when I was like four when I came actually had half a speech tutor. English until maybe I think six was really hard. I had I like combined English in. So Healy in Koo are tribal language into one language only my mom and my sister could understand. For for for so long when I was when I was young, I was like a baby like literally only understood tutor in all of that and so you know eventually when I am older, I'm in my middle school in the my first year of high school really like a middle school year is when I was hanging out with other Africans is like they all knew me in I? Did it felt out of place and then also you know what I did have like my outside of Africa is like my other friends in other fronts in general that are Americans that I must like. There's a lot of cultural like things that I didn't understand until much. Later a lot of just you know, for TV shows that music to the food like a lot of things I wasn't exposed to unless I saw that on my own centuries by friends who introduced me to that because my parents did though it was weird at times for more so I guess when I went to Oregon. Last. A little different. You know like 'cause I joined like what is what I could tell this later Fast forward into like when I actually dmed Undergrad University of Oregon a PWI and I was part of be issue in Asa African Student Association club. But like a lot of the BS you is like I didn't know about the movie, Friday. I didn't know about all these different staples that I I should have. No you know just different cultural things like that I also later. Caught. Up On between then I was. Doing. Good realized. Parts of you know American culture black culture. You know like that was missing out on because of my up gate. So. This is by Felicia you go. To. You find that now considering what you do that otherness is sort of an advantage. Actually I think. So because you know for me, I find that I can adapt to any community I've lived in Kansas I loved Oregon. In Arkansas I lifted a Virginia. The DMV area. Being exposed to all those places? Right. There are different communities now Brooklyn, which is huge right and so for me, I, feel like I could really be able to like talk to anyone and everyone and with the community that I'm building black people are not a monolith right? So all of them are so different in their own way a lot of them have different UPBRINGINGS and perspectives. The next person right next to them don't have. So for me, I'm learning from them. Think they're learning from each other. You know it's still early but I see that I see how we're also different. We're all tied to like similar experience.

Kansas Kenya Africa Oregon Nigeria Mike Midwest Los Angeles Missouri Chicago Undergrad University Of Oregon Asa African Student Associatio Canada Brooklyn Kansas. Healy DMV Miami New York KOO
Travel Photography in the Age of Modern Travel

LensWork

05:44 min | Last month

Travel Photography in the Age of Modern Travel

"I. WanNa spend just a few moments talking about travel photography. passably because a lot of you are traveling right now although with Covid, maybe you're not traveling so much but we will travel again and lot of you enjoy travel photography and it's a big topic and so I kind of like I WANNA put my two cents into the thoughts about travel photography because I have a little different perspective on the potential for travel photography what we can do as photographers when we travel and how we can make something that will be of interest other people. Of course, some of you may remember a very old comedy routine by. A long forgotten comedian named Jackie Vernon that I thought was hilarious called the slide show in which he? Basically bores people to death with the slides of his. Vacation travel that that's kind of a cliche about what happens with a lot of people in vacation pictures. and. I think to some degree like all comedy I suppose this routine is founded in a little bit of truth because vacation pictures can be. Boring but they don't need to be. The problem with vacation photography is that in my opinion anyway I think a lot of photographers think it's about the location. And the idea being this is sort of the underlying principle that I'm going to travel somewhere that you don't or that you can't and I'm going to make pictures of that exotic location. I'm going to bring them back so that you can have the vicarious experience of traveling to that exotic location by looking at my pictures. And I suppose in the history of photography, there was a time when that's exactly what travel photography was. I remember a really terrific friends of photography publication part of their untitled series. That featured the work of Samuel born. A nineteenth century photographer who had traveled to India and or was it Egypt. Now I can't remember. That I want to tell you but one of the two year traveled to an exotic location I think it was India and made these wonderful photographs historic in their nature because they today take us back in time as well as to an exotic location that sort of the quintessential travel photography project I will take you somewhere either physically or in time that you can't go and I'm going to show you what this place looks like because it's so interesting because it's so inspiring because it's so exotic, etc.. Okay that's fine but we don't live in that age anymore where Samuel born or think of William Henry Jackson. Incredible Difficulties they had in travelling to those exotic locations in doing wet plate photography and it was incredibly difficult for them to go and so when we see they're photographs, we really do have a unique experience that most people at that time could not have could not go any of they could. They certainly couldn't take pictures because of the complexity of the photographic process but fast forward to today. Today we can jump on a jet. We can go almost anywhere in the world. You can literally be anywhere on the planet probably within twenty four to forty eight hours from leaving your house right now, and once you get there, you'll probably find there's some sort of comfortable accommodations. Might be a bit exotic food might be a bit exotic but basically, for most locations on the planet, you're not going to have to take your life into your hands. There's no risk you won't come back because the travel is so dangerous think about all those photographers running off to Antarctica or to Iceland there no physical risk of losing their lives in pursuit of the fine art photography, they're doing with their travel photography in these really exotic locations. They travel on reasonably comfortable boats with reasonably comfortable rooms they take their laptops, they upload their images to light room at the end of every day they're probably eating reasonable food. This is travel photography today that is a different thing. Than William Henry Jackson or Samuel born had to endure in the nineteenth century. So if we play out that same scenario today that. That those nineteenth century photographers used. Are. We really doing the same thing or is it sort of kidding ourselves? What we're doing is something really adventuresome. It's not as adventuresome as it might seem might be adventuresome to us because we've never traveled there but to photograph and bring back those photographs and show them the exotic natives who live there or the exotic landscape that there is there is simply not as impactful as we might guess. Not that it's boring but it's not the same kind of thing that it used to be in history I. Guess That's what I'm trying

Samuel William Henry Jackson India Covid Jackie Vernon Iceland Egypt
Diversity in Photography

This Week in Photo

05:51 min | Last month

Diversity in Photography

"Welcome back to another episode I'm your host Frederik van Johnson. Today I'm talking with my friend Karen Sacks. We're GONNA be talking about her new accidents, not even that new, but it's a it's a service that you may not have heard about its. Services a good name for Karen can explain what what the loop is all about, but it is a, it's something. Like this carrying you can tell me if I'm wrong, it is something that is serving a niche that is severely under served right now, and she's at the right place at the right time with the right product cares acts welcome to the show how's it going and it's going great. Thank you so much for having me and great description of of what we're building at the loop. WAS THAT AMORPHOUS? You it was. It was why don't I? Can. Go a little bit deeper and. What we like to say is that we're building a platform that is connecting the world's best diverse photographers, commercial professional photographers with brands around the world to make great work we want to help brands get content. Simply we WANNA simplify that process and we want to help photographers especially underrepresented diverse photographers get work. So we're bringing those two together our platform, the loop. Wonderful. That sounds like you you practice for. Maybe once or twice. Saying that a lot lately. To, the elevator with with. Man. Musk at your kitchen, you know. Right, exactly that's my elevator patch. Has Perfect Elevator pitch. Okay. So let's let's rewind I wanNA dive into the loop and kind of understand you know at a at a DNA level what it is you built and are building. But let's let's understand who cares. Sachs's I swear what's your? What's your pedigree that brought you from A to B. Sarah? No problem. So I have been in the industry for close. To twenty years, it sounds a little crazy to say that twenty years But that's how long it's been. I started my career at National Geographic I actually backing up a little bit started taking photography classes in high school like many photographers they always put in there about me section on their website that somebody gave them a camera when they're fifteen or sixteen years old. Similar similar for me I started taking classes. Photography classes in high school fell in love with it decided I wanted to major in photography. I went to the University of Michigan where I studied photography. I have a BFA photography I also have. A degree in American culture. So I did it be in American culture I felt like I needed both of those to take me where I wanted to go in my career yet I didn't know where I wanted to go in my career. I had this idea that I wanted to be at national geographic like many photographers many young aspiring photographers who wanted to go to national. Geographic I had my heart set on it. I. Didn't know what that would look like for me. I didn't know how I would get there. I didn't know what I would do there but I. Knew I. needed a career in photography and I wanted to start there and that's what I did when I graduated from the University of Michigan in August the following summer at the end of the summer I, moved to Washington DC and I started a job at National Geographic Kids magazine as a photo assistant and worked my way up to a photo editor. I. Was there for four years. It was an unbelievable experience I would ride in the elevator speaking of elevators I would ride in elevators with photographers whose work had been studying in school and I would be so nervous. I often wouldn't know what to say to them. That it was they were my heroes, my superstars they were who I wanted to be around into study their work and to know their images and I loved taking my film to get dropped off at the at the film lab at National Geographic. How cool that there was a film lab there and yes, we are still shooting film in those days. And I would be you know right next to Steve McCurry are Jodi COBB and that to me was the coolest thing. So I was there for four years and over that time I, realized that my place was not behind the camera was not being a photographer it was working with photographers. So I started to get a glimpse of really what I wanted to be doing and with each move I made in long career I got closer and closer to what it is that I wanted to be doing. So after I left geographic, I moved up to New York and I started freelancing for the Wall Street Journal. Started meeting a lot of photographers being in studios with them kind of understanding how they operated, how they worked, how they got jobs, and from there where did I go Martha Stewart Martha Stewart living in I was a director photographer on the merchandise side at Martha unbelievable experience I felt like I was working with the best of the best actually where I met my husband and I worked on all of her different product lines overseeing the photography for the product lines working with Martha on a couple of. Shoots, which was an incredible experience and I also after I left there. I went to a place called Archive. I skipped one I was at Corbis for a little bit Corbis, which is now part of getty images in the stock photography world. So I was getting glimpses of different aspects of the photo industry starting with editorial moving into commercial with Martha's products moving into stock photography. At Trunk Archive, I worked with high end photographers, Boutique photo, agency So so I kept kind of building I. Think these are all building blocks. And then more recently, I was at shutter sock for five years. So that's when I really understood what it meant to build products and to work for a company in the photo space. And then that has led me to the loop,

Martha Stewart Martha Stewart University Of Michigan Karen Sacks Frederik Van Johnson National Geographic Corbis National Geographic Kids Trunk Archive Sachs Steve Mccurry Sarah New York Wall Street Journal Washington Editor Jodi Cobb Director
UFOs Are Key

Photography Tips From the Top Floor

04:51 min | Last month

UFOs Are Key

"So. The reason that it's been another several weeks for this episode to come out is that My my mind is occupied with a lot of things and the things I talk about here on the show. You know I'm. A one those things to matter to you. And as I'M As a not out and about that much right now, like we most of us are. Ages takes a bit longer for something to come along that matters. That matters to me and I matters to you. So I came across this topic of UFO's. To you because they do matter to me now I'm of course, I'm not talking about flying saucers. which might exist but I guess they're rarely in them know that you said I'm talking about our socks. scarfs. Or sweaters. Okay. Hear you being puzzled ufo is a term that I learned from come and it's a term from knitting. And it stands for unfinished objects. And it's something that every nigger will. Now you start a pair of socks and you run out of patience or. Out of time or out of inspiration for whatever reason, you end up putting it to the side. And you might start a new project. You have just. Created. A UFO an unfinished object. And sitting there. And maybe a few weeks or months or years later, you get back to it. And you continue where he left off or you abandon it, that's always a possibility. and. The thing that matters in the context of this episode is that I realize more and more how these strange times are shaping the future. And not just in a bad way I mean. Where masks we'll protect others and it will help you can help protect you. Our Future is changing right now big time. So a virus comes around and everything changes change changes. For. Many of us. Changes. Discomfort. And Discomfort can make us curl up in a corner. or it can make us change something ourselves. Maybe. The way we react or maybe the way we think and. Out of this change in this discomfort. For me came this whole shift to the production side of things. You looking possibly looking at the video version of this right. Now, this has really been a dramatic change at the the necessity has accelerated the change in a way that. Yeah I've I've not experienced that often in the past. and. I want to give you another example of that up again, another project if talked about in the past. And that's the project started. After mid March and that's pick one photo. Which is where we're talk with photographer is about to photos and we discuss photos and it's free and it's pick one photo dot com. I look and just out of luck and release that first video episode. On May, the second twenty twenty. And I think for me that kind of marks a turning point. It's almost exactly six weeks after everything came down after by workshop and my travel business evaporated and. I finally realized that it needed to do something, but you know the truth is. That project was already there pick one photo was a year old at that point I had the website ready. The concept. Even, online already you you could give could have gone at Christmas time. You could have gone to pick one dot com. You would have found the almost exact same website that you find today minus all the videos on it. Had you known the address you could have found it in May. One, thousand, nine, thousand, nine, hundred. And told anyone about it because. Because the only thing that was missing was. Content, the scaffolding was. I've already put work into that. Even. The photos were already there the selection of photos. Those are I have put any new photos up there. If if you look those those photos are from May Twenty nineteen and before there's no current photos on there. And then. And then that's when I set up the first bunch of video recordings. When Kobe hit. Not right away but. Fairly soon and yeah that felt really good.

UFO Kobe