LGBTQ

Infuse your ears with inclusivity and listen to the latest from the LGBTQ world. No matter where you fall in the rainbow, our playlist has you covered. Aired from premium podcasts.

Sustainability with Queer Brown Vegan

Homo Sapiens

05:54 min | 4 d ago

Sustainability with Queer Brown Vegan

"I, say us. It's so lovely to meet you. I'm so glad to be talking to you today. Thank you so much again for having me glad Chris. I'm over the moon as you know because we we're we're super fans like the. Stock you on Instagram we found profile didn't we and I think I just loved title Queer Brown Vegan I thought it was. NEAT and I love the way you present your ideas like it's really colorful and beautifully made I. Think it's a really good thing you're doing that you're. Talking about. Urgent subject but making it kind of. Fascinating and interesting and alive for people not to skating because that's one of the things we've. Talked about like, how do you? Do what you're doing, which is well, what do you? What what would you say? You do tell us what you how you define yourself. I would describe yourself as a queer environmental educated that provides accessible environmental education on content for anyone interested in learning about environmentalism is as you live zero waste. What does that? What does that mean? Zero ways you know for a lot of has a broad term of. The Way to define it but zero waste and lowest to me it looks into higher able to create redesign the way that you view plastic and so understanding it from an individual impact, but also a global impact. So understanding that reducing your waste in different ways but also acknowledging the fact that the plastic crisis is a global environmental justice that is disproportionately harming black indigenous people clerked me globally and now we have countries that. That heavily exploited by colonialism are dealing with the amounts of waste that is usually delivered from countries like the UK and United States with waste where do you know what are you? What are you talking to us from? Los Angeles. Oh I thought you are and I thought you were in Queens New York, is that I recently moved back home grown up but I'll be back in New York and twenty one. Okay. So you're. So you're I in La boy and tell us your story because your upbringing really affected how you have come to this. Place as the career, Brian Vegan doesn't it growing up? My parents had immigrated an one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty s onto la from Mexico and so we grew up low income living in a way with affordable housing programs or programs that are sponsored by the government and so many of these. In, Los Angeles are known to live in communities are already low income but that are nearby toxic facilities or places that generate noise pollution in some sense in. So my aspects of environmentalism grew at a young age because of like based off survival. So it wasn't necessarily because I thought about being was about others what we have. So have to reuse it and use what I have to, and as I got older I. Started learning about environmentalism making these connections within myself saying like wise the air quality in my neighborhood this way why? What is climate change? How does that interconnect to me and so the older are realizing my own identity great being clear and then I realized the people who usually talk to me or that represented in the environmental spheres We're usually straight white men and so I ask myself like Oh. Is this this is Interesting because I don't see anyone who looks like or comes from a community, and so the ones university I realized the fact that many of the classes were dominated by, of course, white students and not to say that it was bad. But it was to say that there was a lack of diversity representation within those movements in you know having the lack of support having to deal with certain spaces in the environmental field dealing. With Homophobia in like thirty remarks being told to me I realized that that wasn't necessarily space I needed to be an and so leaving after college that's something I want to cultivate it because had I known that there was a educator growing up or had had a mentor like that it would have changed my outlook in environmentalism but instead I had to go through all those hurdles and challenges to unlearn that things that I was taught. To really get to where I'm at today. So you felt that you were being given environmentalism from a very straight white mine ankle and you're like a whole other spectrum out here is. It's interesting that. As. Well, isn't it like do how poverty and like like I remember like growing up like I went to a very smart school wherever and money, and so if you brought in your lunch in a plastic pot, for example, it was kind of considered like you poor. So, there's so much attachment to. What did they do? What did they push wants? Did they went to the school lunches or? Like, yeah, it was just buy something or you know you just go out and buy something whereas like. and. So there's a lot of like use. The is about image know like if I can afford to buy this thing that I can throw away. Of. People. See people striving for that. Almost it's funny. Do you do you think that is I think the idea of consumerism is so ingrained in all of us you know whether would be in our television show our media art magazine anything read it's all about Centrum consumers at a young age even to I remember kids like shaming. We're having thirsted close or even does the fact of like reusing resource that is now seen today as like environmentally-friendly now, which is great to see that shift but back then I, think it's because we ingrained in our own children in our own parents consumerism is a good thing. Yeah well, especially in the say, that's like the kind of the currency celebrity and. Consumers Arctic the to. What degree

Los Angeles Chris Skating Brian Vegan Centrum Mexico New York Queens New York UK United States
Lili Reinhart Discusses Her Bisexuality

LGBTQ&A

05:51 min | 6 d ago

Lili Reinhart Discusses Her Bisexuality

"If it is okay with you I'd like to jump right into talking about being queer Sir I would love to. Amazing. So in June you posted although I've never announced it publicly before I'm proud bisexual woman that was just a couple of months ago why in your life was that the right time to share that with people you know I've wanted people to know that I am bisexual but I've never felt that there was like a right time to do it I was afraid of coming out. I didn't want people to tell me that I was lying to get attention or something, and so I, kind of just kept my mouth shut I. Also, I've told people in the past and they've told me Oh you know it's a phase and I'm like, okay. Great. Thanks. So you know that's discouraging obviously I think that happens with bisexuality a lot because I like men and women they're more of a let's phase. You like what you're. You're it's a phase with women and I'm like. Whatever you say. So take us back you write this post and he hit send what is that moment feel like for you before the reaction started coming in I think I. Didn't want people to think that I was making something that really wasn't about me about me in referring to see the protests that was going on. You know I came out when supporting a protest I kind of tried to do it as nonchalantly as possible I guess coming out is not a nonchalant thing. It just didn't seem like a big deal to meaning also like the way I look at the world right now I'm like isn't everyone I, look at it isn't everyone bisexual like is this you know? So I didn't really feel like this was any breaking news by any means and so to get kind of the attention that I got was kind of surprising to be I I wasn't expecting it I was like Oh ship I'm really fascinated by the public versus private coming out. So it sounds like this is something that you did not just discover about yourself. Yeah. You know I remember being in fifth grade and thinking to myself like I'm thinking about girls law I didn't tell anybody it was very like a private thing I was only ten that's point quite young in my opinion. So that was an. Interesting revelation for me, and then my idea of sexuality kind of it didn't really come up again until I like moved to La when I was eighteen and started to have feelings for this role when I was here and like being sexually attracted to her and a really kind of identified as story I didn't really think about it other than that until I was put in a position where I found myself like really attracted to this one girl that I was hanging out with and then I, guess just over the course of the last couple years like I've I've realized that is just part of me and I didn't really stop to even think about it until. A couple of years ago again. It was just an interesting self exploration. was so interested in how you came out also because you've been on magazine covers and very easily could have had another cover to announce your queer ness and I think it shows like what progress we've made as a society where like celebrity had come out ahead to be on the cover and now it's so nonchalant and I just love that message that sends to other kids that like, Hey, this is not like the biggest deal ever. Yeah and it shouldn't be like I. Didn't I did not want that for for. Me Like Oh do I need to make it a magazine cover for me to tell people I'm bisexual like no, it's not who cares like I. It's not that big of a deal to me like it's not something that it's not like our sexuality define who we are. But I think a lot of times people wanted to they want our sexuality to be the defining that gay guy or that lesbian you know like that's that's what people love to do and left to say in it's like I would hope that. Being out and owning your sexuality isn't something that needs to have press around it. So even though you're. Not that big of a deal to you. We still live in a world where it is a big deal correct. I mean were you afraid that you were going to be quote unquote outed to like the world before you're ready? Not Necessarily I think my biggest fear to be honest with people telling me that I was coming out for attention that was my biggest fear and I'm not necessarily sure why but I think it to me in my eyes kind of became like of fad like that people like you know Oh we're coming out people were bisexual people were dating women like and it was coming out kind of rubbed me the wrong way. I believe it or not and I know I get myself in a lot of hot water sometimes space speaking up and being vocal about things. But I do not like to be the center of attention. It's ironic because I am like a pretty open book. So I'm I'm constantly balancing Matt like but I, but I also don't think that sexuality is something that needs to be. It's just. Not, something that needs to be super private I. Guess in one of my friends was saying, why did you feel the need to do that like he wasn't judging me for saying, why did why did you need to do that? Just why did you feel like you needed to tell the world and I was like I don't have like a very philosophical beautiful answer for that. I just think. Why not it's not a secret it's not something that I was ever ashamed of and I felt like in that moment I wanted to show my full support for this community in the that I belong to it. It was very lake freeing in that sense. It felt very much like, yeah, I'm here I've been here the whole time. Part of this

LA Matt
Transgender activist Sarah McBride wins Delaware state Senate primary

KYW 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | Last week

Transgender activist Sarah McBride wins Delaware state Senate primary

"Transgender activist Sarah McBride has won today's Democratic State Senate primary in Delaware and is poised to make history as the first transgender person elected to the States General Assembly. McBride is the favorite in November's general election as Democrats outnumber Republicans in the district by more than 3 to 1 Governor John Carney and U S Senator Chris Coons easily beat back challengers to win their Democratic primaries.

Sarah Mcbride Governor John Carney States General Assembly Chris Coons Senate Delaware Senator
Angela Chen: Asexuality Is Pretty Complex and That's OK

LGBTQ&A

06:27 min | Last week

Angela Chen: Asexuality Is Pretty Complex and That's OK

"The book you do a really incredible job of giving the as sexuality. One one that doesn't necessary without dumbing down or oversimplifying thing I think for me my biggest takeaway sounds obvious in hindsight. Biggest takeaway is how many different ways there are to be a sexual and I hate to say it. But I did not know that it was this umbrella term that encompasses such a broad range of experiences you find a that is a common misconception. It is so common and you know there's part of me that's leg come on everyone it's been a while like we should be caught up. There's this other part of me that is so so synthetic and I. Think. Some of it has to do with language right because a sexual it's not a word someone made up. You know people already have associations with it. So it's just not intuitive that you would call someone who maybe has positive sexual experiences a sexual, right? Just semantic level people are like, what does that mean? So I totally understand why people would not understand. It's an umbrella term would not intuitively know that there's such diverse range of experiences under that but also. I feel like it is time for us to be having that conversation and moving away from about one image of asexuality even for people who think they know what it means they think it means like, Oh, you just don't like sexy repulsed by sex, but it's so much more than that. That's such a great point before reading the book I would've told you that asexual people do not have any desire for sex or romantic relationships and that is the case for. Some, but in no means the entire community. Do you mind just giving us the definition that like we should be thinking of for a sexuality? Absolutely. So the official definition is a sexuality means you don't experience sexual attraction which seems simple enough right but then you have to be like, okay what is sexual attraction and most people think it means, oh, you just are repulsed by Sax you don't WanNa have sex, but sexual attraction is not the only reason to have. Sachs. Example I always use which I, don't love as metaphor, but it was just a food better for it. There's foods that you love and you're attracted to quote unquote there's food repulsed by and there are some food that like they taste fine. But because you associate them with like your best friends in college in like that social senior, there's like an emotional reason while I won't speak for you. I'm an emotional eater, right? So I feel like there's all these wants is there to make it really simple. It's possible to not experience sexual attraction without being repulsed by SAX to be basically sex in different but because there's so many other reasons to have sachs. Emotional reasons like you might be bored or you really love someone or you want to feel attractive desired sexy that can hide for many people donate sexuality, and that's all of these nuances and all of these complexities I think for many people maclear community we first began to discover and understand our sexual orientation through sexual attraction. Only to oversimplify right I'm sexually attracted to men I must be gay without that component. Can you talk about how you spurious attraction and like what you base those feelings on? That something that's really complicated. So one thing with sexuality is that in some ways de orientation is based on what you don't experience. So then you have to kind of explain what is it? You don't, which is beard philosophical question rape. So for me like when I feel attracted someone this romantic sense, it's basically like having a crush on them right like I want to date them like I could see as being romantic partners and I even have an. Aesthetic type you know I always say like do not get me wrong. I have a type it's not like everyone looks the same to me. Some people are hot. Some people are less heart don't get me wrong but there's not like a sexual motivation for it and I think that can be really really hard for people to feel out and understand can be so many nuances and also want to make clear that being a sexual is not the same as. Being a romantic because Saxon. Romance aren't the same right I think most people would agree so many people sexual and they are say Hetero matic or their pan romantic or by romantic, and there are some people who is actual are a romantic thing that they just don't expand traumatic attraction to others the of course, they might love their friends at their family very much. It's so interesting compared to non x people to have to come out of the closet because. We can discuss our sexuality talking about the broader terms, dating relationships, and yet you coming out as half discuss sex sex has to be in the conversation. Does that pose challenges like say parents when you don't want to talk about sex with them? Yeah absolutely. So the funny thing is my parents just don't know the book is about it's funny because if you Google my name like books and come up with into second jewel, it'll stay on the jacket copy. You know in her own experience as actual journalists but I'm just not out to my parents in part because it just it really feels like I'd be talking to them about my sex life in a way that I don't think it would be the case if I were is actual or vice actual for example, and I've talked to other aces about it and they've said the same thing where it feels almost more inappropriate you know like they kind of A. Conservative not hyper conservative but a little bit of a conservative workplace and it feels like if I were to talk about my sexuality, it just seems much. It is not done. There you the way it might be okay to talk about other orientations, right? Because like marriage equality passed for many reasons. But one of them is because we reframed it to be about love and relationships we moved away from sex but for asexuality we don't actually have that option did. It take a while for you to become comfortable with that label for yourself absolutely, and I think in many ways I still feel I still feel some ambivalence about it. You know I like talking to other aces other people the crew community because I feel like I can be more honest. You know there are people who still say sexuality doesn't exist you're just repressed or maybe there's something physically medically wrong with you and because there's so many naysayers of course. There is this pressure to dig your heels in and be like not only my actual I love the sexual twenty, four seven. It's the best thing in the world because you don't want to give them any room to invalidate you right and so I think when I'm with people who are queer or who are as there's more, there's great things about it, and in some ways I've internalized some anti sentiment and sometimes I feel about it. So it's a long process.

Sachs SAX Google Rape Official
Niecy Nash gets married to longtime female friend in surprise wedding

If These Ovaries Could Talk

01:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Niecy Nash gets married to longtime female friend in surprise wedding

"With a new member of the tribe Jamie? Yeah and it's a good one niece e Nash announced that she married lady a lady. And she was married to a man and he's he's like a pastor too much. She was like that's dumb I wanNA lady but she wasn't just married for like a year this thirteen years. Yeah. Like a long time and then all of a sudden now she's married she married lady and then she came out and all of it it's amazing. She's Hilarious does she I don't know what I know about Nash is one from getting on. I loved her so much on that show. If you haven't seen it, it's HBO immediately or else you're dead to me near not at all I. So I'm very, very very agro this morning. I haven't seen any negative press wool from the gays around this, but everybody seems to have really just embrace this. S. nece-. Are just so happy when anyone comes under our umbrella run to it here. It's dry under here. Come on. She's so funny I've ever on you know I love her, I'm telling you please watch her getting on. It's like she's I think what movie? Series it was based on a British series, and of course, because we have no new ideas, we remade it as an American the series we do it all the time. She S British Maury mccafe's also in it and Alex. Burstein it is a killer cast. It is so well written. So funny but what needs Nash doesn't I think she's so underrated as as an actress

Jamie E Nash HBO Alex Burstein Maury Mccafe S. Nece
A Critique of Dallas Buyer's Club

Is It Transphobic Podcast

07:16 min | 2 weeks ago

A Critique of Dallas Buyer's Club

"Let's. Let's Talk About Dallas Buyers Club. I first and foremost all the triggers. Goddamn because everything you thought you knew about this movie you were right and then there's more. There's The the TRANSPHOBIA is there from the characters. It's enacted characters but it's also just that kind of trans-phobia where it's tucked under. Oh, it's actually homophobia but that's because they don't know what to do with someone who presents in a way that is not stereotypical. To one gender or another. and. Yes. So look up triggers for this movie. There are so many that I don't even feel like sitting down and listing them but look them up before you continue to consume this podcast and before you decide to watch that movie. That said, had you either? Have you seen this movie before we went to the podcast first time? For a first time on that radio to. See what I did there. On brand very unbranded. Yeah. It was my first time too. I definitely knew it. As you said, for all the reasons that I knew, and then there were more reasons that I was glad I did until now. Oh Yeah so This movie I have to say because I tried to as much as I'm trashing it as much as I'm like Oh this all this I really wanted to like this movie I went in wanting to like it I remember talking to a friend about this movie because I refused to see it. So I was like, why are people praising jared leto wire people praising his portrayal of Now, I can't remember the name of Rayon why and I actually had to coax it out of a friend because. This was a friend that I respected their opinion on and they basically said they were like, well, you don't actually want to know you wanna be mad and it's like, no I respect your opinion i. am asking you why people care what is it about this helped me and what this friend said to me was that the portrayal of someone who is going through a having aids being HIV positive and then having AIDS, and then dying from another disease which. It, it was the thing that really drew this friend of mine into the character and into the world of this film and as much as. We are going to talk about a lot of the specifics now having watched it. I respect that opinion. Even though I did not get the same thing from this movie. At least from from Rayon and that's really mean I also did not grow up like I grew up as a child during the AIDS crisis I did not know a lot going on but at the same time. The movie in my opinion the movie itself. Didn't do a great job with ray on. But I really dug the way that they dealt with. Woodruff Matthew. mcconaughey character in the first act. Yeah To to. Put My cards on the table for we continue. To very specific misconceptions or like nervous conceptions but two very specific things that we're going to my mind when I started watching the movie. Deborah really softened a lot of it for me, which was one. The last movie that I've seen that was in relation to the AIDS crisis was the film adaptation of Rent. which was the worst movie that's life. I it's just. Sorry And the others conception is that I didn't realize that it was made in twenty thirteen I thought like watching it. It felt like it was like an early two thousands movie in house can be like well. Okay like Even. The Straits don't really get chanced stuff I. It was like a good attempts to try to like bring more color to the table metaphorically speaking. But it's a twenty thirteen. I don't know like. I mean at times article didn't come out yet. It's just it's just weirder and it's also like. That film strikes very early two thousands and I'm not like sinophile so I could be completely dead wrong on this, but it just felt. Like You know way older movie than it actually ended up being. So. And that. Up Sorry and then I guess the third conception. Sorry. The secret third one was that I actually was trying to give him the benefit of the doubt because as soon as I found out that it was like historical like a history piece because runway was a real person. As like, Oh, well then you know if they had to deal with a real life trans person like they're they're dead in the water like you know they're not going to handle that well. But no round is is a real. She was made for the movie. So cool. Great. Love that for us. So. Yeah. I wonder because Silas one of the things that you had mentioned that you had focused on when talking about the movie was a lot more of a real life historical things that were going on and about the real life of what was happening. Can you talk a little bit about that? Yes so Aside, from knowing about, you know sort of the kerfluffle about jared leto playing the part and hearing a little bit about that when the movie came out the other thing that I really had a bee in my bonnet about is the fact that Ron Woodruff was not straight. And he did talk about long clearly had some stuff but. They just. Changed him to be straight and altered his character quite a bit and watching it. It's so clear to me that they were like, how do we make this the straight male hero anti hero type that the straight people will come see the movie for? And so that to me like before, we even get to any issues of transphobia homophobia of that in the Bi phobia that really just made me now it becomes this sort of like. The straight guy in the hero of a crisis that you know certainly straight people and all people belong to this lots of. It was but it was primarily focused on the queer. Community. And sort of start off before you even have a chance to give the film the benefit of the doubt with that erasure just really for me. Through me completely out of it it was I wasn't able to come to the film really with. A kind of the I at that point.

Aids Jared Leto Dallas Buyers Club Woodruff Matthew. Mcconaughey Deborah RAY Ron Woodruff Silas HIV
Tayla Parx: Has Written All of Your Favorite Pop Songs

LGBTQ&A

06:27 min | 2 weeks ago

Tayla Parx: Has Written All of Your Favorite Pop Songs

"You know you've worked with some of the biggest musicians in the world and you've created full albums with these artists. One of the things I think is most intriguing thinking about your work is that I can't believe how young you are to three honest because that's something you hear a lot. Yes it's definitely something that I hear a lot in also it's nice because probably just in the past few years, maybe three or four years I've been seeing a lot more young women kind step into this role at first when I first started there wasn't so many people my age doing this and now you know you have so many talented young bear like now they don't year. Well, I. Never see somebody this young doing it anymore and I'd like to think that. I mean, some of my other. Incredible peers were a part of making that normal team now. So setting out though that was something heard a lot you're judged by your age. Yes. When I was starting out. Yeah. When I was starting out, it was like, okay. Now you don't really probably know what it is to talk about love they just Kinda try to do like the OK key thing to you. They doubt you just based off of you know they've been on the earth longer than you I guess but I think that. It's special for people that are a younger and metal coming up to see people like me to say you know what? Actually my age is something that's GonNa. Benefit me coming in at this time and June example of how you see your age is a benefit. Well, when I first started out, it was interesting because it was like, okay everything was so new to me. So when you're writing a song, you really tapping into all of these different emotions and what I was able to use my imagination. A little bit more when I was younger because it was like if I was in love, this is what it would feel like are all the things that you assume that it will be so being able to have that kind of innocence that youthfulness all of those things when you're talking about emotions for the first time, for instance, when you get your heart broken the first time, it feels like it's the end of the world and maybe even the second time but after like you know a few. Tries being visit just happens in relationships you're either you know going through it, and this could be the person to with for the rest of your life or not, and you know most people go through go through a few to just try to get it right. But I think that having the innocence of gone through all of those situations without I mean until you get older realize it's GonNa be okay. You know is a part of what makes you feel that artists a little bit more those lyrics. Because the greatest love songs are not written about rational mature love where Oh to break up and that's too bad. But I'll move on I'll get better exactly. That's exactly. So I think that you every songwriter has to kind of dive a little bit deeper in into that like The innocence when they are creating so that it doesn't take away the magic. The magic you giving people. Hope you know also when you're when you're writing music even especially when it's like a love song, you know you write songs for other people as well as yourself and we all have egos for lack of better word is it as satisfying for you to put something out in the world like thank you next which doesn't have your name attached to. It. Well, I think it is because it's it's satisfying in a different way, which is something that me personally as a creative I ne- you know also very, very bored I enjoy being on tour and being able to connect with fans who you know relating to my story personally, and then also like when it's not about me sometimes and it's about really adding value to somebody else's. Career and something this humbling. You know it's something that is. That allows me to at perspective to myself and it also gives me the creative freedom to say look I'm going whatever I want. So I could take an entire year off of performing in still be totally fine or take a tire entire year off of writing for other people and be completely fine. But another had the creative freedom to do them with. Thank you. Next example I used when you write A. Song which was a number one hit. Do you know it like in the studio Walker making it like can you hear that I think that you know when you have a song that's that has the potential to relate to millions and millions and millions of people. You never know that it's a hit until it's a hit though so I usually try to say like at Tel labels in you know in the ANR's. Whoever it is, the moment that we stop pretending to nominate his is the moment will will get to hit faster because it's not something that you can just say, Oh, I know that the world is GonNa relate to this we have a clue and maybe we can go into the right direction but it always happens at the right time when the wall needs to hear it and you just happen to put that song on the right artists who they're gonNA listen to it from securing the studio and you're not thinking wow, is this going to be a number one you're thinking? Is this going to relate to the most people possible? Yes. Because that's what his long is. Literally. It's how can you get the world to relate to this artist and for songwriters job like? It's our duty to say, how can we make this artists relatable and his real? How can we make this story heavily make the world understand their story coming from them in your own music I hear very few pronouns like you're not singing hymns and hers and everything is that intentionally to make relatable to the biggest possible audience I, think that was something that I started to do towards like right before I started to. Work on my album we need to talk and I knew that you know I'm I'm by so I was also like well, there's that side of me. That doesn't want to shut it off from being whatever gender because it has been either gender or at one point in life you know and so it was definitely something that was you know what? I also know that I have a lot of fans it fills. Same. Exact way that I do and I have a lot of girlfriends in the habit of a lot of guys hands in the have have a lot of them or they fans of whatever your Pronoun is and so it is one of those things that I was like out I don't want to neglect people who aren't so literal with whatever their pronoun is and also I don't think that you should exclude people are. There listening experience just because you decided to say him or her you know I I think that it allows for people to say Oh this song could be about anybody I can sing it to without having to kind of censor myself.

ANR Walker
Chasten Buttigieg: Shares His Side of the Story

LGBTQ&A

05:13 min | 3 weeks ago

Chasten Buttigieg: Shares His Side of the Story

"You know for all the Presi during the Democratic primary and for everything that was written about you. It wasn't until reading your book that I realized how unique your position also was as an out gay man in a relationship with cylinder running for president that has never happened before in our history with that something that you thought a lot about our talks about with the team I thought about it endlessly. I obviously encouraged him to run. You know gave him all the support and instead go for it. But that's because I had no idea what running for president was like so it's very easy. Say Like Yeah I love you great president and then you know the campaign took off rapidly and then my profile rose pretty rapidly and for a few months as you read in the book I had there's a lot of anxiety about how do I feel this rule? This world has never been done before there's no playbook I was anxious for a long time about making sure I got the moment and making sure that I was doing it whatever quote the right way was and ultimately I just decided. I have to be myself like I can't do this pretending to be anybody else or. Expecting people to think anything else but myself and that worked really well, and it was also disappointing to some other people but at the end of the day, I just wanted you know people liked me I, want them to like me for me and if you know if it wasn't enough in at least it, I wasn't going out there pretending to be something else every day. Are you able to explain why it was different being a gay man married to a gay man in the middle of a presidential campaign compared to like any other spouse? Will there was sometimes, it was like sitting in the middle of the blender and just kind of like watching the world like swirl around you and you're getting all this input and feedback and everyone has an opinion about what you should do, what you should wear what you should say, and then sometimes with really invasive things like how you should perform your identity, your sexuality things you should talk about or shouldn't talk about and it was weird to watch. You know one side of the aisle we were far too gay for people like rush Limbaugh, right of course, and then other people saying like there he is or he is not performing a way that is what I would like to see and you know at the end of the Dan thinking like I am just being myself but I I don't think I would have been as successful. Had I been trying to pretend to be this mash up of? Michelle Obama and Chrissy. Teigen. Something I was wondering during the campaign was. Fun joked that people had was calling you the future first lady did hearing things like that like hurt or offend you know? I mean I felt like a lot of it was just ingest and felt like people were celebrating it. They knew that it would be historical and they and they knew it was something to be celebrated I never really took offense to. Anything like that was a piece of criticism that was the hardest to hear some of the criticisms that sort of made my head spin. You know when when we talk about like what is enough in what isn't enough? And I was spending so much time on the trail and I. Wish. I. Wish more media would have covered what I was doing on the trail because I spent most of my time with teachers, students, lgbtq centers, homeless service providers they all have very personal connections to me in my story and so almost every day I was in some sort of LGBTQ senator or Having roundtables with young people and I. Hear these stories that were so reflective of mine you know young kids who had ran away from home without they didn't belong who were bullied in school who were pushed out of their churches who didn't feel like there was space for them and who are literally questioning their worth and their dignity, and then I see these criticisms of myself, my marriage, this campaign saying were straight men I think one. Person Quips that you know we're just two straight men without women. These situations that like Queen's must look a certain way and I'm thinking like, why are we policing the boundaries in making young people believe that clearness has to be performed surgery has to look a certain way as if you have to exist a certain way to belong in our community when many queer people are sitting, for example, in Tulsa Oklahoma or in the desert and California. Wondering if they even deserved exist at all and at the end of the day like I'm, I'm a big boy. I can read that criticism and think about it and you know examine it through our critical lens. But then I thought that was really dangerous to to young people. It is a funny thing because you know talking to somebody queer people everyone's like digesting messages of how to be gay how to be translated all these things and a common theme I've heard over and over again is they didn't feel like the right kind of gay and then suddenly we have you the national spotlight and like throwing that same criticism that hurt so much on you as well. Yeah it's funny because like I was I was at an event once and this woman asked me. Does being gave matter. I. Mean You keep talking about it like you talk about running away from home and you talk about. Marriage equality and the fight for Trans writes does any of that really matter I think it was one of the only times I had to like look at my team on my God you know hold me back. This is is so insulting and I said. You know until people stop killing us it does matter.

President Trump Michelle Obama Tulsa Limbaugh Trans Senator DAN Oklahoma Chrissy California
A look at Gladys Bentley, American blues singer

Queer as Fact

06:07 min | Last month

A look at Gladys Bentley, American blues singer

"Before we get started as we normally do at the start of a person's life I'm going to jump in when gladys was forty five years old in the year nineteen, fifty, two revolutionnaire. Arcada. Their time travel is upset. Yes. Heavens the reason why jumping in he is because nine fifty two is the at that one amount main sources was written and I want to talk about that. Source. Pot, Abou- review before we actually. Talk about that. So in the nineteen forties and nineteen fifties in the USA politicians like Senator Joe McCarthy was spearheading moral and political panicked about queer people in the understanding that we who are not only immoral but also susceptible to blackmail and therefore more likely to become communist spies. Goddess Bentley had built her career on being an openly queer and gender non conforming blues performer in nineteen, Fifty, two in. The African American magazine Ebony, she write an article titled. I'm a woman again in which she talks very late at queasiness before renouncing it and championing heterosexuality and Hetero normativity. In this article, she says, I became a woman again when I discovered unaccepted the one glorious thing which for so many years I had bitterly fought with all my heart mind and body the law of antennas, the devotion of a man. I thought it was kind of Jesus. Is, the man Jesus, the matters not Jesus She did definitely become more involved with her church later in her life, but she doesn't necessarily link that to her. Queens. So like Jesus here but only incidentally. Background character. Incidental Jesus is my Christian rock band. Do you come across. Do. Christian covers rock songs. Both I anyway. What happened YOU CLAP We'll talk a lot more about the background to this article and what was happening in life at that time. When we get to that I, think the sort of political background McCarthyism is. Hardly the main you need to know that, and the reason that I wanted to bring this up and mentioned at the start is because this article is the only information we have about Gladys inhering voice. Well, that's quite a pickle. It is quite a pickle that we are. And it's also the only source of information we have about her childhood before she was about twenty one. Okay. So that's that most by graphical information comes from what can be gleaned from newspaper is nobody's ever written a biography. All Gladys on the work of like interviewing people who knew anything like that is that is something that could still be done. Do you think she was born in nineteen ninety seven so like a lot of people anyone who knew her in her early life is GonNa be dead. Yeah. But from headlight alive that would probably still be some still alive could talk about her bought definitely have to be done pretty soon. I'm not aware of anyone working on unfortunately, but hopefully, someone is yeah. So I just wanted to raise that heavy keep in mind that that's the source of wealth with before we start talking about glass at life. So I got us was born in Philadelphia on the twelfth of August nine, hundred seven to George and Mary Bentley. She was the oldest of four siblings in a black working class family according to Gladys's article in Ebony Mary had wanted a son and she was very disappointed when she had a door refusing much as tasha child on Nessa Child. Gladys. Intern says she always felt repulsed by men including her father brothers and uncles and she says. I suppose the reason was that they will admire while I was scorned from ninety nine or ten. She began to steal her brothers choirs at first to feel she was getting even with them but then I began feel more comfortable in boys quarries than dresses have parents teachers objected to gladys as masculine dress. The gladys was obstinate and she and her parents eventually reached a compromise by gladys wear what's called a meaty blouse. So that's what you'd pictures like kind attritional Salas like a navy ship and she went out with a skirt during elementary school gladdest about to crush on a female teachers she tells us in Class I sat the hours watching her and. Wondering, why I was so attracted to at night I dreamed I didn't understand the meaning of those dreams until later. I. WanNA mention this because it's got his first experience of being attracted to a woman that we know about and also just think it gives you a bit of an idea of how in her article the Ebony she does talk openly about like being que- and being attracted to women and wanting to present in a masculine way and these kinds of things like she doesn't deny that this is an aspect then renounces it and decides that Hetero. normativity is better suicide angle on this that she used to feel this way but she has stopped. Or the she feels this way but has decided that that's not any good. I tell you. It's more than she used to feel this way but has stopped. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. It's hard to say because she does sort of talk about talk about there are other people who have the same who had the same experiences in she refers to those groups like she uses like way if she's talking about painting society and she's still kind of identifies with those groups. But at the same time, she says as things like I've become a woman again now I love man I'm able to Vin into this female role Besse so I'm interested to hear how gender and sexuality. Interacting glasses life. Easier we go through what I was saying I've become a woman again. that. Yeah. I really interested to hear your thoughts on that. I, don't really nine because we have so little in gladys invoice except this. Has a lot of a lot about the stuff going on and influence why she write this article. It's hard to say how gladys feels about gender, but we will talk about Nemo. As. Gladys grew older cy when she was a teenager, her mother thought taking doctors. She doesn't explicitly tell us in Ebony article the reason for this but it's apparent that it was connected to fairly to perform femininity in the way that was expected of him. Gladys tells us she believes parents meant well botched quite what my family did not know was that. I didn't need a doctor, but love's affection and healthy interests to supplant the malignant growth festering inside of me, and she seems to argue at this point in the article that it was the original rejection by her mother that fest push towards her gender non conforming behavior and that her parents subsequent relations attempting to force her to conform to femininity. Ireland. Encourage to.

Gladys Inhering Ebony Article POT Hetero Normativity Goddess Bentley Queens USA Ebony Mary Senator Joe Mccarthy African American Magazine Intern Salas Mary Bentley Ireland Besse Philadelphia Hetero. Normativity Tasha WAN
The Ancestors Are Plenty and Petty with Alexis P. Morgan

Revolutionary Mystic

06:19 min | Last month

The Ancestors Are Plenty and Petty with Alexis P. Morgan

"Hello and welcome everyone to another episode of the Revolutionary Mystic? Podcast I'm your host. Mets Lee Alexandria. Joining me today. I have the privilege and honor of chatting with our guest Alexis P. Morgan. I am so stoked I can't even tell you. Just for reference right now were let's see. Moore in August twenty, twenty were stolen the middle of a pandemic and. Like. Alexis mentioned to me earlier. The world is like basically on fire and as a disabled person who is pretty homebound it is a very awesome opportunities today to get to chat with Alexis P. Morgan who I have a lot of in common with and like so much admiration for their work and I'm. Thrilled to get to connect with somebody who? You know understands and it's just it's refreshing. You know we live in a pretty abled world. We live in a pretty neuro typical focused were held. And so I'm really excited to get to talk to them and share their magic with you and. So rather been telling you all about who they are and what they do. I would love for you to hear it straight from them. Hi Alexis. Thank you so much for having me on. This is I think this is the first. PODCAST appearance I've done in a while. So that's exciting. So about Me I am twenty eight turning twenty, nine in a couple of months very exciting in the throes of the Saturn return which is. Home. I'm black and ice that I'm the child of indigenous mothers because my second adoptive parent, which is a story will get into in a second and I'll clarify what I mean by that. Is Indigenous and I'm still trying to figure out if my biological mother was truthful with my adoptive parents about my indigenous heritage, it's not one of those leg. My grandmother was like a such and such kind of situations It actually has to do with my paternal grandfather So you know we're figuring that out but in the mean time I say I'm a child of indigenous mothers to be really clear about a WHO I am in that regard m professionally, I am a writer, an artist and a sorceress. My pronouns are she heard they I identify as FAM- 'cause my gender is really weird and complicated. and has layers of Wu mixed into it too. So sometimes, it's just easier to be like yeah okay. This is folks do what they want and I'm also queer so and I have autism I was diagnosed at twenty seven which is funny because I studied autism for like four years in high. Slovenia with a thought that maybe I would have On something but Nah. but I did but I didn't. Add I'm also disabled I have a multiple sclerosis I was also diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis at twenty seven. During my birthday month it was a very exciting bursting. That see in a nutshell. Wow. Yeah. I just want to say like I love. The amount of representation you're able to bring for folks I. I know when I hear you speaking about who you are I'm hearing things that I I can really to and I also have seen like out there in the world. I. Know isn't really being said, and one of them is that you mentioned about how? You like had been studying onto them for some time and like how did you not know well A for folks that don't know. Much about my professional history I was a social worker for a long time and I had a long like eleven year long career and towards the end I was a teacher for kids with autism and I loved it absolutely loved it felt super at home and just like you didn't reach diagnosis until I was around like twenty, seven, twenty, eight I, think. It's just kind of funny like how it works out that way you know Ray Lake and like I think my so it's funny 'cause like in my particular situation, my first set of adoptive parents. Okay. So let me back this trailer up a little bit. I was adopted twice I was adopted as an infant and I usually call that set of parents by foster parents because it helps make things less confusing to the wider world. And just because I usually don't have time to explain my family tree with the. Diagram. Like New People. So I was. Of Infant, and then I was adopted again as an adult adoption by my mom she is my mom. So when I usually when I say mom speaking of her and what I'm speaking of my adoptive parents who were a queer couple I was raised by White Lesbians, which is who boy that's a Latin to wrestle with in hindsight but. I'm usually not referring to them, but sometimes I'll slip and I'll just call the MOM and everybody gets real real confused because I got like twelve of them lying around it's great. Twelve months I mean but when I was a toddler, I showed some of the signs of A lot of lake professional clinicians would probably deemed autism

Alexis P. Morgan Ray Lake Multiple Sclerosis Mets Lee Alexandria Slovenia Moore Writer
Armistead Maupin

Homo Sapiens

05:13 min | Last month

Armistead Maupin

"Let's listen to Amazon, open Darling Darling armistead or teddy as his family Tell me about the time because he and mcallen came. I come out. Yeah I did. Say How did that come about? I think Ian had been seriously considering it. All along and wanted a little support in that way and. My. Partner at the time and I were. More than. Willing to. Give him my opinion. You know you were friends prior to that. And he was in the closets publicly. Yes. I mean IAN was. Pretty Open. People. Knew IT professionals but he didn't. He never talked about it. He didn't I see. This subject but they didn't bring it up. And contextual textually than was obviously a big thing, but we'll say. Did sort of them make you an activist Jesus have to then. Every day. No. If someone came out in public life like Oh, that's what the that's often the fear that I'll have to be an activist. Really. But. Sorry. That's what happens. That happened Ellen Degeneres. She said the very same thing. Really. I don't want to be an activist well. Once. You're out and you're and invulnerable to the. Public's opinion you you. You start getting indignant. About the difference in the way you're treated you know. And and Ellen in her own way is a big activist just who she puts on that show Totally. And also. I think there's an. Sort of. There's a benign version of activism which is just being around just being around and being gay and just well I've always been a member of that. Well I think. What you can do is just be ordinary about it in public and that's what I think people always connected with about your stories it was. It was it was gay straight everybody all mixed in. Yeah. Yeah and I think that's why find interesting is people. What's gay life like? Mostly straight people. Can in my way. Yeah. Yeah. That's been really my. Called arms all along, just be yourself. And get on with it. That's all I've done. Really I don't I don't consider myself an activist in the sense that I've taken to the streets a lot. That's really interesting. Yeah. but I think what I've done. This insisted on the. By visibility. And the early days when I did press I'd be. Off Rambo with a reporter and Telling some queer story and they'd say, of course, I won't put him really that they were censoring me on the spot and and I said, no, I said that to you because I want you to put it in I want you to say that one thing that I remember. Was You said publicly about rock Hudson. And the he was gay. And That caused A. It, but you felt among people. Yeah. Usually had to be set question it had to be said. First of all, he was clearly a man with AIDS and it wasn't going to be around very long and I wasn't going to keep silent about. How he got that. because I had lost so many friends myself very brave people who've been openly gay and dealing with the prejudice. Most of all. I knew that the world would be kindly or to rock if somebody spoke intelligently about what sort of man he was and honestly they were lying brost hunter, his producer was lying and talking about a watermelon diets and things. And the liver cancer liver cancer just ridiculous panicked responses. And I. I didn't I couldn't take it. And Rock ended up sending his biographer to meet me he said you're the first person I should talk to so. I realized that he understood what I had done. Why done it but a lot of queers didn't really. Thought it was a betrayal because they were still that code of secrecy you must. You must not spell the spill the secret you know if you're lucky enough to know a movie star and you're supposed to keep quiet about it. And I didn't sign on for that. Did, you talk to him about it ever? Before thing you know I I yeah. I did when we first met I, said, you know. If you told your story would make a huge difference in the world and and. He was kind of fascinated by the idea really but his partner. Tom Clark. Said not until my mother. Dies. and. All I could think of was if I was fucking rock, Hudson. Which I tried briefly. I would be happy to tell my mother about it. and. She would probably be happy for me. See Me over the move.

IAN Rock Ellen Degeneres Partner Darling Armistead Amazon Jesus Aids Rambo Tom Clark Producer Reporter Hudson
Holland Taylor: Is 77 and Busier Than Ever

LGBTQ&A

04:51 min | Last month

Holland Taylor: Is 77 and Busier Than Ever

"Taylor. Welcome to the show and congrats on the emmy nomination for Hollywood. Fell into a pot of honey without role yeah. I. Agree. You know I love that character she was a genuinely nice person for lack of better words. She genuinely cared about the other actors in the show and helped guide them to making good decisions in their careers in your own career. Did you have anyone like that? You know I've lived for so long I can scarcely remember being mentored but of course, I learned from everybody I encounter and I ex and I even consciously experienced myself observing someone and say Oh what an interesting way to do that I learned a lot of people and I'm particularly interested in seeing very young actress and how they. How they attack task you mentioned your age you're seventy seven. You also seem to have never been busier. I know it's actually I've had I've had an extraordinary career in that the usual plight of the actor, which is long periods of not working has not been my situation. I've really worked pretty steadily. My beginning years were hard because I was. Too Young to play the parts that I was right for because I was never nausea new but once I hit my stride I've really never had hard period is so untypical ever atypical that I feel kind of guilty about it. I've been blessed with good fortunate lately Ming One thing right after another. It's just been very, very quiet lately it's changed very changed experience and having never been busier though, are you the anomaly amongst people your age or you're seeing that across the board? Oh I I'm seeing a lot maybe because I'm in the Ryan Murphy Universe Ming Ryan Murphy has an enormous interest in women as characters on their own separate from any relationship they may have with whatever man is in their purview. Female actors are used to having roles that are connected to a man you. You can't just be a person who story is being told. You are the life of the mother, all the daughter of the friend of the sister of I think now in the Ryan Murphy World, he sees him and he sees women and their particular evolution of their life and how they realize themselves. He finds it very interesting. So. There's plenty of women an elder women in his world. One of my favorite scenes from Hollywood was between you and Joe Mondello icon Joel Montello discussing your relationship and it was a vulnerable conversation and kind of hate how much it stood out to me how rarely I've seen somebody your age onscreen talking about those things yes we were very aware how rare are. Seen it was and as such, we really wanted to do it. Well, we had a lot of sort of fluttering nervous about it because it seemed such a critical scene. You can't really fully right out a scene like that because so much is unspoken so much as difficult to say so the characters really behave with each other in ways that you hope are revealing. Such an ineffable occurrence that happens when one person reaches out to another and the reaches not grasped back I'm feeling tightness in my throat just thinking about it because it was a scene of such delicacy and we really so wanted to do it well, because people never forget moments of such delicacy and human pain human stress and human urine. I'm Kinda surprised to hear you talk about wanting to do the scene well and Justice I. Guess My assumption would be that at seventy seven you feel very comfortable and confident in your craft a lot of things in acting happen or they don't happen. and. INEFFABLE. It's hard to put your finger on it. You know what the ingredients are. You know with the character was, but the character moves through behavior not just to the spoken word when two characters are working together. There is always an element of Magic to it, and sometimes it clicks and sometimes it just doesn't. It's hard to really control. So there is a sense of. Walking on a tightrope, always enacting you and your partner have to pick up each other's infinitesimally delicate hues and it's very moving. When you are in connection with another actor. It's like being outer space. There's a little spec these tune respects each other and they come within. Communication blinking distance and they blink and then they pass on.

Ryan Murphy Hollywood Emmy Joel Montello Taylor. Partner Joe Mondello
Brandon Taylor: Would Rather Be Alone, Thank You Very Much

LGBTQ&A

05:19 min | Last month

Brandon Taylor: Would Rather Be Alone, Thank You Very Much

"This is not the typical queer character that we're used to reading about. Yes he's black. He's a scientist but on top of that, he doesn't fit into the gay male stereotype usually presented of gay men being sex obsessed is that something that you want to push back on you know I mean I wouldn't say push back on because I think that that is like gay men sort of feeling free to express their sexuality or people in general being able to express their sexuality is really an important part of like. And feeling like you can. You can do that without being persecuted by the law. So it wouldn't say something that I wanted to push back on because I think it is an important part of your life but I was interested in sort of telling a story that feels closer to my own and trust in my own way of being in the world and I know many Queer people who? Are Not sort of sex centered and were Sachs's sort of a thing that exists but it's not sort of something that we're interested in pursuing necessarily, and so it felt important to me to sort of tell different kind of story. But I I don't really see it as being in opposition to those other kinds of stories i. think it's you know we're all part of the same party it's great. Knowing Gotcha. You've written before to about like your view on relationships and sex and I just think again comparing that like the history of literature and Hollywood like were sold this myth that if you're not in a relationship, then your life is not fulfilled. was that something big that you would get over absolutely ages ten to twenty, eight or something I was. Really relationship obsessed and I really really wanted relationship. But I thought that if I didn't have a relationship that I wasn't worthy of love and I wasn't a worthy person and I had all these myths many of the internalized from culture I. I will say and so it was really only like when I turned twenty twenty nine or is kind of like. Oh I really like myself like I like the human I. Am I am an interesting person i. don't need someone to desire me to feel worthy or fulfilled in coming to that place in my own life. Allowed me to sort of imagine you know characters who existed beyond the realm of like. They won't they will get involved in relationships, won't they? It became a much more interesting set of questions to me to sort of understand how a person exists in the world if I kind of set that relationship question aside. But it was really only after like working on my myself that I was even able to kind of see how you know becoming relationship obsessed. It's not that it's an unworthy thing, but it was just kind of like, oh, it's not the only thing that I can do my wife. And then just to clarify, are you not interested in a relationship ever or is nothing that you're like spending time pursuing? I, it's nothing that I didn't spending time pursuing. You know I had a boyfriend for the first time ever in two thousand eighteen and we were together for about a year and it was a really wonderful relationship and and you know it was a great. Like of my life and it was really wonderful. But I I sort of had this sort of growing awareness that I kind of just as good as that was, I think I craved solitude more and rather than letting that relationship get to a place where I was feeling resentful or where I was feeling like negative towards this person that I cared so much for like why not just call it good and be like you know this relationship was really beautiful and really wonderful. But I think I I would rather be by myself I like that more and so I don't feel the need to stay in this relationship if it's only going to become resentment you like it's only going to turn. Turn this great beautiful love into resentment I kind of left that relationship to sort of be alone to sort of thing, and and to be by myself and you know maybe I'll change my mind you know down the road, but I'm just trying to follow. What makes me happy because for a long time in my life I felt as though choosing my own happiness was not only not an option but was also a deeply selfish and really offline. So I'm just trying to unlearn a lot of this toxic west. From the culture and loud you open and talking about it just because I've been single for a long time like in terms of long-term relationships and I get the look of sometimes like what is wrong with you Yes I and I thought that for a long time you know like I felt that. But when I told some friends that I had broken up with my boyfriend to sort of be alone all my some of my friends were like, okay. But like why wasn't it good I was like It was wonderful but I like being by myself more and they're like I don't understand you boyfriend like I could tell that you know I had kind of stepped down in the world by choosing to be alone and I could tell because people started treating me differently you know what? I got a boyfriend people sort of like, ooh Oh, look at him. He's so globally and they treated me better when I had a boyfriend and when I. Chose to leave that relationship people's treat started treating me worse it. So I do think there is something very real to that idea that society likes people paired off and a single person disturbs.

Scientist Sachs Hollywood
Emily Gorcenski - Making Nazis cry

Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

06:19 min | Last month

Emily Gorcenski - Making Nazis cry

"People might not know who you are, which would be an awful shame because you one of the coolest people ever. Would you introduce yourself. Sure My Name's Emily Sanski. I am. Anything say work as a data scientist. But also activist and as many who? Studies on tracks modern white supremacy in hate movements. Technologist hockey player. All sorts of things. So I don't know what is what does it mean to be something where somebody? Wow, that's big. That's big from the from the very beginning. I think one of the things that when I was reading about you. A lot of places at set that you're a person who is known for making that cease cry. What does that stem from? That is true so As a little bit of background I'm from Charlottesville Virginia. or at least I spent. Ten years living there. And of course, Charlottesville was the site of the infamous neo-nazi rally in two thousand, seventeen where. A terror attack happened in the TIKI torches and all of that stuff right so sort of. Stuff that we've seen all around the world. And one of the Neo Nazis that was there marching at the rally was a man by the name of Christopher Cantwell and during Tiki Torch Rally, he pepper sprayed me. Along with several other people. And? End You know he was also at the time filming a documentary with Vice News And so what happened was after the rally in the? Vice and HBO. Race to put out this documentary about what had happened they had some very dramatic footage and. Christine was featured very prominently in in all of this and talking about. How he wanted to kill more people and you know showing off his guns and all of these things. Well, the thing is I knew who can't was and I knew that he pepper sprayed me because he posted a picture of himself pepper spraying me as his facebook header the next morning. So I went to the police and made the decision to rest charges against him. and. When he found out that there is a warrant for his arrest. This was shortly after the vice documentary came out with all of his bravado in his you know McKee's mount all of that. So this. News of this warrant comes out and he records himself in a hotel room somewhere in North Carolina or somewhere. Crying. On on this like stream because he's worried that he's got this this warrant for his arrest. And so this sort of very poor. Poorly intentioned little video that he produced. Of himself like sobbing, not quite sobbing but definitely sniffling. Earned him the nickname of decrying Nazi. So he became in within the span of just a few days he went from being this. You Know Big Bold Neo Nazi to this reduced hulk of a man. Who is crying because he you know got caught doing violence. And so that became a sort of a worldwide mean. And this happened because I was one of two people to press charges against him so. I've earned the reputation for making Nazis crappy, and since then I've also made several other Nazis cry for various reasons. And so I guess that is just now the reputation that I have. It's it's funny. You should say he was caught. Doing like very much promoted himself doing the line. You know it baffles the mind. This was such a bizarre sequence of events right because you know here he is somebody that went on camera and talked about how he wanted to be more violent. He was trying to be more violent. You know all of this stuff. and. Then when he acted violently, he bragged about it, you know Oh look at all the you know he calls everyone communists, of course, but all the commies that I guessed. And then he gets caught doing it and then he's like, oh no, there's consequences for my actions. Any cries. But it didn't end there right because. Sensible people when facing forty years in prison as he was. Would Shut their mouths but he did not know he started he continued recording his podcast from jail. And then when he was let out on bail. Despite having literally admitted to pepper spraying me. He then sued me and my co defendant or CO complaining rather in Federal Court. So there is a federal lawsuit against me. For claiming that he pepper sprayed me. Of courses lawsuit eventually went away. It was fine. But it I mean the tied up year life and as a result of this and as a result of his. Many. Attempts to to silence and intimidate me and I actually had to leave Charlotte. So I had to leave the country. In fact, I now live in Germany And so you know the sort of. End of the story or the maybe it's not the end. But the chapter that the story is now on is that Chris can't will plate pleaded guilty to. Two counts of assault. He was let out of jail. So he didn't get the forty years in prison. You got you know basically. Slept on the rest and sent back to his home but he was banned from the state of Virginia for for five years. Well, he didn't make it five years because now he's sitting in a New Hampshire. Jail. Awaiting federal charges where he is now facing thirty two years in prison for extorting. In violently threatening. Another fellow nutmegger.

Mckee Christopher Cantwell Charlottesville Chris Emily Sanski Scientist Hockey Facebook Assault Federal Court Virginia Christine New Hampshire North Carolina Virginia. Germany Charlotte
Ianne Fields Stewart: The Okra Project

LGBTQ&A

05:08 min | Last month

Ianne Fields Stewart: The Okra Project

"The ogre project is pretty new for most people. Can you give us the Quick Synopsis. Of what they do. Absolutely it's a really great organization that is working to deliver these luxury free delicious nutritious meals to black. Trans folks and it's all prepared by black. Trans Chefs get paid to do that and I love in the interview that she talks about luxury in this idea of taking luxury and making it something that's accessible to the most marginalized people in the community and really excited for us to do this interview with you and Diane. Because you know there's been so many there's been so many stories lately in the media about over the Trans Women specifically dying during pride month and into July. We can't only report transpeople than media. When died we need to celebrate them when they're alive and admit E. N. is such a core thing. So I'm so excited like play her story on this podcast. Should we get to the interview? Yes I am so excited for everyone to hear the conversation we had. To this is Scott and e Enfield Stewart. Here it is. Still. Em thank you so much for joining me for taking the time. I'm just going to jump right in I. Really wanted to sort of learn more about the work that you're doing at the OCHRE project. Can you tell me a little bit about what it is and bring me back to where the ideas started? How did you come up with the idea? I was sitting on a couch in December two, thousand, eighteen in my home eating their ways a masculine person who was part of the organizing meeting and they were talking over me a bit and I really feel like I was being heard. So I put myself on mute and it turned my friend Nyla and I said Hey I have this idea and I had been thinking for a couple of weeks that I want to do something to give back to the Community because I knew that I was going to be going back to a home and family that raised me that I felt comfortable being my complete self with and I knew that that was a privilege that I possessed. So I said tonight you know what if we were to raise money through your fund that you've created, which is glad Trans Solidarity Fund and it's reparations group that is dedicated to shifting funds from the mainstream back into the hands of black transpeople. NYLA thought the idea was great. So we use those funds to pay a chef we worked with me August of Zadie kitchen. The I had the ideal Sunday on Monday a we had a meeting with Maliki Maliki greed. Our hope was raised about like five hundred dollars worked with a couple people. We released the project on a Wednesday and by Friday we had raised six thousand dollars all through individual donations. So we were totally blown away by and made the commitment then and there that you know, will you know run this thing to the wheels fall off and the wheels have now fallen off yet so here we are I'm wondering you know, why do you think there is such a resounding amount of support whicher analysis on that? You know it's interesting. I think that I constantly find myself shocked and puzzled by why and how people believe in the work that we do. It just seems so strange to be a part of something that people are actively saying, Hey, we believe in an Arlington we believe in it, but we want it to continue I think that part of it is that you know it. The idea of taking luxury and making it something that's accessible to the most marginalized people saga. I personally am very committed to interrupting this idea that luxury should be exclusive and rather making luxury something that is available to all people and most importantly to the most marginalized in our community. From you the idea of having you know a black trans. CHEF. Come into your home and cook a healthy home-cooked Pacific meal for you. Unit for black people in particular, the kitchen is such a place of familial lineage. It's a place of community place of love it's it's just were so so many things happen in so much a daily life occurs in the kitchen and so to have that kitchen be filled with someone who looks loves and lives like you as a luxury and a joy and builds community because you're not just having kind of this person who comes in and cooks for you and then leaves, but you're rather creating an experience of community where this person is someone who? Can become community. They can become chosen. Family knows what is possible when someone who looks loves and lives like you chooses you and prioritizes you and says, you are special and you are worthy of receiving this meal and you are worthy of sitting back and relaxing and has someone do for you and I think that that for a community of people who for so long have had to make everything out of nothing I think that's just such a gift and such a beautiful thing to have someone say I will do for you because you're worth it.

Trans Solidarity Fund Nyla Maliki Maliki Scott Quick Synopsis Zadie Ochre Diane E. N. Family Arlington Enfield Stewart
Divina de Campo

Coming Out Stories

03:44 min | 2 months ago

Divina de Campo

"Let's rewind a bit and go too little too. When you were growing up because I think it's fair to say, isn't it? When you growing up, you get all these stereotypes sort of enforced on. You don't you. You tend to remember my mother trying to get to wear a skirt wants to wait because she said, that's what girls. Whether it was a big row over that but it was a similar things going on in your household was trying to push the binary on you in some way or my my dad more than my moment, which is weird because when I came out and she did not react well. But when I was little like that was absolutely no an issue we had addressing boggs and like my favorite thing in the dressing boggs was elected. ABC's leopard-print should neely. The Laurie. Today. And it had a goat trim round the neck, and then I think, yeah. HOW SPLIT IN IT? You know I think I'd say go it was a sleeveless dress with gold trim I mean tacky as hell. So Takeda's. But that was my favorite. Yeah absolutely. Follow I. Loved it. I. Felt it was you know this is yes. I love my life I. Always Been Dressing Up Anyway Kate and hasn't been a big deal but then I remember Ed once we have play room I. Mean we're so big class cry you play. So. I remember putting all these dresses on and then going in and feel like look I got all these silly clothes on on my dad's face was he was just like incandescent and just went very nice and. It was like seething. That was that I think the first time that I remember. Thinking Oh there's something wrong doing this you know dot doesn't like it but I don't know why my experience my father is he's very much generation of men were they weren't taught how to talk about their feelings or talk or express emotion in any other way than anger. At how old would you have been? Then I think I was about four five hours really. And then the you go I, guess you getting any attitude, the playground for not conforming to agendas wineries. Yet not conforming with definitely for me it wasn't such a thing at junior school lower. The thing like junior school that just didn't didn't seem factor into people's hey. So, you know Judy School for me. Actually it was a really happy time. I felt well-supported where the no case. But somehow they didn't seem to have that much of an impact on me Oh my thinking or any of that stuff. So every time at school are is singing in the choir. I was in the you know the little school show I was leading. Violin. Bali class. So I was just on cut fruit loop. Any moment are get. That's why I was kind of confused was. She reacted really badly when I came out, but she'd never kind of held me back from doing any of those things. You know if ever there was a little quaint okayed it with me. You know I was like the absolute stereotype epitome of Funky Little A. The. loafing Barbra Streisand, get me that Bob predicts and on the radio I love a all of this like this song, my brothers and sisters used to sing to me all the time in the car was. So my show you've got it the. Match and I was like, okay why are they singing they? Sit Me Oh, it's because I'm not.

Judy School Boggs Barbra Streisand BOB Takeda ABC Laurie Neely Kate ED
Homophonix Artist Interviews: Rainbow Riots

HOMOGROUND

05:39 min | 2 months ago

Homophonix Artist Interviews: Rainbow Riots

"We begin in Stockholm. It is true that Sweden produces an astonishing amount of legendary music small country. Third and world music exports after the US and the UK. No surprise that within the queer communities are Sweden there exists a bevy of talent. Rainbow Reports is a nonprofit organization using arts and coach as tools to advocate for human rights, LGBT Iq, plus people globally. Now. More than ever. Our focuses humane humans should be equality and acceptance for all. It is clear that social justice is not yet where it should be, which is why arts and coach organizations like Rainbow, riots exist if you're lucky enough to live in a country where there oiled ubt brides, a lot of times people get complacent and they think, oh, this is the norm. This is the standard while it ain't Jinnai they're like seventy plus countries in the world grades illegal with same sex relations and where people get killed where where. A death penalty sometimes. Free. Sometimes I think we have freedom, but the struggle still continues. The filed the torture still continues. The fight for freedom still continues. Let's put our hands together for freedom for freedom. Through Rainbow Riots Hitter Lemberg brings to light the ongoing injustices faced by LGBT plus family worldwide. With a background in music production visuals, events publication in community projects combined with an amazingly generous creative spirit. Is Well to use music and media to inform and educate. Rainbow riots invited artists from several countries to take part in a concert as part of the Stockholm pride two, thousand and seventeen. They also made their presence known within the pride parade from the back of a truck proudly blasting out there incredible musical achievements. I asked Peta which countries were represented. On the rainbow riots flow we had a representatives from Sweden what and we had Uganda Kenya. We had Malawi and we had Jamaica. One of the standout tracks from that for me was a song called freedom. See the crowd. Jumping into. Heard? Freedom. To it in such a way can you tell me up freedom came about when I started making freedom which I co? Bro With? Lesbian rapid called you'll be she's A. Legendary rap group in this in the states called. And when we wrote it, it was kind of like part of my old project housing Wallenberg and kind of thought. It was going to be part of that. But then as I started gravitating towards doing something with Queer activism around the world I, started turning my movement Rainbow Rides into a creative project and I thought well, freedom should be part of that. Really. So that's when I went down to Uganda and started working in Uganda 'cause I thought if I'm going to make this album with queer voices from the world's most dangerous places I've gotta go to the belly of the beast which is Uganda. So I thought okay. Well, I've got to go there ain't going to be nice in preschool ad. And before I went like my passport was running out, so yeah, they add to reissue a possible at the Swedish apple before my flight and they gave me a pink. And I thought. How appropriate with driving along well, exactly Scotland I'm going into Uganda practically waving rainbow flags. This is not going to end well because I was not sure what to expect the anything I'd seen and heard was that nobody nobody in Uganda who was queer was safe and everybody was you know hiding whenever you saw an interview with somebody they will always hiding behind a blood pixellated sort of thing and and not just come to know people going to want to be part of this project. Is it going to be really difficult? What am I going to expect? So therefore came prepared with a song that I'd already written which with freedom I thought at the best maybe I can get some people to dogs in the video at least will have something. But when I arrived, I found a thriving queer community with love creativity and that's how the project started. When I arrived in Uganda realized wow I could really make a whole out I could turn this into something much bigger or they're already artists to establish themselves within the community who were making music. N You lots of quiz singers and performers an artist, and I ended up right in the middle of it. So you know I arrived armed with one song and you know it turned into an album of freedom was starting song, and of course, a features my my old correcting partner you'll be of your majesty but also features a Ugandan singer cold deep lack on bicycle and also on the spoken word intro and the thing about freedom was the I always knew that it was really instant kind of be happy pride song and I just wanted to dot context to put it in. Something else. So it's not just the body, song? To. Put it into context of something really really important life and death and I kinda thought what what better way to to get the message out to make people ons. That was to make them listen.

Uganda Sweden Stockholm Peta United States Lemberg Partner UK Malawi Kenya Scotland Jamaica
Shea Diamond: Why Music is a Tool for Trans Liberation

LGBTQ&A

05:58 min | 2 months ago

Shea Diamond: Why Music is a Tool for Trans Liberation

"I'd like to start with your song. AMERICAN, Pie! I love the framing of it that you're talking about living truthfully and framing in terms of the American dream. Can you just talk about the song and what you want people to take away from it well, the thing is you know I just think about my life and my experience and just like and just. Just the many people I've met throughout the years I mean I've met a whole lot of people throughout the years from state to state running I feel like a state running from state to state. Trying to look for that place where you can find that freedom trying to find a place where you can be, you know everybody find wants to come to Hollywood. Everybody believes in that dream of of that they can do something they can do this thing and they have this dream whether it's so small as to have. House, with a picket fence and have a sickening piece of trade at home. You know that's that you can put you know your your feet on his bag and he says now. Let it rest. They're a little bit. What other situation is I mean? We've lost a the ability to dream because people have taken that away from us. They've told them us because we're queer. Because with this because we're black, because we're trans because we're gay, because the with this because we're fat, I had a dream since I was small, and I was told I cannot assess that dream, because first of all I wasn't a girl. I believe harshly. That I was female. So I've been fighting, society. Since my very existence that's gave giving society gave me my script and told me Oh. You know you're not a girl. And you came into this world. This is who you are, so they gave me a script in order to go by in refused to go by their script. Now we all came here but naked. We came in this world nude I came into this world wanting. Always wanting and I still want and who's going to say my want is not a need and I think about my existence as a trans woman, and I would not want to go back and be and uncle, because I started off gender non conforming. We started from these experience. I started as a gay man boy. Whatever you WANNA call it gay bodied person. Queen. They in Trans. Now I am a woman. I Want Society to. Adjust to that change. Trans people are who they say they are. Not who you want them to be. And when you put it in terms of that framing an as the American dream, I'm always looking for ways to sell trans acceptance for lack of better words, and that makes it hard to disagree with. Well I feel like we should never have to to sell like it's a sprite and say look. It tastes good. Feeling. Oh, I mean sell in terms of acceptance and passing laws to protect. Do we need to de Criminalized Being Trans? We're always going to be the person to be objectified in cages locked away pointed. Ridiculed spectacles. They look at us as animals if we're not sil. Sila viral silver. Some ways I cannot save for. Silver, civilized, civilized, civilized, and I guess I haven't had to say that word in a while because I've never been considered civilized. Has that been consistent in your life? That's been consistent in my life. You understand where I come from. What if the world change? Our social construct had changed, and you were told that like a black and darker with superior. How would you navigate? Would you be the same person which would be the same joyful person with the experiences that we have experienced to one day? Have your foot in our shoes people in society. They know what's going. We pretend we act like we don't. And we pretend like we want to make a change, but we really don't. What is white privilege? There's no such thing we've been given that script. And we've just adhere to it. Time in time out, and we have not then then. We don't go to this thing that all people are equal. We had to find somebody better now after we've realized that why people are in better now, black people have to be better. Somebody has to be better in order for somebody to be lesser. Somebody has to be poor in order for somebody to be rich that we monopolize off the things that's happening in this world, so we can look at the the Trans Women in their experience or people in their experience, and no, that's not us, and there will never be a weekend hold I hit up high and live safely navigate in. In this world, and these are all things that you sing about pretty directly in your music. Have the label or producers asked you not to do that so explicitly and do singing about other things well, you know I, have to be honest with Justin Justin is a visionary Justin transfer he is, he is a visionary. He had the people like we were another thing another labor one. It's sign. And the whole thing was. They wanted a lighter music they did. They wanted lighter music. Happy Music. Let's radical music I. Now there. They wanted to sign. They wanted a younger person. Another one wanted to sign. They just like we believe her story is just. It's going to overshadow the music. So, they believe that because I had a freaked up life and I survived that and I'm live in to tell my story in order to in order to encourage other people that they can survive the dare experiences, because because I'm not the only one that experienced things and I don't want people to think that I'm not a victim. I am a survivor and so to my music. I want to encourage people that you are survivor

Trans Justin Justin Trans Women Hollywood
Phil - Growing up gay in South Africa

Coming Out Stories

04:14 min | 2 months ago

Phil - Growing up gay in South Africa

"It can tell from Phil now. He grew up in South Africa where he knew from a very early age that he was gay, and he got bullied for it from the age of eight I think I always knew from a young age, but for me it was different levels of awareness so when I was really young I found myself getting those butterflies in that shy feeling by looking at old is so you know when you see little schoolgirls and they all shy when they see their friends older brothers Zoll. Things like that! That's how I felt and it felt. Different to looking at my other male straight friends, who would get the same feelings for girls? So I had the awareness that they was a difference there I was getting that feeling by looking at guys, but they were getting that feeling looking at girls, and what's certain Cevennes near young mind that there was anything wrong with that, or did you just sort of acknowledging and and run with it I think as I got older Changed the way I. I thought because the majority of the people I was hanging around with were attracted to the opposite sex so I then thought okay. There must be something wrong with me because I didn't know anybody else. Who has in the same situation as me? Let's put this in a setting. Then how old were you? Where were you growing up? I think the awareness really started when I was four five and I grew up in South Africa. That's young, isn't it? Yeah, well I mean the thing is i. that's why I had different levels of awareness as about myself as I was growing up. So I mean yes, I had like kiss catch with girls, but then I had the feeling. Oh, I want to play catch with boys. You Know I. think that would be a little bit more exciting. And then I got a little bit older and. It was. Should I be having these feelings and I think you are actually the first person on the podcast from South Africa. Yes, so I don't really have much of a sense of what it's like growing up being gay part the Elliott Bay Community in South Africa what what was it like south? Africa I find is a little bit more. Conservative than here in the UK. And at that time it was quite homophobic. Very traditional men do this woman do this. That really affected me and I found it quite difficult. There were slows thrown about about being gay I can remember being a kid, and for those the listeners who have some experience in South Africa the word was more fee, which was fag basically and Offie Molefi. So. I was called that a lot I didn't even know what it meant. My mom tells me about the story. When I was young, I must've been eight or nine, and and I would go to my mom in our say mom, how do gay guys? And she said to me I know Philip. How do gay guys walk and I said I don't know, but the people at school are are teasing me because they say that I'm gay because I walk in a certain way and I didn't even have a label for it, but it was really really hard, even for my mom and Dad. They never really had any experience in lgbtq stuff and they've learned a lot through me. Yeah. It's a similar story with a lot of people are told to. Kind of like a lot of parents learn as they go on, which is why sometimes their first reaction isn't always the best one because they literally done what to say, they have gotten a reference point. They haven't met any other LGBT people until that child comes out. This is what it was like with my mom and dad because they grew up in Rhodesia and Zimbabwe. and. It was a lot more conservative than over in the UK, so they didn't have a reference. They didn't have any friends and relatives that were comfortable in coming out and saying who they really

South Africa Phil UK Philip Cevennes Rhodesia Elliott Bay Community Offie Molefi Zimbabwe.
Diversity of LGBTQ Characters in Film Declines, Study Finds

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Diversity of LGBTQ Characters in Film Declines, Study Finds

"Record representation of LGBT Q characters and The 118 films released by the major studios. But for the third straight year, the racial diversity of those characters declined and transgender characters again. What unseen Glad Call city crease and non white LGBT Q characters concerning and that none of the studio's studied received a good or higher grade 50 million people

Maria Town: Disability Rights Are LGBTQ+ Rights

LGBTQ&A

04:31 min | 2 months ago

Maria Town: Disability Rights Are LGBTQ+ Rights

"Disability looks like so many things right, and in fact over one third of the Lgbtq community, house disability, so if you don't have one, absolutely have a friend or loved one does, and you'll hear Maria. Today disability is not a sign of weakness is a sign of strength, resilience and survival. So, let's get to it. This is Maria town. Know preparing for this interview I was thinking about all the different aspects of queer life, or or should I say my queer life because I was specifically thinking about how not accessible they are yeah, and one of the biggest and most visible examples I think is pride, fried celebrations, and I'm just curious about what is in your experience with pride. Pride is interesting. The idea of walking in a parade is very exclusive for a lot of people. There is always biased towards being able to physically show up and watch or debate in a parade that I think our experience with Corona virus may change I hope that various pride committees and organizations across the country are actually thinking about virtual engagement in subsequent years, and how that can be a complement to in-person engagements, but there's all of the events that surround pride typically in June, that often revolve around alcohol and substance abuse in tree, then is a disability having pride so closely tied to alcohol companies creates a lack of access for a lot of people in. In Our community I've never thought about that is alcoholism is classified as disability to be specific it's it's addiction in treatment, so if you are actively experiencing alcoholism and not seeking treatment than it wouldn't fall into disability, you know that's what the law says I. Think we can look at addiction more broadly as as a disability. Ask something that does impact someone's activities of daily living in their ability to accomplish them. You know for someone who is seeking treatment for addiction. They are entitled to reasonable accommodations in their job. If they need a flexible work schedule, so they can go to a meeting. All of those fit under the umbrella of reasonable accommodations the ADA. Issue that I wish more people in the community understood and were open about new sort of diction falls within the ADA, the American disability act or I guess If you're currently in treatment, right I, think people in the queer community knew so many people in treatment. Is that a Bra Lee known thing that you are legally able to ask you like work for time off to go to meetings and stuff so I don't think it is I think that most people's understanding of disability is fairly narrow, and that's very unfortunate the disability. Disability. Community is huge. It's extremely diverse and I think most people when they think of disability, even people within the community. If they haven't had an opportunity to really get to know the disability rights community, maybe think about disability in terms of someone who uses a wheelchair or someone who is blind, but in fact disability covers. You know people who have cancer people who have AIDS HIV. It's a really really broad category. In fact, so broad that people with disabilities are the largest minority group in the United States, and there are one billion. Billion people with disabilities around the world, those numbers are crazy especially, since on on this podcast, we talk about representation all the time, mainly for Queer people in the media, but we think about representation for those at disabilities, if the numbers are so small, if as you said, it is the largest minority group on even with representations right like we are so as a community, so accustomed to seeing disabled characters, being played by non disabled actors, like what's the easiest way to win an Oscar have able bodied person play somebody with a disability. Disability right like Daniel. Day Lewis in my left foot. Shirley's there on in Monster Forrest gump all Oscar winners, all non-disabled people playing people with disabilities I think when we talk about representation, it can't just be like disabled characters. It needs to be disabled riders writing the stories that needs to be production, the whole kit and caboodle,

ADA Oscar Maria HIV Bra Lee United States Monster Forrest Lewis Daniel Shirley
Valentina Sampaio is Sports Illustrated's first transgender swimsuit model

Rover's Morning Glory

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Valentina Sampaio is Sports Illustrated's first transgender swimsuit model

"Sports illustrated has their. Their annual swimsuit edition of sports illustrated. Has. Done a photo shoot with their first transgender model Valentina. Sam, Pyo I, think or something I don't know exactly how you pronounce. The name, but That is the first transgender model theater to appear in the sports illustrated swimsuit edition.

Sports Illustrated Valentina SAM
Munroe Bergdorf on Systemic Racism

Homo Sapiens

04:53 min | 2 months ago

Munroe Bergdorf on Systemic Racism

"Just trying to not try not to think too much about people talking about me and just focusing on contributing to the conversations are going on at the moment and China be of use to make communities trying to be of use to. The people that follow me are looking to educate themselves on what's going on in the wild. What are the reasons we're speaking is because of what's happened with you and Lori L. and for anyone who happens to have been onto a rock for the past three point five years. Will you just explain? The situation from the beginning with them and how that's now been reconciled. Because I think it's fascinating. Okay well I'm going to try and squeeze three years into five minutes so. Allow me a little bit. I was the first transgender motto for L'OREAL Al so fast transient just brakes person and it came in two thousand seventeen, which was just two months after the Charlottesville riot as a year after trump was elected, we were seeing of vitriol. pouted in every direction. I think are a lot of people of color realized what was going to happen eventually I think now the world is starting to see what we've always knew was going to happen. Always known what was going to happen starring my. So? Yes, we I wrote status on facebook in response to it, which was very colorful and emotional and angry and. I wrote about how all white people benefit from racism, and that's an uncomfortable fact, but it's true because it's being there to ensure the success of the white race. That's what raises them. Institutionally systemically is about. Yes. I don't think people are really ready for that conversation. I was I was dropped from the campaign as a result. And it just left, can me? Ask Monroe and what was your? What was your active role? What were you doing l'oreal at the time? And I'm just curious about how the? Phone call or what were you doing? Puts a spokesman mean. So I was I was that fast transgender model, so I was part of a campaign which was essentially promoting that they had a new range of foundations and. It was it was las different shades, and you could find your shade. Tree much foundation. and. They knew that. They knew that I was an activist, so it wasn't really out of the Blue I've always been very cold about my thoughts on racism transfer a beer and systemic oppression of kinds. And I wrote this two months before the campaign came out, so it wasn't like we were mid. Short and then this happened and. So it's before the campaign was public like at it, right? There was there was there was a little bit of talk behind the scenes. I need two days before that the Daily Mail. We're going to print the story and it was very much kind of renewed. They didn't support me basically I. I'll say that much. No support and there was no encouragement of opening a narrative about racism and speaking about racism, speaking about my experience experiencing racism So that's what I was upset about, and it was very much like shut it down. A situation so. Cut To three years in the future and Lori Al have posted a black square and posted a graphic saying speaking out speaking out is always worth speaking out as worth. And I saw it and I against saw Retinas I. Wait a minute. This is all well and good. This is great. This is fantastic, but you haven't made things right with me and you haven't recognized where you fell short with one of your black employees. In a very highly publicized incident, so. Yeah, I basically posted about that. And then all of my followers help them also accountable, so we jumped Anna Zoom cool, and they ended up and it was a two hours. It was very long cold. It was again squeegee. Three hours three three hours three years into two hours, so I basically said everything that I've been through in the last three years. How them refusing to. Offer me that platform to speak about the realities of my experience. Kinda three me to the wolves said they actually offered me a job. In helping them as a brand to understand their role in the beauty industry as a leader that one of the biggest beauty browns in the wild, and they've got. They've got the power. You really revolutionizing, change the industry,

Anna Zoom Wolves Lori L. Facebook China Lori Al Charlottesville Monroe Donald Trump
Laverne Cox: Fighting for Trans Lives

LGBTQ&A

03:53 min | 3 months ago

Laverne Cox: Fighting for Trans Lives

"I want to start with your Time magazine cover if that's okay into dozen fourteen year on the cover of time and the headline, said the transgender tipping point. Wow, I wanNA to know if you knew that that's what the headline was going to be. And what your reaction was, it was a cover. Try so I wasn't. One hundred percent sure I be on the cover. They told me it stem news item happened. That was really big that I would be bumped from the cover so I didn't know that the cover. What's happening until I? Think the night before that was happening for sure. I didn't know what the headline would be. The first time I saw the cover, a friend of mine named Precious Davis. Who's a brilliant activist and human beings? She's in Chicago. She texted me a photo of the cover and then it was. The editor of time premiered on like think morning America. One of the morning shows that morning. And then it was and I think that certainly changed my wow, so, what was your reaction to the transgender tipping point part of it? You know it's I, don't it's hard for me to separate my reaction in two thousand fourteen from the subsequent sort of reaction. That community has had to that title. There was so much. Criticism. From my community of that title, and the suggestion of that tipping point and criticism of the way the article was written, and who was excluded in there was a lot of that. I like about my community, and what I appreciate about activists who are on the ground doing the work is that in their honesty they keep us accountable. They keep us pushing to go further to be more inclusive to think differently and harder about who is being left out and what? We're not talking about so it's hard for me to separate my reaction. Of the tipping point moment from. The criticism and the critical interrogation of that moment my engine Mitchell, it's we did a panel for variety magazine. A year ago about Trans Representation in the media. For Trans Actors, and she what she said, is that that moment in two thousand fourteen, with kind of all about Laverne is the way she framed it. And then she said Post Post because we're probably impose moment, even though poses still in the air. It's about all of us. Jin, Richards contended, and I like that because I think it was always my goal, that was very clear in two thousand, fourteen at that moment was not about me and man it was about. About a community that was part was about all the activist who worked for years to create space for me to have that moment on the cover of Time magazine, and so now that is coming to fruition that more of our voices are being elevated and more perspectives and It's taken a lot of pressure me I feel a lot of pressure in two thousand fourteen I gotta tell you reflecting on that moment is. Do you remember the criticism more than the celebration? Of both, they covered with revealed on my birthday, so my birthday now is not only my birthday. Anniversary of me being on the cover of Time magazine, which is pretty dope and I decided that year I said to myself. If I'm going to be on the cover of time, magazine, chiappa Party and so. I wasn't going to be on the cover. If I was bump for any reason I was like well, they could just be a birthday party, and so I had a party that year and Time magazine mistake were so generous that they gave us tons of copies of the magazine and my boyfriend at the time had posters made of the of the magazine as opposed to of my Time magazine, covering my apartment, and I went to my mom, and then we gave one. Away for charity, so we had a party and it was indeed celebration there were tons of Trans People at the Party and some people from orange, new black with the party, and so I have fond memories of the celebration of the moment as well but I think both can exist all about both end that I can be in the celebration, the neck, and also critically effect on the moment

Time Magazine Chiappa Party Precious Davis Chicago Editor Laverne America Mitchell JIN Richards
Mark Takano on running for office as a gay Asian man in the 1990s

Asian Enough

05:30 min | 3 months ago

Mark Takano on running for office as a gay Asian man in the 1990s

"I WANNA. Take you back to when you first started running for office in the nineties. It was a time where your opponents would us open appeals to homophobia and smears against you, but then when you ran in twenty twelve, you one by quite a large margin, nearly twenty points What changed in the country in Riverside County, and for you personally in that time by nineteen, ninety four. I was taken very very seriously. I wasn't taken so seriously in Nineteen ninety-two. In addition, the incumbent, who just been elected in nineteen, ninety, two had gotten involved in a scandal. The sex scandal and in nineteen, ninety, four I would sweep the primary in June of that year. I'd raise more money actually than the incumbent at that point that that which reduce my of like. How grave it seems for the incumbent. The Republicans obviously were concerned. They used everything in their arsenal that they could including an accusation that I was gay it. It first surfaced with a very right wing senator state. Senator Than Right Haynes. He was at A. An event that had a bunch of religious leaders pastors in. He said to that group. I don't know about you, but I don't WanNa. Homosexual represented us in Washington DC. Mark Takano nutzoid. Liberal homosexual you know that became a little bit of an inside joke, and it never heard that insult before. A small small weekly paper. Picked up the story and that weekly article made its way back to Washington. DC and you can just imagine all the fax machines sort of. The Republican. National Congressional Campaign, committee the RNC was poly spread that that that story all all the way through the. There's venues in DC. Meanwhile the local daily press enterprise was now in a place where. They had to do a story. A state senator had had accused the congressional candidate who the nominee of being gay and the next. Sort of part of the story was to ask the question. Is it true? And so I actually knew the reporter. If you remember named Joan Radovich, I could tell she was not very comfortable. Asking the question is on the job. And you know, I did not answer straightforwardly. I was elliptical and Oblique and I said well. You know this is just my opponents way of of trying to evade the fact that he was on a car with a prostitute and tried to escape from the police. I didn't deny that I was gay I just didn't CEO yes, I am. As it turned out. That was only the beginning. Barney Frank. You know who reviewed this. The you know the situation with as well you know. The press is still looking at this from the point of view that that you've been accused of something shameful and that you've been smeared and that it's somehow. A bad thing to be a gay person. And we didn't really WANNA test being out and proud in that campaign and nightside before. That's wild. Because like you cannot, you cannot imagine the same kind of thing flying in today's climate which is i. think a great thing that shows how how far I think. Many Americans have gone that that I would hope that such a thing would not fly in the way that it was able to back then, but for you in that moment like you're young. Young in your career. How did your you know your very personal experience of deciding whether or not to come out and be out? Coincide with the unfolding of your of your political career like? Did you expect something like that to happen I did I did prepare myself that it could happen I consulted with my family, my mother and father, and I said you know. My mother was still hoping that it wasn't true that I was gay and said I. Don't think it's going to change and I want you and dad that now that this could become an issue and I don't want to go forward with running for office unless. You're okay with that possibility of happening so I had this little conversation with them they they both felt that I should go ahead and run. For whatever reason that was sort of an important thing for me to get out of the way. Wow, so just to make sure I have the story clear like where you publicly out at the time, and if not where you outed by your opponent at the time I would say I wasn't dating one. I wasn't in a relationship and I was kind of just. You know this young bachelor. In one, thousand, nine, hundred was never questioned because I was never i. think taken seriously as a candidate. In so nobody had to kind of try to shine a light on what was what was my Merrill existence in? I would say I was pretty discrete person, but I was. It wasn't a subject that my mother and father talked about a lot, but I did tell them early on that I thought it was gay, and they kind of had the attitude of well. You know, don't decide that yet.

Washington Dc Senator Right Haynes Riverside County Wanna RNC Joan Radovich Barney Frank Mark Takano Reporter CEO