Latinx

Listen to the latest audio content in Latinx culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Latinx individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Sourced from premium podcasts.

In Luz We Trust With Linda Garcia

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:23 min | 5 d ago

In Luz We Trust With Linda Garcia

"Linda Garcia. Welcome to come up here for having again and again Ah. Welcome back I'm so excited for this conversation because it's long overdue and also perfect timing you moved. So I haven't seen you in person in a long time. Yes. How long ago was that? Can you believe it's year already already? Yeah that's. Insane. How do you feel I think? Well, it took a long time. I don't want to Discount Bat. It did take some adjustments and I did a lot of inward work which ironically was part of the journey where I'm at now. So it's like part of the process, and now that I'm like lifting my head above the water. Speak I feel like nothing would be happening. Had I not moved none of this like there I don't think I would be doing what I'm doing now if I still had been in La totally in I remember number Lewis and I tried to talk you out of it. Yeah because like you talked about this way before you actually made the move. Yes, and we were like, how do you know? Yeah so true you know I mean obviously, it's not an easy decision. There was a lot of ego attachment tied to like living in La. What was I going to do if I wasn't in L. A. and the reality is that like I knew I spend most of my time inside my office I'm not doing L. A. Banks. And if there's ever an la thing that is really important, I can simply outs two hour flight. You know I didn't have to make it more complicated than what it was. But what's interesting is one of the consistent messages that I kept receiving from my intuition was that I would encounter wealth. When. I moved out to Dallas shut up consistent loud and clear. It was actually more specific than that. When you moved to Dallas, you are going to be wealthy. Did you question it believed it one hundred percent so it was almost like the driving factor of having to move out here I told one person and it was Ana I saw her I think the week that I was going to move. I was invited to any event with. Nielsen. was the man awards actually end I told her I said, you know my intuition keeps telling me that when I moved to Dallas I'm going to be wealthy and it was weird even say that says that. Right. Sure. Well. Let's talk about that because even with that, there's a lot of shame in our community thinking about wealth and and having a lot of money. It's like how dare you want to have a lot of money because those people like all the beliefs that get so like put in our heads around people that have money because we look at the best you know that has all the money in you're like hanging out but I so Mila, you know with all their stuff and so there's this like sense of shame that. We grow up with around being wealthy. So how was it for you? When you kept getting that? Of course you you've done a lot of work that yes. So I did start doing the work towards that a couple of years ago a wall. So two years prior to moving. So it's been a total of three years and it's been very intentional work like I need to heal my money wounds because money was coming in and I would feel guilty about having it or I would find a way to get less of it. If. I was producing an event or opening up space I would charge my break even point how stupid is that I would urge enough to make money yes. Though I was doing that for a long time and it's very Still. Yeah. That's not okay. something. Really. I mean really it's the clearest message of Oh yeah. You don't value yourself. Exactly. It's. It's all about self worth. So share meister with with Airbus before I forget it, I sent a whole newsletter about it because this month and power sisters is. month. So we're all working on our self worth Steph and so for me unconsciously at individ-, worthy of two, hundred, fifty dollar airports because dairy I spent all this money when there's kids that are dying and children in cages and how Meghan spent two hundred fifty dollars in the pair of electronic set Dr Necessary Right. So what I was doing, this is how like annoying or unconscious works to like sabotages right. So I realized that I had like fifty pairs of different kinds of headphones. Word for different things like some were good for phone calls the wired ones were the ones that are good for phone calls. The wireless were only good for like walking my dog and listening to podcasts because if somebody called me, nobody could hear me ahead over. That were good for like listening to something and like whatever right? Like all the fifty ones that I had had a recent to be, and then when I did the math pam you've bought three. Air Pods. Bright like we do that all the time I mean I know a beach Lucas I live at both solid cotto it's not. It's crazy how we will justify spending a lot of little bit of money. And not the one time. This is a good investment.

Dallas LA Linda Garcia Nielsen. Airbus Steph L. A. Banks Mila Lucas Lewis L. A. Meghan
Autumnal Equinox with Isabel Cadenas

Podcast Gumbo

03:14 min | 6 d ago

Autumnal Equinox with Isabel Cadenas

"Apple. So you said. You've been the emirate EAC you. Marry. Enlisted, elementary. Silicon clearly don't you. Give Up Bongo with respect on the second later. Puts get. Medical meanness when both guest committed for theft better soda you OUTTA. Yes must go to. Alerts, the muscle. But fouled admitted kb that must've been. Aspen. Excellent podcast Gumbo has gone international. I was so excited that Isabel greed to be a guest. So I could test out how well my ninth and tenth grade Spanish classes have held up all these years. So let's see how well I can translate what said. Here we go. Hi Paul. It's Isabel today is September twenty second and here Madrid like in the rest of the northern hemisphere, it's the tunnel equinoxes. I get very sad when the summer ends and that's why I want you to recommend me a podcast that can give me hope to endure the days that gets shorter the days get colder. Please make me believe there's life beyond summer. Thanks Ball. Had, I do. Okay truth be told I cheated I. Ask Isabel to translate what she said and I just read that back. After mismatch Zia would not be proud. For my first recommendation I found an apology is Minnesota with Alli Ward in it. Allie suggestive tissues word that she thinks should be a word. I east to. In this episode she talks about things we associate with summer firefly's watermelon barbecues and peeing in pools. So if the tunnel equinox gets you down, grow up something on the Barbie track down some hollow watermelon an post, a few picks using the tunnel equinoxes Hashtag. Today's guest is Isabel Cadenas. Kenyan. Isabel. Is the host of the day S? No CEO Blah podcast. DASS OH say no OB, La is a narrative nonfiction podcast that tries to connect the dots between personal and collective silences. The big news is that the podcast just dropped this week so you can listen right from the get go. For Third Recommendation Isabel recommends the magic carpet flight manual podcast. Isabel says, and I quote. The podcasts I'd like to recommend is Kathy Fitzgerald's the magic carpet flight manual. I liked this story because Kathy's delicacy in writing and tracking is as magic as the flying carpet itself unquote. For today's extra hot sauce I'm going to say that the one Spanish word that I'll never forget is Limpia Para Rhesus. Don't ask me why because I've never had a reason to use it ever since learning it. It means windshield wiper.

Isabel Cadenas Isabel Allie Kathy Fitzgerald Apple. Theft Aspen ZIA Alli Ward CEO Paul Minnesota LA
Black Lives Matter In Belize

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | Last week

Black Lives Matter In Belize

"Once again, this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here is good to have you with us. I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. Once again, the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. So, with that in mind, let me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. Yeah for sure. So what envisioning what I was in? When I came up with the article title you know those with everything that's going on. There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US I find a lot of conversations especially. I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly an African American movement which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. particularly in the US. but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. Caribbean. Europe other places. Outside saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. So. In the case, of Central, America you know black lives have always mattered. There's always been struggles of On, the ground with black people fighting again, know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? America. So that's what I was thinking about. That's what I had in mind when I, came up with this article and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. Even. Delve into what You, know black lives. Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. Black Communities and black histories in the region I. so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. Belize as well. So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. But with that said, there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, there's some other groups that need to be recognized. So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. Correct. Yes for sure. And that's even including myself I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. So depending on. The vantage point, but you look at central. America play believes etc. Gua. Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. So thinking about that identity in believes to historic. Black Group are black creoles. And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. It's common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, who visually looks why to also call themselves. And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. And of course. When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. migration and group within believe. So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. So that's also present there. and then recently you have a lot of immigrants from. The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. Think someone someone from Ghana, and then of course, from Haiti as well. considering migration Haitians to central. So there's like different levels of that. But in terms of like historic, it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. Father vice versa So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. Experience within the country which kind of work to conceptualize how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important to also considering language racial formations. So yeah.

America Central America Belize Belize Central America Black Group Nicole Ramsey Latin America United States Uc Berkeley Department Of African Oscar Fernandez Caribbean Europe Gutty Funez Duras A. Father Haiti Ghana Jamaica
What is Play Therapy?

Latinx Therapy

07:32 min | Last week

What is Play Therapy?

"Are. Right we are back with another episode and I'm really excited to have on the body guests on the show with us on the data. Vargas is a licensed mental health counselor. She's a registered play therapist and supervisor, but also she's trained in em Dr and not only that is certified as a I play practitioner. So we really have an amazing guest with us that's going to talk about safe air. I want to share a little bit more about her Andrea is also the south chapter. Chair for the Lord Association for play therapy and she has specialize in child and adolescent counseling. Since two thousand six, her practice is located in a western. Florida. where she serves children of all ages teens and their families, as well as college students and as passionate about helping parents and strengthen their relationships through able therapeutic interventions and the I was born in. Columbia and emigrated to the United States with her family when she was a toddler growing up, she remembers that therapy like in most Latin families was believed to be or what unquote people with problems crazy people. So thank you and the wrath or coming on after talking about this for so long welcome to let the next therapy. Hi Yes, and so excited to be here. Thank you for having. Sat. We're GONNA talk about play therapy and I. Know some of the listeners may be hearing this modality for the first time. So let's go ahead and get started with just explaining what is play therapy. Okay. So play therapy is what you would translate regular talk therapy to the developmental age of a child rates. So when we picture adult going to therapy normally command area having a deal more or less than what they're gonNa work on on what they're going to talk about and they sit. On the couch and then the dialogue starts right. But with kids, they necessarily come up with the idea of wanting to go to a therapist. So their parents really bring them in talking to kids like most of you know if you guys are parents, it's not the same. You know some kids don't have the words and even if they do, they'll more than like me say things like, I. Don't know for energy look at you like the really. So with great, you meet them with a yards of elementary. So kids play and they also stare feelings and they even crosses all the changes that are happening around them or maybe negative events that have occurred in their family or in their life and. Of play therapies is a therapist train specifically to enter a child world and pickup themes that the child might be playing out to get a better understanding of how this child feeling what they're struggling with, and then working closely with the parents to help their parents understand them, and then giving parents tools to make certain adjustments and also the child helping them. Understand better ways to communicate or better ways to manage and culprit their Felix Okay and so play therapy involves the children, but it sounds like it involves the parents as well. Yes. Yes. I. Mean. If you think about it when a therapist needs to do child, they might need them once a week but that's not enough time to really change or enough. It's almost impossible to king somebody a child when you're not thinking about the whole family or even school. So if the child is having a problem at school, just working with the kyle limits you to what how much can you really made so if you work closely with the school, you Greco see if the parents and if maybe they're have grandparents, for example. So part of working with. A calendar understanding that they have a lot of adults involved in their life, and if all the adults get on the same page and work together that child is going to be way more successful. Okay. What about children that have caregivers or are in the foster care system? Are they eligible to receive play therapy like with IBM modality for them as well? If they don't have a consistent caregiver? Yes. I mean, when we think about foster, can they definitely need a safe face to process all of those feeling that? You know that they're feeling because of their foster care placement. So it's a little tricky because like you said, they don't have consistent caregivers, but you know if they are in a foster home, you can work leash with the foster parent and then whatever school they were going to. So maybe not as consistent because they might change the foster home or maybe they are still working our reunification with their parents with their biological parents. You can always include depending on the case right whoever is currently taking care of the child and if they still have contact with the biological parent involving his okay that makes sense. What are the ages that play therapy is best for? So people say like play therapists say that they're play therapy can work with anybody from three to one hundred and three right by it been studied and studied have found that it's most effective with kids between the ages of three and twelve. So it is possible and what about the children with special needs is play therapy also something that they can do? Yes. They are just like in adult therapy there's different specializations so they are different type. Training. Somebody would take in order to work with children on the autism spectrum. Can called off play. There's other stuff likes floor time so. Underneath play therapy, there's different branches. So as long as you are there, understand the child special need in your trine in working with that special needs population than we can definitely use sleep there.

Child World Supervisor Vargas Lord Association Andrea United States Columbia Florida. Kyle IBM Greco
LIVE From Home: Here We Go!

In The Thick

06:14 min | Last week

LIVE From Home: Here We Go!

"Ought. To think this is a podcast about politics race and culture from a POC. Perspective I may know Hosa and I'm who you're a low and welcome to in the thick live from home I mean I had to commute from one bedroom to another to get here but I'm here on time. I'm here on time and I'm all present for you. Actually. We're so happy that you're joining us. So thrilled we actually thought we had this big plan for twenty twenty like all you. We were GONNA take the show on the row. We were going to be meeting you in person hugging dance. We're going to dance onstage maybe drink a beer or two afterward. But you know the pandemic happened, a lot of sadness happened a lot of rage happened, and so we're going to be virtual. We're talking about the twenty twenty election along with the letter other things including the POC vote. And you know it's really super important. So just because we're not out there in person doesn't mean we don't have to have these conversations and you know gymnasts we got to all stars tonight to all-stars please give workers. Welcome to Jamila King She's a reporter and host of the Mother Jones podcast she's joining us from her family's In Oakland California joke. Greeting. From apocalypse I doing house the dog. Oh man out there. It's rough. I'm looking outside of my window right now and the sky is. Orange you know. It's kind of tricky but I think it's real. Yeah. It's it's really are out here I you guys. All right. Let's give a poop roof to. Elite. Contributing opinion writer with the times and he's He's not live from the suburbs from Alexandria where we crazy. Live from home life from home or my kids are in the room and I'm praying to God they don't come in and start yelling. We crazy and Drinking Chai in. Coffee hoping that Jamila is. Safe. My home state burning I'm trying to come back to you guys new. York. One piece. Hey. Guess Co host to of in the thick, not only all stars but they've they've guest cohost. So awesome that you guys just say I was thinking about this this podcast years ago and we called so much of what's happening in America right nine we actually have the records to prove it just like the audio records of trump. We have the records to prove that we called a lot of this four years ago two, thousand, sixteen I feel like it's five because I've aged horrible fifty. In our minds in two thousand fifteen but it came to fruition in two, thousand, sixteen but. But. Yeah we did we and one of the things that we talked about which we all have talked about is the role of the media and how you guys are getting it wrong in. So many ways we talk about that but let's start off with our first topic so. It was twenty twenty. I think. You know every single one of us is battling some level of low grade or high-grade. Depression? You know he's just kind seeping in for me. The end of the summer is really hard moving into yet another season and still being in lockdown You know also just the weight of these decades, centuries of racism and injustice in this country. and that is kind of the backdrop for our twenty twenty-nine election update. We are now less than sixty days away from the November election I know, right so both the trump and binding campaigns are really upping their games. We think, right. We'd Hoke we know the Republicans are the Democrats. This election season but hey, the pandering has started as well. I don't know if guys have seen this actually was one of the first people notified about this campaign video by by Joe Biden people that are associated with the Joe. Biden campaign it's a campaign salsa song called. Biden. Muscles. Things. Just just. Coming off. Applaud keeps going. By. By then? Okay. Okay. Okay. So Oh God that's going to be playing all over Kissimmee Florida. I'm telling you they're going all in I know the people that created it. Very committed they just basically put Biden on the hook for that stuff right there. Yeah ecological in. Los Angeles. Off The detention facility. So his own campaign song is saying he's about to do that. Yeah. So and then the other thing I just wanted to add. Yaas who Maria interviewed. And frontline, we talk about this I think all the time you know the Obama deportation policy she was named to the transition team of Biden's campaign and all the immigrants, rights, activists, immigrant lawyers that I know I know you guys have been following. This are just there's a story in the hill people need to read it. They are up in arms about destroy. So there's a lot of questions about the Democrats right. Right it's it's yours to lose and I have nothing personally against Cecilia when yours But I did interview her and it was a moment that was very challenging Was You know? Talk me down 'cause right now I'm feeling like the. Vote. We are combined this immense electorate and it's like. Are you kidding me twenty twenty? I've been talking about this since the first time I covered politics in what in the early nineteen nineties. POC voters taken for granted.

Joe Biden Twenty Twenty Jamila King Maria Hosa Mother Jones York Alexandria Los Angeles America Oakland Depression Florida Cecilia California Hoke Writer CO Barack Obama
A Conversation With Maria Hinojosa And Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Latino USA

06:03 min | Last week

A Conversation With Maria Hinojosa And Lulu Garcia-Navarro

"The one and only Monday. Joins, me now welcome Lulu. It's it's such a pleasure. I. It is such a pleasure to have you on and to read this book it's called once I was you and it is based around the story. Of how you came to the United States for the first time, tell us that story. Yeah. Well, it's an interesting story. I didn't actually know it like a lot of us. We don't actually ask our parents. So how exactly did I know that you came for example, my whole family we were born in Mexico my dad MPC go of us in Mexico City and dad gets hired by the University of Chicago. He's a medical doctor dedicated to research and long story short he helps to create the cochlear implant. He was an amazing human being. May He rest in peace? So that was in Chicago and my mom, and the four of us kids I was the baby in her arms get on a plane. It's the early nineteen. Sixty's we fly from Mexico City to Dallas and change planes in Dallas, and then we're GONNA fly onto Chicago and. When I finally found out the story when I wrote raising, which is a Motherhood Memoir that I wrote like twenty years ago. You know I found out that there was this whole thing that happened at the airport and that an immigration agent was like you know saying that had some weird skin thing and you know maybe had to put me in quarantine and my mom was like Nah and then I came and I saved the no she didn't say it like this but basically, it was like me Ma Ma Ma you know. She's five feet tall by the way, but stood up and. Know had this kind of moment with immigration agent and and it was a story that I told. Kind of like saying, wow, my mom is such a cool woman like I understand where I get my powerful voice even though she's tiny, she spoke back to an immigration agent. and. Then in the writing of this book, blue is really what happens is that I really understand what was happening there. There were trying to separate you from your mother. They basically told your mom that they were GonNa, take you away and put you in quarantine quote unquote and that she was free to go with her other children but that you would have to stay behind I mean. Can you imagine like? When my mom called me in the midst of and you know Lou that I've been covering this story, the entirety, my career immigration writ. Large. And my mom calls me at the airport. I was flying from one back when we were flying around and in the midst of the height of babies being put into cages, we were hearing the voices. You know we knew this was happening. This is not. This not begin with the trump administration but anyway. Mom. Calls me and she's crying she's like is Gay It could have been me. If I'm a your she was like that was I could have been one of those moms and I swear to Lulu that. By heart dropped I was like Oh. My God. So it's not a story of like my mom. Eh, you know speaking back it's a realized now a story of trauma and that. Wouldn't have happened I think had I not written the book and had the horror of immigration policies becomes so. Crystal. Clear. So inhumane so hurtful and frankly now finally so public You. As you mentioned what brought to Chicago, which is where you grew up, but you always maintained your connection to Mexico and your roots you'd go back and forth. You came here on a green card. When did you become a citizen? I asked this simply because that transition of becoming. An American you said was difficult for you. You. You found it hard to sort of occupy these two spaces. So, it was great because in the writing of the book, I actually had to like do the time line and and then I had to go back and find my citizenship. It was a actually I had just come back from a reporting trip with Scott Simon Scott and I were down inside whether it was December of Nineteen eighty-nine Lau Offensive Little Trenton Webb the FMLN offensive the guerilla warfare was happening inside word and I went down to produce Scott. And I came back and just a few days later I took the oath. Look the reason why it was complicated was because way back then maybe now I am beginning to understand maybe it was because of that traumatic experience in Airport in Dallas I, always kind of new. Like this isn't a certain thing for you. This thing about you being able to come in and out of the United States you've done your whole life. Now. You're a woman you're a journalist you've been to Cuba. You've got you've been tool Salvador you. You know. There may be a time when they say you can't come back and I understood that and so I have to be honest as I am the memoir he was motivated in large part by fear that that my green card could be taken away and that I could not be allowed and this was before this whole conversation of like what's happening now you know this was way before it was a different time but I think I kind of I, kind of knew it. So the thing that happens when you become a citizen in this country is you have to raise your right hand and you have to swear that you will bear arms for this country. And people who are born in this country like my own kids haven't had to do that. When you have to do that you take this thing really seriously you know like the Constitution and the bill of rights and you know all like you take it really seriously, and I think that's why because the book is certainly it's about immigration, but it's also about like my. My struggle for democracy and being seen as a journalist taken seriously to be that's all a part of democracy and it just becomes I mean I was living with a green card I was I was definitely understanding my role as a participant. But when you raise that right hand, it's at a whole

Chicago Dallas Mexico City United States Mexico Ma Ma Ma Scott Simon Scott University Of Chicago LOU Cuba LAU Trenton Webb
Why Pioneering Journalist Maria Hinojosa Put Herself in the Story

Latina to Latina

05:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Pioneering Journalist Maria Hinojosa Put Herself in the Story

"Maria I loved the Book A. So, good I told you. I was texting with you I devoured it and I want to jump in in the middle. You tell a story about writing a television script for Walter Cronkite what was the assignment? It's a juicy story. So I love 'cause nobody's asked me about this one yet short story is that I am the first Latina hired NPR. And then very quickly I'm like. This feels weird and I go and work for a Latino public radio in Spanish and San Diego and I experienced. Deep my cheese more there, and so I end up working kind of miraculously back in New York at CBS News in the Radio Department. And, I was doing fill in work the summer, and then I was asked to stay on through the end of December to produce a segment from Walter cronkite they asked me to write his end of the year commentary. And so. I was terribly nervous as a Latina journalism in the mainstream and being the first I was terrified most of the time. I write this piece and I go in I, show it to my boss Norman and Norman Light Me Norman hired me. But he saw this piece he said, Walter Cronkite is not going to read this and I was like no, he's like because it sounds like you wrote it. And I can't remember if he said and you're a little bit of an angry Latina I, don't think we talked in that way but it was almost like as he didn't have to say it he was like because it sounds like you wrote. and. I said well. Let's take it down to the FISHBOWL and have one of the evening news writer writers, read it and see what they think. Something just said. Stand up for yourself. You really hard. You actually worked on this you talk to other journalists. This shit is good. and. You're angry in this piece because every American should be angry at what is happening in the United States of America in the year nineteen, eighty seven. and. So I said, let's onto the fishbowl the people who edit the evening news with Dan Rather. We walk toward the writers who did not know me and he's again this is good. Yeah he'll read it. Yeah change this one word. and My boss had to eat his words eat pro as it were and I was like damn and so the point of the story is that as journalists of color as journalists conscience. When we are the first or one of the few in many newsrooms. We have to battle for ourselves. The way we see the world as journalists is as valid as Walter cronkite sway of seeing the world or Katie couric or Dan Rather we're journalists just like them. There are so many pivot points on your journey from intern to staff producer to on air from Spanish English. Is there one moment that stands out to you as the moment where your career to turn and where you really started to set out on your journey as a journalist? Well, look to decide basically that you're going to walk away from a steady Gig because you want to become a correspondent, you want to try to become on air that was pretty risky move and I feel like I did that in one of those moments where I was like you just have to do this. Like there are no Latinas. There are no Latina voices out there. And you have done radio, you have a voice, you know how to use it Noah. So that was a turning point. I think when CNN recruited me, that was another moment. It was very scary because I had never done television much less live television. But to answer your question, I feel like it really like. Like really came to fruition once I moved into doing now on PBS, which was long form investigative close to sixty minutes in terms of its style and production and deep investigative, and that led me to then doing documentaries and led to the front line which happened at the same time that I created my own company football media and I just WANNA shout out. The book. News for all the people which is was written by Juan Gonzalez and Joe Tories once I read that book I was like, okay. All of this suffering of being a journalist, a Latina you know woman of Color Immigrant. All of this is there is a reason why and it is because you have a responsibility to be part of this long arc. Of Responsible Journalism in the United States. You right I had heard rumblings at NPR some folks that I got too close to stories. I know all about you and your agenda one of my editors a nice middle aged white guy said to me agenda I said, what are you talking about? Maria come on you and you're Latino agenda. How did you respond in that moment? I said so does that mean that you've got a white guys agenda and he was like, no, it's not the same thing and I was like the same thing I'm able to tell you those moments because they were few and far between when I was just like ski is. Key you know like the same in Mexico is style plateau. SAMANCOR will plateau no one mass when I would just like suddenly rip something out and just be like that. But a lot of the times as you know, you're mostly just like dodging dodging you're doing a we've you're doing another we've and then sometimes you're just like a skin nope Wilma's I'm GonNa answer back. I hope that a lot of journalists read this book journalists because. You do have to be incredibly strong willed, and I would hope that they understand that this is not a job it is in fact, a mission that we're lucky enough to love. We need them.

Walter Cronkite Maria I United States NPR DAN Norman New York Mexico Cbs News Radio Department CNN San Diego Katie Couric SKI Writer America Intern Juan Gonzalez
The Oregon Fires

Latino Rebels Radio

06:32 min | 2 weeks ago

The Oregon Fires

"Latino Rebels Radio Latino. Rebels. Radio Julia Regard Novella here in in Sunday September thirteenth twenty twenty and we are back and you're listening to us on audio boom stitcher, spotify apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcast. We've been following the situation in the West regarding these historic wildfires. The images are just tragic, and actually I have a guest in Oregon Nydia Alycia who reached out and said I want to talk about the situation and you're on Hello Nadya. Hey Thank you so much for having me and for giving me an opportunity to share a little bit about what's going on I'm doing the does the I can be in. The worst. nightmare that don't ever wish on anybody right now. So Why don't you just break it down because obviously people see the images, the hear the voices by this is your opportunity to this is your mic tell me your situation what's going on how whatever you WANNA share. What's going on in Oregon? It's been really disheartening to see some of these. You know this is a tragedy. By all means this is a nightmare, but I also just want to share that our community even though we've been the most impacted. We are also like incredibly resilient. So many of the families that I've seen my relatives my best friends family anytime. I've checked in with people that I know I grew up here I was born and here. You. Know are people are so concerned about other people you know even though there are folks right now families who are staying at their relatives or co workers or friends, and it's like fifteen people two bedroom they're still you know like, Oh, I'm really just worried about the people who haven't found a place to stay. So I've been seeing how our local news has taken pictures of some of our folks in. A really vulnerable situation in the middle of all this heartbreak there's so much resilience in so much power. The community is coming together to lead it beautiful efforts for people on. There is so much power in our unity right now in terms of like. Checking in on each other. because. You know when these things happen, it's the direct people on the ground who weren't as impacted. It's the WHO's folks it's I mean it's hard for me because my my dad lost everything. My Mom's home is still standing even though orders, but it's on us. That's the quickest way we're going to be able to make it out of this when you call your house when you call your cousins when you call your neighbor, you just check up on each other and that's the way I've seen a lot of our people get access to food get access to close. The happened at three PM. And thank God even though this is like the worst thing an entire town burning down at three entire towns being severely destroyed by these fires. Thank God. It happened at three in the morning when you know folks are sleeping or at seven pm runs home from work. Because this, all happened in a blink of an eye it was within three to four hours. This fire went from Ashland to talent to Phoenix to Medford like I said, my mom lives in talent and my dad lived or his residence is in Phoenix in from you know checking on each other is like i. i saw the smoke, it eleven intolerant and the like. Yeah. I didn't get the call until one before we talk about your situation and others tell me a little bit about the community I. Mean that people don't know about yeah I mean who that's that question brings tears to my eyes 'cause. were community of be Natal's of a scene laws of now we would call them mighty needles 'cause there's all the ham `bout here. I'll the grapes we're just hardworking people man my folks got. In the late eighties, early nineties following the harvest from California You know once they were done. My mom got here when she was done. Picking Strawberries and she heard about pairs in southern Ohio and had an anti who had come. Sooner and my dad, you know was picking Liz in new? Mexico. about the beans out here and My Dad has planted over twelve million trees in the Pacific northwest like are people are so embedded in this landscape in the food, we produce in the beautiful mountains that you see those are all planted by our arkady that. we have make status community Some folks. Like myself, my mom and dad were undocumented when I was a child and I was a citizen in my mom eventually became a citizen. My Dad is. has his residency. So like a we have different kinds of. Legal status is which also be barrier for some of us in terms of having adjust recovery out of this disaster. But Overall, like this is what the hardest thing for me is is that I don't know a single family in in our community that has that was not impacted by this we're tightening We have some families here that You know that you've got the mom and then you have the kids we have like three generations of families here already. And we all know the you know the big lessons that family so and so make it. Okay. All will that family one lost everything others. Okay. So that's also been one of the reasons why are people have we've been able to you know figure it out a little easier because we do have we do rely on each other and like we do, we do count with each other support you know simply Say Yoga Nisa seat thou. At buckeyes and your Kiekens say you know were were just were just helping help. We're just helping each other to do our best making out of this right now

Oregon Nydia Alycia Phoenix Julia Apple Oregon Buckeyes Pacific Northwest Ohio California Kiekens LIZ Mexico. Ashland Medford
Changing the Narrative with Rita Bautista

Cafe con Pam Podcast

03:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Changing the Narrative with Rita Bautista

"K.. Brita hello welcome to come on Bama. How are you? I'm doing great. Thanks so much for having me today. I'm excited we've been talking for like thirty minutes. Now. You have an awesome stories. Let's dive into tell us who you are what your heritage. So my name is read about that and I am a as used to describe it. I'm Honduran my parents were both from Buddha's but I was born here in New Orleans and raised between New Orleans in Baltimore and I currently live in Houston. So I've had the best of all worlds. Yeah. Headed your parents arrive to to New Orleans. Oh my gosh. So it's interesting both my parents ended up in two different places. My mom ended up in Baltimore with visa the. First Ten than she came illegally, and then she came back again legally and then my dad came here with a visa to new. Orleans. which is a huge population of hundred people for all those under Daniels listened to me there's a huge population Chiquita banana used to be headquartered there at the story's pretty rich and dynamic I think I should probably tell it one day, but it's a really interesting story like two lane. University has lot of really thick ties in into hundreds like they actually have a whole bunch of like less Stella's from the Mayan Ruins. Actually. In the nineteen hundreds went to Tulane University went to Honduras and made copies of them and they're sitting in New Orleans on at the military base. Okay. Fact very attacked. So how is it that it's a big population in your let I mean, it's not random, but it's like not your big cities are right. Well, for anybody WHO's been to New Orleans they have that like has at European small town feel and the climate really tropical. You know if it's if you're going to be close to home, you might as well be host in temperature to but like I said that to keep a banana used to be housed in or their headquarters was in new, ORLEANS? So since the ladder leads bananas in Lewis were also I guess they were reporting to New Orleans everybody who was coming over from Honduras to our liens found out about it because of the Banana Trade So interesting to get I don't be sick of that. But again, that's Your Dad arrives there and then your mom is in Baltimore and then they meet somewhere between. So they've actually met in hunters for the second time. Yeah. My mom back two. The second time, and then while she's in Honduras with my brother, she got married in Baltimore and then it didn't work. She got divorced in the ends up in under his an that second go round. She meets my dad in Honduras and she comes back to Baltimore with my brother wants all you your residency came out and everything she went back and then my dad ends up in New Orleans in. He's like you need to come check this out. This is like hundred number two like you know come visit me and sure enough she goes down there they fall in love with each other than this beautiful child was born.

New Orleans Honduras Baltimore Tulane University Stella Buddha Daniels Houston Orleans. Lewis
A conversation on why you should vote

Tamarindo

05:26 min | 2 weeks ago

A conversation on why you should vote

"Welcome back to another episode of that money though friends we have just a few weeks left before the general election it's happening November third. The day is finally here and we WANNA. Talk about the election this episode because many states are going to be having their deadlines for which which you can register usually happening in October depending on your states look that up and we thought it'd be important to visit with all of you why it's so important to vote. We actually asked them of our listeners what are the three reasons that you're voting and? They said in. His off. Yes. So from the Angelo from the Geek Life, we all knew America had major issues but these four issues have shown us how bad things could really be. He's four years. Yeah. A number to worry about a month away from being still being society e and number three I'm O'Brien in. America. And I grew up in fear and don't want my kids to do. So those reasons we love him. Thank you. and. Then we had the folks from lat. Next point of view podcast. They said that healthcare is the number one issue because less people in the US have access to healthcare, which is a big deal when you're experiencing global pandemic number two, the economy, and then number three `immigration is that these are the three reasons for black next point of view. All right. So we got Joe, Sparkman, who said number one to dump trump Helje number to fight racism and number three fight sexism Mcginn. grazes. And then we had one more and lease said healthcare and immigration for sure. So I mean, there's so many reasons to vote for this election. We have a huge opportunity coming up to course correct the past four years but rather than focusing on us whoever is trump and who by the way we've decided on a shelley and mutually decided actually decided but I agree we're gonNA retire putting trump in the trash can there's just too many trump's there. So we don't have to do that here. There's Lore we're not doing it. WOULDA yeah. He's already there. So if you're. Even, you're no longer allowed to put trump in there because he's there's too many of them in there any who so we're going to focus not on that but instead like what are we voting for? It's not just against trump, but there's plenty of things to vote for. So entertain that why are you gonNa vote this November So. Many reasons and I mean ultimately what I want most is for everyone to live there moth antic fulfilling and healthy lives and I think in order for us to be able to do that, we need to have living wages we need to be able to live where we want without fear. We need to have equal access to education and opportunities, and we need to have access to safe in green communities and environments. Amen, I mean all that can go deeper into a few things and I know Brenda you'll share some with us, but I think I vote because environmental justice and Climate Change I. Think are one of the most urgent issues of our generation and trump has shown us that they do not care about the trump administration says that it did not care about that they recently rolled. Back Environmental Procedural protections under the Environmental Policy Act. So basically, you can build your highways, your pipelines and power plants without consideration of a lot of the harmful effects that they can cause on our communities and environmentally, and also our communities, and you know it's not a surprise that most of the communities that are affected by these types of this construction are Brown and black communities. That's so true. So and then along with that I'm also voting because I care about black lives and I care about criminal justice reform, and again, the trump administration has shown this time and time again that they're willing to put the economy before human lives are willing to protect professor percents. Supremacy and that's Discussed the Americans and we've seen that in how we handled pandemic that he literally cared more about you know the economy than human lives especially. Brown. Black lives we've seen how eases uses platform twitter and other social media insight, right wing violence, and that's been really scary for for me to release it lane actual literal. You know the young man is a shit that shot people and what we've known for a long time is that we really need to re imagine how our criminal justice system works and we know that the trump administration has does not is not putting that as a priority and I know that a lot of people will say. For Sure Joe Biden did help author the crime bill and Nineteen ninety-four. But I believe I believe in the power of change and I believe from what I've seen with from Biden including Kamala that they're willing to course correct and they definitely care more about reimagining and change criminal justice system than than trump does that's one hundred percent true. Those are excellent reasons. One hundred percent concur with that. How about you? Brenda, what are the? What are a few reasons I know there are so many reasons but what if you want to call out for listeners? So many definitely underscore everything that you said, but I think it's good for everyone to remember that the president can do so much including appointing, supreme, court justices, and other federal federal federal judges. So a good reason to vote is the courts you maybe don't like Biden. Harris don't even think about them just think about what's at stake. So the president of the United States gets to appoint judges, and if we remember there's been lots of Supreme Court battles from Dhaka from ACA to reproductive and lgbtq rights in this court the Supreme Court is all over the place that he they're mostly conservative. got to a point to super right wing horrible people including Justice Cavanaugh a rapist, and also eight RPG is eighty seven years old and she's battled cancer multiple times. So it's very likely that whoever wins in November they're to be able to appoint another Supreme Court justice and what's at stake we Really can't afford that.

Joe Biden Supreme Court Donald Trump America United States Brenda President Trump Angelo Justice Cavanaugh Twitter O'brien Shelley Harris Brown Professor Mcginn. Dhaka
Unthinkable Trauma

In The Thick

06:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Unthinkable Trauma

"Hey welcome to in the thickness is a podcast politics race and culture from a POC. Perspective. HORSA and I'm Jerry Galloway. Rela. We have a very special guest joining us from Southern California Jacob Sobre. He's award winning journalist correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC and Hey a best selling author. Now, what's up Jacob? So good to be with you guys you know have wanted to do this for so long with you and I'm I'm just grateful to be here with you together I know he's a fan. He's a fan of in the thick fan. Yes. We love that we love fans of the pod so. We're going to be talking about an issue that you have called an American tragedy and this is the issue and the history of family. I don't even like that term because it's really families being ripped apart torn apart. In your new book separated inside an American tragedy you readers through a very intimate look into the policy into the families that have been torn apart and traumatized. You also talk to policymakers and government officials who ultimately were responsible for creating and really promoting this is stemmed separation of an estimated five, thousand, four hundred children from their parents at the hands of the government and I. Say. And still counting. Yeah and despite the fact that president trump signed an executive orders supposedly ending the policy of Charles Separations in two thousand eighteen, the ACLU alleges that there have been more than one thousand family separation since that executive order and more recently propublica reported on how the trump administration has used the corona virus as a pretext to circumvent the normal legal protections allowed to migrant children. So since March ice has circulated thousands of migrant children through hotel black sites making it virtually impossible for lawyers, family members and advocates to locate them and deported them in order to quote prevent the introduction of Covid nineteen into the US. Even though many of the deported children have tested negative for the virus. So Jacob here have reported on these issues for many many years. These policies you know predate trump. So before we get into the current iteration of this shit show, I wanNA talk about looking back into that history and actually. You great job of setting it and in a moment we'll talk about how it's touched of us. Really personally. But Jacob. From your perspective, talk to us about the origins of family separation and how the stage was being set for these policies way before trump entered the white. House. So yeah, you gotTa tell us how did we get here? Yeah. I think Maria. That what the trump administration did and we talked about ripping families apart family separation what to call this really what it was in the words of Physicians for human, rights and Nobel Peace Prize winning organization was torture at met the. Definition of torture according to the United. Nations it was government sanctioned child abuse according to the American Academy of Pediatrics and you know make no mistake. This is on the trump administration's hands. No administration in the history of the United States of America had ever attempted or done anything like this in a systematic way. But the fact that the trump administration was able to execute this policy was only possible because of decades of failed deterrent based immigration border policy by Democratic and Republican administrations. This will come as no news to you. But for people who don't know in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, the Clinton administration put into place their border patrol a policy called prevention through deterrence. That's why our administration has moved aggressively to secure our borders more by hiring record number of new border guards by deporting twice as many criminal aliens as ever before by cracking down on illegal hiring, which was designed went along with the first wave of border infrastructure walls. Fences what have you and the idea was that by doing that people who are migrating to this country quote unquote illegally would have to go on more dangerous or deadly journeys to get here and sure enough you know many people have died trying I e let them die trying. Let them die trying. That's exactly right. After the Clinton administration. We had the Bush administration which obviously created H S and expanded the border patrol exponentially dozens of agencies charged with Homeland Security. Will now be located within one cabinet department. With the mandate and legal authority. To protect our people, the Obama Administration obviously deported more people than any other president ever no matter how they are. No matter their reasons. The eleven million who broke these laws should be held accountable and we got to this place where we had donald trump is president saying when Mexico census people, they're not sending their best they bringing drugs. Crime, their rapists, often not the pictures of Jay Johnson walk through the same facilities that I saw separated kids in and look yes. The Obama Administration Limited circumstances did separate parents and children from each other and the reason that they did it was circumstances where you had parents who were perhaps violent criminals or dealing a narcotrafficking but they never did on a systematic basis Jay Johnson? The Homeland Security Secretary, or Cecilia Munoz from the Domestic Policy Council. Bowl said to me on the record in my book we could never do. What the trump administration did it doesn't mean the idea wasn't proposed. It came up, it came up in the situation of the White House but they never did it and the minute Donald Trump became president. This idea was on the table right about a Valentine's Day meeting and twenty seventeen and the officer Kevin McLean then the acting commissioner of Customs and border. Protection they wanted to do this from the get-go and now the results of of this policy are very familiar to all of

Donald Trump Jacob Clinton Administration President Trump Obama Administration Southern California Jacob Sobr United States NBC Msnbc Domestic Policy Council Jerry Galloway Jay Johnson American Academy Of Pediatrics White House Executive Cecilia Munoz Covid Homeland Security Kevin Mclean
Black Lives Matter in Honduras

Latino Rebels Radio

05:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Black Lives Matter in Honduras

"In the case of on Dudas gutty fullness struggle for social justice started long before the coup in two thousand nine. Yet perhaps now, more than ever the illegitimate government has become even more brazen and hostile towards the Honduran community of African descent. So, what's at stake in Honduras? The immediate problem is the kidnapping disappearing in outright murderer of gutty activists and social leaders. The long term problem is the systematic array. Of Garifuna Land Culture and very existence in on us. In addition as is often, the case racism plays a role in state violence. So today's show is out to make it clear their black lives do matter in on Dudas. So whiff on the show today as Gregoria Florida's she is a got food and activist and a CO founder of Gutty community services the. US base in the Bronx New York. She joins us today via skype. Welcome to show Grigoriev Florida's. Thank you so much for having me here. Today is my bless her Oscar could be with you in this. And Lisa great opportunity to me to speak out was really going on in Honduras and especially my community across. Absolutely. It's an honor to have you with us, and there's some immediate things that are happening right now even as we have this conversation in on dudas but before we get to some immediate issues with several gutty phone activists being taken, shall we say by Honduran government officials? Let's begin by explaining to people what is of run For an eighth ow Blackberry Organization in Honduras over Anna's founder because of beggar from the people. Estar. Sophomore in. Cain of that discrimination in the city close to the our community. So offer they work clothes they work with that all reflect community. To, defend and to make sure everybody in the community days enjoying the human rights. And Human Rights is certainly the issue at hand here on this conversation because in recent months has been increased violent possibilities by the Honduran government towards the getty fullness. So I want to the best of your ability if you could. Tell us about the incident that took place on July eighteenth in full delacruz on duress. This is also very historic city or town in under a spaghetti fullness. Correct. EAC. Is One of the forty forty, seven community in Honduras myself funder for one sisters after became often the display from. From The people came first from and. That was a farce espace that people? Does the land after. After that was bringing from San be think. So the after they came to heal and the answer they open the forty-seven community. So why does the across the cruise I'm from? I'm born there for my my parents might. Arrays with my. Sisters and community. Buried Pacific community and the way will come in the community. My aunts my father's tell us at home. Always everybody's coming to Delacour do have to welcome everybody and you have if you have something some food, they provide A. And they need rest from the next day, give the space even the coroner to the person get get rest for the next day to continuing journal. So that's the way our parents. Make us a racing community. So all the time is normal for us to see the Community Fund Anada community that people never for the coming for the city to sell different kinds of. Things and. We have the Pacific living in our community but something happened after the eighty, nineteen, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, nineteen. Ninety nineteen because the. The estar selling, our lance west going on with us because when we request. The. Legal communication about. Our land. That Guerrero Limiting Honduras? They do something. That was nice normal and that was not something they not supposed to do because they increase the land for. Policy and they put our land like a Gary flipper from. Inside the limit of land from municipality that of Taylor. So If that's. Saline, our land. So the organization to develop theories me our community. So that's a time our. Situation, they gained worse on this started the persecution about our leaders in our community.

Honduras Dudas Community Fund Anada Honduran Government Kidnapping United States Taylor Skype Grigoriev Florida Oscar Gary Flipper Gutty Florida SAN Cain Co Founder
Unforgetting With Roberto Lovato

In The Thick

04:37 min | 3 weeks ago

Unforgetting With Roberto Lovato

"What's up welcome to in the thick? This is a podcast about politics race and culture from a POC perspective I Medina. And I'm who? We have a very special guests joining us from San Francisco. California. Is Loretto Novato. He's a journalist author of a new book it's called. Forgetting a memoir of family migration gangs and revolution in the Americas. Budo Salva through salary in your Roberto welcome to in the thick. Happy to be you go status. hinted. I love it. So the truth is, is that most of the time like I don't know but journalists, we call each other barrel last names it's weird. So I, really know Roberto as. WHAT'S UP LAURA? I thought you know. So it's kind of like. If I ended up calling you that just Outta love okay know Hosa. Your book is Super Raw. It's super honest. It's very unfiltered because I mean, how other can you write a memoir that deals with the history of Salvador Yeah Your own family's history and the complicated. Longstanding difficult relationship between the United States and in Salvador. You write a lot about your struggles, the Traumas, the violence things that you've witnessed firsthand or that you realize we're passed down to you from previous generations handing down trauma. So you talk about the rise of gangs in both Asadabad Order obviously the gang started on the streets of Los, Angeles? Child refugees, mass migration, the role of the United States in all of this and this really intimate look into Central America that. Well, we're going to talk about the fact that you know I know this place deeply. But most most journalists, they don't understand Central America and inside the from this perspective Gatiss about through go, which is a lovely way of saying he Salvadoran. And really the title. Forgetting. So talk about the title unforgiving and and what you mean and why this notion of unforgiving is so central to the Salvadoran story both here and That's part of the motivation for writing the book I am a personal level. Corrupt in a family of secret surprise surprise I don't know if anybody else had that experience. But I grew up in a household full of my mom's family's pictures. But none of my father's family's pictures for some reason, and it was just something that was not questioned. And my dad had you know I love my dad but he had a lot of secrets. So there's a personal where. My experience as. As a young kid here in San Francisco. You know it wasn't exactly a hardcore click but. Robbing we were stealing cars, we were dealing drugs, we were taking drugs, we were violent. and. We were doing things it. Had A lesson rebels do I also come out as things I did to my young adulthood after I became a born again Christian, which is unbeknownst to many I was. Going to be a preacher that was definitely. I. Was like, ooh Yeah. Yeah. I was going to be a preacher but I had to get out of how to get out of certain dangerous lifestyle. I was leading and became a born again Christian like many youth are targeted by these. Know, they're called youth ministries and they're really right wing ideological brainwashing. fucking. Thank you for pointing it out. We'll because you know what's happening in our in our communities and we're seeing this reflected in the vote is that we don't realize. How the Komo, San Mateo under the guise of preaching love and acceptance and getting into the you know getting into your heart gay and then they end up taking people to their first protests, which is an antiabortion protests and it's like you're kidding, yeah, I got on my knees. You'll see in the book I got on my knees and I prayed for the election of Ronald Wilson Reagan. Oh. My God and no, it was really funny and ironic people known nonni got Doug Guy cuts crazy but the truth is that's what I did from the corner of Twenty First Valente at a storefront church card, the open door alliance and eventually I woke up I was reading all the time and I. Started, going to Berkeley and argue with my German philosophy teachers and eventually said, you know, fuck this right wing church I'm going to bother to find myself and I went and found the Salvadoran revolution and again unbeknownst to most people I came back and was going back and forth between the side of other new. That's when I decided to go to stay for a while and I, joined the Fmln guerrillas as an urban commando.

San Francisco Roberto Central America United States Traumas Gatiss Salva Loretto Novato Medina Ronald Wilson Reagan California Salvador Twenty First Valente Komo Americas San Mateo Doug Guy Fmln Berkeley
The Strange Death Of Jos De Jess

Latino USA

06:01 min | 3 weeks ago

The Strange Death Of Jos De Jess

"The first video has four hours of surveillance footage from May twentieth two, thousand, fifteen the day said died the video is grainy and it has no sound and this is on the day of his death on May Twentieth Two Thousand Fifteen. So, let's start. This surveillance camera is looking down at what seems to be one of the medical units at the detention center. In the video, we see detainees walking around some are on crutches to others are being pushed around wheelchairs. This is clearly a low level holding area. So remember this is the point at which say is still locked up by himself, but he's no longer on suicide watch he's been downgraded and we don't really know why and now he's being checked on every fifteen minutes by a guard. That's what say that the shower area maybe. Yeah. At about two thirty PM, we finally see Jose, we see two guards walk up to his cell, an escort him out they walk into the back of the frame and he walks into an area that the camera can't see. But we know from police documents that this is Jose took a shower minutes. Later he's escorted back to his cell. This is the last time Jose is seen walking around, and it's the last time he leaves the cell where he dies. About, three hours go by surveillance footage and every fifteen minutes a guard is seen walking by says door looking in and writing something down on a clipboard hanging outside his door. These are the checks that the doctor ordered and yes, the guard does come by every fifteen minutes although he doesn't spend much more than a few seconds looking in when he walks by then at the five thirty PM check the guard doesn't just walk by this time he looks in and then pauses exam. At Five twenty seven stairs. Knocks on the door. To host cell. The guard is bending over looking inside through a cutout in the door that they used to give detainees their food, and he continues to bend down for a couple of minutes perhaps calling out his name, and now he's standing there looks unsure looks in again. Doesn't look as call now he's moving quickly to sign that he realized something must be wrong. So they've got a detainee looking in the door probably speaking Spanish. No response he comes back with a few more. They opened the door for a second and then quickly shut it again, one by one five guards and two nurses gather outside the door waiting for another guard to come with a protective shield seven minutes have gone by since the guard found him unresponsive finally, they opened the door and move in. This is where the second video comes in. It's a hand held video taken by a guard in that very moment the moment, the guards and medical staff enter hoses sell. My God to watch my God Oh my God. All right. So the first thing we see is actually just to stop frame. Of some feet. Like looking like they're running. Video is allies. To fifty three. This is going to be intense people. Did. The video starts with Jose lying face down on a green mattress. He's not moving and the first guy that goes in puts a riot shield on his back. Jose is still alive but unresponsive. Over there. Let's as clearly making choking sounds and his body is entirely limb. Somebody misdiagnosis and says, he's having a seizure. Somebody else says if you see just leave him there. He's having a seizure. Another guard grabs as arms pulls them behind his back and puts handcuffs on them. That's when the shield is removed. The medical staff takes his pulse. Meanwhile, someone gives an order to take the handcuffs off. One of the guards seems to be having a hard time finding the right key and then fitting the key in the handcuffs he struggling to get them off of Jose. Because it's taking him. So long another guy tries to help him get the hangups. Off. Almost one minute goes by before the handcuffs are removed. Out. To give you an idea of how much time a minute is. That was just twelve seconds of it. Right after the handcuffs are removed, the video stops. We've been reporting on this case for so long we've met Jose's family and we felt like we knew a lot about him and yet this is the first time that we've ever seen him. The footage is haunting and yes, it leaves us with some answers but with even more questions, it's possible that they're doing everything by the book, but there's No way around it is that looking at it? You know looking at them like spend forty, five seconds fiddle with keys on handcuffing while a man is dying is super hard to watch. You know we know what happens. We know he dies. So we just watched the last two minutes and fifty three seconds of somebody somebody being alive. It's a lot. And knowing what we know now, the people in that room didn't know but we know that will we're watching is somebody who put a sock down his mouth. So far down his throat, we can't

Jose
How Philanthropic CEO Carmen Rojas Learned to Lead as Her Full Self

Latina to Latina

06:14 min | Last month

How Philanthropic CEO Carmen Rojas Learned to Lead as Her Full Self

"What would you do? If you had millions of dollars at your fingertips let me clarify what would you do if your job was to take that money and spend it in ways that would make the world a better place that's the question that Carmen row house is confronted with every day. Carmen is the president and CEO of the Marguerite Casey Foundation. She stepped into the role justice cove nineteen hit, and this moment is inspiring big questions about generosity giving and the future of philanthropy. Permanent. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this. Oh thank you so much. I'm such a fan of you of your show and so I'm so glad to be here. I. Love When Interview Start That way? much of your career has focused on improving the life of working people across the country what about your own upbringing drew you to this work? My mom immigrated from Nicaragua and my dad immigrated from Venezuela they landed in San Francisco and the immigrated at this really weird moment and Hyman US history where it was the peak of the civil rights movement, the peak of the Labor movement, the peak of the feminist movement, and so my parents with middle school education's both from very rural places came to San Francisco and we're able to make lives for themselves in for us for their kids that were so far beyond the things that they could imagine. So my parents. For Middle School and I got a PhD from Berkeley I. Think a lot about how that time that my parents emigrated SOC shaped the opportunities that were available to me, and how from that moment to today we've seen that window of opportunities shut for the vast majority of people both immigrants people of Color. Native folks black people that this moment in time we were expected the squeeze the juice out of a grain of sand. And I looked around me and one. was exhausting to be one of the only women of the very few women of color one of dot of Latina's in rooms and just made it very. Sort of. Clear decision to really focus all of my energy on making sure that I'm not going to be the only one that I won't be the last generation of people that gets to benefit and enjoy from these moments in time and to try to figure out ways to create more moments in time for more of us to be better off. Growing up how was generosity displayed in your home? My mom is one of seventeen and my dad is one of ten. Seventeen all birthed by the same woman, all birth by the same woman. My mom was the first one of her siblings, the MIGRATES, united, States, and my dad was as well and so my mom tells these really amazing stories. Her siblings were sisters especially wanted to come to the United States. She would like work all day work most of the night, spend the nights like filling out immigration paperwork, taking them in for seventeen siblings and our house really became sort of a beacon I can't remember a time in my childhood where we didn't have other people living in our house. My Mom, my mom worked cleaning office buildings. She worked sewing clothes worked at last LEVI's factory in San Francisco, our? House? I feel like was what what I think is true philanthropy this desire to give this desire to open up. Some might think of yours but others think of hours so that so many more people can enjoy the ability to live lives of dignity. When did you first learn about philanthropy as a formal concept for disseminating help? Yeah. I was an Undergrad I. got this really interesting fellowship at this organization in San Francisco called the Green Lining Institute my summer project was to try to figure out in the state of California of all of these institutional donors how much of their money went to organizations led by people of Color and immigrants and it turned out these numbers haven't changed much but it's like less than five percent. and. So my job was to call us institutions to do the tally board and be like, okay, blessing one percent and it was really striking to me because philanthropy is one of those things that is benevolent and powerful we think about is inherently something good to give but we don't ever tell the back story like philanthropic institutions again, like my own are often built on twice stolen wealth wealth that's extracted from our economy on the one side and on the other side, won't that people aren't paying taxes into our social safety net into our government to actually try to resolve some of the instant issues that foundations are trying to solve. Once it became visible to me that these institutions existed that these people were giving money and that they were only giving money to sort of social service programs are to help people from the base of generosity. But these were actually shaping our political and economic experience. We can tie the rise of charter schools to philanthropy. We can tie the rise of privatizing public goods philanthropy wants it became visible to me. It was something that I couldn't unseen and I. Now am in a really interesting position because I in this moment the moment that the covert moment, the economic crisis moment, the social unrest moment. Has Really, invited me to think about philanthropy as this intermediary step

San Francisco United States President And Ceo Carmen Marguerite Casey Foundation Nicaragua Middle School California Hyman Berkeley Venezuela Green Lining Institute
The 1918 Spanish Flu: Fact vs. Fiction

Latino Rebels Radio

06:15 min | Last month

The 1918 Spanish Flu: Fact vs. Fiction

"This is Oscar Fernandes and today on the show, we put the spotlight on Texas to discuss the fact versus fiction of the Spanish flu pandemic of nineteen eighteen and to follow up on the one year anniversary of the mass shooting in El Paso Texas, the largest mass shooting targeted against Latinos, and so there's no need for a long introduction today on the show because our guest today has a lot to say on how the US in various ways is repeating history in its poor response to the pandemic. The scapegoating of others who have no control of the pandemic and which community ultimately praise the costs for the pandemic and so with us on the show today is w Dorado Romo. He's a researcher and the author of a ringside seat to revolution and underground cultural history of El Paso, and is which is available on single prosperous that we joins us today to combat to show W doral Romo. Thank you so much. Is Good to have you with us once again and doesn't probably no way of escaping any news whatsoever as it pertains to the current. Co Ed nineteen pandemic. You know it's affected almost every corner of society both here in the US and abroad. But one thing that's been cited as a frame of reference of valuable one, I would say is the Spanish flu pandemic of nineteen eighteen. Now in recent weeks, politicians and media people have stated that the US has not seen anything like the in pandemic since the Spanish flu of nineteen eighteen. Even you know Donald Trump and self has been cited Spanish flu in his own ignorant ways. I would I would say. But when reasons I want to talk to you was because this soon is the Spanish flu pandemic came up in mainstream media and the first thing that came to mind was Our discussion that we had last year with regards to the bath riots and it gives me the feeling that there's some things missing as it pertains to Race River Garson and the narrative of the Spanish flu pandemic. So a want to know based on what you've seen this far when people sight to space Lou, what do you feel is missing in this important narrative? I think you hit it on the nail. The idea that the pandemic was just a problem of perhaps Just, a a medical problem is something that's usually citing it by these media reports but. Raised and war have a huge part to play in in this. So called Spanish food and I think one of the things that has. Not Been. Looked into as much as. A huge role that the United States played in this called Spanish who I mean I I, I would call it the American sloop because they didn't start in Spain. It actually most of the evidence that we have historically the first official report. Of the Spanish flu was from Pasco County, council. And it was in a in a US military camp. Ford Riley canceled that it I broke out now there's other theories but most of the evidence points to that so this is Not so much the Spanish food at the American flu and I think that has been something that has not been as deeply investigated in many of these. Reports. So the question has to be asked, how did the Spanish flu get its name? If it was actually based here in Kansas as he said. Well. During. World War One, it was censorship. So the when I broke out in March of nineteen eighteen and one military cab. There was hardly anything written about it. It was actually A. A. Cook at the base of contract. And within. A few days there were hundreds of US soldiers? That, That were hit that that excel stake as Devo them died. From the flu. So the reason that is called a Spanish food is because Spain was a neutral country. So they were able to report. The fact that even even some of the most prominent. political figures from Spain were infected contractors to flu. So the name stuck that was the first. Was the first country where there was actually uncensored reporting about the flu to the main stuff but it was. It's also I think this idea of thickness. Always comes from the other side. The His what would you call it? The other association of of disease. You know the. Americans in the very beginning they and some of them playing some of the news sources would blame on the German thinking that it was a form of bacteriological warfare. Germans also had it. And they blamed it on the Russians they call it the the Russian has the Russians blamed on the Chinese everybody blamed on on on someone else the white South Africans called the the copy of. The Black Man Species? So I. Think this is part of. Stigmatization of the other using DC. To kind of Yeah. To stigmatize other racists, other nationality has always been kind of a universal part of this. Funny enough. Even back in nineteen. A lot of the banish medical. So rotation. Would pointed out the unfairness calling the Spanish flu they knew that it had not originated there

United States Spain Dorado Romo Donald Trump Ford Riley Oscar Fernandes Scapegoating El Paso Texas A. A. Cook El Paso Texas Pasco County Race River Garson Devo Kansas LOU Official
Creating Your Own Opportunities with Wendy Amara

Cafe con Pam Podcast

05:45 min | Last month

Creating Your Own Opportunities with Wendy Amara

"Okay Wendy, we have you ever combined finally. League and we are actually live in person. We are saying I, know I know let's start from the beginning. So what's your heritage? So my family came from what they might lack Yes, they came here in the nineteen seventies and then I was born here and my brother was born here and the originally came to Hollywood is funny because my. To my aunt, still live in the scene apartment building that they first came two years ago. Wow. Yeah. Crazy Ray. At one point they were invited to purchase the apartment building in the apartment building is near the border of Hollywood end those fees. Okay. Feeding in La. has become a hot property location where values of homes and apartment buildings and everything has skyrocketed anything boulder but I don't know ten times more than it would have been years ago. So it's interesting because back in the day they turned it down. To permit building because I think at one point, they were renting three different apartments or for I mean everybody has like a little apartment in that building. So that's part of why the owner was like. Would you guys up to purchase it and I think a fear? A fear is not knowing the rules of this new country, what they were getting into and people were. I remember my mom being like Oh no no I think that's too much for us to handle its and they could have actually afforded it back. Then they all would have pulled their money. So the moral of the story is I would be a millionaire. I. Bought this apartment building that's on the corner near the border of Hollywood near Lexington ear Hollywood handle species have you talked to them about it? No you know what? I haven't in years I remember low and I was like twenty over twenty years ago when I was in college, I was starting to learn about like wealth and property and how property gets handed down development of wealth over the years I remember then saying something to my aunt into my mom and be like you guys have an amazing opportunity where you could purchase the apartment building a two of my ex deliver to the state and they were looking at the time. You know that was a lot of money for us at the time. We couldn't see how can make that happen. So yeah all my God as these shadow. So that's so interested in like looking back like how with the story be different, right? Yeah. So if would have been me, I would have been like, let's pull our money and let's make it happen. Now no one was gonNA predict necessarily that see ray s off of a place. Yes has it has become but either way you just know if you're GONNA set for the next thirty years, it makes sense to own the building if half of the people renting or your family. Because you can count on them and the you know. Yeah. So it's interesting. Yeah. Now how the area has changed because it's going through like an urban renewal and so there's all these hippies moving like yeah gentle ricky gentrification. Oh. That's crazy. So you've been California at Your Life I've been in California my whole life except I lived in Spain for about nine months. Okay. Senior your college how did you decide that you go to college? So I I went to a community college. I didn't do all that great in high school. I was very distracted with. With, having fun and socializing a lot again. But it's interesting because I did really well in elementary and parts of middle school, and so I knew I had the capacity to do epidemically. In fact when I met up with people that I used to go to elementary school with they were like Oh. My God. But you wouldn't smartest people in our caused or you used to get straight They remember me getting awards for academics. So I knew I had the capacity to do But in highschool got really lost I got really depressed at tie-ins. There was just you know problems with friends or boyfriends or might focus was health sweat So I didn't actually focus that much on academics. So in typical in their community college which I loved and met some amazing friends that are still friends to this day and I think something's sparked in me that I was like, okay, I gotTA. Get my act together I got to figure out what to do to get together, and for that to happen I was like I got a transfer actually get on the and I saw people that were at the Community College for like ten years. I do not want to be that person I do not want to be twenty, seven and stuff. Can you call junk that there's anything wrong with that but for me I was like, no, I need to go to you know I need to go to college college and fell in love with Ucla Gone Eliot Matisse Salad, for Undergrad. For graduates collection. Elsa. WanNa do it from your vantage sociology okay. Because I loved you know, of course back to the socializing part learning about people learning about cultures. Yeah and you know it was interesting major and loved the campus I loved everything about learning. It felt like such a privilege to take your life and spend time learning rate full-time like that's it. That's doing. Yeah. It's all you do. Yeah. So that felt really empowering is you stayed at Ucla Graduate School too. I did okay I took a year or two years off in between I worked I came back. Yeah. What's your graduates urban planning interesting yes. Okay. Let me tell you about the school of Urban Planning's housed in was many years ago things have changed. Now, but was housed in the school social policy in school public policy in social planning, and there were three majors under that school urban planning social work in public policy. Okay. In all three of them interrelated to classes together and all that

Hollywood School Of Urban Planning RAY Ucla Graduate School Wendy California Spain LA. Ricky Ucla Lexington
A Culture of Silence

In The Thick

05:44 min | Last month

A Culture of Silence

"Hey welcome to the. podcast politics, race, and culture from a multi layered POC perspective I'm money. and. Joining us from Overland Ohio professor. Jeanette. Is Cultural anthropologist author and professor of Comparative American Studies at Oberlin College Hey Gino welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me and thank you for being in Ohio. We need you and joining us from New Jersey. Also, very important state is Pam Gumbo spot mashes a veteran of foreign policy organizer and a senior political strategist. At the Working Families Party welcome. Pam. Thank you so much for inviting me. All right. So we are looking at a sad story, the story of Vanessa Gin. But we're going to put it into a larger context. Right? We hope everybody knows the story of. She's twenty year old specialist in the US Army who went missing from Fort Hood army base in Killeen Texas, which is about. Fifty minutes away from Austin. Right at the end of April. When many of us at least here in the east coast were in the throes of like pandemic insanity more than two months. Later, there was an extensive manhunt. Finally, there was a grassroots campaign led by let the women service members and veterans, and there was national each and the family was finally told that their daughters remains had been found with the backdrop of a global pandemic and you know this real. For Racial Justice long-held accusations have reemerged into the national spotlight around the military sexual violence in the military. Violence and how you protect yourself from other people who have guns and you're living on a base in the military and so many other intertwined injustices in systems that ultimately were responsible for says, disappearance and death. So Pam you've been actively involved in the campaign for justice for Vanessa is well is speaking out on these issues in fact, for years Gina You as an academic have written extensively about the military's relationships specifically with Latino and Latina communities. So gene, we're going to start with you talk about the significance of this case and what it's putting into the national spotlight from your perspective. Well, as you say, this is such a tragic set of circumstances that brings us here together but I think it's also really kind of an important opportunity to honor Vanessa's life and. Hannity, incredible activism, an extraordinary advocacy of her sisters, her younger sister Lupe and her other sister and her mother to bring this to national attention and I. Think. For me one of the things that. So extraordinary about this is that for some people, this is new that this is something that is surprising to people because I think for many people like Pam and others who are have been in the military know that issues of sexual violence and sexual harassment in the military have a long history. And Violence Against Latinos and the way that in social media and used media have framed this as femicide. We also know that this has a long history in our communities alongside history and our communities. So for me, this is a real opportunity to draw attention to things that we don't want to pay attention to enter really hold our elected officials accountable to addressing these longstanding problems that have is incredible impact. On Latina's and women's lives and on their families and communities that they have sworn to protect and that they have enlisted in the military to try to protect, and so I see this as a tragedy that is also a real opportunity. Pam Do you see it the same way tragedy? That's an opportunity from your perspective as somebody who served in the military what stands out about the importance of this case I. Will tell you. I. Organized Around Pretty Heavy topic sprayed ending wars, militarism violence holding the department, of Defense, accountable and when I heard about the disappearance, right because we can't forget that she was disappeared choose disappeared for months and I learned about it through Spanish language media and social media networks not through the English. Media networks and the sowed and devastating part is that Vanessa is one of thousands on thousands. And I think the social media explosion that happened with Vanessa that Hashtag shows you how prevalent this is what is different however, I do think that we are in a reckoning moment in this country where everyday people are no longer satisfied with hypocrisies. Yeah and what greater of hypocrisy than the daughter of an immigrant joining the military to give her life for what rate what caught my ear when I heard. Gloria. Vanessa. Ganz immigrant mother on the Spanish language news. She was very clear about what was happening. She said me e my daughter told me that she was being sexually harassed by a superior right and nothing was done. There was little to no urgency. has also done what often doesn't happen, which is she has not treated the military the Department of Defense generals she has not treated them with blind allegiance or ability. She has said I don't care that I'm a working class, Latina you're going to respect me and you're going to give me answers which is different right and I think that blind allegiance we'll get into it but blind allegiance to the. Institutions have really lead US astray and not had any accountability for

Vanessa Gin PAM Ohio Professor Of Comparative Ameri Working Families Party Oberlin College Jeanette Us Army New Jersey Professor United States Killeen Texas Department Of Defense Fort Hood Austin Gina You Hannity
A Conversation With Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey

Latino Rebels Radio

04:32 min | Last month

A Conversation With Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey

"Ed Markey thank you so much for being on Latino rebels radio. Well, thanks for having me on polio. This is a great honor for me. You know can I just tell you this story before we start I actually met you very briefly at the Kelly's roast beef and you're actually they're ordering Kelly's roast beef in your congressman at the time and I said Hello I just that was just the first time I met you so so so here we are getting your on my show. You're in the middle of a contested race at I never thought that this this primary has become sort of a national story senator and I wanted to talk to you about. I. Think. A community that gets ignored a lot in in Massachusetts is the Latino community. And can you talk to me about your history with the Latino community I in Massachusetts and I don't think a lot of people know this. But I've I've talked to a lot of your supporters who are Latino elected officials who have told me about some of your roots can you just start with that? Yeah. Well, thank you for. The question and I actually eight, some stuff from Kelly's roast beefs afternoon. So you so you you know you you're on to me I love it. I love it. Yeah. Yeah. I I have confirmed that you are a fan of Kelly's. Are Continuing the tradition. So that's funny. Continue Center. So well, thank you. Well, you know I can begin with the work done for. Puerto Rico. In the wake of the of the of the hurricanes earthquakes that continues to ravage the island I worked very hard. To make sure that the trump administration is made accountable I actually flew down to Puerto Rico with Elizabeth Warren to play an oversight role in ensuring that that they knew that destroying paper towels at the citizens of Puerto Rico was not going to be acceptable. So I I did that and then I had multiple summits. With the Puerto Rican community, in Massachusetts, so I could hear their concerns and continued to reflect that in my oversight responsibility has been, and by the way those meetings took place in Boston those meetings took place in Springfield, those meetings took place in holyoke. Those meetings to place in Worcester. So I try to listen to the concerns and in addition I will say that listening to concerns I voted against promise the I know that I can I tell you one thing about that part. So you know I I am a Puerto Rican journalist I I'm I'm in Massachusetts I've been in Massachusetts since the nineties when you said that I think a lot of people miss that point in the debate that you said that because Pro Mesa? Is Not a popular legislation in Puerto. Rico. But also in the Puerto Rican community in Massachusetts and I do want to talk about other communities in Massachusetts outside of the Puerto Rican community but but let's stick on Pro Mesa why did you not vote for promise? You went against your party I mean it was it was a bipartisan legislation President, Obama, signed it. But why did you? Why did you feel that you were against promise of back then and and then talk about how that has changed you know it seems like you're right. I think history has made it very clear that that was the correct boat and by the way. My opponents casts the the opposite vote on that. Issue my feeling was that that we had to absolutely anticipate that it could lead to a hollowing out of educational services, a public safety services services in general who we know now the University of. Puerto Rico is in trouble because of that vote and so I, listened to those who came in and lobbied me on the issue on both sides. And it was there was a divided view on it, but I came to the very clear conclusion that. Big Mistake. To vote for progressives. So I voted no and I think history has worn out especially post. cameras, and the hurricanes that there is an absolute crisis going on in of Puerto Rico. Even as this belt tightening from this something essential control board continues to ham auditory citizens. So I feel very good about that though I think my no vote. has been vindicated historically.

Puerto Rico Massachusetts Kelly Puerto Rican Puerto Ed Markey Rico Polio Barack Obama Senator Congressman Elizabeth Warren Holyoke Worcester Springfield University Of Boston President Trump
Jos Ralat, Taco Editor

Latino USA

03:58 min | Last month

Jos Ralat, Taco Editor

"Roulette. Welcome to let you know USA. Thanks for having me to be like the one and only standing official dot co editor of the United States of America. That's a big deal. Congratulations. Thank you. It's an honor fed I don't. Take lightly because I. I have the responsibility of. Not just. For reading about the food but. priding about the people and I think that's really the most. Critical part of the job but before we continue. People might be saying, wait what's going on and so you're very open about the fact that you stutter that is something that happens and so we might as well just say, Hey, it happens in your cool with. Saying Yeah and and moving on, right? Yes. I am thank you. Yes. It's part of my life and it's never stopped me from doing things like. Live TV or radio segments I. Love that. I. GotTa Say I really do I completely loved that. So. What you may not know is that I've been Taco fanatic since probably before you were even born, I'm Mexican I grew up with this stuff. You know I mean, my mom made dot goes by our leader. Mehta goes you're Puerto Rican you were growing up with this stuff. So what's the story as to why this Puerto Rican dude ends up falling in? Love with TACO's growing up in the states I knew about duck was generally speaking at A. Fast Food Product but. As a Mexican food item. was in. Brooklyn from. A. China and I don't know. Who I fell in love. With I. The woman. or The food. So before we get to talking about that goes which again we talk about forever. One of the things that stood out to us is from the beginning of your book. And this is where you refer to something you call the alita principal. And having just mastered Jose, you'll be proud of me finally having just mastered my I will lead us the you like I finally figured it out. I'm just like Oh my God I can't believe it. I unlocked it. What is this thing about the alita principle when it applies to Dacas? So, whenever people? Talk about Mexican food eventually the conversation. Pros around to. Well. My Willett I made the best Mexican. Food she made best diesels. Hurling. was, the best or her? Malia was the best. and. For them. That's as far as Mexican food goes. Nothing else. Counts as Mexican. which is unfortunate because. Mesko is a large country with micro regions. And Different, cuisines. It's not that. Simple. We shouldn't box it in. Boxing it in. His misguided at. Best and racist that worst Could also. Be. Maybe so and so's grandmother wasn't

United States Jose Mesko Malia Boxing Taco America Mehta Brooklyn Official Principal Editor A. China Hurling.
FavyFav on Planeta G!

Latinos Who Lunch

06:55 min | Last month

FavyFav on Planeta G!

"With us today, we have the Amazing Justin Fella Aka five, eighty five. He's Guatemalan American artists from Nevada known for his large scale sculptures that plays with American pop culture and the lat next experienced. He's the host of a couple of podcasts including the art people podcast and one of my favorite podcasts. Latinos who lunch welcomed Fathi. Welcome. Still trying to figure out technology. Technical difficulties. We're like we're right there. Thank you. Thank you for having me. I am in Las Vegas Nevada right now since. Yes in city where people don't believe that wearing masks is a big so. Crystal. Very similarly. You know we we started working at Greenpeace right around the same time and we really didn't see a lot of lat next representation in the environmental movement in these big green organizations and so we thought hey, like maybe we can just do something like that and on your show you talk about sort of the intersection between being Queer Latinas and sort of like this idea of Spangler. Inside this Anglo world out what do you think is the importance of intersection analogy was important to talk about. Oh my gosh. That's one of the. That's one of the big big missions of Lebanon's lunches that. If it's not intersectional it it's really not for for anyone really like if it's not intersect, the revolution is intersectional whom we will never be free basically you know. So from the very beginning, we've been checking ourselves on our privilege as gender males on the show, and because we recognize the all the you know the misogyny within own you know belief systems just based on how we were raised in America and I'm saying America like North South and Central America and so And then something that happened maybe like a year or two intellectuals who lunch was the recognition of the erasure of Central American culture, and also after let me move out. So we actively before people are using the term anti-racists or. Really. Intersection analogy I think I heard that a lot after the the white woman's March that happened a few years ago So but they got fizzy hatsaw haven't seen many at the black lives haven't seen many at the black lives matter protests but so wh-. Anyway, We really we really started paying attention to like oh my gosh we're really like Mexico centric on our show we need to actively be anti-black and talk about colors and talk about the erasure of offer. Let the needle on our show and we recognize that it was our own. You know that was our one of our personal goal was to really openly talk about that and have sometimes uncomfortable conversation. Let I love what you said. We can't have revolution if it's not intersectional because the sort of Traumas and the histories and experiences are compounded with each identity that include you both you know in a way that's like. Boosts Society and helps you in society also not. About yeah. especially with climate change because at the end of the day, we're all going to be affected by climate change but to what degree and how soon it really depends on where you are how much you have, how much you given, how much you're supported in society. It's funny because like recycling and incur the environment it seen this very same in or you know white people saying but it's like no dinos have been trying to take care of the environment for a very long time. We just don't talk about it in the same way you know what I mean. So I mean I also like to pretend that I'm Vegan. Just people mad because you know that's US relegated to just white people. You know I'm so like Oh. Yeah. I. Don't I don't wanna eat cows anymore because it's bad for the environment and that's like the real thing that I'm doing now that we're talking about claim it and how much Linex do people care about it maybe not in the same context that you know white people are recycling or being around this like we have our willows. Teaching on like here's the. Deal or like rub this like urban you're like sore foot and you'll wake up of. The best. Or some other iteration of that Linex people care about the environment and we quote like or reference this study that happened recently at Yale that seventy percent of people in the United States, Horley care about the environment, and so how do you see that or not see that reflected in our culture and how do you see annex values reflected in the conversation around the environment? yeah, I mean there's there's very different schools of thinking within my own family for example, but like my will lead, you know isolated people do it saying this online to we've been saving plastic bags and containers from jump? Right. That's just something that we do in our like is that sour cream in the fridge? That's probably. Some leftover beans or something. You never know you never know I'm so in little ways like that we're very resourceful as Latinos because we have to be, but also it's just part of our culture even in Latin? America. But I am example that pops up to my pops up to my head is recently visited what the my life for the first time as an adult and went back to where my mom is from this little little village called. We let the in Garland which is right in the center of a psychopath in Guatemala and so. HALF OF MY A. Family are farmers and then half of them are. are raise cattle So it's like. That's when I realized like Yo my family is responsible for like the deforestation of Quantum Allah because I'm seeing all this open land my GRANDPA has. but they don't see that way. They're like, no cows our money we're going to raise cows we're GONNA make you know we're gonna them or dairy cow. So then we'll be sold for me and so there's this acres and acres of land that my family owns that is is just it's just grass now when it used to be rich rainforest

America United States Justin Fella Nevada Fathi Central America Las Vegas Nevada Greenpeace Traumas Linex Lebanon Spangler Garland Mexico Guatemala Yale
Buckle Up

In The Thick

05:48 min | Last month

Buckle Up

"Hey. What's up? Welcome to in the big this is a podcast about politics race and culture. From a POC perspective I'm mighty at Sam and I'm Julia Galleria joining us today. All of us important team separate going crazy. We'd have to return all stars from Princeton. New Jersey is Dr Eddie Claude Junior James. S Mcdonnell Distinguished University professor at Princeton University Hey Eddie welcome back rose more pleasure. excited. We are so happy to have you so happy and joining us from Boston Massachusetts County. Crossley. She's host of W. H is under the radar you're on the radar for here Kelly. Welcome back. I'm so glad to be back and we're happy to have you back so. It has been a minute since the both of you have been on the show it's the first time that you're on the show in two thousand twenty, which is honestly like, wow, I know and a lot has happened since you were on this show, the coronavirus pandemic I became a survivor of the corona virus myself the movement now to defend black lives this extraordinary reckoning that's happening all across the country young people really turning up, and now the twenty twenty presidential election officially heating up amidst all of this it's been intense so Kelly start us off just what's your temperature check? How are you doing like for reals? I'm exhausted I'm exhausted physically and emotionally, and as I wrote about recently I have outraged fatigue and I'm trying to fight it Eddie. How're you doing? I'm holding on I'm just barely holding on actually it's just exhausted like Kelly. Trying to hold on tired of looking at this damn computer screen and really just trying to figure out a way to step away from this moment. You know because I'm drowning in it it's been pretty intense. It's crazy Julia for two people who feel exhausted and kind of drowning in it, I. Mean. We turn to Kelly and two Edita to help us to give context but I appreciate and this show who that we do we do let it all hang out as we used to say back in the nineteen seventies. But the point being about exhaustion I think it's important to recognize that and. Unfortunately, I feel like this level of exhaustion is going to continue because here we go twenty twenty election. And there is now a zoo meeting called the Democratic National Convention DNC which starts this week we. The. People. We the people call the forty eighth quadrennial Democratic National Convention to order. And it goes through Thursday, all our listeners. We're recording this conversation on a Monday afternoon so that you know, but you know the DNC I actually saw this video i. don't know if you saw it on twitter from Nineteen ninety-six, the DNC is starting in everyone's doing the Macarena. Acquit. On. Putting You this big Joyce Event and I remember that actually so it's going viral on twitter. Clinton's yeah yeah claims and ninety six. Oh I saw that. So anyway so they're doing them I got and I was like I remember these conventions and it's supposed to take place in Milwaukee. Obviously because pandemic, it's turned into this entirely virtual format talking about computer screens, Eddie? I'm like, oh So. What we do know is that on Thursday Joe Biden is scheduled to officially accept the nomination from his home state in Delaware on Thursday. On Monday night, the virtual convention featured speakers from former first, lady, Michelle Obama let me be as honest and clear as I possibly can. Donald Trump is the wrong president for our country. He has had more than enough time to prove that he can do the job, but he is clearly in over his head. He cannot meet this moment. He simply cannot be who we need him to be for us. It is what it is to Senator Bernie Sanders at its most basic this election is about preserving our democracy. During, this president's term, the unthinkable has become normal. He has tried to prevent people from voting undermined the US Postal Service deployed military and federal agents against peaceful protesters threatened to delay the election and suggested that he will not leave office if he loses. Is Not normal and we must never treat it like it is but you all know and we have people here who are critical of the Democratic Party like we are of the Republican Party. You've already heard the critique right that a number of the speakers like including Sanders and club HR, and Buddha judge and cory booker, all of them former candidates. So we've heard a lot from these people and one twenty twenty candidate was clearly not invited guests that was Oh let's see Mexican, who represents the largest non white voting block potential voters yes. That would be Latinos and Latinas and yes, they did not invite Julia Castro. Who is the only Latino candidate in the primaries so I mean look there are literally only a handful of Latino or Latina speakers. There are no Muslim speakers scheduled.

Kelly Dr Eddie Claude Junior James Donald Trump Senator Bernie Sanders DNC Twitter Democratic Party President Trump Princeton New Jersey Crossley Julia Galleria Julia Castro Princeton University Julia Boston Massachusetts County S Mcdonnell Distinguished Univ SAM
The Migrant Student Club

Latino USA

03:51 min | Last month

The Migrant Student Club

"Eddie? Lurk Tech's says is a small city just north of the US Mexico border. This CD seats on the outskirts of mcallen, the Rio Grande Valley, and the land of here is wide and flat. Except over and sugarcane season and the fields full of workers. Among the farm fields in new housing developments, seats Edinburgh High School. It's a sprawling campus of two thousand, five, hundred students. A. An inside the. In a conference room with no Windows Group of eight young people gather around folding tables. Everyone here has one thing in common while other kids to spend their summer vacations going to come or at the community pool these students migrated north to working every cultural fields. who wants to go for a few and they are all members or former members of the migrant student club at Edinburgh. High. They gathered today to share their stories. My Name is David and I'm seventeen right now on voter turn eighteen on Sunday. Thank you. David, is a smile young men with shaved hair in the sites and he tells the room his honor working in. Michigan's Blueberry and Strawberry Fields, WACO four, five, six in the morning and okay let's go make yourself a tackle because that's all the time that we have for, and so we would go out and it's long and it's hard I mean to stick your hand inside the bushes you'd have to wear long sleeve. long-sleeve because you rip your shirt, rip your skin. You know he says, he thought he was pretty quick worker until he met other migrant workers I thought I was really fast I was like you know what like I'm a young guy I'm going to be able to be like really really fast this you know like these guys got nothing on me. I'd finish one bucket and the next me finish all six. Right. Next to David is Leslie and she's a former student. My parents have been migrant workers on my life. I was two months old when they first started migrating. Iowa she actually graduated in two thousand and seeks and went on to become a nurse. But she talks about how going to classes a migrant farm worker was a struggle. Especially switching between her school in Texas and her school in Iowa I felt. So out of place because I these weren't my friends, it wasn't the people I was used to. Me and everybody looked at me like what are you doing here? You don't belong with us. It's hard. It's very difficult to go back and forth you can't take the same classes you're never with the same people. That was hard. But I'm on a young men in red t shirt is on the other side of the table he chimes the in. One of. The younger ones there. This is my mother. Many of the students or former students came here today with her mothers. They wanted to give us a full picture of what being in a migrant worker family is like and we've been going to work for a good while like a family tradition. Once you turn thirteen, my grandfather would take you and warm weather will join us and they would take us up and we'd go. Work in Minnesota North Dakota but since I was a little bit on the short side, I had to wait until I was thirteen, and then when I was thirteen, then I was able to join them. He still remembers his bare you first year starting out in Fargo North. Dakota, when he realized the farmer dealing use pesticides and I thought that was cool until I realized that that meant like all the weeds and all the. Everything that didn't belong there. We had to take out by ourselves. So. That was a tough year to have as the first year because that year alone. The farmers like all of the weeds must go and since I was really new either didn't know what was weed or what was

David Edinburgh High School Mcallen Rio Grande Valley Leslie North Dakota Eddie United States Edinburgh Iowa Mexico Fargo North Michigan Minnesota Texas Waco
Why The Tax Collectors Cinthya Carmona Defied Religion to Pursue Acting and Find Herself

Latina to Latina

04:33 min | Last month

Why The Tax Collectors Cinthya Carmona Defied Religion to Pursue Acting and Find Herself

"How do you get from that resistance to you than being in La? Making ooh, I got kicked out of my house. Yeah, I mean look. I grew up in in a very strict household, right? Religious strict household. Emma rebel I'm a rebel I always have been I don't think that that makes me me. I was born the year of the Horse. So freedom is really important to me. Running wild is really important to me. I'm a capricorn also release stubborn and totally believe in these things. By the way I'm a capricorn and I'm just really ambitious and stubborn. I liked just do things my own way and my back is there a conversation that you had were they were like? That's what you want. That's fine. BP Don't live here anymore. Absolutely. Absolutely it was it was masked in other things. It was like Oh Cynthia was being like if you ask my parents, they'll be like, oh, she was being difficult. She was rebellious and I know it's like I wanted to do things all around I was just an artist and you can't trap an artist. It was absolutely like if you wanna live your life the way you WanNa live, your. Life. You can't do it in this house if you don't WanNA conform right like if you don't WanNa live see. No kidding me. Away glass you need to go. And and I did it was the best decision I ever made in my life because I needed to be free and I needed to take that risk and I was homeless for a while I lived with some released weird people for a few weeks and months, and then my mother Dina. Came back into the picture was like you're not gonna live on the street. You're not going to be with all these crazy people. I'm GonNa take you in and she's she nurtured me for a few months. I would say almost a year guiding me encouraging me to fulfill my dreams and then I reconnected when I was about nineteen years old with the very first director that I had ever worked with on a sketch comedy show and I was like sixteen or seventeen, who at the time in Miami was doing a project for John called Moti mortally. And he was this like Big New York director who was making moves in Los Angeles and doing all kinds of stuff and when I connected with him and I was like hey. I WANNA act and I want to go to Los Angeles and like I don't know anyone there. Can you help me? He was like absolutely you should've you should have been I'm so glad that you wanna be an actresses exactly what you should be doing. You have a lot of talent I'm going to help you. Then though twenty twelve, you moved to New York, to train at on the road repertory company is that right? Yeah. Yeah. With Alice Spe- back. So take me back to deciding to make that leap I trained as a dancer. So for me I always knew that like I can't get onstage nobody how much natural talent I have I can't get on stage and do you know a a bunch of times and leaps in all in jumps in all? Of these things without having trained a performance day in and day out for hours, and even though I had a lot of natural talent as far as acting goes, I didn't go to college for acting didn't get a degree in this till this day it's always been a chip on my shoulder like man I wish I could have gone and why you man I wish I could have done Tisch like man I wish I would have had that. I didn't. So I knew that I needed to train with the Best I. knew that I couldn't necessarily call myself an actor without studying the greats without studying Shakespeare without studying much theater as possible I was already working in La at the time I already had a manager I really had an agent. I had already had credits under my name I had done a couple of movies and TV shows. But I felt like a bullshit artist didn't believe myself. I was like how the hell am I gonNA call myself an artist if I have never really trained theater so I moved to new. York. and. That's when I really sunk my teeth. Into, what I know as an actor natural talent helps a lot and like I feel like I'm a really sensitive person and I've had a lot of things on my life that have really formed and shaped me on this journey to be an actress but. Honing down those skills and studying the greets in is probably the most important aspect of my training.

Director Capricorn LA New York Cynthia Alice Spe Los Angeles Emma Tisch York. Shakespeare Miami John
A Democracy at Risk

In The Thick

04:30 min | Last month

A Democracy at Risk

"Welcome to the this is a podcast about politics race and culture from a PC perspective I Medina wholesome and I'm. And today we have to Itt all-stars, call you their homes in quarantine. Yes. Yes. From Winston Salem North Carolina is Tina Vazquez but she's a senior reporter with prism and a twenty twenty I to be wells fellow with type investigations. Welcome back. Tina. High for happy ache and joining us from Atlanta Georgia is the fabulous Russia. Brown Co founder of black voters matter what's up? I'm so happy to be back. All is well and we're so. We're so happy to have you back to. so it's been. Intense that's kind of. An understatement in China. Living here has been intense in this country from the pandemic to racist police violence I mean even this Sunday, there was a five point one earthquake in North Carolina where you Live apparently the largest and over a century. Right. Here in Harlem trees fell down last week because of the storm. So this is just a very first question to ask you how you doing. So Tino, we're going to start with you how you feeling I am tired all the time like I can't complain really too much everything is. Fine but I'm very tired. Okay. Yeah. Short and sweet the TASHA. Who would be a podcast in itself I told you I. Felt. New podcast. How feeling? Is. What. I am I'm having actually every human emotion you can have, and I'm having an all at the same downtime. I'm angry, sad, scared frustrated hopeful fired up every motion human emotion. You can have I'm having and this moment of few weeks ago I myself actually tested positive for covert Nineteen Latasha. It. was the most nerve wrecking name Sweetie. It so I'm here for you sweetie. Oh you understand. Thank you so much and I'm so glad that you are will I had a mild case of but I think more than anything. It's the worry because you don't know how it's going to respond to Matty and then I'm worried about people being around me and being around my family. So I am just petitioning for a twenty two over I was just like a lot of talk to about this. Talk to the manager I need to recite twenty. She's a woman by the way. Exactly I know. So listen. I know first of all, thank you for sharing that. Latasha and. My heart goes out to you for anyone has to go through that especially in this time but we do want to discuss the twenty twenty election. It's less than eighty five days away. As if we're not on edge enough this year and honestly I'm going to come in as the Puerto Rican reporter. I have news to share with everyone in the world. What are we just had a primary election on Sunday complete Shicho. Alison show up two pressings. There's calls of. Delaying. It and moving into next Sunday and it's just it is complete. Chaos down in my home island colony, and I'm very worried now that this is just a prelude to what's going to happen in the united. States on election day November but we want to talk about the power of voters of color and the issues of voting rights. The backdrop of this election season is the coronavirus pandemic. There are now five million confirmed covid nineteen cases in this country, and the number of those infected has doubled since the end of June and then we still have to mention. Joe Biden's comments last. Thursday during a joint. National Association of Black Journalists and a BJ and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists which was an h j of what he said. What you all know. But most people don't know unlike the African American community with notable exceptions. The Latino community is incredibly diverse community. With incredibly different attitudes about different things. This completely overlooks sees issues of race identity ideology, intersectional communities, I honestly think that this kind of statement, the trump campaign's like bring it on because it's just GonNa be used to divide and conquer Democratic voters.

Tina Vazquez North Carolina National Association Of Black National Association Of Hispan Medina Winston Salem Joe Biden Matty Harlem Russia Brown Co Tino Atlanta China Puerto Rican Founder Alison Shicho Reporter