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Interview with Khalil Zahar, Founder of FightCamp

20 Minute Fitness

05:45 min | 4 d ago

Interview with Khalil Zahar, Founder of FightCamp

"Guys that's Martin from shape. We're here right now in San Francisco Studio and unconnected to aid today on with the founder of fights cab Saha. Could you why don't you deduce yourself? It'll. Yeah. Awesome. First of all, thanks a lot for receiving me on the PODCAST. Martin. So my name is Lil- I'm the CO founder, CEO Camp and weekly started Fi Kim about a year and a half ago. So. If I is an interactive corn boxing gym, it comes with everything you need to start boxing and actually follow videos that are built by the best trainers of all the west coast they all fighters they all have obviously a tremendous fight expands but they're also great fitness instructor general for the listener on on our show that has never seen. It's what should be should be mentioned punching back and a pair of gloves. So what be? Yes. So it comes with a free standing bag. The best standing back on the market with a pair of didn't win leather gloves made an approved by fighters with a workout Matt, a pair of with be called quick grabs and the special sauce is who? Motion trackers that you put into quick wraps Ma and detract your hands a thousand times per second trek speed and my my punches. How many punches I'm doing per minute of what should I expect? Yes they tracked the type of country throw the measured the speed of the bunches basically build your output profile from one round to the other. What about impact? Not The impact is really the velocity. Okay. The of your hand and which actually throwing and how does like the coaching look like you were mentioning that you have coaches of all over the place and should I imagine like watching them like on my TV or iphone ourselves for me? Yes. So it comes with an APP you can the. Myriad on a large screen TV or you can watch the workouts on an IPAD whatever you prefer, and then from there, it's Kinda like all you can eat buffet. Really. So if you're advanced, you can jump straight into the advanced workouts right away we go and deep into the complex combinations. We'd practice footwork and the workouts very intense. Otherwise, it can literally start at the very first time. You've you're you're throwing your first punch. So we have what we call the prospect where it takes you from zero boxing experience teaches you to six inches and then at the end of the prospect path which. is about a four weeks program you actually know how to six months probably you know how to stand you know the basics Balkan it's mostly regular boxing the offer classes for a time boxing mma Nelson actually were focusing on boxing at the moment but we're having a lot of internal conversations around providing kickboxing as well as a kickboxing in multi, really as a as a an expansion and so so who's like you you're right now is it really like what you just mentioned on the beginners or is it like somebody that's been into boxing all their life or hundred, seventy, four for you Guys. Yeah, it's really seventy five percent beginners, but it's actually very interesting to see like a lot of them are now not beginners anymore So you know we kind of took a bunch of them. You know through the program you get to see videos online and on the social media and they're getting very proper form on have the basics of boxing. Of course, they don't have the in ring experience right visit steely it's a home virtual experience. Yeah. You can't really compete against somebody else right right. So Yeah, you actually can compete but on up put and precision you can't compete on. Actual defense offense. Of course, you're not going to get him. You know and does like a class look like, is it one on one coaching tailored to me or is it like a big class like pedal tone style or yet is really a group class? So it's you'll have usually the video stream will be divided into not that it's divided on the screen per se but vary between having the camera centered on the coach, and then you're getting bureau that is very dynamic. The camera moves around in the class and focuses on the participants taking the class live at our studio in Newport beach. For for me, you know like me having like an iphone like my supposed to put up my iphone like somewhere like on a on a counter, and then look at it while I'm like punching out on my back or how should I mention it? Yeah. That's a very good question like there's not a lot of people use it only with the with the iphone unless they're traveling aren't as they're actually using it in a gym gym or their apartment Jim the vending most people digging each day my cable upload, the Stream directly on on a big screen. TV. Your accent. Yeah. Oh we have a portion of our users. We actually are doing it on the night pat about Apple TV, that works as well Yeah. You can mirror exactly. You can use apple TV to mirror the the stream directly on a big screen TV as well. That's definitely the best experience you're getting very loud sounds and music. You hear the voice really really properly, the nose of the bag doesn't supplant the voice of the trainer lifts. Your stats are displayed very big for you. So like you're really into it, you feel like you're you're being tracked in. Really part of a group experience and it's both IOS and android os mostly s right now. Saying. It's only on ISLA, its and so why are people doing it Do they just WanNa, get a workout and they are not happy with you know like an experience like Peleton or maybe the half a pedal tone and want to supplement it with something else or do they actually want to get into boxing learn those skills forward let's say self defense. Yeah it's interesting. So. Like calm, we have two types of customers. The first type of customers really just will always intrigued boxing They want to do it because it's a work of that Jesse get something out of it even though you would stop working out after a year like you would still acquire the skills and those are self defense skills. You know a lot of people are mystified by you know. How to actually throw a punch and Hudson do properly. So that was one of our customers the other portion of because there is actually coming from the idea that boxing is the best workout to get in shape and the discovered the fundamentals and techniques through fight Cam. So the first reason they joined is for fitness purposes really assuming that boxing is the best workout out there the. Other portion come straight because they want boxing, but they can't attend to have a busy lifestyle. Their young parents hitting the gym is increasingly harder would a busy schedule? so that's the other proposition that they really resonate with and

Boxing Martin San Francisco Founder Apple Newport Beach Instructor Matt Fi Kim Co Founder Hudson Nelson Jesse Ceo Camp JIM
Becoming a Friendly Vegan with Michelle Cehn and Toni Okamoto

No Meat Athlete Radio

04:27 min | 4 d ago

Becoming a Friendly Vegan with Michelle Cehn and Toni Okamoto

"This is doug from radio and stay. I am so excited to be joined by Michelle Kane and Tony Oklahma Okamoto skip sorry about that who are brand new authors or have just put out a new book or it's coming out when the release date for your new book it's coming out on October twenty seventh so it is out next month the friendly vegan cookbook we are so excited. Yeah. Well, congratulations on that we're definitely going to dive into some of that and things you cover there but. Before doing that I guess why don't I give you guys a chance to introduce yourselves talk a little about. Your background and and you know why you decided to to work together on this book. I'll start Tony and I run a website plant based on a budget and I have been plant-based for thirteen years. Now, it started originally for health reasons but has grown into. Of variety of reasons I've kept me begin for so long including environmentalism and. Animal issues and Michelle and I have been friends for. I would say we've been best seats for about five years now and I had tried to get her to write this book with me for a while at it. kind of went in the same way that I tried to get her to be my friend for awhile which. which was a funny thing I'd met her and I liked her and I just heard energy draws people end until I was like Oh man I really want to be friends with that Michelle girl and so I reached out to liking Michelle do you WanNa be my friend. But really I said, hey, have you ever WanNa get some dinner or anything like that let me know but she had just started working on world Vegan. And she said, I'm really busy right now focusing all my time but thanks for asking and. I was like Oh man okay. I. Know Big Time. Sure, those listening understanding the hustle especially when you start working on your own, it's like you sacrifice literally everything else in your life to be able to make it happen and. So, glad, Tony. So persistent as I am if you could describe me Michelle, you'd probably say persistent because I did not give up there I said okay. Well, what if we create content together the in content for World Vegan and we can do youtube videos and so then we started working together collaborating on Vegan projects which has really been the foundation of our relationship and so nice to bring that to the. This project, the friendly being cookbook. Absolutely I actually. Just preparing for this interview briefly before we before we got on I was watching some of the videos you guys have done together and they're Super Fun they're just I love the energy you both bring to the camera and. Gosh I hope it's not some of those I those first ones that we did where we were trying to act like. I'm doing this. Thing. Thank goodness. A Michelle. How about you? Yeah. So my name is Michelle Kane and I am a Vegan food blogger founder of the website World Vegan I create a lot of content on instruments while through the channel Vegan and my story started way back when I was a little kid I went vegetarian when I was eight years old and then went begin when I was in college and both of those choices were made just because I wanted to be making sure that my actions my food choices were reflecting my existing values of kindness, compassion and sustainability and all. At the time I hadn't even thought about health but soon after that, he became really passionate about health as well and realized that choosing choices that's kind of our planet and for animals and for other people is also so much better for our health. So follow that path have been loving it and for the past gosh thirteen years I've been really created, focused on creating content and resources to help make Vegan living easy delicious and fun for everyone just like with Tony and her website plant based on a budget. We do a lot of that work together now and we are so excited to be releasing our latest product with the from the beginning cookbook. Yeah.

Michelle Kane Tony Oklahma Okamoto Doug Youtube Founder
Interview with Lisa McFadden, PhD

Moving2Live

06:35 min | 5 d ago

Interview with Lisa McFadden, PhD

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live our ethos movement is a lifestyle notches activity. We tried to interview professionals across the movement spectrum because we understand at the end of the day, anybody who is involved in movement either wants their clients patients or athletes to either move more or move better whether it's to move with less pain or to move more efficiently. Some of our best guests come from recommendations from other guests and a big. Thank you to Andy Gillam who recommended today's guest Lisa McFadden they arresting thing with podcasting is i. now have lineage of three people in a row starting with Brian Gary To. To Doctrine McFadden today hopefully two or three more as far as I can trace it's not who you know is who you know who knows somebody. So Dr McFadden thank you for taking time to talk to moving to live this afternoon. Absolutely thank you for having me. My favorite question I always ask on moving deliver the first one I. Always ask is to get an elevator. You get to talking because the elevators really slow because somebody's pressing all the buttons and they say, so what do you do what your thirty second? Not In a negative way elevator spiel my name is Lisa McFadden and I. I'll man and this one's a Turkey one I wear lots of different hats But yeah so. The way I look at what I do is I really put science into practice whether it's with athletes or with patients and Meyer expertise is in bio mechanics. So I like to used by mechanics to help people move better and then I also liked to inspire whether that's inspiring communities around science or whether that's inspiring. Students through mentorship in education. Right. Now, if I'm correct your in South Dakota. Yes that's correct. I work at Stanford Health See Falls South Dakota. And I know we were chatting a little bit before we started recording and both of us grew up in upstate new. York and I have to be honest I never thought I would end up in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, I never thought I would go to Grad School in Alabama and I would imagine that there's an interesting story going all the way from New York state with multiple stops all the way to South Dakota and I would imagine if you're anybody else like anybody else in the movement field is probably a few more stops along the way before you retire. Well, it's funny. I almost ended up in Pittsburgh. Along my way and I've spent some time in Alabama on a couple of different business trip. So it sounds like we've got a similar. Set of journeys But yes I I grew up in upstate New York in a little town called the sweet go not quite as little as where I heard you up. But? Yes. So I grew up on Lake Ontario My Dad was a doctor in I. Always always wanted to be a doctor specifically pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon, and my dad always told me no, you do not He said you really WanNa be an engineer and I said, no, No, no dad engineers are big nerds. And he said you're really good at math and you you have passion for this and I. Really suggest you become an engineer. So I very boldly went to the University of Rochester Pre and applied math saying you're wrong dad. But you know had a had a moment of clarity probably after my first year I did realize and did some self reflection and thought you know the type of. Mother that I wanted to be in the type of you don't grown up that I wanted to be really do not not focus around having call and prioritizing patients, which is absolutely something that you have to do but really being able to have a little bit of flexibility in In my lifestyle and so I finally listen to my father after a long time of not and. decided that I would actually transfer into biomedical engineering where I ended up focusing on bio mechanics as my concentration with minors in mechanical engineering and applied math. throughout my Undergrad I really really enjoyed all of that and so as I started thinking about what was next I started getting really interested in robotics and in two that feel that was emerging back. Then decided that I really wanted to go and get a PhD in that. So I had been at ski resorts I grew up ski racing and I was in Montana with our family on vacation and watched a bunch of ski. Racers who had disabilities whether they were in a sit ski or whether they were missing leg skiing and I was just very inspired I looked at them versus like while they're amazing. They're they're better skiers than I am and then you could see that as soon as they were off the hill where they were excelling the rollout of daily life challenges. So I started getting really interested in prostates wanting to kind of help people that you needed additional help outside of. Being Super, rockstar athletes to help them in their daily lives and so robotics was sort of that pathway for me. My senior design project ended up being a surgical robot and then I ended up getting into Carnegie Mellon at the Robotics Institute which is where I almost went to Grad School and then the University of Utah in my husband and I. Boyfriend at the time looked at each other and said, we should go skiing. So, Kinda took that wildcard robotics institute was number one ended the US at the time but decided to go out to Utah where they had just one anger from the NSF in robotics, and so I was in the bio engineering department and kind of hybrid into mechanical engineering. So I really took courses and had faculty the Committee from both worlds and I was able to do there was. My my PhD was focused on spinal cord injuries and what we were working on with functional electrical stimulation, supporting an array of electrodes and putting them into the peripheral muscles, and then stimulating those and my job was to figure out what the mechanics looked like. So creating models of the limb and then creating control algorithms to figure out how we can control this limbs yet somebody to go from sitting to standing. And to do it in a way that they didn't get tired while they were standing because the way our muscles work. If you contract one all the way, you might get yourself to go into a specific movement but then that muscles eventually wanting to fatigue and you can't can't sustain it. So what does that look like as well?

Lisa Mcfadden South Dakota Pittsburgh New York Engineer Alabama Grad School Andy Gillam Brian Gary To Stanford Health See Falls Robotics Institute Lake Ontario Carnegie Mellon University Of Rochester Meyer York United States
The Massive Impact Work Has On Your Health & Why NOW Is The Time To Change It

The Model Health Show

05:06 min | 6 d ago

The Massive Impact Work Has On Your Health & Why NOW Is The Time To Change It

"Today we'll be talking about one of the most overlooked health issues that has been affecting our entire world and it's been overlooked long enough and I truly believe that right now is giving us an opportunity to actually change this. So, we're going to start this with a Meta analysis of four, hundred, eighty, five studies, and this is published in occupational and Environmental Medicine. And found that job satisfaction is one of the strongest influences on mental health issues. In Our world, most notably for depression and anxiety. The study noted a relationship also between our job satisfaction and physical health issues like gastrointestinal issues and cardiovascular as well, and this is echoed in several other studies including study that was cited in the Journal of chronic diseases. Taking into consideration array of risk factors and of vocations and an array of income levels uncovered that the lack of satisfaction in the work that we do is a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease. Why don't we talk about this? Real health and wellness is dynamic. It comes from so many different things. It's not just about food you can eat the perfect. Personalized, unique blood type buddy type, every type diet. And go to work and spend half or more of your waking hours of your entire life hating what you do or being unhappy go into the place that you go every day or doing the work that you're doing instill still develop chronic health issues even if your diet is perfect, even if you're hitting the gym all the time, all of these things matter. Relationships matter our sleep matters. All of these things go into the overall code. The human that you are. and. This issue. More than any other time in our lifetime is something that we can change what's happening right now with the job market and all of the turmoil I believe is offering up an opportunity for us to change this because many people are working themselves in his sickness and don't even realize it. It's happening and they don't realize that it doesn't have to be this way now we're going. To discuss, there is a modicum of course of doing what you gotTa. Do you know getting the bills paid but we have to move beyond that and this is the opportunity to do. So we're GONNA talk about how we can actually do that today as well. But I want to dive a little bit deeper here because I scratched the surface in some of the issues that we see. The results of another peer reviewed study and this was published in two thousand fifteen finally direct link between job satisfaction and psychological distress as well as physical disorders. Now according to the researchers satisfaction with the nature of work that was doing was the strongest predictor for psychological distress for sleep disorders, headaches, and gastrointestinal problems what. You don't hear stuff like sleep problems caused by. Dissatisfaction with the work one is doing. The data exists, but this is something that we brush off really think about this. Again, we think somebody's illness quote comes out of nowhere where there are so many different factors like they eat. Perfectly they're exercising all the time. And we have to take a broader view of health now and take all of these things into consideration. And that's what I'm encouraging us to today. Another study. This was from researchers from the Ohio State University say that their work shows that happiness on the job or lack thereof appears to have the biggest impact on midlife mental health. One of study authors noted that and listen to this is really interesting. And having a scale very satisfied satisfied to completely dissatisfied. They discovered that quote seen with the majority of people are either very satisfied or satisfied with their job, but we find that even they subtle distinction between. Satisfied and simply being satisfied has significant effects on your health. I would say our studies, main findings are you're likely to have worse health if you don't love your job rather than if you hate your job So did you catch that distinction? People who are just kinda getting by tolerating what they do, and maybe they're okay with their job. But if they don't love their work, not loving your work, not loving the thing that you do every day is far more of a predictor of negative health outcomes than if somebody absolutely hated the job. So that little subtle distinction of actually enjoying what we do every day is the strongest predictor of our health when it comes to the work that we do.

Occupational And Environmental Journal Of Chronic Diseases Depression Headaches Ohio State University
Dr Aaron Tressler, DC Making Pittsburgh Healthy

FitLabPGH

06:00 min | Last week

Dr Aaron Tressler, DC Making Pittsburgh Healthy

"Welcome back to another edition of the Islamic Pittsburgh podcast. We are a podcast along with our sister podcast moving to live. The firmly believes in the ethos movement is a lifestyle, not just an activity I've said before some of our best guests come from recommendations or searching around in the Internet today's guest is actually coming because he searched out on the Internet and found me a couple of months back in sent me an email and said, hey, I've got this podcast making Pittsburgh healthy and I'd like to interview you for it and we did the interview will post that in the show links you can go listen to that podcast in IT'S A. Great, example of breaking. Down Knowledge Silos because there's so much knowledge out there. Sometimes, you don't know where to turn or sometimes you're just not aware of it. So I'm really happy day to be talking to Dr Aaron Tressler He is a chiropractic physician. He has a podcast her and as somebody who's on the north side of fifty. Also, what I think is great is he's taking the ethos movement is a lifestyle seriously because it fifty plus years of age won't let him share how old is if he wants not only is he a regular mover but he still plays rugby. So Dr. Tressler. Thanks for taking time to TALK TO FIT lab. About Movement and about your podcast to which I think is a great thing. Well, thanks for having me on the show. Ben. I love sharing my story and I love to hopefully inspire motivate people to get healthier whenever journey there on hopefully today after today's episode, they'll do a little bit more and have fun and like. I'm always curious as people who listen to fill out Pittsburgh. No one of my first questions I always ask every guest is are you a Pittsburgh native if so why are you still here if not what brought you to Pittsburgh? I am I grew up about forty five minutes east of Pittsburgh in the country and a went to slippery rock, my health and physical education specializing especially when. Back in nineteen, eighty seven and I moved West Palm Beach Florida get my teaching job when I was lived on there I began playing rugby there. I said they'll never come back. I said I have not coming back to the snow went to Chiropractic school in Georgia life and I chose that because it had the best rugby team. In any Brackley School, what are the best in the nation? And then after that, we had one daughter we my wife was pregnant with our second and I thought we gotta get we should get close to family so I did the trip back to Pittsburgh and I've been here ever since twenty six years here so and I love it it's it's great. So I'm always interested to hear when somebody does a career change into go from teaching to Chiropractic although I think you would agree that as a chiropractor you are teaching or educating it's just a different body but what was it at a? As a young teacher in high school or junior high school or elementary school says, okay I'm done with this. I'M GONNA. Go to chiropractic school. How did you find that path? It sounds crazy I I really believe God led my path the was orchestrating it. I didn't know at the time but I was Going back to slippery rock, they did a phenomenal job teaching. Physical Education is an education without her physical body. We have nothing that's how I look at it and. They so I, I graduated with the Palm Beach and It was looked at as like a gym teacher and remember parents saying to me once Did, you have to go to school to be a gym teacher and it just Just irked me. Teachers didn't understand the importance of integrating physical movement with the kids were they would say, Hey, the kids they didn't get their schoolwork that we're going to keep him out of your class to get their math at the wait a second. This is physical movement. This is just as important learning three plus three. So I had the best school in Jupiter Florida, a brand new school I was so frustrated I visited like university in Atlanta and I saw the rugby team and the rugby players me into just do it and you'll love it. It's great. I said, we're planning to get married my wife and I I said that let's do it. She said, okay. So I finished up my third year teaching got married. Atlanta Georgia playing rugby like two weeks later and I woke up thinking, how will you get here? So I love to I love Chiropractic I love integrating exercise movement nutrition lifestyle choices with the body and keeping his body healthy because it is absolutely incredible. I'm also always curious how people find out. There sports activities are the lifetime of movement where was it? You were first exposed to rugby from. What your age is, I. Know that that point in time in the late seventies early eighties a high school student. Rugby. Probably. Wasn't that comet I mean it's still common but I know there's a few teams in the Pittsburgh area. I. Never heard of it. I. Played Sports was a little kid by love football baseball and then going to slippery rock I didn't play their played intramural stuff and they talked about the rugby team I thought that's crazy. I am not playing rugby. You guys are saying when I moved to Florida my roommate. On the rugby team and I was playing softball for local church and I was the crazy I was diving into at second base diving for every ball. I'd leap filthy broken and this is a church league and they're looking me saying why you're doing this. If you'RE GONNA play all up. So my roommate talked me into visiting watching a game. So I went watch the game thinking that this is going to be brutally insane I. Loved it. I thought this is this is just what I want for pair spikes on a mouthpiece. The next Tuesday I was at practice and that was back in nineteen, eighty, eight of fifty. Four and I've been playing almost consistently several years off and on with the team Kinda folded up in that. Yeah. Fifty four still going strong. It's like celery shot shut me with some some rugby blood in my system and I can't get it up. My wife thinks I'm crazy but I think she's given up on trying to talk me out with this one.

Rugby Pittsburgh Dr Aaron Tressler Atlanta Brackley School Georgia West Palm Beach Florida Palm Beach Florida Softball Football
Interview with Dr Andy Gillham PhD Sports Psychology Coach

Moving2Live

03:59 min | Last week

Interview with Dr Andy Gillham PhD Sports Psychology Coach

"Welcome, back to another edition of the moving to live podcast, we are along with our sister podcast fit lead PG h five. The House movement is a lifestyle noxious and activity as you heard in the intro for moving to live our knowledge is to interview different professionals and break down the silos of knowledge where the strength coaches talked to the straight coaches physical therapist the physical therapist and on across the fitness or movement spectrum at the end of the day, most people who are working to get people to move more or. To move better and I've been looking for a person with knowledge sports psychology to interview for the last few years I've had a couple of people that hasn't worked out and a big shoutout to Dr Brian Geraghty from Denver. who was generous enough to give me the introduction today's guest Dr Andy Guilhem who has a doctorate in sports psychology he's also a strength coach and I know there's two questions I want to get out of the way I because I think it's important my first question I always ask everybody kill him is. What do you do when somebody sees you in the elevator and maybe you've got a t shirt on or you're talking or you're coming from a presentation at a conference somebody says, oh well, what do you do? What's Your Elevator Spiel? Elevator Spiel as I help folks get their performance better I. don't care if it's In Sport Out of sport moving base or not quite as much moving basis, maybe we'd like but the reality is that's what I try to do. Help folks get their performance better. And I'm sure there's a great story we're going to get into and how you decided. That was the career path you wanted to follow. We were chatting prior to recording I kind of put my foot and mouth a little bit, and you were very quick to say make sure that you understand the distinction and I think if I didn't really understand the distinction, a lot of listeners aren't going to either you have a doctorate in sports psychology. But as you corrected, me said, you are not able to call yourself a sports psychologist if we could kind of break that down before we find out more about your story. No. Yes. So it's a huge. Problem to be honest for the field of sports like algae. The term psychologist, the G. I S. T. part at the end that's the legally protected term, and that means you have licensor in a state and the requirements for licensure changes across states. And there's some some basic can training differences there between someone that cannot use gist and so the. Quickest way to sort of decide that is a psychologist, has the clinical background to deal with all the big nasty scary things. We humans do to each other, all the domestic violence and the marriage counselor or marriage and therapy and family systems. Just all the big scary things in life they have that training. And then if they so choose because they are a psychologist, they can slap the word support in front of it. Even, though they have no training in sport never took a sport class have no idea the difference between one hundred meter and a thousand meter and a ten K. and all of that they can call themselves a sports psychologist. I however who my PhD is officially in education with a major in Sport and exercise psychology. That's the way the University of Idaho did it. I however cannot claim psychologists because I'm not licensed I. Don't have the clinical background. So I cannot call myself a sports psychologist. This is really important for if I can be so bold all of your listeners to understand because when someone googles sports psychologist, they will not find me I will not show up and yet I am the guy that has. Three degrees in sport apply certifications in both starring conditioning and Sports Ike and I work with coaches and athletes every day on a field honoring on-court somewhere. But I am not and cannot call myself a sports psychologist. So the folks that Google will not find me when they google sports psychologist

Dr Andy Guilhem Dr Brian Geraghty IKE Google University Of Idaho Denver.
Energy Healing for Food Issues and Body Image Recovery with Sarah Speers

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

06:32 min | 2 weeks ago

Energy Healing for Food Issues and Body Image Recovery with Sarah Speers

"Sarah Welcome to the show. Thanks so much for coming on. Could you talk about to kind of introduce yourself to listeners a little bit to start what were the biggest influences on your relationship with food and your body growing up Ooh I, love that question and thank you for having me. It's really interesting when I reflect on my relationship with soon, grind up I didn't think I had a lot of. Unhealthy eating. Messages I thought my family was relatively healthy. I thought I had a healthy relationship with food. In hindsight looking back I can see the the seeds of sort of unhealthy relationships creeping and mainly I would always eat sugar to self soothe as a kid and we used to have these nightly routines of always eating ice cream after dinner or using food as a reward, those sorts of situations which as an adult. Started to really come into fact in terms of my unhealthy eating habits and so as a child when I had this super active and I had a very high metabolism, it didn't appear to be an issue and then later in life I was able to see. Oh Wow, I really became attached to food and certain foods specifically became sort of my emotional crutch that I use as my wages Osu their self matic later in adulthood. Thank you for sharing that I. Love How you said. You know where you're talking about when people are kids if they're like just naturally in smaller bodies, it's like I love how you said it didn't matter that I was eating sugar like it didn't appear to matter. Right. So that's actually something that I run into a lot of the time when I coach kids for swimming and not something that I ran into growing up there people will be like, Oh you're swimmer it doesn't matter what you eat and the sense of. You can't see any changes on this people's bodies because they're teenagers and have insane metabolism's and also happened to have smaller body genetics I. Think it's so important to talk about that distinction. Yeah, and if I can also add that in terms of the body messages. Growing up because I was. So skinny might nickname literally on my sports teams or people my life would call me twiggy string bean and a my identity came really attached to having to be skinny to feel like I was valued or. Was Getting approval from people. So again and as an adult, you know sometimes we think your weight issues are just if you're overweight but for me, there is always this angst around I have to stay skinny because that's my identity in that's where my word comes from and so I didn't think I had. People affecting my body image growing up either I thought I had a lot of love for the people around me but even these seemingly harmless messages or fun nicknames were actually really shaping my identity to my body. Yes. So how did you go from that from kind of struggling with your relationship with food and with your body as a teen and maybe until like early twenties to transitioning to work with women on food freedom and specifically through energy work? Yeah. Will my story really took a turn it might twenty. So I would say most of my childhood teens and even young. Adult I felt like I had an okay relationship with food. But in my twenties I started to develop really severe eating disorder bulimia. Yeah and that happened because I started to go on a diet and I thought I wanna be really healthy and I wanted to see if I, can you know shed a few extra pounds and and that turned into a very obsessive? Counting calories coming up with really strict food roles and as a result, I just wasn't nursing my body and I was getting anxiety around what to eat and and it leads you very severe been gene and then bingeing purging I got stuck in that vicious cycle and suddenly I felt like. Oh. My Gosh how is life? Like you know the Pitney came one day when I was over the toilet that Oh, my God, this is not normal or healthy ns somehow become minority and so that became a struggle for six years. Once I got pulled into that I just was struggling so hard to get out and it controlled my life and it became my mission to heal my Sol's. So that I could then help other women because I did not want another woman to ever have to go through the agony and the like the torture that I was living in in my mind in just my reality, it was consumed and I lost myself to it and I was determined to get myself back if not better and then do everything in my power to help woman y'all. So that kind of started my like. My determination to figure this out and I was determined to try any in everything to to get better and so for a long time I, sort of was always turning to food. Let me try and control food. Let me use little power in. That will be my way to get over this like I'm just going to be perfect tomorrow. And that Kinda like I tried that over and over again and not just never worked right. The answer was not controlling food, and so I started to them look outside of that at other healing modalities. And I just got desperate inserted China everything in eventually stumbled Pon emotional freedom technique also noticed tapping and things like ricky and emotion code, and all these different energy healing modalities and Literally within a matter, six months pretty much all of my quote unquote symptoms seemingly disappeared like I just felt whole and complete again I felt like myself again, I felt empowered in normal again and it wasn't a fight or struggle. It just seems like as I got it through issue and really started to uncover all of these repressed emotions in the subconscious programming and these wounds. I didn't even know I was carrying. That were leading me to say stock in these unhealthy habits. Omega, it was like a radical shift, and so that is what made me then realized I need to get this massive these modalities out to as many women as I can because it may not be the one thing that's going to help but it is certainly missing piece in the equation and I think a lot of times we don't look at these other modalities that can be so powerful in conjunction with like proper nutrition or you know a good mindset etcetera. Yeah we're therapy exactly anything like that. Exactly.

OSU Sarah Disorder Pitney China Ricky
interview with Dr Mike Schneider

Moving2Live

04:59 min | 2 weeks ago

interview with Dr Mike Schneider

"Dr Schneider. Thank you for taking time to talk to Pittsburgh Philip PG and moving to live. Sure my pleasure. Guess the first question I. Want to ask because I was I made aware of you because I'm also guilty of these silo knowledge is. You see somebody in the elevator, what's your thirty second elevator Spiel of who are you or what you do Yes. So my elevators. I am a chiropractor by training working in a physical therapy department doing back pain research on a full-time basis. And I know I wanNA touch briefly on how one goes from a career as a chiropractor seeing patients which I know you did for many years we won't say many many years and then you did Not, really a complete one eighty, but a big shift and decided to get a PhD. Briefly. How to do or why did you decide to go into chiropractic medicine and then what was the decision to kind of go and get some additional education and go from primarily patient care to doing research? Sure and I did do kind of a one eighty mid career so. Beginning back to why they go into Chiropractic it's interesting. Her somebody saves me once before we choose our career pass when we're basically teenagers. Right, so I'm. I'm doing Undergrad, studies I went to. University of New York at Binghamton, as a biology major, and I wanted to go into some kind of healthcare profession and. I you know I was was intrigued by sort of the the alternative fields to medicine. I didn't want to go to medical school I wanted to do something else carpet just appealed to me was something different. Alternative. Kind of A. Mainstream alternative and not completely alternative medicine field. So I chose Chiropractic as as my profession being young and. Naive I guess. And I know prior prior to moving to Pittsburgh and becoming acquainted with the number of chiropractors. My thought of Chiropractors were they were somebody that you went to a couple of times a week for basically I'm saying this an air quotes back cracks and I've learned over the past seven or eight years that there's really. Two directions, the chiropractors go there's those that do that. They want to get people in maybe on a subscription basis where they come in multiple times a week, and then there's others that I've been fortunate to meet where they work in a manner that's very similar to the way physiotherapists work in other countries or physical therapists work. Which Direction when you started out in your career path where you or was it entirely different when you started out as far as the directions, the chiropractors tended to go. Well I'm not embarrassed to tell you to my agent I've been practice I graduated from chiropractic school in Nineteen Eighty two. So many many years ago well over thirty years ago. And at that time, chiropractic. Had Not quite evolved to where it is now but over the years since that time we started seeing, I think the boundaries between physical therapy and carpet professions getting blurred and what I mean by that it's probably in the late ninety s crate Lebron Sin The chiropractor from Los. Angeles started bringing his rehabilitation model to car practic. So prior to that most banks just doing the manual. As you call back cracking techniques and then start blending rehabilitation techniques at the same time the physical therapy sessions going the other direction where they mainly just prescribing exercise not putting your hands on people as much and there was an interest in the PT profession and the eighties and nineties start introducing more manual techniques. So I think we're seeing you know blurring of the lines now as evidenced by me a chiropractor working in a physical therapy department. And what was the impetus after working as a chiropractor to as you said, do a career one eighty, get a PhD in rehabilitative sciences and become more heavily researcher. Yes. So even when when I was in clinical practice all those years and I practice over twenty five years before he decided to get a PhD which is very unusual thing I'm finding out that's not typical path. But all those years in practice it always kind of bothered me I was helping people but I was realizing in a sense we're experimenting on patients doing things that I would learn at conferences or at reading books. Would do them my patients. I felt part of me felt badly about that like I. Don't know for sure that this works I. Think it does. And so even when I practice I was publishing papers and trying to get involved research. It seemed like I always was being pulled in that direction. So. Quite frankly was his family events change. I have two kids when I started getting sat empty nest part of life. So we're really what do I to do now right I got my kids through. High School and they're often going into college. I'm going to go back myself.

Pittsburgh Dr Schneider Philip Pg Binghamton A. Mainstream High School University Of New York Angeles Researcher LOS
A Discussion About Mashup - Fasting

FoundMyFitness

05:51 min | 2 weeks ago

A Discussion About Mashup - Fasting

"Are other ways of changing the microbiome for one Actually, a pilot clinical trial found that intermittent fasting for fifteen days intermittent fasting. But on the days of their fasting in this pilot study, people could eat with up to five hundred calories sort of like a fasting mimicking diet almost in a way. They basically did this for fifteen days. So they were fasting for a total of seven days and then not fasting for total seven days, and there was an increase in bacterial richness in in the gut microbiome in certain types of bacteria that have been shown to promote the production of t regulatory cells. and basically there's This was including lactobacillus bacteria, which are which are commonly used in probiotics as well. Those those have been shown to play a role in promoting T regulatory cell numbers through the production short chain fatty acids. it also enriched other bacterial species like protozoa, which is another one that's also been shown to play a role in. T Regulatory Cell Production In the Gut. Interestingly, it was also shown that fasting induced is sort of its own. You know like kitone body metabolism was happening. That was regulating the micro basically was facilitating microbiome growth as well. So I thought that was a really interesting study was because fasting itself has been shown to also affect autumn unity through other mechanisms aside from the Gut microbiome. which that study I just cited really focused on but there have been other studies. A lot of lot of studies have been done. by Dr Vaulter Longo and colleagues that are found either fasting. Fasting mimicking diet or even a Ketogenic Diet. Has. Has Been Shown in animal studies and a very, very small pilot clinical study in patients with multiple sclerosis. An autoimmune disorder where individuals basically just just one week of the fasting mimicking diet or. or six months on the Keita. Genetic Diet so much longer period beyond the ketogenic diet versus the week of the fasting mimicking diet. They had an improvement in in clinical measures for a variety of clinical measures for for Multiple Sclerosis the animal studies sort of confirmed that. That the you know there was a lot a lot of effects on on t regulatory cells and a variety of different effects on autoimmune regulation from the fasting mimicking diet or also fasting. So other studies have found that fasting itself. Can Basically Lead to to preferential preferentially lead to the death of dysfunctional cells, and the seems to happen quite a bit in the immune system So as as a fast becomes more prolonged A tofte g starts to happen and a tough ogies basically clearing out damaged off with NFL. But as the as the stressor becomes stronger, if the entire cell is actually damaged enough the cell will die via pop toasties and this has been shown to occur in definitely occurred animal studies where basically if you if you take a mouse and fast for forty eight hours. About. Twenty. Eight percent of the immune cells in the mouse will die off and this activates stem cells in the blood system and. Then, he met a poetic system where they stem cells increased by six fold, and this causes stem cells then to make brand new. Immune cells, young brand, new healthy immune cells, and. Only it's. VAULTER has shown that they bake. Non they make they make functional immune cell. So you can clear out a number functional immune cell that perhaps would be was playing a role in auto immunity and replace it with a healthy functional immune cell that you know that basically is not having that autoimmune sort of defect But it's really you know the those animal studies were shown to be dependent on it jeff one levels just plummeting going going way down and it's important to to to realize translation of animals that he's like that to humans There's a lot of factors to consider. So for example, and mouse or rodent will lose twenty percent of their of their body weight after a forty eight hour fast whereas a human will only lose one to two percent. This a big difference and it's also been shown that within that two day period. Rodents can blower there one by fifty percent. whereas. It takes a human five days on a water on on. You know of basically not eating anything to to lower their levels by fifty percent. So big differences there and with respect to translating animal to to mouse studies but again. there has been some pilot studies looking at. Fasting and the effects on auto immune disease like multiple sclerosis when I just mentioned there's also been some pilot studies looking at a forty eight hour water fast in humans and there was a trend towards the adipose stem cell activation like I just mentioned with the Animal Studies.

Animal Studies Dr Vaulter Longo Multiple Sclerosis NFL
Matt Cooper on the Human Performance Engine

Just Fly Performance Podcast

06:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Matt Cooper on the Human Performance Engine

"There's stuff that we look at Mrs true with anything in life, right like their stuff that we look at and right away all our biases coming hit us right like we see someone just messing around and it's got the tag functional or someone's doing some sort of balanced based movement. We instantly tag that there's not enough strength. We got an appropriate exception last podcast we're getting new at this time and so obviously. There's always these biases that we have and it's not to say that these some of these methods are the perfect method right and I always enjoyed talking to you but digging into the parts of some of those methods that we would just kind of toss as functional garbage or whatever insert your term here. Right. But trying to dig into what actually is useful there what does fit with how the human body because clearly it's someone had to do it and feel good doing it. There had to be some component of that that felt right and good and worked with the body. And so the I was hoping we could get into a little bit of we're going to start talking about Fasha and fashion wiring. So though that in mind, what's your thought on? will explain actually I don't I don't see watch watch those videos probably enough as I should. But like kind of like the functional try triplane type activities and Fasha and fashion waring's could you give an overview of what train the fashion system means to you for athletes? Yeah. So basically, I think that training fashionable system in a holistic capacity is sort of one of the more missing ingredients when it comes to training faster here talked about in isolated silos, which is kind of interesting because a lot of people are very familiar with Myers work in anatomy trains. So they're used to hearing about how like the spiral line various slings body are interconnected yet for some reason, doesn't necessarily make it to the training application. It's like we all might be reading the same research, but we're distilling different applications, different training modalities from it. You'll hear it talked about a lot with just like foot morphology things like that, and that is very important for sure. But a lot of people aren't necessarily like the integration of fashion is making it to their training. Otherwise, they're not necessarily doing ballistic missiles is strength movements, our movements, corrective exercises that integrate all of these things at one time, and when you do that it kind of almost creates a suspension type effects like the wires about the Golden Gate Bridge, for example, give you titi southern coastal in a way that's like connecting the body with an segregate right tension with with integrity instead, you'll have these sort of. Isolated silos people might generate tension in one muscle group, but not in the same time until so you kind of tend to see some fashionable. Disjointed nece show up when someone goes to. Get Out. Court in the gym whatever. The. Whole ten legacy and the that whole element of it all and you spoke about the foot there and there was a presentation I did it was a couple of years ago on the foot and one of the pictures I included was It was a dinosaur and it was I. think it was like a break your source like one of those dancers. With a really long neck and it was talking out it was like each of those kind of like the same thing like each of the the ligaments that connected and the facial lines that connected each of those bones was really the the total structure, the total, the ten segregate created by that total structure was what was required to hold that net head up if It was just a muscle like individual muscles that were linking the bridges. It just wasn't going to happen or linking the spinal segments. It wasn't going to happen you needed something that was more that superseded like the single joints and kind of was like a grand more grand wrap that actually could hold that neck up and I think about that too I've mentioned this. On this show before but my kids, they like the book on Pop, the two and four, and they like to do that and so when they're jumping on, me barefooted you the the pressure that goes through the meal. Anyway like thirty pounds you know thirty and forty and the pressure that goes through the balls of their feet into me is is massive compared to. Any other strength output they might have. So it's like. Walking for skill and you don't really have any muscle, you can put all that pressure through one point through the facile system that to me I'm like, okay. Every time they step on like yeah, I think this is the fashion system at work here and that type of strength you just get. That's not the strength you build by a really by I mean you can get a better by lifting weights in particular ways that you do it but I feel like it's just so much more developmental and in our wiring and our physiology. Yeah, I mean and and that's kind of. A nice little loaded carry that you have. Manual loaded Gary Exercise of going on there with your kids. But Yeah I mean a lot of like in A. Kind of all straining conditioning community, it sorta sounds woke rights talk about the nervous system and I mean there is. Obvious, obvious obvious component for that. But if you're not also addressing on the structural side rights of the nervous the hardware, you're not also addressing it on the structural side by developing integrated fashion than you're still muscling through movements. Right. There's a lot of people who might think that they're doing performance training, but they're only really tackling it from kind of a rate of force production, nerve contraction, and relaxation velocity side of things. However, it's the fascist not integrated well, enough at least you're still kind of building an engine without building handling. Your building, our speed, but it abilities in the nervous system without. Having the structure transfer that energy, right? So the the fashioning well wound together is not just an injury prevention concepts right? It will yes. Distribute forces that you absorb in create appropriately or more appropriately. So you're less likely to get hurt but the fashion being well woven together almost like a basket or like one of those Chinese

Golden Gate Bridge Fasha Waring Myers Gary Exercise
How the Plant-Based Diet Changed Eric Adam's Life

No Meat Athlete Radio

06:21 min | Last month

How the Plant-Based Diet Changed Eric Adam's Life

"With Eric Adams. Welcome Brooklyn. Borough President Eric Adams thank you so much for being with us today. I. Can only imagine how much you're going on in the middle of endemic your responsible for the health safety and happiness of something two point six, million people I had to look up. That's that's larger than nearly half of the states in our country. So you've got a big job and I'm I'm so pleased that we're able to make a little time to share your journey on your health journey and everything else you're doing. So thank you for making time to be with us today. Thank you and you know. Hello from Brooklyn. New York and you're right Brooklyn is a huge place of in the numbers of two point, six, million documented. But as far more and we were a separate city and instead of one of the counties in New York as a separate city will be the third largest city in America extremely diverse forty seven percent of the burrow speaks a language other than English at home. So there are a lot of opportunities to really oblivious people here in the borrow Brooklyn. The third largest city that that is amazing I cannot imagine. Okay, well, an even bigger job than than maybe I understood again I know you like going on and I wish we had more time to dig into so much of your role at especially with with. Everything doing public health, we'll get a little bit to that. Started in in health everyone gets no you. Tell us a little bit about your background and you spent twenty two years as a police officer. You've been a state senator. Now, of course, you're the broke president what drove you into public service. Why did you know that was your calling? And that's a great question oftentimes we start out on a journey only to take a detour to find out that that is really without purpose, a may be I had a negative encounter with a police police officers as a child, and it evolved into a civil rights. Leaders come in to me and twelve other young men in asking us to go into law enforcement fight from within, and I was extremely reluctant because I. Was A computer program wanted to become Cisco qualified and open my own firm of but I had a lot of respect for them. It was a very turbulent period in new. York with was a lot of tension some similar to what you're seeing now between police communities and I, joined you and Saudi inauguration one, hundred blacks enforcement chair, and I'll goal was to build a better symbiotic relationship with law enforcement communities and communities of color. After twenty two years I retired as a captain and I really saw a bad police in public safety. was responding a reactively to some of the problems that were created and I wanted to have a more proactive approach in Iran to stay Senate was elected served a four terms in the state senate and pass some really good bills around a health public safety in later of ran to become the ball president of Brooklyn of this in other municipalities, you probably call this the county executives of, but I'm the county executive board, the county of teams in New York. Amazing, IT'S A. Son's to hear when a negative situation is is transformed in something that drives you. My own personal health journey was due to the loss of a loved one. Yeah different than kind of course. But but I think that mark of a true leader you can. Say Take something like that and transform it into a positive even and I commend you for all the work you've done over the last three decades in public service Let's transition a little bit to your health journey. On the personal side I, know you were diagnosed with type two diabetes and transformed your health. As many of the folks watching listening this are doing or have done themselves share a little bit about. babies start with what happened where were you at that time and what were some of the changes that you implemented in your own life? And I think. You said something very important on a touch on it as we evolve folks of about. How do you turn around these of really missteps or encounters and you know my mother told me as a child if you're fortunate to live long enough you're going to be misfortunate to experience pain. We must find ways to turn pain into purpose and just as in law enforcement encounter it was extremely painful a ahead to turn it into a purposeful journey. In law enforcement and it was really a free lewd two of the experience of being diagnosed attack diabetes. I was out of the country at the time when I was experiencing of discomfort in my stomach. I thought it was calling cancer beyond his because just lost friend from it at the time and it was the same tech symptoms wasn't gassed wasn't moving stationary. And when I returned to America. I said I will go to the doctor in that morning. When I woke up, I couldn't even see the alarm clock. It wasn't sleeping my eyes but just that as my vision. Just totally just sort of lost particularly my left eye my right. I was going as well and I was experienced for some time almost a month tangling in my hands and feet. And I couldn't feel my right eye thought it was due to. Plan, you know football and it was just nerve damage but little did I know after I went to the doctor to check out just comfort in my stomach A. I had an ulcer

Brooklyn President Trump New York Eric Adams America Senate York Senator Officer Football Cisco Iran Cancer Executive
20 Minutes About Traditional Chinese Medicine

20 Minute Fitness

05:50 min | Last month

20 Minutes About Traditional Chinese Medicine

"Welcome back to twenty minutes fitness. I'm Kessler and you're listening to your favorite podcast for health and fitness science and technology. Today we're airing the second part of my conversation with Dr Marcus Gado, a leading Chinese medicine practitioner from Europe who spend close to a decade in China learning the ancient Art of traditional Chinese medicine also referred to as. If, you haven't listened to last week's part one of our conversation. You May WanNa poss here and listen to it first so that you can learn about his background and what he believes, he can teach us about our own emotional wellbeing and healthy nutrition in today's podcast who we will continue the conversation and cover how. Six to guide how we should exercise sleep and even have sex. Yes. Heard correctly the how and when of sex also plays a role of healthy living in ancient Chinese wisdom. So beware that today's episode is pg rated because of that disclaimer why Chinese medicine has been around for thousands of years? It is really just at the cusp of being scientifically looked at an understood it is usually fascinating topics we. Wanted to share with you, it is hard not medical advice by any means nor endorsement of the scientific validity or efficiency of any of its practices or interventions. Having said that we do try to stick to only the things that have already been backed up by signs, and you can find a full list of studies and Research Without show notes on twenty minute dot fitness. All right. Let's have at it. Or let's move on to to sleep I. Think the third tip is get plenty again seasonal steep was is that mean? Yeah. If you look at animals, they're way more Richard Eight. Some analysts even hibernate in summer and social we we shouldn't be sleeping the same amount of hours throughout the whole year and well, it's good general of funding to get at least eight hours of sleep in the wintertime nine or ten hours is fine and in the summertime if you're feeling really energetic seven or six and a half if you're feeling great is actually not the bad for you and but the Chinese say that. Especially, the early Stephen in modern sleep research confirms this that early steep, sexy, more beneficial because you're getting a lot more autographs wrong excreted in the hours roughly before midnight and so the Chinese advocates between nine thirty and ten thirty, and then of course, old biohacking stuff you know keeping blue light our heading your house of very dim lights getting you really into this calm evening mode and have no ben at a TV and don't eat obviously before you go to directly before you're gonna go to bed and instead off the Chinese medicine advocates to have some green team your cup of tea because it's so. Call me you down activating the Perez pathetic nervous system. It's advocating for a bit of movement no meditation before you go to bed or even even taking a hot foot. That's a great little trick that you can fall asleep or joystick colts he keeps you up take a hot foot and research has shown that down hot foot actually heading the black by heading this hot water your feet. It increases the circulation periphery in your feet which saw in our regulatory process lowers the corporate body temperature, and we'll have a lower temperature it signals to the brain. Time and so these are some little tricks that the Chinese advocates and in another great one is actually funded fool study here Naski and others in two thousand seven they had two hundred thousand subjects in Greece against epidemiology but again, food for thought day found a thirty seven percent reduction in cardiovascular disease of people who regularly had a Siesta who took a little nap at night thing that study was quoted in a wide receiver is really interesting book I that everyone should read yeah. That's the guy from UC Berkeley, Matthew Walker that's right So So yeah a lot of these these things that they that they already figured out and keep the probation is a big one, right Here's another statistics who has National Health Center for statistics in nineteen sixty, two percent of American slept less than six hours while in two thousand four, it was already thirty percent. So generally speaking we're not sleeping enough. So wildly you WanNa just your sleep in obviously the day is longer than summer so you could also stay up a little bit longer but the country in the wintertime you shouldn't feel bad on your cells you need nine or ten hours of sleep a really give your buddy that go with the season skull was the dynamic of nature and let your body hibernate Chinese proverb says no losing a night of sleep as followed by ten days of inconvenience. Never never sacrifice after sacrifice sleep and sleep a little bit more in winter, and then you can stay up longer and have more energy into following summer. Again, let's just quickly touch on the fourth a little hit or tip to stay healthy in twenty twenty I picked this one because I think it's contrary to what we believe in the West and does the about exercise movement excise the Chinese things that moderation here again is key. So we shouldn't be doing chronic cardio over having really high pulse rate on training for ultramarathons but instead we should go on strolls and walks and we should exercise buddy while the do it in short intervals and with a high intensity. High intensity interval training or just even intensity training where we doing body weight exercise in keeping a muscle mass obstacles casino the Muscles Pretty, much ski organ of Longevity. You can draw a line of lean body mass versus fat mass and an pretty much. It's with old people get and it gets difficult at your old to build and maintain muscle story you WANNA regularly. Exercise. Your buddy but you don't WanNa chill your body lacked we like to do in the West aware that where it is even for a lot of people, it ends up being addiction like an exercise addiction but

Dr Marcus Gado Kessler Europe Stephen Richard Eight China Perez Naski Berkeley National Health Center Matthew Walker Greece
Interview with Dr. Brian Gearity

Moving2Live

04:11 min | Last month

Interview with Dr. Brian Gearity

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live moving to live along with our sister podcast fit let ph believe movement is a lifestyle not just an activity with moving to live. We try to interview professionals literally across the world although today were interviewing a professional from Denver. Colorado. We are in the middle of covid nineteen and and high school and college sports are either canceled postponed or up in the air. So you read a lot in the literature in the newspaper about what's going to happen to the student athletes the stresses that are placed on the student athletes. And as I was reading this, I was thinking there is not a whole lot has been mentioned about coaches some of them who may be new to the profession. Some may be in a profession many years. So I reached out to Dr, Brian Geraghty who is program Director of the Sport, Coaching Program at Denver, university to get his insights on it first of all about the education of coaches and why it's so important and second of all to give some insight about what we can see with coaches with covid nineteen possible suggestions to help with what's going on in a crazy time. So Brian, thanks for taking time to talk to moving to lift. X Ray I haven't been is good to be back with you've been a while. Bryan Bryan was one of our first interviews for moving to live. We found out about his. Long strange trip from Ohio to the deep South all the way out to the rocky mountains. Now, now, look at him, and now you decide that big deal with spotify. Glad. Glad. You've taken me a long ride. I, know you and I have talked a little bit before it conferences and I think many people who are in the movement profession across the Board kind of think that coaching is something you kind of do and your athletic career is over or on the other hand. Some people say, well, if you can't teach or if you can't do you teach you you coach and if you can't do that you consult but there is a whole body of research that's growing on the importance of the Education of Coaching and the Socialization of coaching, which you're one of the people at the forefront kinda briefly describe what is the program at a Denver With Sport coaching and who is it intended for? well I if I Oscar Wilde was a terrible teacher that right? So, just just check that off my list here Oscar Wilde is rolling over in his grave because he couldn't teach him but. So, our program do you In. This is kind of my 'cause I founded the program I, created the curriculum. Guidelines and I took advice. Right. People in great minds that came before me and curriculums, structures, national standards but ultimately, somebody has to decide to Zeina curriculum. When they hire me I was the only person here to start the program. and. So it's a combination of sciences and arts and humanities that's throughout the courses throughout the actual assignments in the activities that we do. So we've got you know everything's about athletic performance in a bit about health and wellbeing too. When you've got to think about that because depending on the what we're using sports or sports are not necessarily earn inherently healthy. oftentimes they are that can be but right like nowadays if you're playing sports in. And you get sick Corey, you have long term damage or Some sports result in long-term Marthe, rightous no. Various tendonitis is or pains a psychological emotional abuse. Have to say these things and I'm not a cynical or pessimistic. With bad it's being realistic in more wide awake in truthful in in what you see in. Sport So we've got bom mechanics. Collagen sociology. There's a great I don't know if you part of it would have been the. Model now back in the seventies. And I believe it's angle I always get tripped up if it's angle or Berg. Forget what is called the bio psychosocial model. And it's a way that we would normally talk about interdisciplinary. Approaches to research as well as practice.

Oscar Wilde Denver Brian Geraghty Covid Bryan Bryan Education Of Coaching Program Director Spotify Colorado Tendonitis Ohio RAY Berg Corey Marthe
Dr. Brian Gearity Phd- Denver University Sport Coaching Program

Moving2Live

04:11 min | Last month

Dr. Brian Gearity Phd- Denver University Sport Coaching Program

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live moving to live along with our sister podcast fit let ph believe movement is a lifestyle not just an activity with moving to live. We try to interview professionals literally across the world although today were interviewing a professional from Denver. Colorado. We are in the middle of covid nineteen and and high school and college sports are either canceled postponed or up in the air. So you read a lot in the literature in the newspaper about what's going to happen to the student athletes the stresses that are placed on the student athletes. And as I was reading this, I was thinking there is not a whole lot has been mentioned about coaches some of them who may be new to the profession. Some may be in a profession many years. So I reached out to Dr, Brian Geraghty who is program Director of the Sport, Coaching Program at Denver, university to get his insights on it first of all about the education of coaches and why it's so important and second of all to give some insight about what we can see with coaches with covid nineteen possible suggestions to help with what's going on in a crazy time. So Brian, thanks for taking time to talk to moving to lift. X Ray I haven't been is good to be back with you've been a while. Bryan Bryan was one of our first interviews for moving to live. We found out about his. Long strange trip from Ohio to the deep South all the way out to the rocky mountains. Now, now, look at him, and now you decide that big deal with spotify. Glad. Glad. You've taken me a long ride. I, know you and I have talked a little bit before it conferences and I think many people who are in the movement profession across the Board kind of think that coaching is something you kind of do and your athletic career is over or on the other hand. Some people say, well, if you can't teach or if you can't do you teach you you coach and if you can't do that you consult but there is a whole body of research that's growing on the importance of the Education of Coaching and the Socialization of coaching, which you're one of the people at the forefront kinda briefly describe what is the program at a Denver With Sport coaching and who is it intended for? well I if I Oscar Wilde was a terrible teacher that right? So, just just check that off my list here Oscar Wilde is rolling over in his grave because he couldn't teach him but. So, our program do you In. This is kind of my 'cause I founded the program I, created the curriculum. Guidelines and I took advice. Right. People in great minds that came before me and curriculums, structures, national standards but ultimately, somebody has to decide to Zeina curriculum. When they hire me I was the only person here to start the program. and. So it's a combination of sciences and arts and humanities that's throughout the courses throughout the actual assignments in the activities that we do. So we've got you know everything's about athletic performance in a bit about health and wellbeing too. When you've got to think about that because depending on the what we're using sports or sports are not necessarily earn inherently healthy. oftentimes they are that can be but right like nowadays if you're playing sports in. And you get sick Corey, you have long term damage or Some sports result in long-term Marthe, rightous no. Various tendonitis is or pains a psychological emotional abuse. Have to say these things and I'm not a cynical or pessimistic. With bad it's being realistic in more wide awake in truthful in in what you see in. Sport So we've got bom mechanics. Collagen sociology. There's a great I don't know if you part of it would have been the. Model now back in the seventies. And I believe it's angle I always get tripped up if it's angle or Berg. Forget what is called the bio psychosocial model. And it's a way that we would normally talk about interdisciplinary. Approaches to research as well as practice.

Oscar Wilde Denver Brian Geraghty Covid Bryan Bryan Education Of Coaching Program Director Spotify Colorado Tendonitis Ohio RAY Berg Corey Marthe
The perfectionist, people-pleaser, and all-or-nothing mentality with alcohol, with Georgia Foster

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

04:50 min | Last month

The perfectionist, people-pleaser, and all-or-nothing mentality with alcohol, with Georgia Foster

"Self proclaimed alcohol self esteem anxiety reduction expert, and a clinical hypnotherapist, and today we are to no one's surprise talking about alcohol. Specifically, we are getting into the emotional issues that can come up when alcohol is used as a coping mechanism. Hello Twenty twenty, the different personality traits that come with drinking including the perfectionist, the people pleaser and the inner critic. Finally, we're discussing why the all or nothing. Mentality that comes with dieting also applies to both food and alcohol why it's so detrimental, and then why cutting out alcohol completely will not really solve all of the issues of the casual drinker and then Georgia is giving us some practical tips on what you can do to both get out of the all or nothing mentality when it comes to drinking, and then what you can also say to people if you're more of the people pleaser mentality. I WanNa know more about how you became a self-proclaimed like alcohol self esteem and anxiety reduction expert and a clinical hypnotherapist. show. Well I I'm fifty four now. But. Many years ago when my late twenties I had. One could set with breakdown. Berlow. self-esteem. Overweight. Pretty miserable attracting the wrong guy and I was very aware that I didn't like myself so. I, Ran, away. To a health bomb went to the travel agent and I said the travel agent I want to go on holiday on my online. I WanNa, know who I am. She can look to a bit of a widows and I said. I need to go somewhere where there's no cocktails with is no crazy kind of food that will make me feel more crazy. So the worst place, one place in Australia. In Queensland and I flew on a plane up there and I lived in this in the middle of a rainforest a two weeks where we went into. Therapy basically and I've never done anything like this before. So but what was really interesting about being in this environment? was there people who really beautiful enslaved some rich had beautiful families and I could walk out why they were there because. Everything. That got you know slim bodies money. And it turned out that we all have. Different lives but the same thing was that we over crap about ourselves bicycling. So I left that not knowing the answers but understanding that I wanted to find them. And I came across a book. Add Up to share this particular. I'm theory with with with you at this book. Really literally an Cliche. But it changed my life. My mother is a therapist and I open this book and wanted to know malls. So I went to California and I studied this incredible psychology theory. And then my grandmother's British. So our went on to London and I trained to be clinical hypnotherapist and that kind of. happened organically because I met a friend I was in those days you call that a secretary working. In. An office and I met this woman hugh had been hypnotized to help her give birth. The pain control, but that's interesting. and. So I just. Something about it kind really productive. My my is so I applied for college in in Europe One of the biggest college. And I trained to make the Clinton therapist. And so I decided that was going to. It was like falling in love. It's a really weird description but. I realized that it was something had to do just. But along the way when I was training I was working with friends on wasn't charging anybody and were getting really good results but I was combining it waived my psychology training. And then the college in Botany back to become a lecturer for them. So used to teach in the universities hypnosis for many years and. I. Just as I soul. Students blow some I was hypnotized myself and getting some great results and unrealized one of my problems was. Because, I didn't like myself. I thought was because it was a bad person of considerable people thought. It was. A permanent stress in my life

Twenty Twenty Georgia Australia Europe Hugh Queensland Botany Secretary California London Lecturer
Jessica Kury Special Olympics of PA

FitLabPGH

05:55 min | Last month

Jessica Kury Special Olympics of PA

"Welcome back to another edition of the Fitness Lab Pittsburgh Aka fit lab PGE podcast. We are a podcast that has ethos moving a lifestyle not just an activity. We want to give a big shoutout to Richard Butler for. US to today's guest and a big shout out to today's guests for being one of the first fit loud pg guests who has agreed to appear via zoom rather than US travelling to her or her traveling to us. Thanks covid for decreasing our ability to cross bridges and go through tunnels to meet people. We can still take advantage of technology learn about neat movement events in the Pittsburgh Pennsylvania area today we are with justice. Jessica Curry. She is the director of special events for the Special Olympics of Pennsylvania, and we're going to find out about how she got involved with the Special Olympics. What exactly the Special Olympics is. If you don't know and I know I, WanNa know how the Special Olympics of Pennsylvania ended up headquartered. In Pittsburgh I was surprised to learn that what I was doing my research and I think she's got a special events coming up. This got an acronym as far as that you could participate in virtually with other special Olympic athletes. So Jessica, thanks for taking time to talk to loud PG H. Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate it. Bye Favorite question I always want to ask people that I interviewed for PGA H. in that I always do is are you a Pittsburgh native if you're a Pittsburgh native? Why are you still here if you're not a Pittsburgh native, what brought you to? Pittsburgh. I am I have a Pittsburgh native born raised. And Baptized on Super Bowl Sunday. So you know Pittsburgh girl and. Nineteen seventies I'm giving away my age now but yeah, Pittsburgh girl born and raised scold out of state and coming back about it's probably been about fifteen years now that I've been back in the city of Pittsburgh but I did the unthinkable. I was in North Hills kid and actually crossed a tunnel and went through earth room whether tunnel cross the bridge I believe just moved South Hills when we came back, which apparently is something you don't do here. I know he's interviewed a couple of people who've done that and one of them said that her mother still refuses to come see her in the South Hills from the North Hills and say one way trade or a one way car ride that way because mom apparently does not go south and great. It's fifteen minutes. It's such an easy drive. Really. and. I'm always curious when we interview people for this. What draw drew you into being involved with what you do your with these Special Olympics what was your background to get you in this where you somebody who you are in high school made you you took an adapted class or volunteer said boy this is a really neat thing I want to be involved with this or is that something that maybe happened afterwards or a little bit later on in life? He also interestingly I did not study any kind of adaptive movement or anything like that through high school or college my degree's actually. Public speaking and writing. And I worked for the development team. So I, do a lot of both development. We obviously do fundraising for Special Olympics had been working in nonprofit for a long time if worked for a substance abuse clinic in the animal shelter. And then most recently Special Olympics I've been here for five years now and. When I work for a nonprofit, having a mission having 'cause is something that's really important to me. If I'M GONNA give all he knows so much time and attention. It's GonNa have to be to something that I really truly believe in the Organization is 'cause is absolutely something that I do believe in I grew up with a cousin who is an athlete and were only six months apart. So this organization has actually been part of my family and my life since we were children. Our Age starts about seven where we start training younger children on appropriate eating habits. It's a young athletes program than getting them ready, and then they can start participating as they get older. So she had started at a very young age and is still active where. We're going to be forty five. So, she's been doing this for a really long time. So this is literally been in my life forever. Here's. Ano- know I WANNA learn more about that because I seem to recall at some point reading somewhere in a blog or something like that that there are some special Olympic athletes who are sixty plus years old who have probably been competing even longer than your cousin is yeah. Yeah we do. We have athletes ranging in age from seven to into their eighties. We are fit lab Pittsburgh were podcast that promotes movement. We always like to find out the activities that people. Do themselves that we interview even if they're working for specific companies or specific specific on prophets, I, know we interviewed a lady in the past he said, well, I'm not really an athlete I dance three or four times a month and I swim I walk US I don't know you are an athlete I. Tell people when I teach health classes at universities like your goal is to be able to do whatever you WanNa do when you WanNa do literally until the day you die not have that fear. So I'm curious. When you were growing up, were you in active can't or are you somebody who wasn't active and maybe became active a little later on in life? Yeah. Always been inactive kid I always participated in sports all different Tennis softball. docker. you name it. I was never afraid to try it. Physical activity was something for me is just a very natural part of my life and something that comes easily to be danced in gymnastics for very long time since I was little and. That type of physical movement is something that just has always been very natural and very comfortable for me, and if kept doing things as I've gotten older definitely changed the things I can't do they used to. Buy I'm still still active still out Aaron Indefinitely. Still. Moving.

Pittsburgh Olympics Wanna United States Jessica Curry Pennsylvania Director Of Special Events PGE Richard Butler North Hills South Hills Aaron Development Team Tennis Softball.
Paul Cater on Flow, Rhythm and Awareness

Just Fly Performance Podcast

04:24 min | Last month

Paul Cater on Flow, Rhythm and Awareness

"All right. So I'm going to ask you this because you just a few minutes ago but I think it's definitely worthy of telling again. But you know we were just talking about running in adverse. are being a weather and stuff like that and how that impacts the workout. But I know you a little story about running down from a mountain and being in a little bit of fight and flight or fight or flight What was what was going on there? We were in hike in in Colorado one of the fourteen and fourteen thousand foot. Peaks. it was all. They're all on a silver mining or something in. Few Iron Tools in reminiscent of the the mine and I thought. I the? History first and foremost. Undergraduate days. I'd appreciate it history and. Take some of this home so. L. The thunderstorm. Came at around. Four o'clock in I and lightning was striking everywhere. I think one of the greatest training memories ever. was running down probably three miles just downhill down shale. Rocks. Cooks and crannies down this trail surely exposed mountain. Top Man. That was. One of the moments my life I was super dialed ignite. I was fully engaged with a body mind. Spirit. I would get struck by lightning. Yeah so I. I I enjoy those natural elements when I trained you know. For the wider flight nexium whether it's pretending you're getting chased by A. Sabertooth tiger getting or actually get struck by lightning. I think there's something to that creating that experience training. We can learn from. That's what I was. That's what I was. GonNa. Ask You. That's how I was going to go with that because I think that. The best training sessions I've been in not just trained but also just experiences team sport. You know it's like you lose the self a little bit and it's just about the moment and how what better way to be in the moment than the being kind of a situation where your life isn't a little bit of danger. Of being struck by lightning you gotta run. I've been in not too many of those that I've been in one in particular in my memory and I, I remember thinking man if if all training was had some of this or not all but even once in a while, you're outputs are just like so much higher. And it brings a really different element in so I do big said he had you find yourself thinking about that sometimes where you have a training session or does that just the general idea? Does it cross your mind in the environment you're trying to create you can't allow sure think every day I think you. Have to ask myself did you create an experience? in the. Maximum awareness and within within the scope of what the goal. At adopted goals that day? Die Create inexperienced that supports that. And you know without without having it be. A maximal. The adrenaline situation because I think. or saying earlier that. These kids specially. Get these. Third Gentleman Junkies they've they have to have this massive height Ra- music with musical element. which I I didn't use very important but. Or? Everything's. Also, walls all the time. So I think. Creating experience of both. Deep introspective. Meditative state all the way to the. Collective experience of competition. And You know there's a whole spectrum there you have to decide where in the day you're GonNa work on that spectrum or within the session or Yeah. So that's a huge consideration every day. So are you creating experience? Where you WanNa go

Colorado
Mandy Shintani, OT & Gerontologist- Urban Poling

Moving2Live

05:20 min | Last month

Mandy Shintani, OT & Gerontologist- Urban Poling

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live podcast. As you heard in the Intro, we are a podcast where we try to break down knowledge silos our ethos along with our sister podcast lab Pittsburgh is to spread the word that movement should be treated as a lifestyle not just in activity. Some of our best guests often come from recommendations or introductions from other guests and a big. Thank you to fred go PT Helper who connected me with today's guest. Fred was the sponsor or cosponsor with P T helper of a virtual clinic that was held with a company called urban polling. When I saw urban polling, I'm like I'm not exactly sure what that is. I looked it up I found out and I was fortunate enough the defender of the company Manish Shantanu who is a gerontologist occupational therapist. Was Willing to speak to me. So Mandy, thanks for taking time to talk to moving to live. Oh. Thank you so much for having me. Ben In I. Agree Sometimes, the name is a bit misleading in terms of. Away represents I know my first question I always liked to start out with with moving to live is what your elevator spiel and you get on the elevator someplace in your either carrying an urban pulling tote bag. You have an urban pulling sure people say, what do you do? Who Are you? What do you tell them? On okay, in two minutes well. Generally I'll say to them is that. Bourbon polling is based on Nordic walking which is. Security that. Is Very popular over in Scandinavia. Have the healthiest people into world. And basically, your upper body is doing something that looks like cross country skiing at your body you're just walking in urban settings so Sidewalks. Roads. Parks trails. For Friday other different ways. But that's usually my elevator pitch on the on the topic. and. I know we'll get into that more detail in the second half of the interview. Out of curiosity, just for the listeners, how does this differ from maybe somebody who's a hiker or a trail runner who uses polls on rough terrain? Oh, we're great question Whitmer gave asked that a lot. Well, basically onion I'm a big hiker myself and the different is died. It's one as the design of the poll and second round it's the technique. So when you're hiking usually you're you know you're elbows are banned in, you're using it to offload the weight off your hip Sidney used to give it more stability. Whereas this activity, your arms are straight more like cross country skiing not sure every volunteer this user familiar across cross scene, and it's about changing your walking into brisk walking or an athletic walk. You're using the pool and has got allege. That's designed. Did you press down that legislative move your arm back and you get insert you work like seventy five to ninety percent of your muscles. So it's all about getting like a high intensity cardio and including resistance training there as well. So just say different benefits, different pools and in different technique. So. It's almost like it's the exact opposite when the trail runners using the hikers are using it as you said, to offload the body or to offload the worker, decrease the work. In the case of polling, you're trying to increase the workload or make it more of a workout that is an accurate representation. Yeah. Absolutely. That's a great description however just to. Add to the confusion we. Developed in in different ways, what we did was we took the generic activity ignored walking and we looked at I'm as as an occupational therapist I I look at the research and then I was like Haney, how could we doubt this so that we can actually use this fitness activity for habilitation that case it's more like hiking. You Know Allen Allenstein posture offloading like hearing candidates since it's the best practices to use it for pre and post beneath surgery for those exact reasons. So on the one hand. You do all those use it for that reason for Rehab but on the other hand it, you wanted to use it for losing weight or you know increasing your intensity exercises. So for example. Here in Canada people with diabetes people recovering from cardiac heart surgery, a people who are beasts will action use the urban pollinger fitness technique whereas Parkinson's stroke pre abusive new surgery on you. Other neurological conditions they will actually use our activator which provides more balance instability and

Fred Mandy BEN Pittsburgh Manish Shantanu Allen Allenstein Haney Whitmer Scandinavia Sidney Canada Parkinson
Chris Korfist on New Advances in Sprint Training

Just Fly Performance Podcast

06:13 min | Last month

Chris Korfist on New Advances in Sprint Training

"Christi Man it's good to have you back. I know I think you have a story about you. You are Carlos now right aren't you writing like a kick bike around and you're getting a hamstring workout what's going on with that? Yeah. So we have three cars which in most families is plenty But my daughter has taken a car up to Minnesota and she usually works during the day. She's GonNa go to Iowa the. Sun's. Going to be a junior but he said his license since December and he has volleyball every day. And then tournament sound the weekend, which I don't know is legal or not these this day and age. But basically, I'm a fifty one year old person that doesn't have a car I have a licensed but most my days and evenings I am Carlos. So. A couple of years ago more than a couple years ago I saw Franz Basch was playing around with the kick bike and John Prior. told me about it so. I've become the kick bike master of Chicago I am the. Middle aged guys zooming around on a red kicked bike. My record so far is fourteen miles. which. Is Pretty good on a kick bike I did it in forty minutes but I. Go Grocery shopping go pick up Britos things like that. Throw in my backpack and I kicked bike around the western suburbs of Chicago, which it may look easy. But kick biking is much harder than riding a bicycle It's your one leg is peddling through. So there's a ton of hamstring involved in the other leg. It's like in this isometric squad before. So. He can get low enough to get your foot on the ground. So. That's been my summer so far kicked. biking around trying to get food or go get whatever I need. I. It's awkward like I go to the wine shop, which isn't too far away but we're a backpack in my backpack I got a bottle of wine in a Burrito like. This is Kinda messed up. Usually, it's like a fourteen year old something like that but it's not often you see a fifty one year old how ask you do you? Do you take that thing through timing gates? How fast is that thing go all well, I have these hotshots because sometimes I just go out for the exercise and there's all these trails nearby and you got these hotshot bikers with all their gear on. And I always like to wear street clothes just to make them feel bad and zoomed by the bikers. So I guess I can go fourteen sixteen miles an hour when I get it moving. That's that's not too bad for non motorized. Yeah. But that's a that's a that's a short burst hold that for awhile. You tired really fast. Yeah I was just GonNa say this is a good segue innocent things that you've been some recent sprint ideas and human locomotion ideas but like the spiralling nature things, right like you got one leg, that's has one job and the other leg has the other job and I know you've been talking about the Lila Somme symmetrical stop there said you feel do you feel like you get a little like spiraling action or how long do you go on one leg before you switch to the other see don't like start running circles or do you care does it Usually I do just because I get bored I counted ten so I do ten pedals But then sometimes I go let's see how many I can do on this leg before my. My metric leg, the leg that's on the machine or bike completely is burning and then I'll switch so. Something like that, and I'm usually listening to a podcast. So I'm doing that too. So I'm. To me, there's nothing worse than doing aerobic work I. Think it's just mind numbing. So between going fast and kick by listening to a podcast and. Worrying about crashing in which legs burning word that usually is enough to keep my mind off the fact that I'm kicked biking and it does get to pissed at my children for taking all the cars and using the a kick bite. I think life is interesting. We don't have a car you know. It definitely I feel like there's always something to be learned I I I was Gonna say I will say as I've gotten older too I. I definitely appreciate having a good aerobic system but finding creative ways to do it not just running and in one direction and all that type of thing. So I did your bear crawl push saying this morning. Nice and that's hard it. Oh Yeah. No, it's super hard. It gets it gets tough like it's it gets logarithmic. You know like one, two, three, four whatever. But then he's getting five, six seven I need to come up with a way to make that more like 'cause everyone's GonNa get stuck at like eight you know or you can just rest the really longtime. Yeah. It I thought it would be easier than it actually was. Yeah, for me. I would do if it was me and someone else doing push ups and it was like you could either do two competitions. One would be just how many push ups can you do in two? Let's do that crawl thing. I would do way at the crawl thing because I get to rest and I'm way better read and it gives me a chance to like the take a break and I've rule more aerobic and all that the last stick. So I I think I, just kind of a cheater way for me to make it look like I'm a little stronger, my body or something I don't know. I feel like it's got I was thinking. It's like you do get the gait cycle in between every bilateral. So I agree I felt that same thing I you know I think the crawling huge is everyone's lack down. And we're lucky because we have gym center basements but still you start cranking off pushups just for something to do and. You can it gets a little numbing after a while and you can feel the impact that? Are Great. I crank off one hundred fifty push-ups but I'm not walking as well in my shoulder kinda hurts now. What am I really doing here is it really important to do that many push ups or is it more important that I feel pretty good after I do the exercise? Yeah. I was doing one of the last traditional strength programs I down for a while and ever since all the lockdown stuff and the weight rooms have been a little more sparse. I didn't have a barbell for quite a while, but one of the last programs that I was doing was just easy strength just two sets of five everyday basically three sets of three and I was Barbell benching every day and I haven't Jack, yeah I'm getting older but I haven't I haven't jacked my shoulder up that bad in a long time like my left shoulder was dying after awhile and every time I do those crawls like it's just like it's all good. You know you just a way to mitigate the same stress and you're back in your shoulder blades being pinned. You know, of course too

Chicago Carlos Biking Franz Basch Iowa SUN Minnesota Lila Somme I. Go Grocery Jack John Prior.
How under-eating and over-exercising can lead to hormonal imbalances with Dr Heather Rhodes

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

05:06 min | Last month

How under-eating and over-exercising can lead to hormonal imbalances with Dr Heather Rhodes

"So before we get started, could you tell people a little bit more about yourself and what you specialize in? Yes. Definitely. I am so pumped to be here and to meet you. Dana. So my name is. Is Holistic Services and I specialized in taking Mormons in them simple for women in order to effectively inefficiently reached their health goals So a lot of times as women in Women's health and experiencing symptoms are hormones are kind of ignored but then like we have this deep intuition of like, no, I, think it's a hormone problem. I think Raimondo Donna balances out of whack and A. Lot of times I dismissed and we kinda. Fugler we don't really know what to do and it just kind of feels like this messy messy spot. So I commend and basically clean it up and teach your hormones. They are help you find easy root causes. You can apply simple and practical strategy towards in order to get those results in that healing and symptom relief that you're looking for. Awesome. So incentive onto Google, we have Dr Heather for here here for you guys say. So we were talking about this briefly before we started recording, but I actually had a lot of requests from people to talk about P., C., O. S., but I haven't had an expert on yet to talk about pcs. So that's kind of what I want to start with so. Four listeners who aren't as familiar or if they just don't know like the macro view of what is P. C. O. S. unlike what does that even mean and what are the implications of it and everything? Could you do a brief? Is for people yes. Of course. So if you're to. Heathrow as you're gonNA find, it stands for poly cystic Ovarian Syndrome which basically means that you are experienced experiencing cyst on your ovaries. According to most Western medical standards to have a diagnosis you've got have two out of three qualifying conditions, which is irregular or no curious high levels of male testosterone engine based hormones or cyst on your brakes that are verified ultrasound. So here's the thing about that diagnosis. There's a couple. Sit Out there that say when you gotTa have at least one of the three or got to have all three gotta have two three nobody in the westernized community really has dislike standard baseline likely for things like pressure or diabetes or whatever. It's kind of this very ray area and a lot of times because of the intensity of the test in invasiveness that's required to either have ultrasound or half blood work drawn a Lotta Times. Women experiencing. Or even PCs likes that domes are very much dismissed. So when someone comes to me and I'm thinking What I'm hearing is they're having regular cycles maybe they are having issues with their blood sugar and your ability in mood swings. Potentially date got access here growth around their chin or jaw line. Maybe it's hair loss in the male pattern form obsolete thinning hair loss access here growth acne on your jaw line is like a major indicator. So can you have those symptoms and not ever officially diagnosed with PC s? Yes. Can you have symptoms and not actually have? On your ovaries. Yes So a lot of times as women week disqualify ourselves from having strategies and the way that we will doesn't impact us because we don't have that diagnosis but I account since I was one of those people that when you apply. Basically, this concept of okay TC. Means that my hormones are really relented in their lot more sensitive than other people's and you kind of take that view of your hormones start treating it as if you do have s than you actually experience all of these results and this kind of new branch of your help by focusing on that area. So I guess in Short, he's Eos is technically. Assist on your raisin meeting qualifications for a westernized doctor. However, I think that there are tons and tons of women out there that experience TV os likes symptoms August pseudo yo s either because of certain seasons that have come up in their life or because of you know my Song Changes Habits Mind specifically came from log period of over exercising under eating. Disordered, eating stop in all of that. So I think that having what I want audience members to kind of think about is kind of broadening their perspective in thinking more about these symptoms of zero s rather than to I technically have a diagnosis of. Or. Not. Right exactly. Well, thank you for explaining that. So I WANNA. Go into one thing that you just mentioned

P. C. O. S. Raimondo Donna Dana Google Testosterone Diabetes Ovarian Syndrome Dr Heather
The Last Serve with Courtney

9INE POINT Started With A Dream Podcast w/ Jacolby Gilliam

04:08 min | Last month

The Last Serve with Courtney

"Enjoyed episode gray story very relatable unless you to it. Though. The question that everyone that comes on as when you're younger than athlete would like bigger to the goals you underachieve. Oh God as an athlete I actually wanted to be my first athletic dream wants to be a professional basketball player. So I guess that's where it started is that was the first sport that I really played. And it that quickly died. After a while was like, you know what now got Bergdahl kind of fascinated found volleyball luckily. Yeah. I had a poster of Lisa Leslie on the back of my bedroom door. Measure myself against our. Be, like that one day. Lead the. Though at least leisurely. So when you kind of said, we're doing basketball. Then how do you kind of land up on wall kind of thing that was? A good place for you. Volleyball, why is the last sport that I tried like the last one I picked up and I've been I was always playing. As a kid I was just always I, think of a lot of athletes say that like I just play it every and volleyball was lost when I picked up his all my friends are playing it and I went to a camp at our high school, Our Future High School put on with them and I. I. Hated it. Just because was bad and I hate big batted things it just makes me so angry. And I just kind of stuck with it because all of my best friends were playing and it was really fun to play with them. So it was like I'm sure I'll like it. You know when I start getting better and I like hanging out then so stick with it and just did a job middle school along with everything else that I could play and I, just live London it gets so much fun. And when you start to get a little bit good, it was just I think we've no others or I didn't feel anger sport but I played before when I started to get good I just wanted to keep getting better on I. Definitely felt that was all. Yeah and then just think what I was in high school. Coaches. OCD recruiting letters, and found out. That was the thing I could do you know playing college now? It's like, okay I guess I'll do that. And Going with that same process. Started, getting good. How did you? Become good with was whether jet practice or you redoing the outside of just the usual everyday stuff. A little bit of both I mean I think it really helps like I always tell players that I'm coaching. I was not good until I was like it senior sixteen like even I started playing when I was twelve terrible until I was almost in high school. I think a lot of it when I turned I was a freshman in high school. So it's like fourteen fifteen years old in a big game changer was that summer I played a lot of volleyball because then middle school I played every sport. So I didn't really dedicate that much time I played club but. You know I'm not very, very good club not for a very good team. The practice wasn't very intense, and then that summer before freshman year when I decided I wanted to play in high school. I switched clubs went to NATO's Houston. Was a better had had give reputation at the time played was in the gym at all the open gyms, all the clinics they had. At least twice a week ever all summer long and I grew like four inches in like almost like less than six months I grew so much and. I. Think the biggest improvement was. By jump, I could actually jump after all of that playing at all jumping off the heading and I could finally. Serve consistently and served. Well, I was stronger I was in middle school I would I hated surfing. I just got so mad because I was so inconsistent I would actually. Do. Push ups in my room every night when I was like thirteen and fourteen seventh and eighth grade I served improve. But then I was in the gym so much that summer after middle school and it made such a big difference. I think here in your journey, just how you were determined to get better you like I'm not gonNA. Anyone be. Yeah and just be like I'm not going to be bad at this. This is ridiculous like I'm not I'm not going to be done at this. This is stupid. Like

Our Future High School Middle School Volleyball Basketball Lisa Leslie Bergdahl Nato London Houston
Your Pursuit of a Better Body and the Perfect Diet Is Never Going to Make You Happy

Ben Greenfield Fitness

07:52 min | Last month

Your Pursuit of a Better Body and the Perfect Diet Is Never Going to Make You Happy

"Welcome to the show folks I have today. Actually, an old family friend of mine Doug Wilson, who is the Minister of? Christ. Church in Moscow Idaho, Church that I attended through much of my childhood and also during college and still visit quite frequently whenever I'm down in Moscow Idaho which is only about ninety minutes from from my home in Spokane, and so I've I've known Mr Wilson for quite some time and he actually had a stint in the US Navy for a while. and. Then he attended the same university that I did University of Idaho ever while I got a glorified personal training certification he studied philosophy, and since then went on to do quite a bit notably, he he helped found and now serves on the board of Logo School, the school that my wife attended, which is a classical and Christian K through twelve school down in Donna Moscow he's also the senior fellow of theology at New Saint Andrews. College. In Moscow Idaho, which I would consider to be One of the better liberal arts institutions in the country actually end quite close to the coffee shop that my mom actually runs down in Moscow. Idaho and so I'm familiar with a lot of the students that go to that university as well or or that college as well a he has authored many books Mr Wilson is a prolific author and and his books are fantastic. He has A. Books on marriage on on child rearing on on I absolutely love his his titles on raising boys just because I have twin boys myself some excellent books on Christian Education his son Nathan Wilson. You might also be familiar with as as a as a well-known fiction author and all a link to to all of his books as well as everything else that we talk about if you go to Ben Greenfield fitness, dot com slash Doug, Wilson and. Doug also has about a metric ton of grandkids spread across the planet with what seems to be rapidly increasing frequency, and so he has a he has a lot of a lot of children out there bearing his name as. and so it the the topic that I really wanted to get into today is related to a book that Mr Wilson wrote called confession of a Food Catholic. I'm also going to link to that in the show notes as well because I I really really love to get. Your perspective. In by the way, I seem to be going back and forth between Doug and Mr Wilson, what do you prefer for for the show on Doug is great. All right. That's GonNa that's GonNa shorten the syllables I gotta us. All right. So so doug, you wrote this book called Confessions of a Food Catholic and and I know that you've also done quite bit of thinking about how we tackle this. the this relationship between health and fitness and pursuit of a better body and caring for our bodies and carrying for God's Temple but at the same time. Not kind of a sliding into into a selfish obsession with with our bodies and with health or with longevity or anti-aging at all costs, and this is certainly something that's been a a topic on my mind quite a bit lately and so. the this book confession of Food Catholic that you wrote with you say is dedicated all those at church dinners. I noticed didn't have enough protein on their plates and tried to cover it up by noticing I didn't have enough Greens on mine. Let, let's start here what what is a food Catholic and how would you describe yourself as a food. Catholic. Great. Thanks for having me on. This is a great opportunity afoot. Catholic is someone who believes that all foods are acceptable for us to eat with regard to our spiritual condition. In other words, I cannot put distance between me and God through anything I, put my mouth or I. Can't be put right with God through anything that I eat what I've noticed, and the reason I wrote the book is that many people feel they eat they feel a spiritual guilt either they feel if they eat poorly, if they missed the regimen that they assigned for themselves, it's not like, Oh, I failed to do the extra push up. It's there's a spiritual guilt that many people feel. And what I wanted to do was go to war with that sensation of guilt with regard to what you eat now if someone said yeah. But if someone had a a diet of deep fat fried twinkies and that's all. That's all they ate wouldn't that be bad for them or yeah it'd be bad for them. It'd be bad for their physical wellbeing is not healthy, but they're not corrupting their soul by means of the twinkie. Now, they may be corrupting their soul by means of their lack of discipline but that's a different issue. It's a different category. So we have a tendency to blame when we have a moral failing or. A spiritual shortcoming, we want to blame the stuff instead of addressing the root spiritual issue, which is your relationship to God i. think it's far worse to be fighting with someone over what they you go out to lunch with a friend and you spend the time quarrelling over what they ordered instead of just enjoying the time with your friend, right so so you're saying basically, is that sometimes the the legalism or the Self Righteousness That we get with with a lot of these laws that we set up for our self regarding food whether it's you know I'm going to be gluten free or I'm avoiding carbohydrates or I'm I'm not consuming vegetable oils because those aren't good for my body. What you're saying is that is that what you would care more about is not whether someone eats organic or processed food but why they're actually making those decisions exactly. So if What somebody else eats is frankly none of my business they're the one asked to eat it is their lunch they ordered it e if you want a a meal that's higher in fiber are lower in fiber or you need gluten not there or you maybe earth counter countering you order extra gluten. Right. Fixed. Diluting powder but we actually call that soy sauce. So. So you use this term in the book called the Food Pharisee, which is great. The P. H. O. Food Pharisee. And you describe these food pharisees as those who who would be unwilling to bring their food laws before the Bible to be examined and and said, that's a topic that Christians really need to think through biblically and when you get into this whole concept of a food fairs lifestyle, what I'd love you to do if possible is telling, you told me what you would describe a food Baresi. And then get into some of the issues regarding I. Think you break it down into into five different issues that this food pharisee lifestyle could be described as. So if you bring your food if you. Say Okay I want to compare how I eat to the Bible I to bring my food choices in the Bible. There's good news and bad news well, good news and bad news for the Food Pharisee. The good news is that whatever it is you're eating is fine. That's the good news. The bad news is whatever it is. Your neighbor is eating is also fine and the food pharisee is someone who wants to feel superior. They want to look down on someone who's making sub optimal choices right

Nathan Wilson Doug Idaho Moscow University Of Idaho Donna Moscow United States Spokane Mr Wilson Senior Fellow Logo School New Saint Andrews Ben Greenfield Christian Education Greens
Small Steps Towards Productivity at Home with Sid Garza-Hillman

No Meat Athlete Radio

05:50 min | Last month

Small Steps Towards Productivity at Home with Sid Garza-Hillman

"Everyone welcome to radio. This is Doug Hey and today I'm joined by my good good buddy who is so nice to talk to you sit Garza Helmet said welcome back to the podcast. Doug Nice to be here and thank you for having me on. It. was that was that was that to professional? No wonder. Out He's like, I don't want to be around that kind of anyway. Thank you so much for for for serious is always good to talk to you. Yeah same to you and. Say That anyone who is a longtime listener of the pod or follower up athlete knows exactly who you are. But you know who is said Garza Hohmann who who are you, and why should people pay any attention to what you have to say? Why don't know about the second question but the first question is that I'm. Well. Nutritionists running coach Author of two books and another one that I just finished. It's not out yet. PODCAST Vlogger I direct an ultra marathon. And I run a wellness center at at the Stanford in a nutritionist there and. father husband. That's that pretty much sums it all up. Yeah. You know our other things. That's a lot I do a lot of stuff which is i. think partly of what we're GonNa talk about today, but we'll see where that goes. Yeah I I was so disappointed in this year, we also come back out for the race would have been my. Third Time coming for the senior Costa Fifty K. which is. Without a doubt, my favorite ultra-marathon off there ever is Martin was or will be. I. Guess I can't say that definitively about I, I, can I mean there will never be a better race video It's such a cool race rents along the coast of the Mendocino coast like Northern California cliffs just absolutely stunningly beautiful and then through the redwoods and along this big river out of there, it's such a cool that and. But of course, like everything else it was canceled this year and I was sorry to Miss Miss that option is here. Yeah, I was I was a late hold out like we were getting the news about you know. Groups of fifty sounds like okay. I can do that because all space my runners out Mr groups of twenty five probably can do that. You know, and then finally it was a group of ten and I was like okay and I had to pull the plug and it was really. I took it way harder than thought it would take it. I was very bombed Tanaka the race and. It's come for some reason. The last couple of weeks I think I'm trying to nail down next year's date and everybody who signed up to have a free. You know they have a free entry into next. You basically postponed the race a year essentially, but I'm like drinking coffee out of my Mendocino Coast Fifty K. last few days I've been wearing the hat like. Just around surrounding myself with all things Mendocino. Miss you so much. You know it's It's such a fun. It's like the it's such a thing I look forward to every year and to not have it this year amongst every amidst everything else was just really a bummer. Yeah what what do you think was the most? Disappointing part about if you just about the about the race by cancelling. Yeah. Just because I love the it's such as you know for anybody who's run it they know but I keep the number on purpose. You know have quite a big wait list actually but I, keep the number very tight at one hundred fifty. Because it's really intimate fun and it's become would have been in its fifth year, but there's a lot of returners. So it becomes this thing where it's almost familial. You out there there's traditions that are being built now around the race 'cause it's now it's not in its first year now in its would have been in its fifth and so it's it's a new race but you can sort of see the establishment of traditions in and just seeing people again for the you know that one time per year and it's just it's just I greet everybody when they come. Across the finish line because I keep the numbers manageable and it's just it's just this fun. Fully positive no negative day and even people who drop I've never had a negative person. They always come back and I go I. Miss a stupid thing. You know they get a beer and they walk over to the beach you know like it just so it's all good and I've knock on Wood I've never had. A bad experience around. So it's just it's just a fun thing for me to do. It is a good addition to altering community. Thank you for putting that on. Yeah, my pleasure. All. Right. So we'RE NOT GONNA be talking about the racer. We're not even going to be talking about today we're talking about a productivity and kind of staying focused in the age of that I. Know I have I've worked from home for a long time and you've partially worked from home for a while and so I'm used to this whole working from home thing. But I'm hearing increasingly more from people who from friends and family and stuff who are getting growing increasingly frustrated with the work from home experience and. They're having they're having trouble with productivity. You're having focused missing You know their friends at work and their colleagues and and so even though we're wet like five months into this whole thing and most people are still working from home. We. Thought it'd be good to talk about productivity and to talk about. You know just kind of waste to stay focused and and be efficient but we're doing it in the framework of small steps because you're like the small stuff guy, you might be the og small sips guy. I don't know what are small steps. I'm pretty I'm pretty Oh, Jeez most. Well, my small steps are from most other small steps. So I'm there are people out there talking about micro steps, break everything into two minutes my specific approaches to train people how to set their own well. I'll put this way a small step for me as an is the mindset it's what you view something as small step. So it's not a fixed amount of time in the world. It's just for you if it's a small

Garza Hohmann Doug Nice Doug Hey Mendocino Stanford Northern California Tanaka Martin Wood
Scot Prohaska on Total Athlete Development

Just Fly Performance Podcast

05:35 min | Last month

Scot Prohaska on Total Athlete Development

"Scott. Welcome to the show. It's awesome to have you here Min. Banks. or It's something myself and my team we listened to you guys all the time on on just fly sports It's got a requirement for anybody that works for me to listen to your podcast though. They'll thank you. Yeah. It's awesome to have you. I mean, I know every time we've talked or I've I've just more and more intrigued by what you do. Because I, know you're not like you're not all over social media. You know you're not. You're but entire, I've just like I am. So I wish before I left. California could've stop by and really excited that chat about your. Your your insight into your system and how before we get into that I'm curious to like and I like getting into this for especially for people who have who see things in such an expansive way. But what was your gateway into coaching like what got you interested in it, and then what were some really big milestones in changing the way that you thought about your process? Yeah I, you know quick Reader's Digest version is. A pretty good athlete grown up back East right and had scholarship offers and was fortunate enough when I was in. Eighth Grade. To walk in the YMCA, fine little dungeon part where all the tough guys athletes working out in in. There was a level five Olympic lifting coach, and saw me with my little fitness books working out and said Hey kid Chimera. I WANNA teach you how to really train and while I was in eighth grade I started training with. Professional, athletes Olympic, athletes learning how to snatch clean squad sprint hurdles. Everything. So was a amazing experience for young kid be pulled into that kind of culture right away. Top properly. And then after. Know went into finance world business world is kinda miserable, but I was always getting fathers and guys played college football with call me when Scotty? Knew so much about this stuff. Helped me, I got a contract or my kids to a scholarship, teach him and I was doing it on the side and just fell in love with it and started growing in saw business opportunity, and then got called sportsmed guy in Toronto like the work I was doing and went up there and started running its clinic work with NHL guys in Canadian Olympians and stuff like that. It just grew from there kind of an organic way of. Loving it as a young young kid. Being, lucky to have someone mentor me and saw how it changed my life, and then fell into coaching. I feel like you're not the. For, some reason the finance and I didn't like it, and then again, the sports perform I. I've heard that story before I. Don't Mac Shakers on here had that too, and I feel like I've heard others. Maybe I do feel like that that like systems kinda thinking or do you think there's any thinking and finance that is helpful for sports is just make quincy dental you are. I think it's I think it's for competitors. We'll always WANNA look at measures of success. And that's kind of a natural thing. Until you realize I work, I work hard to get something and I realized I. Don't like it when I get here, that might not be success but I think finance is a challenging. Competitive. And and you know with detail and all these little nuances you can take and I think that attracts people to feel they wanna feel successful right, and then you realize you're sit in front of a computer all day long. Yeah. I. Can totally see that. Makes that makes sense I. You're speaking of success to ask the first thing. It's official question. I had and I just I guess, I, felt like starting with this rather than jumping right into the six lanes but. What is success in sport mean to you or? Yeah. So. What it used to meet. Right. So we all have these objectives and goals right, and we think that success when we meet that, we're going to be successful when feel successful yet, what happens when you need it? How long does they last for me? It lasts maybe five minutes and then I'm spending the next stuff in saying, okay. GotTa, start grinding now for the school and realizing that my daily experience wasn't great. So, success for me sport or any endeavor is your daily optimize experience that's sustainable over time. So if you're an athlete of Your Business Guy, whatever it is, if you're living your dream, you're loving your days, you're making a contribution feeling fulfilled. Ben. That's success to me. And so that's how I look at it when I get an athlete that. Wants to scholarship, but he's loving the training loving where he isn't high school having great teammates. Great relationships performing on the field. Every day is not future. You know obsessed all the time that successful to me. That makes sense with the process, right? Like. So often we just look at this. What's the goal? Win The Akron serve get the scholarship, but then, but then what I mean. Eventually it just. Eventually. There's think an emptiness. I mean, it's Nice Scholarships for sure. But at some point you get to the top and. Maybe realize you're on the wrong ladder something, but it's Where I've dealt with the most Olympic athletes after an Olympic year while they struggle. Mightily, they struggle with purpose with focus with what it all means. Up the disappointment of even if they got a medal, did feel as good as they thought. But the daily optimal experience their love in their life in the training or joining, they're enjoying the relationships are building that seems to be sustainable

Olympic Banks. Mac Shakers NHL Toronto California Quincy Scotty Official Football Akron
What is Metabolic Fitness?

20 Minute Fitness

04:09 min | Last month

What is Metabolic Fitness?

"Everyone it's Martin from twenty minutes fitness. I'm here in San Francisco and I'm connected to levels founder Josh, Clementi Josh. Why don't you to be yourself? Martin's great to be on the show I mean on I'm josh, founder of levels and John Interested in bringing metabolic fitness to the mainstream rates, and so what does everyday mean? What is Metabolic Chiasso metabolism? Easy Way to think about metabolism is the set of cellular mechanisms that create energy from our food and environment that. So this is how we power the processes in our body ourselves bringing fuel and they turn it into energy and so metabolic fitness or metabolic health is when those systems are. Operating properly and you have often energy weight balanced performance without excess byproducts and so the way that that we're doing this is using continuous glucose monitoring hardware software analytics to close the loop between actions you take every single day in your daily life and the reactions, your body experiences in particular, the blood sugar response, your body experiences, and so this is this is the level, is that closing loops between action reactions the way that behavior change becomes eating, easy and obvious I, and so we're the first metabolic fitness company greenest market, and how do you define an excess byproduct like at what point you have too much nutrition what is it exactly? So, the some of the easy ways to think about this art glucose itself. So this is a it's sugar essentially, this is a molecule that is the primary energy molecule in the human body so that metabolism functionality that we talked about is driven primarily off of glucose sugar and fat, and so when you're consuming sugar, it releases into the bloodstream and You know this is actually just tipping carbohydrates while they sugars that interest the bloodstream, and so this triggers a cascade of processes, hormonal processes, and those tell your body, how to op sort of appropriate that Lucas, into the cells for for their useless contrived things like weight gain can. Be for muscle expenditure for energy using mechanical loads on a commute for cognitive function in the brain. But those laws get too high. You actually have an inflammatory situation because Lucas is a very reactive molecule it produces what are called free radicals, inflammatory cytokines. I'll sixteen alpha you know these different molecule byproducts of glucose reactions that actually are very inflammatory and can cause breakdown of tissues and skin glaciation, which is right leads to Browning of the skin and wrinkles. All these byproducts that ultimately are are not good for us. So there's a fine balance and glucose is meant to be kept in tight control and that's what we mean by byproducts. Normally unless you have diabetes, you should not have resistance to insulin release right so how does that really matter van for you know everyday use that a non diabetic being that we have been since glucose is the primary energy source for for the modern person we've studied the Post Disease State of Glucose for for many decades. So this is called diabetes typically type two diabetes which a lifestyle driven illness that sets in your body can no longer respond to insulin you can't use glucose in. Your bloodstream effectively, it gets really high toxic levels. So we studied that quite a bit but the thing is that all of us across the metabolic spectrum from healthy to to less healthy are all using net glucose and so there is an optimization function here where because these mechanisms are linear you know it's not it's not like a a threshold where you cross over it, and then suddenly you're unhealthy that's kind of how start thought about a me to think about this metabolic fitness meaning the choices. We make require focus effort and repetition to achieve optimization. So it doesn't matter where you fall on the spectrum metabolic health de Choices you're making today are affecting your hormonal cascade causing qualitative experiences in causing quantifiable to potentially detrimental effects like weight gain, where's performance exercise cognitive decline sort of all of the things that we struggle with our day-to-day are affected by the choices we're making that we don't really connect because we don't have that close loop system. So now by by showing that the person who. Doesn't have diagnose metabolic dysfunction. You can optimize your choices daily see the data in real time, make better ones, and then achieved this sort of metabolic control where instead of having these this roller coaster of spikes and crashes in energy issues, and again wait gained the rollercoaster. We all ride day today that we kind of use our emotions feel way through. You cannot have data and you can use that to achieve this the state of balanced control and you know lower flatter smoother continual on metabolic control.

Clementi Josh Lucas Martin Founder Diabetes San Francisco John