Leadership

What makes a good leader? What are the skills, qualities and basic characteristics individuals need to organize, co-ordinate and manage a team's path to success? Listen up for essential info, testimonies, research and theories on the business of management, aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

How I Built Resilience: John Zimmer of Lyft

How I Built This

05:24 min | 3 d ago

How I Built Resilience: John Zimmer of Lyft

"We I spoke with John back in two thousand seventeen but now fast forward a few years and like most of us John is dealing with challenges he never anticipated. But when we spoke a few days ago, he sounded pretty optimistic. Personally, I'm doing okay I. Think you know the business has had a tough time but has seen some really strong recovery since the bottom? We were down about seventy five percent at the peak. In terms of rideshare rides, we now return to little. Half. down. which is actually good progress. We've always been a very long term minded company. We've had hard times before we've always been the challenger brand, and so actually I think moments like this are opportunities for us in our team to shine and so happy to share some of that with you. Yeah I WANNA I wanNA talk about that. Let's let's first talk about like kind of drill down to some of the challenges i. There's no question that this has to be the most challenging time in your you know in your leadership of lift I think it's the most challenging time for any business leader founder around the world today for variety of reasons and as you mentioned, it's been a tough year four left to have some layoffs in May I think about thousand. Layoffs which could not have been easy for you to go through. So as you began to see the pandemic having a significant impact on on your business, what kinds of conversations were you having with your your leadership team with your co founder Logan about ways to kind of begin to to build resilience? What are the conversations that we've had or one of the challenges throughout is how many different audiences groups of people that were working to take care of throughout this right so we have our drivers, we have our riders, we have our employees. With an employee's, there's those that are working in person to help drivers at Parisian centers and there are those that could work from home. So all different populations that we want to take care of. Investors as well who who are judging those decisions we make. So I think that's been a really interesting conversation also the conversations around short term thinking versus long term thinking there are short term decisions we need to make in order to preserve the long term mission that we have as a company. In. Those have been really key decisions. You talked about the dot was very, very difficult. It forced us to make hard decisions some of which I think actually. In hindsight were very healthy for the business but very difficult to make especially for people that are all in this tough time where where the market is difficult those were not easy decisions. Let's talk about some of the short term decisions that you had to take. I mean you are publicly traded company So you're obviously countable to investors and it's everything's on the table you have to review can't hide anything first of all, just to keep the business operating and to. Get. You through this time because this is going to be a challenging year and maybe a recovery next year for you we'll talk about that a moment but you knew this was going to be a tough year. So was one of those decisions to retain as much cash on hand was that one of the initial decisions that you had to take? Yeah obviously. So we look at the cash that we have on hand. We also raised our first debt to add cushion. Quite, a strong position where lucky that we went public when we did. Have a you know near nearly three billion dollars in the bank. What we did to start as we ran all different scenarios we said Okay if we were seventy five percent down for six months or two quarters, you know what would the situation be like for cash if we were down, you know for four quarters what would it be like for cash? We ran the the worst case scenarios, the medium case scenarios and the best case scenarios, and then made the decision that you know raising the debt was kind of a no regrets move but then also to your point preserving the cash that we do have on hand. Making decisions about expenses that we had in the office that were more of a luxury making decisions around certain teams. That we needed to tighten up for example, on on the operating side there were some markets where we had to close some of our centers. What are you finding out from users like why what is what is it? That is preventing them from using lift? Is it basically that they just don't have anywhere to go or is it? Is it the fear of being car with somebody else? It's a mix of both you know. I I think it's people changing their transportation behavior, their actual transportation behavior, and then secondarily It's obviously the questions around health safety and I'd love to walk through what we're doing on on that end as open. The APP we ask both driver and rider to confirm that they're wearing a mask. We ask driving rider confirmed that they haven't been in contact with anyone has covert, and we ask everyone to keep their areas clean and open. Windows if possible. So that's gone a long way. If you zoom out actually the fact that half as many rides are being taken now as before I'm actually quite happy within a strange way because I know many people that are they're not going into the office that's a huge change in transportation. So the fact that one out of two rides are still present even in this environment show some flexibility in the model because we've seen different. Types of rides we've seen a lot of essential workers using this way more because there are other options. Potentially public transportation are things that they're more concerned about from a health safety perspective,

John Founder Co Founder Logan
Vic Martinez on what he learned as a leader at Disney

Hacking Your Leadership

02:50 min | 5 d ago

Vic Martinez on what he learned as a leader at Disney

"Names Vic Martinez and you're listening to the hacking you leadership podcast guests series the most impactful leader mentor my life would have to be Mike Myers. A reported up to him in some way during my career Walt Disneyworld and he was always a shining example of what a true leader should be by just watching him and spending time with him. I learned that people should be taken care of instead of managed he taught me how to build effective teams and how to leverage people, skills and passions to get the best work out of them and best of all, he taught me how to own my mistakes and keep moving forward instead of dwelling on them. The first mistake meat is a leader of people might have been dermot first year as a Disney leader at. Disney. Most customers want to grow with the company and I assume that this personnel at down did as well long story short. I was trying to help them get out of their shell grow and apply to be a trainer. What I didn't do is get to know them better I or I. Would have learned that they didn't really want to be a trainer or teach people. They were perfectly happy as Kenny art is making caramel apples all day and anyone more responsibility in. Now focus on building relationships and really getting to know the person and more importantly their needs before I offer up any advice or offer help and career development. The difference between a good leader and a great leader simple. They care and they backup that care what action. I've been fortunate enough to be raised by amazing leaders I mean I was sixteen when I started with Disney our leaders were basically like my parents teaching me right and wrong every day. But my absolute favorite leaders were the ones who cared had empathy had natural emotional intelligence. One of my most favorite moments was when my dad came to visit me when I was an early cashier at Disney. He worked nights and weekends saw only got to see him a few hours a week and my leader remembered me sharing that with him months ago and confidence in he instead of telling me to go back to work, he said Hey Vick don't you go over data tour of the operation take thirty forty, five minutes. I thought I was going to get in trouble for for him being there, and and this leader decided to put me I in the operation second for about thirty, forty, five minutes. But that thirty forty five minutes was so impactful that I would work late or come in on my day off and and give him my best work. No matter what after that because of so indebted to. His kindness I don't have direct reports in my current role at NPR but I realize you don't need them to be a leader, a measure success as leader of people in developer talent by looking at attrition. If our client is leaving us then didn't see the value won't we offer, and that issue could be as simple as that were they think we're too expensive and when I hear that. I hear that they don't think we deserve to be paid that much for what they're cutting. So something's wrong. So work with many people to ensure that the client is taking care of sees the value of their purchase and continues to do business with us. Being in sales is really starts with me and it's up to me this at the right expectations and give my team the tools. They need to successfully onboard the client and when things go wrong on Yo on blame I just seek to understand entitles failures with a teachable moment and maybe add another bullet points at a checklist. Then I follow up to ensure it doesn't happen again and when it doesn't, I make sure to thank them I think this is a healthier way to work with others to accomplish the same goal.

Disney Vick Walt Disneyworld Mike Myers Vic Martinez Kenny Art NPR Developer
Catherine Sherlock On Moving From Overwhelmed To Empowered

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

04:23 min | Last week

Catherine Sherlock On Moving From Overwhelmed To Empowered

"Nice Guy Community welcome back. So today we are focused on moving people from overwhelm to empowerment and to make the MAC side of your potential as a person and both as a leader as well. So Catherine Sherlock, she plays on the edge of human potential and focuses on elevating the leadership conversation and leadership from the inside out. So she operates in the realm where many are too afraid or too. Distracted to go elevating lives and leadership in the process I'm really excited to talk to her today. She comes through a source through through Michael Hand I think over at over it barefoot wine. So I'm excited to have you here Catherine welcome to the show. Thank you doug. It's great to be here. So how'd you get hooked up with that with that whole hand guy? Do you remember? you know I think it might have been through Lincoln actually. Wow that's terrific. We and now we kind of we have a good connection. So I really enjoyed talking to him. Michael's come on the show a couple of times and and he and his partner Bonnie Harvey. Of course, everybody knows them from some of the past episodes they started barefoot wines and and turned it into a a eight and a nine figure business and did a great job with that. So you come through a very high source. So Catherine appreciate appreciative that you were here today and thanks for being here and and talk in your topic and your Azzoni of genius today. Hang Stack. It's great to be here. So let's talk a little bit about one of the areas where I think that many entrepreneurs may not focus specifically on, but it's an area that I think that We are remiss if we don't spend some time on it and it's talking about the world of leadership. So can you share maybe before we get into the actual topic for the sake of our our entrepreneurs that are in our community? Can you share what your span on leadership is and how they got to be something that you became an expert in? Yeah, you know I I come come from probably an unusual path I was an environmental and sustainability. Consultant. And I did that for a long time and I have a master's in that area. and. You know. I do have a desire to change the world and impact the world and I guess that's why was in that career to start with. But yet I kept finding that it wasn't wasn't having the impact I, wanted to be having. I wasn't able to open up to conversations. I really wanted to be having and when things came to a point where I had to kind of shift in what it was in my career. I ended up turning conduct my personal life and what I had been doing in my personal life. And that mixed with some new areas like organizational development, which which I moved into as I was in sustainability consulting. Just just need. Gid from from clients. And I started to realize that you know a lot of our challenges start from the inside. And yet we so often focus on especially as leaders in business, we focus on solving them from the outside. And it's not your best leverage point. So before you take a deeper dive into outside versus inside, can you maybe just take a thirty thousand foot approach and maybe what some of the things that we're working on that are maybe Say Wrong and leadership because there's so many different styles of of of leader in types of leaders that are out there and they're so many different ways in which we can lead. But what are you saying is some of the common pitfalls within the realm of Leadership Today Well in leadership development. It's based on trade theory a lot, and that means that somebody goes out and maybe they do some research on some leaders or maybe they just come up with a list of sort of must have characteristics. And then they go in and they say, Hey, these are the must have characteristics i. mean you seen those articles all the time of the year that ten, the twenty the I saw one that was one, hundred and one. Hundred one must have characteristics leader. And I think it's so backwards to who we are and. What actually brings out our best selves our best leadership abilities. it's that trying to adopt something that makes us feel like impostors. Instead of. What I really think that we're. Were meant to do is really deepen into our own personal gifts. And then you connect to then you're not trying to inspire anybody then you're inspired yourself. And your teaching other people how to inspire themselves.

Catherine Sherlock Michael Hand Lincoln Doug Bonnie Harvey Consultant Partner
What's Your Story

Jocko Podcast

06:39 min | Last week

What's Your Story

"This is the Jaakko unraveling podcast episode nine with Daryl Cooper and me Jaakko, willink. So. Last time we were talking about. The stories that we tell ourselves and then how We get stories in groups in those start to expand in those start to unify people together. And it seems that we have an instinct towards. Some level of those. Stories unifying us to a point to where we start to drift into just straight tribalism. And then we actually use those stories and change those stories. As a tool to strengthen our tribes even more. And I know you had some some interesting stories, slash myths. That that that kind of represent that very well throughout history we've seen this it's it's it's tapping into. A basic. A basic way that our mind structures reality for us right I mean if you think about. How you teach. The youngest children something if you need to teach them something, you need him to tie their shoes right? How you GonNa do that through imitation you're gonNA show them do what I do. Right that's the same thing that like chimpanzees how they teach their children things. As they get a little bit older was the next way that you're going to teach them stuff probably maybe by like five six, seven years old you're GonNa Start Teaching them basic things about what a good person behaves like whatever you're GonNa do it through stories right? That's like the next level up. It's like later on down the road, you can start talking about kind of concepts right? You can start teaching them. Teaching somebody things in terms of you know instead of telling you a story about prince charming and this is how a man should treat a woman. You're going to learn through this story and internalized that maybe later on, we can say this is the essence of love and how love operates and Blah Blah Blah but stories narrative is how we how we structure reality and understand things and very, very profound way. Yeah. I've written a bunch of books. The two of the leadership books that I've written actually all three of the leadership books that have written are. Heavily based on stories stories from combat and then stories from the civilian sector. And and obviously people the feedback I get all the time and we have the principles written in there in extreme ownership in their leadership. We write the principal clearly in there. Hey, this is called covered move. This is what it means. But people never say Oh, thanks for spelling out the principal for me. They say Oh love the way you guys told the story in that I could see it. So yeah, this is not just something that we do for kids I mean the. With US sticks with US forever, and it's such a great way to to get your point across much more powerful way and for certain things, it's the only way. Right I. Mean. There's just like you're not gonNA tell somebody breakdown into philosophical concepts had a tie your shoes. You just got shown him and tell him i. do there are certain things that? You just have to use a story. That's the only thing that's really going to serve that purpose and elucidating the principles we are really doing there is saying, okay, you know all those stories this one, I just told you in the book. Yeah. But all those other ones you've always heard and there's that there's that thing that the leaders are doing something. This is what it is right and so you're drawing out that communality and those stories by stating the principles. interesting when you said. These you actually brought it up perfectly in my mind. When you said these stories, we tell ourselves can be unifying, and then that same story can become like a divisive type of tribalism right and it reminded me of this this book. call. It's book about the. Rwandan. Genocide by Philip Gourevich who also wrote a really powerful book on Abu Ghraib actually it's very, very You, know? Eric. Weinstein. Actually knows that guy believe he's married to a friend of their family and if at all possible I think it'd be a great guy for you to talk to certainly possible. Just incredibly, morally sensitive writer just a very, very interesting guy anyway, and so in this book about the Rwandan genocide, what's it called we wish to inform you that tomorrow will be killed with our families. I have that one I haven't done it yet. Man I I did Michetti season was kind of. All right. There's one there's one more maybe it's that one life life laid bare? Probably switching is by the same guy who wrote. Interviews the victims brutal. It's as brutal as you think. Yeah. and. So in this book, we wish to inform you that tomorrow we will be killed with our families Goes through when it's just harrowing book as You can imagine at the end of it. He relates this story. That took place. As the genocide was winding down I believe in this girl's school in Rwanda. Some of the entire homeway militias were still running around the rebels had come back and we're pushing back against him, but this was still ongoing. And a bunch of them came into this girl school. And we're trying to figure out who are the Tuzi. So we can kill them all. And they were telling him you know who to girls on one side tootsie girls to the others and on the other side and either girl he's a grade school girls. They refuse to separate themselves out from the Tuzi girls in so that they could know who they were, and one of the girls said that there are no who Tuzi here. There are only Rwandans here. And a lot of them died they all the killed, all of them rather than kill none of them and eventually somebody came broke it up, but a lot of them died. And if you think of that like Whoa okay That's something that in a lot of context were told is a dirty word that's nationalism right I mean that's what it is. Nationalism in the United States is what got Irish people and Italian people in German people to say Oh Germany's attacking people in Europe. We gotta get together and go over there and stop them right. Very unifying thing. That same force is what got Germany to start the fight in the first place. And so identity is a very interesting thing because you go up above the blood level. And everything after the blood level is a story. That's what it is right and you need a story to keep it together. You look at a place like United States we need a story more than anybody.

United States Tuzi Principal Daryl Cooper Germany Europe Prince Philip Gourevich Weinstein Eric Abu Ghraib Rwanda Writer
My Problem with Masks (It's Not What You Think)

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

03:04 min | Last week

My Problem with Masks (It's Not What You Think)

"Being welcome to remarkable. TV. And the remarkable leadership podcast today I'm talking about my problem with masks and it's not what you might think. Are you ready? Let's get started. As I sit here, recording this I'm wondering and thinking about six months ago wouldn't have been possible for us to be thinking about masks for me to record an episode with a mask on or for it to become one of the most contentious issues in our country. It's almost unbelievable. Now I have a problem with masks not political and it's not scientific. Here's my problem with masks. Masks hide are smile. See our smile is universal infants recognize them instantly, they know no borders they know language they know nationality smiles can change relationships smiles can make us more influential smiles can change the meaning of our message and masks hide are smile. So if you need to wear one in. Six. There's some things I'd like you to consider if you have to wear the mask, put it back on and try it like that. So. If you have to wear one and you can't see your smile smile with your eyes. If you smile really big people can see it in your eyes. Smile. Really big and let your eyes do the smiling for you. Second use a hand signal if you work with a team of people and you all have to wear masks all the time. Come up with a signal to let you know I'm smiling mark. It's the thumbs up or what I don't care what you pick. Pick something that everybody knows. So you can say, Hey, I'm smile and it's okay. It's kind of like the emoji remote economy email to let people know where smiling find a way to communicate others if you have to wear the mask and the third thing in some situations, it might be okay to laugh I mean laugh is a verbal smile, right? Vocal smile and so the reality is

Are your employees coping with this ok?

Hacking Your Leadership

02:29 min | Last week

Are your employees coping with this ok?

"Are For this week's episode Arnold talking about something called terror management theory. Is a social psychology theory created more than thirty years ago by Professor Jeff Greenberg at the University of Arizona it basically says that when facing our own mortality, we've human beings attempt to eliminate the associated feelings of terror by doubling down on the values. We already hold specifically the ones that had meaning to our lives and by investing in people who seem to subscribe to those same values. Great so is on a leadership podcast. Will. Because over the last six months covid nineteen is forced millions of us to face our on mortality. And ERTA lesson those feelings of dread. Every one of US subconsciously is doing things that allow us to feel like we're valuable contributors to a meaningful world. After. All. If I'm an important worker, an entrepreneur, a teacher, a scientist, a doctor apparent. I'm much more capable of believing that some part of me will carry on after death that might impact might be enduring. Because of Corona virus were reminded of death all the time. This will react in ways that support the values we already hold dear and will gravitate towards leaders whose actions appear to support those values to. It also means people who already have a difficult time believing they contribute value to a meaningful world or even though we live in a meeting for wall to begin with are likely struggling. The more people struggle with this, the less likely to be successful at mitigating those feelings of terror and the more likely they are to interpret difficult but manageable situations, tasks and responsibilities as overwhelming. These people will also need to assign blame and because assigning blame to the cause of their actual fears isn't really helpful. They'll find people to blame for the frustrations they experience in those overwhelming situations, tasks and responsibilities think about your current group of direct reports I bet there's one or two of fit this bill. By turning on the news, we can see the negative impact of this phenomenon on the growing political divide in America but not taking into account can also undermine your ability to lead support develop your team. If your leader a people and what you're hearing now is resonating with you. The first thing to do is really understand that everyone deals with mortality differently and should try to meet your people where they are rather than having the same expectations of their grit as you did a year ago. And I think people should be let off the hook for the expectations of their job when people have a job to do the expectations to get done are perfectly appropriate even during a pandemic. But I'm saying is that some people who were able to move through challenges with easy year-ago might need a bit more compassion now and leaders who provide it will have the teams who bounced back the quickest months. The fears truly gone.

United States Professor Jeff Greenberg University Of Arizona Arnold Scientist America
A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:11 min | 2 weeks ago

A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

"Google and its parent company alphabet on the precipice of several major challenges regulators are expected to file antitrust lawsuits as early as this month and other example some faith company isn't as innovative as it used to be. A CEO of alphabet sooner Pechanga will play a key role in how the company navigates the headwinds, and while Pichai, is not nearly as in the spotlight as the other tech leaders. He's already had a long history Google, and by taking a look back, we can try and get some clues about how he might move the company forward a reporter Copeland joins us with an inside look rob. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. So, at the tech hearing before the House antitrust subcommittee earlier, this year Pichai himself as an immigrant sort of the picture of the American dream. And wonder if you could start by telling us more about the Chinese upbringing shore so Definitely outlier in many ways in Silicon Valley perhaps the most famous way that he stands out is that he was born in. India. So he grew up middle-class for India but not necessarily add western standards. He famously talks about growing up and getting in his first. Rotary phone. He is in such an older guy that the technology was just a lot less developed there. So he speaks frequently about the connection that he feels to technology and the knowledge that new technology can really change someone's life. So pettah eventually came to the US for Grad School. How do you find his Google? He worked relatively ordinary corp jobs until he joined Google right after its IPO google was not the Google that it is today it really was just a search engine. Quickly impresses people for his ability to one build consensus, which is true to this day, but also get the job done his first major job at Google. toolbar product. So before there was chrome there actually was an add on on your browser to search google. So his job was to convince companies like Dell when they sold you a laptop to have an automatic google search bar on there. So he's moved through the ranks since then becoming CEO of Google and then last year taking over as alphabet. CEO How did he make his way up the ladder? What's so remarkable is he's been at Google for sixteen years and we even though we're the Wall Street Journal have never done a full profile of him. So a big part of my task for the last few months was really unpacking who he is and how he got to this position and what really emerges is that Google was a place and still is a place with big personalities people who scream at each other people who say we should bet the farm on this or that and what sooner sort of did. was stay in the background, but he was also very careful that whatever he did it worked starting with toolbar but that extends to chrome the browser which he co lead and is now by far the most used web browser one of the big reveals of this reporting for me was that he's a very strategic person. It's not an accident that he stayed in the background for instance, someone who used to report to him. Told me early on in a meeting with with Larry? Page. who was CEO of Google before soon Dr Sooner made sure that they never disagreed in front of Larry. He really didn't want anyone to see any cracks and this also emerges in a lot of the people I spoke to some of whom sooner himself suggested that I speak to. But then when I got on the phone with them, they didn't seem to know him personally well. So he he keeps it very close to the vest. So it sounds like he's pretty deft at navigating the company politics now that he's in the top spot. What's he known for as a leader? So to a man to a woman ever and I spoke to said that sooner has a tendency in the middle of meetings to stand up and begin pacing in the middle of your presentation. He won't say anything necessarily sign that he likes or doesn't like it. It's just signed that he's thinking. So you can imagine people have spent weeks preparing for the CEO and he leaps up in the middle just starts pacing it can be quite disarming frankly this comes back to the criticism. Of Soon Dr to standing up in the middle of meeting and pacing as you think is not necessarily your traditional hey drive the car forward leadership. There's a big knock at Google today it's that and this comes from investors analysts even some executives of the company it's that the company is pretty much operating on autopilot. It makes almost all of its money from online advertising and you don't really have to do much besides sit there and the money comes in adding an extra add to youtube isn't exactly a high level. Decision. So the criticism is that sooner hasn't necessarily made the big move to position Google for the next decade on the other hand. When you have such a head start that Google has just not messing up is a billion dollar proposition. And what about as a coworker? What's he known for that? The best thing that's has going for him is that people genuinely like him in fact, one of his deputies Caesar. Gupta told me he loved sooner Pichai. He said the reason I stayed at Google this long as because of Dr He's someone that I trust. He moved to Jakarta because soon are asked him to. People. Say in this world where everyone is obsessed with Silicon Valley with what is happening in Menlo Park and Palo Alto and San Francisco that soon Dr a truly global outlook that he cares for instance, about Google pay in India where there are many multiples number of people using payment products in there are in the US. But tacitus surly had as much investment and one of the really fun things that is in the story is he's very much a creature of habit. You can imagine your CEO of of Alphabet you're traveling the world whenever he's in Korea he goes to the same burrito place an orders, the same Veggie Burrito. And in this world of he's hard-driving CEOS who appear in TMZ or go through high profile divorces. Everyone says that sooner Chai's legitimately just a kind nice guy.

Google CEO Pichai India Silicon Valley United States Larry Tacitus Jakarta Dell Wall Street Journal Copeland Reporter Caesar Grad School Korea Pettah
The Danger of Being a Know-it-All

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

02:58 min | 2 weeks ago

The Danger of Being a Know-it-All

"Today I'm talking about the danger of being unknowable. Are you ready. Let's get started. You're like me you went to school for a long time thirteen or more years taught you that knowledge is a good thing. Knowledge is what wins the game of school right that's been driven home to all of us and we all learned and hurt, and probably said that knowledge is power. Well if knowledge is a good thing and it is. Where's the danger you might be asking? Well, let me answer that question because being a know it all can be dangerous. Here's some reasons why number one? It's a fool's errand. You can't know at all about anything you know a lot, but you can't know at all. So setting that as your goal is probably not the right answer and is dangerous in and of itself. Second thinking we do makes us wrong. Well, just proved that to you. You can't get there. But if we think we do if we think we know automatically already wrong which of course, if we think we know it all is setting us up for the third point, which is thinking we do makes us obnoxious. That person that person actually thinks they know it all about something and they may know a lot about it but even the attitude or the belief that they know it all makes them obnoxious. Even more. So when they think they do in truly don't they don't even come close to knowing all of it but regardless of all of that, this is dangerous because it can damage our relationships it can make us less influential even though we think it makes us more so and remember that knowledge alone doesn't influence others anyway. Next thinking we do keeps us from learning. This may be the biggest one of all. If you really want to be an expert something the minute that you think you know it all you stop. Learning you no longer are looking to continue to add to that treasure of knowledge. So the reality is the minute that we think we know it always stop and in that moment immediately become wrong. Thinking we do know it. All keeps us from learning and lastly. Knowing more isn't the same. I started by saying that knowledge is power I started by saying that knowledge is good and it is and it can be an end making your goal knowing more. Will avoid all of the know it all challenges it's a much better goal. It's something that you can achieve at, keep you from having the negatives that come with being a know it all. Let. Me Close with today's tweet. Make your goal to know more not to know at all because you can't. Anyway

Are all rules supposed to be followed?

Hacking Your Leadership

02:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Are all rules supposed to be followed?

"For. This week's episode aren't talk about rules. Every company that ever worked for has rules and the week of Covid nineteen many companies are creating new rules in order to maintain a safe environment from ploys and customers. So season of stranger rules. Why does this matter? I can say from personal experience that I. Don't like rules like at all in recent years of to tone this down a little bit. But I generally believe in asking for forgiveness rather than permission. And I don't mean for everything I just mean if I have a good level of knowledge of what the rules are, how the rules interact with each other, what they're designed to do, and with a potential consequences are for nodded hearing to them I can sometimes we know to take calculated risks and not follow those rules. But I wanNA focus on one specific part of that last sentence, the part about what rules are designed to do. In general, the designed to encourage your insurer specific behavior from employees as it because there's a risk of loss, the potential degrading the brand or in the context of Covid nineteen making sure your environment stay safe. But what specifically are rules is I do? We'll each rule has a different answer. Some of them can be considered more important than others, but each one has a purpose and this is what I want to talk about today. My propensity for breaking rules is not a some attitude that I'm too good for rules or they don't apply to me. It's out of a belief that a large number of rules were written with a specific action or behavior in mind and that applying the rule across the board would actually not be in line with what that rule was actually designed to do. It's a belief that the spirit of rule should always outweigh the rule itself, and this is only possible with a strong understanding of the environment you're in each job Iraq's one another the expected support from any leaders and a proven track record of performance and partnerships. If. You're a leader of people and you have all those things when you see a new implemented aides to feel like your job to investigate why this rule exists in the first place, what you're expected part and upholding it is and most importantly, if you can think of any scenarios following, this rule will actually lead the less desirable outcomes than if you didn't follow it. Very obvious example might be a return policy for purchases without one customers almost definitely take advantage of you but following the rule for everyone with meeting during the individual relationship that exists between your company and your best customers. Anyone can follow rules. It doesn't take much leadership to follow them. What takes leadership is nuance. It's an ability to see what the big picture is, and whether each rule potentially detracts from it because many do. Thanks for listening and have a great day.

Covid Iraq
Tantra for High Performance with Victoria Redbard

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Tantra for High Performance with Victoria Redbard

"As I mentioned in the introduction will be talking about entre for high performance and my pronouncing that correctly Victoria is tawny tra-. Yeah. I like the way act and you sound with your accent. Very. Cool. We're GonNa Fun Conversation Today and I WanNa Know What this New Paradigm leadership looks like. So break it down for us. What does that mean the New Paradigm leadership and what does it look like? It's the kind of a change in the economy know it's like A. With, things have been in this overpowered I'm it's. Like building fair and kind of creating from that place stress on I think that this new pattern is coming through is just like this place of abundance in giving and Really. Comes in where we are in this place of like the love with ourselves and connection to to every pot about like no pot of us get left behind and when we create from that place like awareness that flow site from the expansion of a renewed like organic state is so much that can. Change the way that you know everything that the ripple effect on from there is huge. Do want to really dive into this mentality about abundance versus scarcity because let's be honest. You know twenty thirty years ago. There is some reason as some understanding why people had this scarcity mindset we all like lived in these small towns spread out across the world and it was like well, Hey, if like I opened a car dealership next to the other car dealership like. Like if I sell a car that means he or she's not selling your car like this mindset of scarcity was pretty prevalent in the world, and then of course, the Internet came in changed everything. Now, we just have this opportunity for abundance because there's so many pieces of Pie. In fact, you know there's like all this abundant pieces of the pie for everybody in every niche and that's why I. Love talking to people who are really carved out these specific cool niches in their life and they're able to have an abundance mindset around that. So I really love the world the we've evolved into and I. Want to dive more into this as we kind of have this conversation. But let's go to get into how tantric practices can actually change the way you lead your company like how can we apply? Your expertise in tantric practices for fire nation leading their businesses entrepreneurs love that that she something that I'm really exploring right now I feel like the the major pace of Light Hal i. do things a little differently is like really by trusting in like the energy of Aeros United States like these energy in our body it's like this life force energy is always there and I feel like we get to have a choice with it and I think most the time when people think about our energy like there's like a fear of it you know it's like arousal it's Yet it's kind of like this overriding energy and I think that when we start to gain mosque with, it actually allows us to kind of build on that plane abundance that we just spoke. Oh, so it's likely coming back to that baseline of life thought we come from sex we come from this vibration that is a much deeper than the polarity that that is built around. And often even the way that most people having sex in the world right now is from this place of like not wanting to feel their emotions and wanting to just jump like away from any kind of feeling to do the job. And I feel that. This is really about you know building from. mcclay solves. expansive energy I think one of the reasons why people are so fearful of their Kenji because it is expensive in if we think about like. Times that we felt contracted triggered or. Via and we make decisions in our business from that place. It always kind of leads to like a string on effect of war things going wrong in the business more problems to kind of do with because we've made these decisions were placed feel or as I feel like when we come into this bicycle arousal this kind of. Energy that's actually naturally pumping body and we're not leaving any mess behind. It's someone's like we get into this state so. In the big difference in May when people masturbate pleasure and they kind of just rushing with disco to get little Gaza. Pushing possible without of their emotional body to. His goal so they can have a stress relief. On. The other side of that is when we actually like slowly build the energy in the body and allow the parts of is that have been behind that day possible is it might be vulnerable must. Micro survival scarcity that she kinda come back to ourselves really like a rise from that play when people go into that kind of orgasmic state from the is this You know it's like I would connect into that dot oneness feeling that. Feeling of unity with everything and they're not operating that place of scarcity competition or any of those places, and that locked the non-effective that flows that comes into. Everyday life into your business is huge and he started light bring that every single moment of my life in the way that I describe I'm seth pleasure is to conduct like be with the body in in every moment rather than actually just like going into my body and I'm going to have an orgasm I'm GonNa Pleasure I'm GonNa have arousal right now it's like as she would've out of my body want to be with me. And so it's one of listening to the body and I feel like we saw to do that in a business. Then when not going to be stuck in these making decisions from fear spies or you know thinking like we need to compete against others, we kinda going to be disconnected your essence and entrust for that and You know trust that we're actually really supported moving from that place. I think that's rijn if like everybody was was making business decisions from that kind of expansive flow state when I'm influence, I have the experience like now all my decisions Econo- the right decision is a con. Get it wrong when I'm in

Victoria United States Kenji
The GREATEST Wealth Strategy of All Time with Reshveen Rajendran

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:36 min | 3 weeks ago

The GREATEST Wealth Strategy of All Time with Reshveen Rajendran

"The greatest wealth strategy of all time who is not going to press play on this I mean fire nation if you're listening to this right now you obviously did I'm excited chat about this because there's a lot we're going to be covering and you have quite the story forest US brothers. So let's dive right into the story because I want to know how does a person go for making a million dollars a year to a million dollars a week break down for This year collected to combat a once and what happened was Tony Robbins became speaking been. Talked about how to dominate me say there's one Gorby said if you give more than every other person to give more Salvia yourself more than every other person in your industry, then you dominate and you win. Any. Seat John I think sometimes you know. Sometimes gets in your body in your soul. So like did quarter really really sunk in men how do you? How do I give more than everybody else and then really really stood something thinking my spirit is this something in my soul. Came back. Entrepreneur on file. Also, fire on fire to give money every single person all day in my industry and dude, you know like if you seen my actions like the action that. Are Given so much a neural. Brunton did something you said give your best stuff for free? I need this things man I need this do things I get my best offer free contrary what entrepreneurs beliefs And I. meet. Sure that I guess more than everybody else out there that nobody would even catch up what else doing this Halloween four million dollars in a year to generating a million dollars in a single week in the month of June I mean fire nation. This is one of those lessons you just have to really absorb just like rush Wien absorbed at Tony Robbins quote so. Eloquently it is critical to recognize the fact that when people don't know you when they don't necessarily have the opportunity to trust you yet they're not just going to lay down their hard earned money to invest in a product or a service or coaching from you like whatever that might look like you need to earn that trust and what better way than what rush Wien. Is talking about by giving the best of yourself for free to completely out serving your competition to such a level that you absolutely dominate and rush, and you're talking to fire nation. It's it's a massive audience around the world and a lot of people right now are saying, well, how do we even get started like I'd love to make a million dollars a week heck. I'd love to make a million dollars a year mean I'd love to make a million dollars over the next five years. That's a lot of money. But what would you say is the best way for somebody listening right now who has very little to get started generating income for themselves. Good. I. Love This. I. Love Your Question Man I love Christian and Syed. I have. I run my company Eramet Company. DEEM RUSH DOT COM check me out and stuff but ironic company in John. I wanted to share with you that I have this vision sue big in my vision is to create the largest community of givers in the would. That's my vision. That's what I've actually set my mind to do. In you know, it's very interesting that you asked me the question because just yesterday somebody actually asked me the same question, right? He is like. So again, a swimming bullock following me and yesterday somebody actually means wishing. He's like rush. Why don't you reply? Why don't you reply to messages right. So again, let me read you this exact messages crazy man, right so You to play I know you told me give more or you didn't know this but I have nothing to give men I will surely stop giving once not growing. Right see the problem is is in many people always see I will give I get rich I will give what I have the knowledge I will you know I will do whatever it takes but. When heavy but he meant you give when you have nothing. I don't know if it makes sense like what I'm seeing. Make sense but you know it's like. Women people tell me that. I was giving when I started growing I'll stop the meeting when I actually make money doesn't make sense. To me is like telling me like he made, I'll stop eating right excising. When I get expect right? Like Dude, you get the six pack because you're eating right and because you are

Tony Robbins United States Gorby John Eramet Company Brunton
Opportunity Through Persistence with Cordia Harrington

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Opportunity Through Persistence with Cordia Harrington

"Hey, guys you know what I love about America and the free, market? Enterprise. What I love about business leadership is what I love about Andre Leadership and that is that we believe that great success can come from humble beginnings. You guys know this. You know in our country, it doesn't matter what your skin color is. It doesn't matter if you're male or female. All. It takes passion drive and a desire to make a difference. You may say why don't have enough money to get started? I don't have enough education I. Don't know the right people guys. I'm telling you those are all just excuses. From the Ramsey network this is the entreleadership podcast where we help business leaders, themselves, their teams and their prophets. I'm your host Daniels Hardy and my guest today is Accordia Harrington she's the founder and CEO of the Bakery Coast today they've got multiple plants and customers around the world including. McDonald's Oh Charlie's pretty big deal. But. It didn't start out that way and like a lot of great success stories that start with really humble beginnings accordions is really not that much different. And all began for her and a small town in Arkansas. I started my first business in Russellville. Arkansas. Do you know where that is i? Know Arkansas. Russell. Okay. Well. Down a beautiful town on a lake about halfway between Little Rock and Fort Smith and my first business was a real estate company concept one realtors and foretelling we use tweet emblem on a real estate vine. Yeah. Little. Did I know? And that began. With the good fortune of having bartered for office space from a doctor that had a big empty building and least my chairs and my desk three dollars a month for the deaths and a dollar fifty a month for the chairs and I was in the real estate business us all five hundred, eighty, seven dollars to buy plywood signs to put in front yards and it grew and it was so much fun. The ladies that I hired. We were the first off you mill business in Arkansas, and the men bankers would literally come by to see what we're doing. And we would stage houses. That's before we knew what staging was and we would try to rearrange the furniture in houses so that they showed the best and it took off so you're showcasing the houses to make them look great. That's very common these days. What was it uncommon? Totally people thought we were so weird to come into their house and stake some pictures down in rearrange the furniture Abed we were trying to give them the best opportunity to get their house sold. You know back then houses there eighteen hundred square foot house two car garage on an acre of land with a lakeview guess how much it was I can't even guess forty thousand, you're really cloak. Thousand. and. So you know and there were lots of properties available and not very many buyers. So it was it was an interesting business in the only reason. I. Got Out of it. I. Loved it. I loved working with the families helping a find a home bettering their life but the people that moved to town the For your family bought the local McDonalds. Daniel. But when I grew up, I didn't know you could own a McDonald's and when I found out, they owned it. I was like all. That is cool. They lived on a Beautiful Lake House they drove a Mercedes than they had every weekend with their family. So for me I thought Gosh this would be so great. They didn't like living in Russellville they wanted to move I love Libyan Russellville K- I can imagine a real estate you weren't necessarily your weekends with wasn't a thing and you're just grinding all the time. So was it was the opportunity for flexibility? What was what like when you kind of had the dream I mean Mercedes is nice but was like drawing you to them exactly. Well, unfortunately, I went through a divorce and my children were one three and five when I did that in having a job that I could be off on the nights and weekends was very motivating. I was driven to spend more time with my kids and yeah I, mean the perks looked nice to but are really wanted quality time with my. Kids an and in as much as I love real estate, it was just impossible. So many business owners I talk to really the family is the reason that they get into owning their own business. You know maybe they work at a corporation at its ninety hours a week than ever see their family, even the money can be nice but I mean, you look up and your kids are. Little and they start growing and you go I'm missing out on their lives. Curious to hear from you how you continue to keep that value as the business grows and scales because there's a little bit of the grass is greener on the other side. If I have my own business, I'll have the flexibility and the autonomy, and it can also be that same dragon that takes you away. From your family if you're not careful yet you're totally right and I haven't the greatest respect for restaurant owners because when I did buy my first McDonald's we were unable to stay in. Russellville that just wasn't the way McDonalds did things and that was offered the chance to buy the EFFINGHAM. Illinois McDonald's where that is I know effingham driven through there once okay. Most people have driven by. Again, a big town of ten thousand people and we had an interstate McDonald's that I purchased. At the time I paid a very high price for it. This was nineteen, eighty, nine paid a million, six, fifty, four it and I had to figure out how to grow sales in order to make that Walker, twenty, seven, thousand, dollar a month payment. And the only way to do it was to drive more sales as you know, that's the way it. But if you'RE GONNA ten thousand, how do you find more people? Yeah. I can imagine I mean the supply and demand kicks in a real way. What was it? An existing store was this new store? It was an existing store in the man was retiring and it was a good store because it was in the middle point if you're driving from St Louis Chicago. Great Place to stop get a bite to eat go to the restroom. Great Location. But again, how do you grow the sales and so? Back and that day an eighty nine we didn't have cell phones, but we did have CB radios. So we began to have some fun get on the radio and go hey, good buddy. If you're driving a bus stop by, we'll give you a free meal if you bring your bus

Russellville Arkansas Mcdonald Andre Leadership Founder And Ceo Effingham America Mcdonalds Beautiful Lake House Daniels Hardy Abed Russell Bakery Coast St Louis Chicago Fort Smith Accordia Harrington
What if It All Ended Tonight?

Dose of Leadership

05:58 min | 3 weeks ago

What if It All Ended Tonight?

"Hello DOSA leadership listeners. So happier tuning in thought I'd give you a slow solo episode. This week man I've been very busy lot of flying is starting to pick back up I. Think I hope. It's hard to say. Is. We're recording this at the end of August twenty twenty am so tired of twenty twenty as you are but I thought I would give a solo episode today it's titled What if it all ended tonight sounds kind of dire kinda scary. But think about that. What if it all ended tonight If, your life was done midnight tonight would you been happy? Be Happy with what you've accomplished so far. How would you live differently? If you knew it was going to end tonight if you would have known ten years ago that tonight was the last night. What would you have done differently I think it's a fair question. And the reason why I'm thinking about this and by the way. This isn't A. As a prepared episode as normally do I wanna do so episodes I usually have it a lot of detailed notes typed out in front of me and just kind of. giving. My stream-of-consciousness have a couple of bullet points. Again is bothering me heard me maybe say show that. This summer has been strange I mean both personally with elements that happened with my family and my daughter. Kind of the estrangement where she Cut Herself off from the family. In moved away. And you've heard me talk about it and some of those episode don't go into all the details but it's My point is. This show is shifting I have some visions and some dreams and some ideas of where I wanNA. Take this show. I will share this with you that there has been stuff behind the scenes. Really going to ramp up the show to another professional level maybe a set maybe multiple camera angles maybe dedicated youtube channel. Maybe, some high level sponsors more to come. I'll share more as it comes unfold great guests by the way and I'll certainly do that and I'll talk about leadership. The for almost eight years I've been talking about this concept of leadership and leadership is a broad umbrella. Huge Right Huge umbrella but I'll be honest I mean sometimes. I feel like I've got a PhD in leadership from talking to four hundred plus people about this concept of leadership and certainly has helped me personally. Change, my mindset, and I still want to continue to do that. Have these fascinating conversations continue to learn continue to be open minded. WanNa get more dissenting opinions. I WANNA have real conversations all that stuff. You've heard me talk about that if you're listening to this show if you know who I am. And that's going to happen. And this show is dying bny strapped if anything it's. It's going to grow and I just have this vision this ideas of where it's going to go and I know it's going to happen. It's just going to happen because part of my purpose my. Reason why I'm here to do this show. And so I need to put more love energy. And Passion into this show, and it's going to be something completely different in the year is going to be completely bigger. It's going to be a wider audience. All that thing is going to happen. And the reason why I'm telling you this because. It goes to the mindset or the thing that certainly have become has become clearer to me. Throughout this year, there's a lot of things bothering me a lot of things bother me as their bothering you. But I wanted to just get out. I just thing is important because if you're on this leadership journey in if you're invested in personal growth, which I think you are otherwise, you wouldn't be tuning into the show. And I think if you're to listen to show, you do believe that the understanding or the application of leadership in your life is one part of the answer and a huge part of the solution to leading a cynic significant life in isn't that what we all want to do lead significant lives and that's Why I think it's an important question to ask. What it all ended tonight. Would you've been happy How would you live differently if knowing that tonight was going to be your last night And that's the power of the vision that's power of becoming pretty intentional and explicit and clear about what it is that you want to accomplish. Just spent a couple of days last week with an organization helping them with their company vision. But the elephants are still the same think about your personal in your in your company vision it's all interrelated I think it's vision mission values all that stuff kind of gets in her. Interspersed but I think when you're talking about vision. It's pretty universal that what we're talking about here at least what I'm trying to get across and conveys how you want things to be. How are the things that you want things to be where people get hung up? is they think they need to understand how they're going to get there, and that's where they get stuck and and then the stop it leads to stagnation it seemingly so impossible. But if you can avoid that trap. Of Coming Up, you say this is the dream and I'm dreaming big and then you start coming up with. Action Plans right out of the gate. I think that. Your vision. Think. That's the reason why you need to surround yourself. With people who are going to force you to dream bigger. An I intentionally have done that I've surrounded myself some great individuals who have pushed me. WHO said no dream bigger dream bigger anyway my point is you got to have this vision this layout of where you want to take it and I think it's important to point out that. The fear and the uncertainty you've heard me say this on this show that it's never going to go away I know you have annoying and you got a gnawing in your gut. I have it. It's there with me constantly. And I want you to embrace that nine and realize that that is not abnormal. It's frustrating have that knowing I know I get it because that knowing makes you restless that gnawing makes you impatient that gnawing makes you feel like you're never going to get out or accomplish your dreams your goals. I get it. Go Away I want you embrace that gnawing. I. Want you to embrace really that's fear and uncertainties what that is. And fear and uncertainty is never going to go away.

Youtube
Knowing What Leads to Victory

Jocko Podcast

05:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Knowing What Leads to Victory

"This is Jaakko podcast number to forty five with Echo Charles in me Jaakko willink good evening Echo vide-. Also joining tonight is Dave Burke leaving dave good evening. Did you make it to the status of Honorary Co host. Yes No. As thinking, we're getting their people want to know why they call him a good deal Dave. This. The fact that we've been talking about this is why check back again tonight with more combat lessons from the. From the document called combat lessons. Document written in the throes of World War Two and what they were doing interviewing. Frontline leaders and front line troops. Fact. The subtitle is rank and file in combat what they're doing and how they're doing. We've covered to these so far, and this is the third one. And you know sometimes I, think you know, I mean, we kinda get the idea right and I'll start thumbing s I started thumbing through. This one is you know do we really need to cover another one of these? So I started coming through it and you start reading these things. And I can't put it down and I'm still learning and so. I figure if I'm learning, we can all learn. Why why try to hold back from the people? No reason. We can get right into it. So here, this combat lessons. Volume Three. and. We've done to these so far actually I forget what number podcast they are, but we've covered to these volumes is the third volume. And this is what all the volume start off with this. The paramount combat lesson learned from every operation is the vital importance of leadership. which is really an interesting thing that we say. Every single time we talk to people are equipment or supply, and above are all men and above all our men are splendid. Aggressive and determined leadership is the priceless factor which inspires a command and upon which all success in battle depends. It is responsible for success or failure. And that is. July third, nineteen, forty, four. Starts. Off just jumping right into leadership command need for leadership comments received from all active theatres continue to emphasize the need for competent and aggressive leaders. This is especially true as regards junior officers and noncommissioned officers. Who tended General Courtney Hodges who observed operations in? North Africa and Italy stated. Before, I even get to that. Why is it? So why is it just so awesome? That they're just pointing out over and over and over again in each one of these volumes that leadership is the most important thing on the battlefield. And yet. We. Work with companies. That have no leadership training for their people. Until Axel Homefront shows up and then I guess they do. But it's bizarre. that. It's bizarre that it is so hard. What makes it? What what day? What makes it so hard to see? That leadership is the most important thing. What do you think makes it so hard to say I. Stumped. Good. Yeah. There's a couple of things I. I don't think people. Realize how impactful leadership is almost convinced themselves that hey, are what we can do is. We bring people with these skills or are our software, Sweden. They get. So wrapped up in all these other components they lose sight of the fact that this thing intangible thing that you can't really track with the with the spreadsheet they lose sight of how important it is and I think the other part that we've seen a lot now is. People lose sight of how often you have to keep addressing leadership, and so they think it's sometimes eight. No I understand what a good leadership and they think they are applying it but they don't realize that. Hey, I've gotta keep addressing this over and over and over again and they lose sight of not just how important. But also how important is how hard it is to sustain it and we come work with companies. The more we work with them and the long work of them. The more they want to keep doing and they realize man had I had no idea how long this journey was going to be. But the ones that figured out. To. They. They. They elevate quickly they so good so fast when they make it a priority. The first thing that you said. You are defacto not detached when you're inside of a company your firefighting day to day, you're trying to figure out what the next quarter is going to be. You're trying to figure out what's going on with the sales team. So you're in it and so you you start to lose track of the fact that this is this is. All about leadership. Yeah. So that happens and that's why when we come in with a company. We can immediately see because we are detached.

Dave Burke Echo Charles Dave Courtney Hodges Axel Homefront Sweden North Africa Italy
How To Tell Your Employees The Truth

Jocko Podcast

05:19 min | Last month

How To Tell Your Employees The Truth

"So Dave here we are I want to talk a little bit about how we got here in why we decided to do this. What we do. Sean Front. Is Work with companies we talked to them about leadership we try and pass on the lessons that we learn about leadership. We try and help them along the pathway and help the organization align all of their leadership. We do the same thing with e Af online, which is our all my platform. And we spend. Basically, all day every day talking about leadership with. All these different individuals and all these different scenarios and we. When these things happen, you know there's issues that get resolved. There's issues that get. The don't get resolved and take another move in another step, and we spend a Lotta time debriefing these things and I. I was thinking and we were thinking that it would be. I've got done. One of these things and I said Nice if we had recorded that debrief and let everybody know that. There's solution to that particular problem. A lot of good topics, lot of universal lessons and we thought it might be cool to put together a podcast about that. So here we go. We try and keep it a little bit shorter than the normal Jaakko podcast not talk for hours. So we people can digest them get the lessons in move on try and keep up maybe like a half an hour something like that. Cover a couple of topics. So with that. Dave let's debrief we got. The cool part about talking about leadership. All Day, every day. I can't think of anything else. I'd rather be doing. And the conversations were having are these real time problems at these companies are struggling with and when we come up with a solution and makes a huge impact and I think the connection I was making when we're talking to it is how useful back can you don't have to be at this company for the lesson and the takeaway to be useful for you? So. This is pretty universal. The first company. This first conversation we're having it came up recently and the thing is crazy about it I probably had four different companies that I've been working with just in the last couple of weeks all dealing with the exact same thing. Gobert hits. Early March. The whole thing everything kinda shuts down. And, one of the first things we were talking about you talked about this on one of our very first eve online sessions you gotTa. Tell your people the truth. and. This is an emotional time you gotta say detached from the emotion, but you have to tell people the truth. And one of the things I think a few. People did was in their. Fifth Concerned about making their people worried. They said, hey, there's nothing to worry about. Everything's going to be fine. We're not letting anybody off we're not gonNA, make any big movements and so in the interest of keeping people come, they said something that in in in the short term actually kept them pretty calm. Hey. Yeah. Nothing to worry about. Let me ask you this. What was what they were saying the truth. So No. It wasn't the you say. That you can. You can pre identify the issue that you're going to have when the out of the gate, what you're saying is not the truth. Yeah, and here's what you gotTA. Watch out for his. I think. that you understand you might think you understand and you kind of bolster your opinion because you know it's the easy way. It's the easy way to roll. So I look and go hey, what this viruses hitting it's going to last a month. You know what we can we got enough funds will be fine. We're not laying anyone off. That's the truth as you see. The part that you're missing is you don't know. That's the part that you're missing, and if you remember early on when we were talking you national on front I said. Hey, this is a virus. It's going to run its course it just like when you get sick as a human being with virus look when you get a bacterial infection guess what you go and you take antibiotics clean you up that's just what you do. With a virus there's no, there's no antibiotics. It runs its course, and then it's you spend three days in bed. And then when it's over, it's over you lose. Five, eight pounds of whatever. Because you can't eat or you're sick or you're throwing up and then you get down is over and then you go back to normal life and I just thought to myself. Okay. This is a virus is going to run its course. In you just extrapolate that out to the nation and you say, okay, well, the virus that's what I did. Okay. The virus going to run its. And actually when you look. When you look at the world. Many places. That's exactly what it looks like. There's a massive spike, the virus runs its course, and then it's kind of gone. The. If you look at easily right now massive spike people dying it's awful and then it's over, it's run its course. So that was that was my opinion of what was gonNA happen but if you remember. When we talked about what we were going to do it s front. I said we could breath hold through this thing meaning, Hey, we could just be like, okay. Batten down the hatches. Let this thing get go through and we'll be back on the road. Two months and we'll be back to normal business.

TA Dave Sean Front Batten
Why You Should Capitalize On Marketplace Opportunities

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

05:53 min | Last month

Why You Should Capitalize On Marketplace Opportunities

"Nice Guy Community check this out today a hunter. He is known for his success as an architect of change and a leader of business transformation. His belief is the importance of talent culture and it's exemplified by the strong executives he has developed. He now works closely with executives, entrepreneurs, business leaders, and organizations to help them capitalize on marketplace opportunities and proactively address digital disruption. So what does all that stuff mean? So it means that our guest today he knows what he's talking about. He's not just a guy that talks the talk. He walks the walk as well. Welcome Tony to the Nice guys on business podcast pleasure to be hurt Doug. Thanks. For having me at love having you here man and and you know we talked a little bit in our pre interview just about some of this stuff and some of your your experience that you've been through and I love it because you've gone from publishing to pot from media to marijuana and conservative to cannabis. So can we start just a little bit with your back backstory 'cause I think it's so fascinating how you've gone from a really ultra conservative environment and publishing, and you're now into an entirely disruptive in a brand new world. So maybe share a little bit of your background and then we can take it from there. Tony. All thanks Doug I usually get asked that question that's not a straight line of course for most to think about a after a long career at Tribune company one of the greatest media companies in the world. After I left the company. There were three things I was looking for one in publishing mission. Our mission was always sold for and I wanted to have that I also love being an disruptive environment and the challenge and then third I enjoy. Building something and building a team and setting visions what I look at opportunities. On the mission side, you know cannabis a started out. In every state and I've had experience with friends and relatives that have seen the relief and benefits but disloyal cannabis and I really been attracted to that and natural medicine in general for about fifteen years now. So I started learning more about that and saw the impact it was having and I really believe that as regulations are relaxed, we're gonNA find more benefits of medicinal cannabis and so that intrigued me second clearly this is a disruptive You, know as this gains more traction more clinical trials, this will be disruptive form of treatment and medicine, and then last I believed that my experience as a an operator at Tribune and complexity was really perfectly aligned for rapidly growing company like Revolution Global, which is the Illinois based Cannabis Company that I am chairman of the board and I thought bringing those operating skills could help manage gross and really have the. Organization have the Rigor and discipline to succeed. So it wasn't that far of a stretch given my personal and belief in natural medicine but also experiences of friends and relatives that have found release is so that's how I that had brought me here and brought me to participate in this site. So you recently wrote a blog post I guess within the last couple of months and you mentioned in your blog post. Farmer versus hunter companies, and you know we're dealing in the day of this recording. Hopefully, people are listening to this five years from now what was that time in life? That was really? Challenging that that Cova dive but we're dealing right now in an environment that that you need to evolve and change rapidly or and pivot rapidly, or you're gonNA find yourself on the firing line of of extinction. So can you maybe explain this farmer and hunter mentality within organizations and see you know maybe we can create some connection between farmers and hunters and those that are in our community right now? Yes. Well, you know it's an. Older, way to look at businesses but farmers, you could just think of those as big established legacy companies. And Hunters as these emerging startups and high growth companies that are disrupting many of those legacy companies and. I really believe greatness occurs len you do and also things you know it's it's not big companies do a lot of things well, but they normally are very agile. They normally don't have this passion behind the mission and vision of the company and also their their ability to pivot to your point and drive new ideas because they're so successful in large in many times, they lose that edge and I think they could learn a lot from the hunters and maintain those real good benefits being large in scale and discipline, but add those components of. Being Agile and also creating a organizations that pivot frequently, and conversely I think a lot of times the hunter organizations. Lol. Organizations they're growing at all costs, and at some point, there's an inflection that needs to occur and use pivot that needs to occur, and they could learn a lot about building a talented leadership team having the Rigor and discipline of a large organization while maintaining. Those agility characteristics, passion conviction, innovative thinking in those. That's the essence of that blog post. Doug is learning from the strengths of one another and to be great you should do all of those things. Well, how

Cannabis Doug Tribune Company Tony Cova Illinois Marijuana Tribune Chairman Revolution Global
A Conversation With Genevieve Piturro  Founder of the Pajama Project

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

03:53 min | Last month

A Conversation With Genevieve Piturro Founder of the Pajama Project

"Hello My. Women, friends, I am so happy to share today's gas genevieve paternal with you. Her story is an inspiration, a busy television marketing exact in New York City and she hears the whisper of a little girl in her ear and her life is forever changed. This story speaks to the power of what one person can do when they have set their mind to it. Genevieve is the founder of the Pajama Project. They have given out over seven million pajamas and read books to children with those pajamas in shelters across the US in Puerto Rico. A can't wait for you to hear her story get ready to be inspired. Let's meet genevieve paternal. Welcome extraordinary woman radio. genevieve. While thank you, Happy Cami. It's great to have you here. Where are you joining us from today jokes out of Manhattan in the county of Westchester. Very good very good house Howard things out there. In West Westchester we have a lot more than in Manhattan. So it's amazing how you know half an hour away. It's so quiet and closed in Manhattan but has to be that way so that we can say exactly crazy times for sure. Isn't it upside down world? Yes. Yup. As an why some of our work is so important right now and I really am excited to hear some of your stories and here you know you're passionate around human connection and really just helping people step into leading with meeting. So I'm super super excited to hear more of your story unless you start there let's start with this amenity. You were successful television marketing EXAC in New York. And right in the heart of the city and a little girls question changed the course of your life for ever. So tell us more about that. Yes. Yes. I wanted to climb the corporate ladder. And it was not what my family expected very traditional Italian family and I think everyone's waiting for grandchildren firstborn. warned me. Only I had a culprit clock tick game and I just wanted to be independent and wants to be independent woman and I wanted to be like Mary Tyler Moore show at everything and I would just stay off and watch watcher every Saturday night as. I wish I had met the woman that I took a picture of their statue. That's that's all I got to do. But yes she she broke a lot of barriers and I want to be like her as it is a kid. And I did find the corporate ladder and fifteen years in I thought I had the great job and I had the great apartment like she and I was working on that, wardrobe. So. I heard a voice in me before that little girls question. It was question in me I was so shocked I heard a voice in me ask if this is the next thirty years of your life is this enough to that came? What were you doing when that came to you in the moment I was in my apartment was an afternoon. I don't know what they what? It must have been a weekend and I sat down because I never heard a voice come from anywhere except the babbly of my brain and this wasn't up there was lower. Now I call it my heart voice, and we all have a heart voice we need to listen to it because I wasn't listening to mind until. I screamed at me, but it was just a clear. A, clear whisper. But it was unmistakable and I sat down and I realized, wow, fifteen years in thirty eight years old now I'm thinking was right path. This is the question I have to answer. Really the answer was came to me so fast it was no, you know what was what was the big deal? I was alone and I would be along if I didn't really think about what was important because I realized all of a sudden nothing mattered.

Genevieve Manhattan New York City Pajama Project United States West Westchester Founder Mary Tyler Moore Westchester Puerto Rico Howard New York
Leadership and Toilet Paper

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

04:15 min | Last month

Leadership and Toilet Paper

"Today we're talking about leadership. And toilet paper. Yes we are right here. Are you ready? Let's go. Over the past number of months, I've done a number of mashups of leadership with other random topics. It all started with some people on my team challenging me, and then it went all the way to being a whole series of videos over time we even have a whole playlist on youtube where you can check them out. This one comes from Jose Louise who said Kevin, what about leadership and toilet paper. I don't know whether to thank Jose or to wonder if he hates me I don't know which it is but either way challenge accepted, and as long as you keep the cynicism out of it, let's see if we can make something valuable out of this leadership. And Toilet paper okay here we go. Leadership and toilet paper are necessary. They're both necessary, right? I. Don't need to tell you why this is necessary but I can tell you this that if we have leaders, things will go better now if you don't have this, there are other materials you could use. I don't think you want to pick those things just like I don't think you really want to have a team without having a leader leaders are necessary and help us make better decisions. Help US move forward at the end of the day leaders help us get better outcomes and that's what we are after. Second leadership and toilet paper are in demand. Well. Now, this stuff was clearly in demand during the early parts of the lockdown. Like shortages of toilet paper, it was in demand we got to have the teepee. And we gotTA. Have leaders. Leaders are in demand the leaders who are most effective are in great demand and have great value strive to be that kind of. See. There's lots of kinds of toilet paper. You know there's like the two ply and then there's the apply. So there's different kinds of toilet paper. There's different kinds, a leaders, and hopefully you strive to be the kind of leader that will make the best. Different biggest difference and make the best outcomes. Next leaders and toilet paper don't last forever. Eventually this role is going to be gone, it's going to be finished and as leaders we have a shelf life to hopefully longer than that roll of toilet paper but the reality is that leaders don't last forever most of us as leaders will find ourselves moving to a new team. And sometimes we need to move to a new place. The team needs fresh blood doesn't mean we're an ineffective leader, but there's A. There's a there's a time. When it's ready. When the team needs something new and we're ready to move on to something new leaders and toilet don't last forever, and lastly, leaders and toilet paper must do some dirty work. Okay I'm not going to say much more about that on the. Side. But on the leadership side. The best leaders are willing. To to roll up their sleeves and go to work, and sometimes there's work that they have to do. That's hard. That's dirty and nasty and difficult, and conflict -I and all those sorts of things as leaders. We've got to recognize the sometimes there's hard things. Unsavory things things we'd rather not have to do. That we do need to do. Now normally, at this point in an remarkable TV episode or an episode of the Remarkable Leadership Podcast, I've been summarized not really sure how I summarize leadership toilet paper but I have talked about four important things. Leaders are necessary and the best leaders are in demand. And we have a shelf life before we need to move on to help other teams or to continue to change out the enter the interpersonal relationships and the people we work with, and lastly as leader sometimes, we have to do some hard dirty stuff. Let me close with today's tweet. The best leaders are like toilet paper they are available to do the dirty work

United States Jose Louise Kevin
TikTok CEO resigns amid US pressure to sell video app

BBC World Service

00:47 sec | Last month

TikTok CEO resigns amid US pressure to sell video app

"The chief executive of the Chinese own video APP. Tic TAC, has resigned. Three months after taking up the job, Kevin Maher told employees that the political environment had changed sharply in recent weeks. Irishmen Advice, Barney reports. Mr Mayer was brought in to take talk to help give the Chinese owned app on American image. The thinking was that he would be able to negotiate with a tough on China Trump administration better than perhaps a Chinese CEO, and that would help smooth Tic Tac's path in one of its biggest markets. The US Instead, The intense pressure from the Trump Administration on TIC Tac only grew President Trump claims Tic Tac is a national security threat because of who it's owned by the Chinese Internet from fight dance.

Tic Tac Trump Administration Donald Trump Chinese Internet Mr Mayer Kevin Maher Chief Executive Barney United States CEO President Trump
How to Coach Your Sales Team with Jeb Blount

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:29 min | Last month

How to Coach Your Sales Team with Jeb Blount

"I don't know what feelings come to mind for you when you hear the word sales. Maybe you've been sold to. AB. Something's been pushed on you. You're like a lot of people, your experience with sales as somebody's manipulating you to do something that you don't really want to do. That's gross. Fear, small business owner. If you lead a business, if you're part of a sales team, the truth is you don't have a business if you don't sell. From the Ramsey network this is the entree leadership podcast where we help business leaders, grow themselves, their teams and their profits. I'm your host, Daniel Tardy, and today my guest is Jeb Blunt. Jebsen author speaker, but he's not just one of those motivational gurus. The last thing we need is more hype around this topic we need real answers we need real people, give it a solutions for not just how to sell stuff not how to push things on people, but actually how to serve. At entreleadership teach. Doing sells well as it's all about serving people. And that's what JEB beliefs. Lot of organizations are doing this while they're serving their selling growing and some organizations they're not because they're actually spending less time selling, serving and spend a lot more time just talking about it. The problem for a lot of small business people and I was there I, love the corporate environment and started my own business is that you plan to plan to plan to plan to sell. So you spend more time trying to get your business cards set up than you actually do trying to go out and get customers. So entrepreneurs are the first people. And if you are an entrepreneur businessperson, you're always going to be the number one salesperson for your organization. You can't ever forget that. So for small business people acquiring customers and keeping customers is the number. One thing you do. That's how you make an impact organization and is how you scale and if you don't do those things very well, everything else doesn't matter. I want to talk about the art of sales and how that works in a second. But in let's stay with this idea that small business and entrepreneurs you know these guys figure out they figure out how to sell. You know an oftentimes I'm visiting with the founder of a small business who you know they are still selling actively and they're actually kind of getting stuck because they can't go work on the business and build the operations and lead and build a team because like you said, they're still there number one sales person. There's this tension of will bring in revenue. How do I let that? Go while I go build the business well, that goes back to. You can't scale yourself. So if you're going to run a business you have to at some point, elevate yourself to a leader that doesn't mean that you you're not selling anymore because in my business deals in the line myself people bring me in and sometimes I'll be the person that pushes it over. But the goal is to coach them to the point and grow them to the point where they don't need me because my whole goal is leader to make myself obsolete and the people don't need me into deal however, I think that is the inflection point for every small business as when does the business owner in the entrepreneur move from doer right to scaler and Listening to your podcast with Dave that you did a couple of three weeks ago and you know he's talking about not barring money or not taking the sea. So when you're growing slow as he says and I'm a business that grew slow with no debt no, no capital no investors get free. You know the point is that you have to there's pain in that scale, and the hardest thing that you're going to do is higher for a salesperson. You're probably going to fail and then when you have the second salesperson. The third salesperson you're probably GONNA fail until you find the right person. Why is that? Why? Why do you have to feel so many times to get it right if you're a really big company and you're hiring salespeople, you have the capital to go and find talent you've got you've got an HR department that does the recruiting for you. You've got a battery of task to bring them in and you have the ability to hire lots of people and maybe maybe heart ten people in three of them work but you're. Still Ahead. But if you're a small business owner and you're selling and you're doing and you're delivering and you're taking care everything and then you're trying to be good at hiring people in professionals that are good. Hiring sales people fail often. So small business people come to me and you know that we coach and they say, well, you know how do I hire salesperson and I say the same thing it's not easy and you're gonNA fail but you need to do it and you need to understand that you're GONNA have. To go through the process until you find that anchor and once you find that anchor then you take care of that person Thiessen which you know, and then go on the next anchor we wanted to be easy. We want there to be an easy button around there's not an easy by around it. There's not an easy button I not an easy button anywhere there isn't, and so what happens though is in then you end up hiring people can see the next steps you hire people and you do you scale yourself. And then one day you walk into a conference room and I've been there and all your people are sitting in a conference room and they're having a conversation about systems and processes and workflows, and all those things and you look around and there's nobody in the organization selling anything and you have to say stop wait a minute. We can be the best organized system company in the world. But if we don't go sell stuff, this doesn't make a difference because we're not creating casual so you moved from balancing your time. Into business versus working on the business to then helping balance other people's time working to grow the business versus working on the business and the problems continue to grow they just they're just different but the fact doesn't change that businesses job is to get and keep customers. That's it. That's number one you do that you're. GonNa win and that's

Business Owner Jeb Blunt Daniel Tardy Founder Thiessen Dave
Creating New Work Routines

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

03:01 min | Last month

Creating New Work Routines

"TV in the remarkable leadership podcast. Today, we're talking about creating new work routines. Are you ready? Well, let's get started. Last week from the same chair on this same channel I talked about. The power of routines to improve our lives and so? That you can go back and watch it but let's just think about your routines for a second. You ever been in a situation when things were changing and you're a little bit disoriented and maybe even discombobulated. One of the reasons was that that change got you out of sync with your routines or the routines that you used before don't work anymore so. For example, you may now be working from home and you didn't use to do that. So you may still feel a bit disoriented and discombobulated in relationship to that. So what we WANNA do today is help you think about how to consciously create new routines whether there because you're now working remotely or for any other reason, how can you consciously create new routines that will serve you best? Let's talk about that now. Okay. First thing is review your former routines looking for winners so even if your situation is Now different from what it was. You had a routine for a certain thing before how did that work and what about it was affected, and then how can you tweak it for the new situation? So look at your past routines to say what worked and what didn't right. Then translate old into new if there were things that you used to do that work really well, let's either replicate them now or tweak them for your new situation. So what we're really talking about here is routines are sub-conscious their habit. But what we're talking about now is looking at those and deciding which ones of these might serve US best moving forward. Next ask yourself what do I need now? Again, your situation might be different. So. The way I did the routine before won't work or wouldn't really serve me now. So the question is, what do I need now?

United States
Ed Latimore Explains How Action Leads to Mindset

Dose of Leadership

05:09 min | Last month

Ed Latimore Explains How Action Leads to Mindset

"Admit. It's an honor to have you on the show. Welcome to dose of Leadership A. Thank you for having me man I really appreciate you taking the time to talk to me I'm always grateful when people listen to. Say Yeah well, you you're when I get a lot of requests for people to come on this show your stood out to me again I I. Love you know everybody loves a great story of how you got to this point. I mean you're relatively young young man but you've experienced a lot of life in your your your youthful years. I think you probably more lifetimes than than most of us I mean, I think even when I was reading your bio on your website you. Like in your fourth incarnation of your life. You know what was funny somewhat off topic but about that bio I have found that when you get. Good people around you in terms of like their skill and ability, it tends to a lets you focus on what you're google? And and this website is it sounds you know to buy this very new production. He have like three, hundred, sixty, five days ago that website look completely different and we put a lot of time into redesign it and making it more friendly more for conversion Cetera et. CETERA. One of the things we did not have was bio and and I'm I'm lazy man like. ME Rather. I don't like to put the star of energy and things some towns and I'm working on the air and the guy who works on my website very smart. God's got a lot of insight both both technically and socially you know put together a bio didn't give me guidance asset, right? How long would it be goes lungs you want it. So I got to writing and I said, well, what am I good at I? Think I'm GonNa Communication I think that's why in teaching spinning these stories, these words. So as it, what's the best way to describe my life because I become aware of light you gotta sound different you can't only your house right and I said Okay I always tell people and I I do I've lived A different experiences that that are so different that you don't hear. From them in the same person. And from each of those, you know with with the blessing, the realism blessing I have control over it and slut how my brain works out how I like to take lessons learned from beings and really. Sit In dive deep gets some afflictions of my life. That's where that came from the four lobs and related for major lessons that I've learned moving through them, and in really continues to give me a great advantage today I. Think makes me more label gives me a different different ways to enjoy 'em relate to the worth. Yeah. No there's a level of authenticity there and I think that's what stood out to me when I was. Again. Get I probably get thirty to fifty pitches a day for people to come on in your stood out because it does seem like there. I don't know what it is. I can't even articulate it, but there seems to be a level of. Authenticity around you you seem to be I don't know if you're intentional about it or not, but it seems you seem very authentic and I. I think you know. Someone actually asked me that last night and what I realized is that. In terms of the intention. Of versus not being intentional manufacturer versions spontaneous or whatever What what I think is occurring is that right I I don't have many natural talents. One of them is teaching I think I have a combination of the patients versus the ability to kind of reverse engineer not be struck on a carson knowledge etc autos things together make you agree teacher and communication and I understand that for me to be successful with what I want to do with how to be I can't ever let myself getting a position where who I am comes into question. Yeah. So that automatically. For moves strongly disincentivize is a false presentation. So. All that leaves us for me to be myself and and fortunately I've lived in such a way to myself is not a bad guy. He's not a dull guy. I understand that by being honest with moderns about everything I've gone through I can affect the bigger change it does no good if I tell a Guy You know don't drink alcohol for. Bad for you or something like that. It's a lot of course a lot more back in you know discuss my troubles to the point where you know so. The book about it many articles website about it. If there's a commercial angry I'm out of four, I need to be able to eat. into you to do this. But I'm lucky in that I don't have to put such emphasis on the commercial because the life itself is the work it's it's the art. Now like in many ways, I tell people in the art and artists not a businessman.

Google Engineer Carson
Ed Latimore Explains How Action Leads to Mindset

Dose of Leadership

05:09 min | Last month

Ed Latimore Explains How Action Leads to Mindset

"Admit. It's an honor to have you on the show. Welcome to dose of Leadership A. Thank you for having me man I really appreciate you taking the time to talk to me I'm always grateful when people listen to. Say Yeah well, you you're when I get a lot of requests for people to come on this show your stood out to me again I I. Love you know everybody loves a great story of how you got to this point. I mean you're relatively young young man but you've experienced a lot of life in your your your youthful years. I think you probably more lifetimes than than most of us I mean, I think even when I was reading your bio on your website you. Like in your fourth incarnation of your life. You know what was funny somewhat off topic but about that bio I have found that when you get. Good people around you in terms of like their skill and ability, it tends to a lets you focus on what you're google? And and this website is it sounds you know to buy this very new production. He have like three, hundred, sixty, five days ago that website look completely different and we put a lot of time into redesign it and making it more friendly more for conversion Cetera et. CETERA. One of the things we did not have was bio and and I'm I'm lazy man like. ME Rather. I don't like to put the star of energy and things some towns and I'm working on the air and the guy who works on my website very smart. God's got a lot of insight both both technically and socially you know put together a bio didn't give me guidance asset, right? How long would it be goes lungs you want it. So I got to writing and I said, well, what am I good at I? Think I'm GonNa Communication I think that's why in teaching spinning these stories, these words. So as it, what's the best way to describe my life because I become aware of light you gotta sound different you can't only your house right and I said Okay I always tell people and I I do I've lived A different experiences that that are so different that you don't hear. From them in the same person. And from each of those, you know with with the blessing, the realism blessing I have control over it and slut how my brain works out how I like to take lessons learned from beings and really. Sit In dive deep gets some afflictions of my life. That's where that came from the four lobs and related for major lessons that I've learned moving through them, and in really continues to give me a great advantage today I. Think makes me more label gives me a different different ways to enjoy 'em relate to the worth. Yeah. No there's a level of authenticity there and I think that's what stood out to me when I was. Again. Get I probably get thirty to fifty pitches a day for people to come on in your stood out because it does seem like there. I don't know what it is. I can't even articulate it, but there seems to be a level of. Authenticity around you you seem to be I don't know if you're intentional about it or not, but it seems you seem very authentic and I. I think you know. Someone actually asked me that last night and what I realized is that. In terms of the intention. Of versus not being intentional manufacturer versions spontaneous or whatever What what I think is occurring is that right I I don't have many natural talents. One of them is teaching I think I have a combination of the patients versus the ability to kind of reverse engineer not be struck on a carson knowledge etc autos things together make you agree teacher and communication and I understand that for me to be successful with what I want to do with how to be I can't ever let myself getting a position where who I am comes into question. Yeah. So that automatically. For moves strongly disincentivize is a false presentation. So. All that leaves us for me to be myself and and fortunately I've lived in such a way to myself is not a bad guy. He's not a dull guy. I understand that by being honest with moderns about everything I've gone through I can affect the bigger change it does no good if I tell a Guy You know don't drink alcohol for. Bad for you or something like that. It's a lot of course a lot more back in you know discuss my troubles to the point where you know so. The book about it many articles website about it. If there's a commercial angry I'm out of four, I need to be able to eat. into you to do this. But I'm lucky in that I don't have to put such emphasis on the commercial because the life itself is the work it's it's the art. Now like in many ways, I tell people in the art and artists not a businessman.

Google Engineer Carson
Are You Leading From Inside A Fishbowl |

Leadership Biz Café

04:36 min | Last month

Are You Leading From Inside A Fishbowl |

"As I'm sure you can imagine I read a lot of books to help me prepare for my interviews with my guests not to mention articles in studies I. Read Tell me developed material for my talks and corporate training sessions as well as for new articles I write from my leadership log. As such, I like to make time to read about things outside of the field leadership to give me a change of pace and scenery. While reading one of these casual reads in my reading pile I read about one of these odd facts that make for good conversation starters when meeting New People. The item in question is a law in the city of Monza Italy that says, it's illegal for people to keep goldfish in curved bowls. The rationale behind this law is that curve balls create a distorted view of what's outside the fishbowl and that goldfish would suffer because of this distortion. Now while this law can make for some interesting discussions around the dinner table. I also realized that it serves as a useful metaphor to evaluate your leadership to better understand the impact your words and actions are really having on those you lead. In keynotes. About. My First Book Leadership Vertigo. I share how leadership vertigo reverse to this gap that exists between how you view your leadership and how your employees experience your leadership. Now under normal circumstances, this gap is something that every leader can manage and shrink to ensure real alignment between these two realities. However, as we are all aware covid nineteen has made a substantial impact in the way we operate and will continue to do so for some time and with the unplanned shift to relying more on virtual communication channels over in person conversations with both our employees and our customers leaders are being challenged and tested more than ever to be strong communicators who provide clarity both for the president and what's to come as well as assurances that we can find a way to the other side. We've already seen how the cove nineteen pandemic has cast a harsh but necessary spotlight on social injustices which have gone unaddressed for far too long. To, think that a similar harsh light will not be cast on the ongoing leadership issues from the past decade or so is in many ways a reflection of our willingness to swim within our own Fishbowl, allowing those distortions to obscure the necessary effort and work that needs to be done. If we are to help organization, do more than survive this pandemic but thrive in that new reality when we finally bring a definitive end to this health crisis. Of course as I shared in my talks and corporate trainings around this concept of Leadership Vertigo, it's often hard for us to realize that we're swimming in our own version of a fishbowl. In fact, I've had many attendees come to be after my talk saying they wished they had brought their colleagues or even their boss along because they realized this is the problem they're having with them. That they are too focused on how they view their leadership that they failed to appreciate how their colleagues and employees experience working under their leadership. In many ways, these leaders are experiencing that very distortion. Those Italian lawmakers were concerned about exposing goldfish too. So how can you ensure that you're not leading from inside a fishbowl that distorts your perspective of not only what it's really like for people to work under your leadership, but what they really need from you to be successful in their efforts. Well to help you start this process of gaining more clarity awareness and a better understanding of things I'd like to share with you for questions, some of which I wrote in my book, as well as some that I share in some of my leadership keynotes that will help you with this process. The first question is. What am I really communicating to my employees? The second question. How does my emotional state impact the people around me and how I respond to them. The third. Question. What is it like to work with me? And finally. How and by helping my employees to do their best work.

Monza Italy President Trump
Multiply Your Time

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

04:36 min | Last month

Multiply Your Time

"Hey Rory. Thank you so much for being on the PODCAST I can't wait for this conversation. Well, thanks man I'm I'm glad to be here. Thank you so much for speaking at the summit and also just to say this frankly were also living in a post cova world or. Current Cova. and which means things have radically changed and things not only have radically changed what they changed. Or they're changing. Almost every day it seems like there's new. New Information new strategies just this whole pandemic has introduced us into a season of rapid change. One question that I might lead off with his. Is Time Management still relevant when there's so many serious things going on when there's so many so much tragedy going on why is it still appropriate to talk about this idea of how we manage time? Yeah. Well, so let's start a fight early because. The I don't believe in time management like time management is a total misnomer. Manage time there is the I cannot pause I can't fast forward time I can't rewind time like time continues on whether I want it to or not. So there is no such thing as time management there is only self-management there is managing your emotions managing your focus it is it is managing yourself and what you choose to do and I think that self management is more important today than. As important today as any other time in history I, think it's more relevant though today because die distraction in dilution is is so rampant and and that I think really makes this. Like critical a critical time at just to you know to Dr, caveat sure you're familiar with the seven habits of highly effective people right in the twenty five million copies. Here's a here's the thing about that book that a lot of people probably don't know or haven't thought about. That book. Amazing. Changed the change the world but that book was written in Nineteen. Eighty nine. And just you to think about for a second how different the world is today than it was in the year nineteen, eighty nine. Radically Different Yeah. And and so that's why I think you know when when we started to notice that that the multipliers, the ultra performers, there were things that they were doing and how they were processing decisions that was different from everybody else it's because they've they have evolved because you can't solve today's time management challenges using yesterday's time management strategies. Yeah. I appreciate you saying. That Roy because this is what I loved about your talk you introduce this new phrase, not just managing time but actually multiplying time as soon as I heard that I was like, yes, that's that's ten times better. Even if it was possible to manage time I, don't want to manage time on a multiply time. Can you talk a little bit more about that? Yeah. So That's the thing is is when people? When people think of like you know control time you can't really control time. But if I say you can multiply time everybody the first. Sunday. Here it they typically think it's a superlative like it's an exaggeration and they go. Well, you can't multiplied time and and it is true that there's nothing that we can do to add more time to one given day right? Like we all have the same twenty four. Hours, which is fourteen hundred and forty minutes, eighty, six, thousand, four, hundred seconds, and there's nothing that I can do in my power to add more time today. But that's exactly the problem is that what most people do is they wake up in the world and they they ask themselves what's the most important thing I can do today and that is not how multipliers think what multipliers do is completely different they. The urgency calculation is Evalu- evaluating everything through the Lens of twenty four hour window. What's the most important thing I can do today what multipliers do as they evaluate their decisions based on what we call the significance calculation the significance calculation is breaking free of the paradigm of today and their instead thinking about tomorrow and the next day and the next day and the next day so. The question is is totally different. It's not what's the most important thing I can do today. It's one of the things that I can do today that create more time tomorrow.

Time Management Cova. Rory Evalu ROY