Feminism

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How Majo Molfino Helps You Break the Good-Girl Myth

Latina to Latina

04:03 min | 1 d ago

How Majo Molfino Helps You Break the Good-Girl Myth

"Tell me about a time in your life that captures your good girl behavior I time in my current life like as an adult. As a child take either. Okay. Well as a child, I could definitely paint the good girl image open up my book with this image of me as going to Catholic school wearing my uniform being really nervous my pony tails really tight. My shoes are very polished and this feeling of are the girls going to like me? Am I going to be accepted having a lot of anxiety about going to school and really feeling like I had to be the best daughter of immigrants I could possibly be. To repay my parents and the way that played out in my later years in adulthood has been being a hyper achiever like just. Wanting to excel in every area of life from work to every relational role and having this chronic sense that I'm not enough for I'm failing is what? I call the good girl myth of perfection, which is as we'll get into my primary goal. Meth. What were the messages that you were receiving about what it meant to be good. So, there are four main systems that shape us the major system that shapes us into good girls called the patriarchy, which is cultural social system that's been around for thousands of years has very deep roots and it's really privileges men over women in and other genders in a way that makes us form a good girl protection mechanism. 'cause we think Oh, if we just were good girls go along with the program we assimilate. And we are committed to the patriarchy will be safe. So we developed the good girl mask and the good girl archetype as a protective mechanism. So the main place it comes from the Patriarchy but the Patriarchy is like an abstract thing right when you're seven, you're not thinking about the bag. So to grounded in what I call. Messengers. So who are the messengers that we have as children that spread? Patriarchy to us and these messengers are often they don't even know they're doing it one major places family. So I always ask every client that I work with to look at what are the rules you inherited from your family the messages you got from your parents, your siblings, your uncles, your aunts, the tribe that you were born into. So what were the rules in your family? For me it was very much get the highest degree of education possible because that's how you. Get lifted out of poverty because that's what my father did. So steady has to work hard. Choose a safe path in your career. So that, you can earn that salary. So everybody is safe. Don't take risks. You argue and break the good girl that there are different types of good girls depending on which myth is at the core of your value system. So there's the myth of rules, the myth of Perfection, the myth of logic, the myth of harmony and the myth of sacrifice. You Say, your dominant myth is the myth of perfection. How did you determine that? Well I took my own assessment that I created. It felt so fun I felt like I was in a women's magazine being like B.. B. B. A.. It's like a cosmic Christ like back to your. Days. Good I definitely play into that I. Think the one telltale sign that the method perfection could be your primary is is my primary. The way that I know is persistent feelings of failure and guilt tend to mean. You're probably in the perfection camp because every good girl meth has a core fear. and. So for perfection, it's the fear failure for sacrifice the fear being selfish. For each one, there's a particular fear that really will tell you and particular desire you know with perfection, the desires related to perform.

Catholic School
RBG in Her Own Words

Can We Talk?

05:18 min | 4 d ago

RBG in Her Own Words

"Hi It's no rouse and Judith Rosenbaum. And this is, can we talk the podcast of the Jewish women's archive where gender history and Jewish culture meet in this episode we're honoring and mourning the loss of Supreme Court. Justice. Ruth Bader GINSBURG. The first Jewish woman to sit on the nation's highest court Justice Ginsburg died on the eve of Russia China after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. In the days and nights following her death the steps of the Supreme Court have become an impromptu memorial. Thousands of people have gathered to express both grief and gratitude leaving flowers, writing messages and chalk lighting yard site candles. Some have even blown show far in her honour Ruth Bader GINSBURG was not only unapologetically Jewish but she and her experience as a jewish-american really guided her work. The Biblical Dictum Setback Sabatier Dove Justice Justice. You shall pursue adorn the walls of her chamber and the Word Setback Justice was embroidered into one of the lace collar. She famously war with her robes though tiny person justice GINSBURG was larger than life a Jewish hero and an American and feminist icon she stood for gender equality and racial justice and modeled fighting steadily for what you believe in. Her famous friendship with Conservative Justice Antonin Scalia showed that you can disagree and still get along. She was a role model for so many people, but it's important to remember that she had role models to in two thousand and four justice Ginsburg spoke at a Jewish women's archive event marking three, hundred, fifty years of Jewish life in America. She talked about some of the Jewish women who inspired her. One of them was Henrietta sold. Zolt was born in eighteen sixty in Baltimore and like Ginsburg was both visionary a doer who faced in overcame many obstacles as a woman. She founded DASA and helped build the social service infrastructure of what became the state of Israel. So here's ruth. Bader. Ginsburg one of our heroes talking about one of her heroes, another inspiring Jewish woman from history. In my growing up years, my mother spoke of glowingly. Though new had to say no. Better than any other person whose words I have read. Sold had seven sisters. And brother. When her mother died the man well known for his community spirited endeavors. Hi, imperative. Offered to say the codfish. The mourners fair that Ancien customer instructed to be recited only by men. Zone responded to that carrying offer in a letter dated September sixteen. Nineteen sixteen here Kuenssberg reads the key passage of the letter Henrietta sold wrote in response. It is impossible for me to find words in which to tell you. How deeply I wish touched by your offer. To Act as. Well my dear, mother. What you offered to do is beautiful beyond thanks. I shall never forget it. You will wonder then that I cannot accept your offer. I know well and appreciate you say about. Jewish. Custom. That only male children recite the prayer and if there are no male survivors. A male stranger may act as substitute. And Jewish custom is very dear and sacred to me. Yet I cannot ask to say after my mother. The cottage means to me. That the survivor publicly manifest. His intention to assume their relationship to the Jewish community, which is parents had. So that the chain of tradition remains unbroken. From generation to generation. Each adding its own link you can do that for the generations of your family I must do that. For generations of my family. My. Mother had eight daughters and no sun. And yet never did I hear a word of regret. Past, the lips of either my mother or my father. That one of us. WAS NOT, a son. When my father died, my mother would not permit others to take our daughters place. In saying the cottage. Until I am sure. I am acting in her spirit. When I am moved to decline your offer. But beautiful you offer remains nevertheless. And I repeat I know full well. That it is much more in harmony with generally accepted Jewish tradition than his might while my family's conception. You understand me don't you. Flee or celebration of our common heritage while tolerating indeed appreciating the differences among us. Concerning religious practice. Is, captivating, don't you agree?

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Justice Antonin Scalia Supreme Court Henrietta Judith Rosenbaum Pancreatic Cancer Ancien Israel Russia Zolt Baltimore Kuenssberg China America
Rich People Problems

The Cut

04:57 min | 6 d ago

Rich People Problems

"I realized I've been using the words envy and Jealousy interchangeably when there's actually a fine but stark difference between them. Jealousy. is about fear. Jealousy is anxiety about losing what you have that nervous feeling that someone is out for your spot. Envy on the other hand is about desire. Envy is wanting what you don't yet have its daydreaming and striving and keeping up with the Joneses. But. The primary difference I would say is that these are two radically different feelings. Jealousy. Is Corrosive and painful, and it drives you absolutely up the wall. Envy on the other hand is almost. Fun. I mean I feel like what my therapist would tell you that my obsession with comparison is like not good for my life. But I also feel like it's a strong part of unfortunately my personality for writer Evie Ebert envy is a byproduct of ambition I had kind of built my life around this idea that This version of me and the president is not the real me. The real me is this like Hologram of myself that I'm pursuing where things work out the way that I want them to and I'm better and I'm smarter and I'm more successful and I'm getting there. and. Then it was sort of like the pandemic HIV extremely harsh pause button on everyone's life and it was like, no the what you have right now is all that there is there's no forward movement we had to remind ourselves to be happy to be alive and lucky if we're in good health. Grateful for what we have right where we are. Blake. That's hard to sustain. Aspiration without opportunity ferments envy. Of course, I could be much worse off but I was like green with envy about people whose homes are larger were living in better climates maybe who had outdoor pools and I had a real inclination to kind of judge myself for becoming obsessed with. Who has a better basically and so I was like, no, this is part of my self care practice is allowing myself to be annoyed by people. But then every realized that other people were probably allowing themselves to be annoyed at her. He's essay in the cut is titled Do. You hate me for my lawn. She has a law and it feels extremely luxurious like being able to open the front door and signed my four year old out I feel like marie-antoinette basically for a while felt like everything and anything was a luxury showing off your sour dough bread meant you had groceries Zoom conferences meant you had a job complaining about your kids had human contact you can't win at this. I mean, some people are having A. Hard. Time but nobody's having fun and then in the midst of pointing our fingers at each other and tossing are envy around our immediate circle. We picked our ears up. We heard sound. Horrible sound. No has been the siren song of extremely wealthy celebrities. Huge We rose up and grabbed R N D, r proverbial pitchforks, and we marched to the photographs of Drake's weirdly empty hotel lobby of mansion. We swarmed to pick apart the celebrity bookshelves on zoom. We roundly mocked the rich and famous as insistence that all in this together it was so overtly tone-deaf. Are. Envy. was almost. Delicious I'm having this resentment and you're having to and it's it's something that we're kind of sharing. I feel like it's part of the shared pandemic experienced. It was suddenly like we were truly all in this together. Freud talks about this in civilization and its discontents that cohesive society unites around a common enemy an out group. There are lots of scary an unfortunate examples of the groups America has ostracized, but the rich and famous are not among them. Because, it's so much more complicated than pure animosity if they're so awful and they're so ridiculous in there. So repugnant why? Why does Kim Kardashian have like a Zillion instagram followers molly young is the literary critic for New York magazine and she was wondering why we want to keep looking at rich people for envy or fantasy or whatever we turn to them for I mean what's interesting about the quarantine is you started seeing a lot of people turn against celebrities right like Ellen complaining that quarantining in her gigantic house made her feel like she was imprisoned or whatever, and finally people are starting. To kind of examine the purpose that these celebrities are serving in our lives need to examine why we're interested in them in the first place

Joneses Blake Kim Kardashian Ellen Freud Evie Ebert America New York Magazine A. Hard Instagram Writer Drake President Trump Molly Young Envy.
Escaping monogamy

Ladies, We Need To Talk

04:59 min | Last week

Escaping monogamy

"Women are more sexually liberated than we've ever been, but in spite of. Work, nece. The majority of his still believe in monogamy monogamy means the search is over. You'll here now arrived where it's safe, secure and familiar. But if we admit it, it can also get kind of well. Being polite, he bit kind of repetitive. After you find someone, you think he's Jesus settle down with its completely assumed that your in monogamous relationship. And that presumption isn't just coming from society it's coming from you. According to the Australian Study of Health and relationships ninety six percent Australians expect monogamy from themselves and their partner. But what if instead of one pot now one bed and one stupid advice to look at every morning it's two, three, four I don't know maybe five stupid faces. We're exclusive to each other people might say like, why did you bother game? Then sometimes I do think that myself. This is Khloe she's in her thirties been married for three years and with the same partner for ten. They're still working out the rules of the Pali Game. We talked about threesomes, but it never happened because like how'd you engineer that like neither of US wanted to go on the APPs because it was it would just be embarrassing like all. What if someone that we know US knows that we have sex. And then earlier this year basically all started I developed this huge crush on a friend. And it was actually really stressful. Because I was terrified that it kind of meant that I didn't love my husband anymore and maybe I wasn't supposed to be with my husband and maybe are supposed to be with this guy and my partner knew about this told them from the very beginning like, Oh, I'm having these squishy feeling. So this guy and I was very honest about all of it, but then the more intense feelings. The more stressful. It became because like I said I was worried. That it meant that I needed to get a divorce. I'm been in therapy for a long time and I remember me telling the therapist, all of this and her being like I'm just going to tell you something all of these feelings your feelings have got nothing to do with your relationship with your husband. It's all on you and I was like say. It. Just needed to say that because I was so scared and I think talking about that with other women like we all get crushes and it doesn't mean that you've made the wrong decision. So, yeah. That didn't go anywhere but then old friend of mine called me around my birthday happy birthday. Then a couple of days later he text me and invited me over to his place and I showed my husband this text and I was like isn't it with like we don't see each other often I've never been to his house before yet he's inviting me over. Do you think is like trying to sleep with me and my partner was like Nah sounds like he wants to hang out and have a few drinks and I said Okay Should I continue with this story? This is where interesting. So I went to this guy's house. So I, my PJ's I really didn't think that he wanted to have sex with me. And we sat up and we were talking for ages and we're watching telly and he just suddenly turned. Hey. So I can't get Netflix on this. TV. In the lounge room but I can get it on my laptop. This question like watch TV in bed together is that too weird and I was like, oh no, that's fine. So we lay down in bed and I was like as far away as I could possibly get from him on the other side of the bed and we sat there and we watched about twenty minutes of Queer Eye. And he was like, can I just I just? Can you come a bit closer? If. That's a good idea and he was like why and I was like because I think if we touch than, we might have sex and he was like, would that be? And then weakest, and then we had sex. And it was very intense like that was the first time I'd had sex anyone side from my partner. In ten years. It was intense. What about your husband does he had any? Yeah. He doesn't tell me unless I ask I think because he knows that it it makes me feel icky by also know that that aching. US. Get smaller with time like when I first found out, they had slept with someone. I, was on a train. Carriage on a drain. And he text me Tomiichi I. Yelled like what the fuck? Everyone in the. ME. And I couldn't I kind of couldn't stop laughing because I was so shocked. I mean he's a sexy man. Obviously I, love him I married him but it was just so weird to thing that he actually likes let with someone else. And it felt horrible. And I got off the train and he met me and I just. I I couldn't stop laughing. So. Like I moved through their emotions pretty quickly obviously shock I. But then it was funny and then it felt a bit gross. Then it was kind of sexy which I didn't see coming at all.

Partner United States Australian Study Of Health Netflix Khloe Engineer
How Beauty Insider Tina Hedges Created LOLI, an Environmentally Sound Brand

Latina to Latina

06:11 min | Last week

How Beauty Insider Tina Hedges Created LOLI, an Environmentally Sound Brand

"Career has taken her. From the perfume counter at macy's inside a conic brands like Christian Dior Estee Lauder Al. but after almost two decades beauty shetty personal crisis that inspired her to start lally beauty the I zero waste organic food grade approach beauty we talk about her a Pitney the one thing she asks every investor she meets with and why she is so committed to getting this, right. Teen almost two decades in the beauty industry and then you had both a health scare and day crisis of conscience. What happened I had spent about almost about to get decades or so traveling the world in pretty high powered marketing roles and innovation roles for big companies in the industry pretty much helping, decide and create all the products in women's beauty cabinets and. started. Simultaneously, I had this weird across section of I started having all these other immune issues and systemic allergies. A No physician could sort of pinpoint what was really triggering it as well as went through early menopause. And I was in my mid thirties and no underlying health conditions for that and I started to think about. All of the products have been applying to my body from head to toe for almost two decades and I started thinking about all those buildup of toxins and chemicals, and I realized that I had been polluting my own body and simultaneously. I had this consciousness of wow. Not only have I been pushing into the world products filled with all these chemicals and nasty since and and carcinogens endocrine disrupters all of this you know really scary stuff but on top of that were blending all of that in eighty to ninety five percent water because most of your skin hair and body products are literally water you're paying for water. And then wrapping all that in single use plastic and when the world is running out of water, it's one of our most precious resources when the boy to be more plastic in the ocean than fish by twenty, twenty five. None of this makes any sense to me or None of that made any sense to me a when I had this convergence of the crisis of health and crisis consciousness. Once you had that a home moment what was the first thing you did to sort of take that idea and start? Making it an actual reality. So I had already left the corporate world and I had gone into the start world. I launched a very successful. vegan sulfate free hair brand. Actually I was the first to use reality TV show on Bravo a show called blow out about a hairstylist in La and his hair salon. But because of us sort of uniquely understood, it was basically an hour long infomercial. We turned the industry on dime because prior to that I mean it was super early days of reality to be. We're talking like two, thousand, four it was America's biggest loser where for the straight guy blow out and the apprentice those were the reality shows that were on at that time and I realized wait a second. This is a show about a hairstylist. Want we show him developing his own brand? and. Don't have done that. So we were the first do that. And the purpose of going back to that stories I know how difficult it is. To start a business especially as a minority Hispanic female founder over the age of thirty. So I was really scared to start this and I. Just. Kept finding excuses left a brighter I'm going to consult or help this person with their brand, and it finally got the place at I was just sitting there and I realized. What do I have to lose? What's the worst thing that could happen? So I- self-financed and out of my upper side small studio apartment I launched a test of Lawley and so that was the beginning. Lawley is the world's first zero waste organic food grade approach to beauty. I want break each part of that down what does it mean to be Zero Waste We go to farms and fairtrade cops around the world, and we find parts of organic food that are being wasted or being thrown away in the process. So for example, our Plum Elixir, we work with a organic farm four generation owned in France that grows a very rare plummets called the end tape them and sa- tiniest considered like the fog or caviar of plums it's it's quite unique. It's extremely potent in antioxidants and vitamins and minerals, and when they make prune juice or pitted prunes, they were throwing away the colonel. And the Patriarch the father of this owner of the farm. About ten years ago said wait. We, press avocado oil from the pit of an avocado. We press all sorts of oils from pits Robin Doyle, why can't we press an oil and organic food grade oil from the pit of the plum? And he literally invented it like they're no one had ever had plum oil, and then he worked with the French bent to get it organic certified and recognized as a food ingredient, and then we started working with them and realized how powerful it was for skin hair

Lawley Christian Dior Estee Lauder Al Robin Doyle Macy Menopause Lally Systemic Allergies I Bravo LA France America Founder
U.S. Supreme Court's Ginsburg, a Liberal Dynamo, Championed Women's Rights

WTOP 24 Hour News

04:01 min | Last week

U.S. Supreme Court's Ginsburg, a Liberal Dynamo, Championed Women's Rights

"Of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She's passed away at the age of 87 from complications from cancer. A little earlier, I spoke with the U of D. C is executive director Monica Hopkins about the legacy of Justice. Ginsburg, obviously like much of the nation were saddened and shocked to hear of the passing of Justice Ginsburg She devoted so much of her life and career to advance in the quality girl. It gives us time to think about her legacy. Both weapon. The A C l U, but parasol she was dedicated to ensuring that we understood about equality wasn't just about getting women. They're equal rights but that it actually have impact were the sexes in total talk a little more about how she worked with the Luo and made some achievements for women's rights. Prior to starting the women's rights project Up the hill, you she actually served as professor Rutgers law. And she, additionally thought important legal battles before the Supreme Court back establish the foundation for currently legal prohibitions against sex discrimination. And then in 1972 later, Ginsberg sounded today. So you women's rights project. And she directed that project throughout the decade of the 19 seventies, but case after case to the Supreme Court and also establishing constitutional protections against sex discrimination, and you know her legacy continues today. Throughout the feelings, work to advance women's equality and employment and education and housing, and in all It's just it is. She was a Supreme Court justice, which is such a monumental achievement, right? But she was so much more than that. He really waas so much more than that. It's securely interesting she became. I've heard and seen, And then the news people calling her a feminist icon. You can see people now carrying tote bags with state against Bird's image on it, she has come to symbolize Stalwart and dedicated vision of equality and what could be achieved through the law. Her legacy she just had such a dramatic and lasting impact. Not only I think on the Supreme Court, but in the lives of many women across the country, and it's great to see that multiple generations have been graced her legacy and what she accomplished on the port and you mention her becoming a cultural icon. It's really fascinating to me because I don't think we can say that about any other Supreme Court justice ever. I mean, there may have been T shirts with faces on them and things but not to this degree. Yeah, One of the things that I think about is the quiet power up Justice Ginsberg had and how she You know, would wear her descent color, which became in pop. I can obviously you know, you see necklaces with her descent color on a she would wear that on days when the court where she would descend on DH. All of those little things but sort of picked up on by people who not only followed exactly what the court was doing, or may have read the brief stores things like that. But I understood some of these decisions and how decisions that are made with the law. And at the highest level of the court of our land. Ah, really impact our lives. Monica Hopkins Thie, executive director of the U of D C sports at

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Executive Director Monica Hopkins Monica Hopkins Thie D. C Professor Bird
Virtual Holidays: Lessons from our Muslim friends

Can We Talk?

04:46 min | Last week

Virtual Holidays: Lessons from our Muslim friends

"Angelica Lindsey. Ali. My name is Sukhothai. My name is Ben to file. Hardest for all of us was on that was that was a killer think yes. Definitely a killer to not be able to be such a community months as a whole month. And for most of it for all amid were at home was how very first one ever. My entire life remembering having big told that we can't go to the mustard. A typical is version without covet. It's The Best Day of the year. Is Really Fun. So what we do is we wake up in the morning we put our best clothes on put our best perfumes and put a best jewelry. And then we go to the market for for prayers we played shoulder to shoulder some of us stay until midnight I'm the last ten days especially because those are more even more specialties the last than days a lot of people I, truly stay at the much. And then after prayers then we you know we congratulate each other go and visit family and friends. There is always a lot of food. There's a lot of festivities and my family I'm usually the one who cooks for all of our family and friends. I think all of us everything shut down in March. We knew Ramadan was coming in late May tune. I think all of us started to pray hard that this was not going to last until them. Praying shoulder to shoulder is a huge deal for us. It's almost like a transfer of a spiritual energy as we pray together and you you have to stay succeed apart because of covid obviously, I must sheets have been closed. So we had a live streaming of the actual prayer. I might be you know out of turn saying this but I, really think it was the women in Lima Sloan Community who really made the most of it because I think we're used to having to be adaptable to change and I. I really liked the way that there were so many outlets like there were so many classes I've found opportunity as many other women did to sort of take center stage. And so I actually had a class with over two hundred one from fifteen different countries every Saturday during the month of McGaw and that gave me an opportunity at least once a week to connect with women to talk about Ramadan go over spiritual principles and really gained much as we could from the month. So that was really beautiful. There were daily drive-thru if tires that women like put together so that if people need it food that they could drive through or walk through or deliver. So yeah I, think it's a time of. Trauma we're all in a collective state of trauma, but it's also a time of immense spirit of opportunity. So Rahman to actually very fulfilling. It got us to be we missed that community but on the other hand I, think all of us were just surprised that the advantages the positives. For instance, I would often either take all of my kids would break at the mustard or break at home and then pray at the mosque together but schooldays, right I wouldn't be able to do that I would often leave the behind This one though we came up with very. Creative ways of involving the kids. So the whole thirty days of the fast, we were able to private the break with our kids play with them, and then we were able to show them what we do in the mustard here at home we we taught my my son to lead some of the prayers which was I think very. Very in new and interesting for him very you know they're empowering for him so. That was a big positive I will go so far to say this year. Ramadan Ede were a lot more meaningful than they have been in the past because we have to be very intentional about who we chose to spend our time with. we were very mindful about wearing things that we could make ourselves or that we already had because a lot of the shops or close We spent a lot of time cheer rating, the experiences that we wanted to have for our children and with people who were within our bubble. So I'll though the fanfare of holiday was missing I really feel like this was one of the best holiday seasons ever because it stripped off all of the slush and really focus on what the essence of the holidays truly are so that that made unexpected. Beautiful.

Lima Sloan Community Ramadan Ede Sukhothai BEN Angelica Lindsey ALI Mcgaw Rahman
Activists, Anna Arnold Hedgeman

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:22 min | Last week

Activists, Anna Arnold Hedgeman

"Today we're talking about a trail-blazing political activist and educator. She was the first black woman to be a member of a oral cabinet in New York City and the only woman on the administrative committee for the nineteen sixty three march on Washington. Let's talk about Anna. Arnold. Henchmen. Anna was born in eighteen ninety nine in Marshall Town. Iowa. Her family later moved to a NOCA- where they were the only black family in the community. In Nineteen Eighteen Anna graduated from high school and enrolled in Hamline University. It was there that she heard a lecture by w e boys and was inspired to pursue a career in education. In nineteen twenty two Anna was the first African American to graduate from HER UNIVERSITY After graduation unable to find a teaching job in Saint Paul Public schools because she was black and found a teaching job but historically, black school in Mississippi called Rust College. On her train ride down south to her new job in Mississippi Anna, had her first experience with Jim. Crow segregation laws a train conductor told her that when the train reached Illinois had to sit in the overcrowded colored section and not in the dining car white people sat. Anna spent two years at rust college before turning to Minnesota. Unable to find a teaching job after once again, facing racial discrimination, she switched careers. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, and became an executive director of the black. Branch of the Young Women's Christian, association or the YWCA. She continued her executive role for twelve years helping to develop various international programs and education. In nineteen thirty, three Anna married folk musician merit a henchman. In nineteen forty, four Anna was appointed executive director at the F. E. P. C.. The national. Council for a Permanent Fair Employment Practices Committee. She spearheaded the fight against employment discrimination. From nineteen, fifty, four to nineteen fifty eat anna served in the cabinet of Robert F Wagner Junior then New York mayor. She was the first african-american and first female member of a mayoral cabinet. For the next few years she worked in a variety of roles including as a columnist as well as as a public relations consultant. In one thousand, nine, fifty, three Anna spent three months in India as next leader for the State Department. She also unsuccessfully ran for Congress in one thousand, nine, hundred sixty and for New York City Council president in Nineteen. Sixty five. One of Anna's most famous feats was her role in the nineteen, sixty, three march on Washington. We hold these choose to be self-evident. That, all men are created. Was the only woman on the administrative committee working with civil rights leaders, Martin Luther King, junior, Bayard Reston. And Eighth Phillip Randolph. Mobilize people to attend to arrange transportation logistics and to organize food and water for attendees fell on Anna's pleat because King Randolph and the other men she wrote for carrying on all of their regular responsibilities and it was difficult to get them to the meetings. Shortly before the march. Anna was angry when she saw that no women were included as speakers instead randolph was planning to briefly mention some black women activists in his speech although Anna strongly urged for women to be included a speakers on the program her calls were largely dismissed. In the end as a compromise, daisy beats was allowed to speak at the end of the march but her allotted speech time was significantly shorter than all the other male speakers. Anna later captured in her autobiography a moment during the March as she sat in front of the steps of the Lincoln. Memorial. I thought of the one, hundred, eighty, thousand Negro soldiers and the twenty nine thousand black seamen who had moved in at the crucial moment to win the war and save the fragile union she wrote. Most of the two hundred and fifty thousand people present could not know of these men for the history books available to Americans have failed to record their story. In the Nineteen Seventies Anna continued her work as an author and lecturer in the US and abroad. She wrote two books about her life's work. The trumpet of sounds in Nineteen, sixty four and the gift of chaos in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, seven. Anna was honored for her working race relations by various organizations throughout her life and was awarded honorary doctorate degrees from both Howard and Hamline University's. She also received the Pioneer Woman Award in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three from the New York State Conference on Midlife and older women. Anna died in nineteen ninety she was ninety years old.

Anna New York City Hamline University Rust College Executive Director Washington Permanent Fair Employment Prac Arnold New York City Council Mississippi Phillip Randolph Robert F Wagner Junior Iowa Congress New York State Minnesota Marshall Town Illinois Executive United States
Stay Weird With Stacy Ossei-Kuffour

Unladylike

05:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Stay Weird With Stacy Ossei-Kuffour

"So stay we thought we would warm up a little bit because We were delighted to find out that one of your favorite things in the world. Is Felicity. So. What is it about felicity? Well. It's a couple of things I think. For me growing up I I didn't realize it until. Now but I was really obsessed with the WB like. The WB. Children out there will be like, what is she talking about and I think for me? I became obsessed with felicity because she was like I mean obviously Carey is stunning I'm talking about like I know are but I think really affected. Me Was it. It was about this woman who didn't know what she wanted, but she knew she wanted Ben and saying it now it's like such an eye roll but I just thought it was so cool that she. Didn't do anything that her parents or friends wanted her to do and she like just dropped everything and moved to New York for this guy and Mike as a eleven year old a twelve year old I was like yes. Hi. I'm this is I'm going. This is where I'm going I. totally forgot you're going here. So unbelievable. I know this from high school. This is Susan this is. This is. versity felicity while. All right. So I'll see you around. and. Just told myself that I was going to do the same thing felicity did and obviously I mean I there wasn't a boy that I was like in love with and moving to New York for but I researched that like the school that they were modeling it after. Was Nyu, and so I decided that when I was gonNA turn eighteen that that was the school I was GonNa go to. So it's crazy to say now and you know when I did turn eighteen deny auditioned for nyu I didn't get in and so it was heartbreaking and all that stuff and obviously I realized I was not in TV show in not felicity. But then I auditioned my sophomore year and then I did get in and so I moved I dropped everything and moved to New York did you also? Like seek out a job at Dean and Deluca to really out. Absolutely, and they were like no ma'am and I was like please and it's crazy because i. think when I went in there I couldn't afford like not even a Bego I think it was like seven dollars an onion Bagel. But I was like for me like walking Dean and Deluca was like walking into a museum felicity just had an extreme profound effect I. Mean even now I go back and just watch the pilot discussed. Makes me feel good. So getting a little bit into your work to words that we noticed while researching up on, you two words that positively came up a lot to describe your work either by like your own words or other people describing your work. Were dark and weird. So I was wondering what those words, those two words mean to you. I think if I'm honest both of those words like. Growing up had a negative connotation for me I. Think. People often thought I was extremely weird and you know I was a pretty dark kid in terms of the stuff that I was into I mean publicity isn't that dark but I was really into. Buffy obviously but also these. Books where like it's just you know murder and incest, and then I think a lot of my friends were reading goosebumps which I was into but then like my sister was reading just rl Stein. So I was like wait what's that and so I kind of ditched goosebumps because it was like. And got into Rl. Stein. The adult books recalled Rl Stein and so I would read those a lot and those kind of just kept my. I think I was obsessed with a lot of stuff but I didn't WanNa read the Kitty Shit. I really wanted the adult books and I fought really hard. To like, trick my parents into getting me the staff and pretending it was a PG and That's just show you the kind of kid. I was just like I was beyond curious like I wanted the content I wanted I just wanted to grow up really

Felicity Rl Stein New York Deluca Dean NYU Carey PG BEN Susan Murder Mike Buffy
Why Pioneering Journalist Maria Hinojosa Put Herself in the Story

Latina to Latina

05:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Pioneering Journalist Maria Hinojosa Put Herself in the Story

"Maria I loved the Book A. So, good I told you. I was texting with you I devoured it and I want to jump in in the middle. You tell a story about writing a television script for Walter Cronkite what was the assignment? It's a juicy story. So I love 'cause nobody's asked me about this one yet short story is that I am the first Latina hired NPR. And then very quickly I'm like. This feels weird and I go and work for a Latino public radio in Spanish and San Diego and I experienced. Deep my cheese more there, and so I end up working kind of miraculously back in New York at CBS News in the Radio Department. And, I was doing fill in work the summer, and then I was asked to stay on through the end of December to produce a segment from Walter cronkite they asked me to write his end of the year commentary. And so. I was terribly nervous as a Latina journalism in the mainstream and being the first I was terrified most of the time. I write this piece and I go in I, show it to my boss Norman and Norman Light Me Norman hired me. But he saw this piece he said, Walter Cronkite is not going to read this and I was like no, he's like because it sounds like you wrote it. And I can't remember if he said and you're a little bit of an angry Latina I, don't think we talked in that way but it was almost like as he didn't have to say it he was like because it sounds like you wrote. and. I said well. Let's take it down to the FISHBOWL and have one of the evening news writer writers, read it and see what they think. Something just said. Stand up for yourself. You really hard. You actually worked on this you talk to other journalists. This shit is good. and. You're angry in this piece because every American should be angry at what is happening in the United States of America in the year nineteen, eighty seven. and. So I said, let's onto the fishbowl the people who edit the evening news with Dan Rather. We walk toward the writers who did not know me and he's again this is good. Yeah he'll read it. Yeah change this one word. and My boss had to eat his words eat pro as it were and I was like damn and so the point of the story is that as journalists of color as journalists conscience. When we are the first or one of the few in many newsrooms. We have to battle for ourselves. The way we see the world as journalists is as valid as Walter cronkite sway of seeing the world or Katie couric or Dan Rather we're journalists just like them. There are so many pivot points on your journey from intern to staff producer to on air from Spanish English. Is there one moment that stands out to you as the moment where your career to turn and where you really started to set out on your journey as a journalist? Well, look to decide basically that you're going to walk away from a steady Gig because you want to become a correspondent, you want to try to become on air that was pretty risky move and I feel like I did that in one of those moments where I was like you just have to do this. Like there are no Latinas. There are no Latina voices out there. And you have done radio, you have a voice, you know how to use it Noah. So that was a turning point. I think when CNN recruited me, that was another moment. It was very scary because I had never done television much less live television. But to answer your question, I feel like it really like. Like really came to fruition once I moved into doing now on PBS, which was long form investigative close to sixty minutes in terms of its style and production and deep investigative, and that led me to then doing documentaries and led to the front line which happened at the same time that I created my own company football media and I just WANNA shout out. The book. News for all the people which is was written by Juan Gonzalez and Joe Tories once I read that book I was like, okay. All of this suffering of being a journalist, a Latina you know woman of Color Immigrant. All of this is there is a reason why and it is because you have a responsibility to be part of this long arc. Of Responsible Journalism in the United States. You right I had heard rumblings at NPR some folks that I got too close to stories. I know all about you and your agenda one of my editors a nice middle aged white guy said to me agenda I said, what are you talking about? Maria come on you and you're Latino agenda. How did you respond in that moment? I said so does that mean that you've got a white guys agenda and he was like, no, it's not the same thing and I was like the same thing I'm able to tell you those moments because they were few and far between when I was just like ski is. Key you know like the same in Mexico is style plateau. SAMANCOR will plateau no one mass when I would just like suddenly rip something out and just be like that. But a lot of the times as you know, you're mostly just like dodging dodging you're doing a we've you're doing another we've and then sometimes you're just like a skin nope Wilma's I'm GonNa answer back. I hope that a lot of journalists read this book journalists because. You do have to be incredibly strong willed, and I would hope that they understand that this is not a job it is in fact, a mission that we're lucky enough to love. We need them.

Walter Cronkite Maria I United States NPR DAN Norman New York Mexico Cbs News Radio Department CNN San Diego Katie Couric SKI Writer America Intern Juan Gonzalez
The Social Science on Women, Work, and Motherhood

The Double Shift

06:18 min | 2 weeks ago

The Social Science on Women, Work, and Motherhood

"Julie Kohler. Welcome. Thanks for joining us. Thanks so much for having me. Well, I'll just jump in and ask because obviously, this cove nineteen crisis feels totally impossible on so many different levels but this family crisis that you have written about, you argue that it didn't really have to be this way in America that this particular crisis of feeling the strain as profoundly as we have in our families that that's not actually a byproduct of the global health crisis can you explain? Yeah Yeah. But what I think is happening is that we are now experiencing a level of. Discount Verge and seeming impossibility with a situation that really had begun long before the current crisis and it is simply expanded to include more and more families. Those families especially middle class upper middle class families that maybe were getting buys sort of at the margins by our fingertips. I've really been thrown into a different milieu post Cova. So on its own terms, we are living under the economic system that has failed. There's been less growth less economic security in this country since nineteen eighty than in the forty years prior. But this economic approach has become really politically sticky. It's kind of existed or endured as Zombie ideology some have said, and that's because what they've been successful. An is expanding this notion of what constitutes private family responsibility and enshrining that is sort of a reasonable bipartisan consensus. So the article was really designed to kind of unpack the family norms that. At the root of this failed economic approach that's often called neoliberalism and one is sort of an economic assumption that families will provide for their own little public support and nested within that are interrelated with. That is a cultural assumption that the two parent nuclear family is the optimal structure to do. So and I really believe that at this moment were big changes are possible. What we need to do is not just. kind of raised the policy solutions but explicitly critique and dismantle those norms that lie at the heart of the dominant economic approach. Can you lay out some of those norms that we're talking about because the thing about norms is normalized we think that they're normal and that's the way things are supposed to be. So what are the expectations of this private family unit that you talk about that maybe shouldn't be expectations on us. Right. Well, I think what's kind of so ironic is there's been this kind of idealized family type right? Kind of a two parent traditional nuclear families still is kind of promoted as the best way of doing family even though many families no longer fit that structure in any way. But then itself was a social creation of a very specific time in history, it was really kind of the mid twentieth century postwar era and it was enabled by massive government spending. So it was only able though for a certain group of families largely white. Families especially and with husbands who had unionized jobs. So those benefits massive investment in housing massive investment in higher education for white men who were returning from the war and could benefit from the GI bill. All of these public supports enabled this kind of family ideal. Now, in the forty to fifty years, kind of sense that is beginning really in the one thousand, nine, hundred eighties we've dismantled all of those forms of public supports that made that kind of family possible and yet we still have the expectation that families are going to be providing for their own. So it's kind of a catch. Twenty two families they're forced to believe. It's their responsibility to provide for everything for their kids that can assure a middle class life for economic security in the future families have to pay for childcare to all the kind of enrichment activities that accompany middle-class life these days to higher education, which is increasingly financed by families or through massive debt that families have to incur either college students or their families on their behalf. So the economic burden for families has increased exponentially over the last forty to fifty years, and yet we remain locked in this family ideal. This notion of what families should look like. That simply is not possible with the economic burdens that we now have. I'm curious. Besides you know us feeling stressed and. And people having less and less money like what sort of the result for society of that. Yeah. Well, here's what I think is kind of interesting. So this economic approach was facilitated by two parts. A partnership you could say between Neil Liberal economists. So these kind of economists would a specific idea about what would lead to economic prosperity and social conservatives especially, Evangelical Christian Social Conservatives, and the case that Evangelical Christian Social Conservatives made about the innate superiority of the two parent nuclear family like that has not actually one out in the court of public opinion in this country like. People today are far more accepting of a wide variety of family forms and they were a generation ago. So we're at a very different place in kind of what we think can constitute a good family and yet at the same time because of all of these policies because of these economic shifts. Individuals are more heather to families through wealth in debt than they were a generation ago. So it's almost as though the economics has done the bidding of social conservatives for them. They haven't been able to succeed in winning the ideological war, but they've wanted on the economic

Julie Kohler America Cova
Feminist Literature

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Feminist Literature

"This week from me here getting the problem that has no name. Feminist literature. All right. If we were going to cover just like feminism assure general, we would be here. Forever I'm sure there's already a podcast that that covers that folks I'm sure. So we're not trying to reinvent the wheel here. No. Quick definition. Feminism is a range of social movements, political movements in ideologies that aim to define establish in achieve the political economic, personal and social equality of the sexes. Feminism incorporates the position that society's prioritize the male point of view and that women are treated unjustly within those societies Charles for Ya who is a utopian socialist in French philosopher. He's the one that's credited with having coined the word FEMA KNEES MMA in. Thirty seven. So, modern Western, feminist history is conventionally split into three time periods or waves. So you'll typically hear them referred to as that Each of them has slightly different aims based on the prior progress that was made during the wave before. I wave feminism is the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that was focused on overturning legal inequalities, particularly addressing issues of women's suffrage. Second wave feminism is the nineteen sixty s and nineteen eighties that broaden the debate to include cultural inequalities gender norms in the role of women in society, and then third wave feminism. The nineteen ninety s to the thousands that refers to the diverse strains of feminist activity. So third wavers are see this as a continuation of the second wave in also as a response to the perceived failures out of the way before it. So I guess we're right outside third wave right now I think we're moving into the fourth wave interesting, which can't be defined until after it's passed exactly exactly a you. Hey I know my history man you know what I'm talking about or woman. Watch out I should say I WANNA point out as part of that definition. feminism is not women are better than men no absolutely not and it's still maintains to this day. It's about Equality Ackley. So exactly that's all I wanted to point. For our listeners great segue. Lauren. So seminaries literature, it can be fiction or nonfiction or drama or poetry that supports the feminine schools of establishing, defining and defending equal civil, political, economic, and social rights for women. So we're GONNA. Cover. Ten important feminist. Pieces of. Very excited that everyone should know. Great and we'll go in chronological order for me So the first we're GONNA talk about is a vindication of the rights of woman with strictures on political and moral subjects by. One, craft from seventeen ninety two. So this is one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy it was published in the United Kingdom Mary wollstonecraft responded to th century educational and political theorist who believe that women should not receive a rational education. It was believed at the time that women were too susceptible to sensibility and too fragile to be able to think clearly. So not able to be. The recipient of a rational education. Sure. Sure. Sure. So craft argued that women's education should match their position in society in that they are essential to the nation because they raise its children and could act as respected companions to their husbands then yeah So Wall Street, maintain that women are human beings deserving of the same fundamental rights as men and that treating them as ornaments or property for men undermines the moral foundations, a society which how about that you think You'd think that people any rational person would be like, yeah. That makes sense treat women as human beings. Sure. But the fact that there was such vitriol against this concept is like my to me but it was seventeen, ninety two that was like, yeah. Put it into writing and people are like. Dr. So her work had significant impact on advocates for women's rights in the nineteenth century particularly, the eighteen forty eight Seneca falls convention that produce the Declaration of sentiments which laid out the aims of the suffragette movement. In the United States Mary Wilson Craft her name might be familiar. She is the mother of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley. And she actually died eleven days after giving birth to Mary wollstonecraft shelley. So Mary wollstonecraft was like she was this great feminist philosopher great writer, her husband was super. Supportive. And she died in childbirth which. was killed a lot of women. Yeah. Septicemia man because men who were only allowed to be doctors. Refuse to treat women because of all of their naughty bits, nobody washed their hands. Oh Yeah. Nobody we should really point out. Yes. No one wash their hands that probably cost a lot of issues too.

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley Mary Wollstonecraft United Kingdom Mary Wollstonec Septicemia Charles Fema United States Mary Wilson Seneca Falls Lauren
How to break up well

Ladies, We Need To Talk

05:44 min | 3 weeks ago

How to break up well

"In your own life have you ever had a good break up I just remember feeling. So angry I broke up with my boyfriend over skype when I was eighteen in a lecture uni. And then I broke into his house it was a pretty bad way to do it but. I have very fight for what you love mentality by the end. All I could think of was I need to get out of this narcan white food do not be around me any war. I. Would constantly tech when drunk, which is now in hindsight Divorce and breaking up can feel like the bloodiest dirtiest combat you'll ever thought experience in your whole life. and. Almost everyone on the planet has been through one in. Australia in twenty eighteen alone nearly fifty thousand dollars got divorced to put that into context in that same year about one hundred and twenty thousand people got married. I WanNa make something clear before we get going this. Is Not focused on domestic violence or abusive relationships. Where talking about run of the mill breakup which astill devastating? People lose homes amass great be debt for into addiction used their kids as collateral get depressed all bottle up all their feelings and totally not cope. and. Some of that has to do with the fact that popular narratives tell us that that's the way love goes when it ends its war or didn't count. Rarely away modeled the best. Case. Scenario divorce. So, what if they was a guide? What if you could break up better or dare I say it divorce? Well, what if the process didn't have to leave both parties wounded devastated and financially? I'm Jimmy Stein's. Ladies. We need to talk about how we can break up bit up. In two thousand eight, I split up with my partner. We had kids and a house together and there was mediation lawyers, child custody arrangements and it sucked. There's a bunch of stuff I wish I needed that I know now. So let's share it a practical guide to breaking up well. In this episode, we're going to talk to a US a psychologist and a lawyer who all have skin in the game when it comes to breakups and divorce. I think for a long time we just assumed that breakups were allowed to tardily rain of your eating habits, your drinking habits, sleeping habits, how you conducted yourself in terms of going completely. Lupi and and just feeling like a bracket with completely appropriate answer to that. This is Zoe foster blake she's an Australian author and entrepreneur. We're speaking to her because she's written a book called break-up boss. Though, he's married with a couple of kids. Settled and happy. But during her early twenties, she reckons she was the authority on bad breakup and in this ladies, we need to talk guide to better breakups. Zoe is going to start with a bit of what not to do. So I would go to his house in the middle of the night. Drink dial constantly I would stalk can be aggressive towards these new partner I would. Yeah it was cool. Everything that you're not supposed to do and we really we didn't give it together I don't. Consider your behavior, and that time isn't it really making years this person if you want to get back with them but I think it was a good listening going what not to do, and so we beat further break up I realized that that was embarrassing and it wasn't a true encapsulation of my character. I didn't think but I'd let my emotions and my fees and my panic, and probably my hang up is the better of me and I. Behaved in a way that I wasn't proud of it's a real relief to hear you say that because. We all do embarrassing things I. Think during a I don't want it to sound like I'm saying look you have to have for outward appearances control you suffer God's sake women conduct yourself in the proper it's not about that. It's about. Showing courage and strength at times that are really hard in your life and not just behaving irrationally or illegally just because you're angry at someone having been a bit of a break up monster a few times in my life I realize that there is a good in a bad way to do it the really important for me was the night contact because when you've got a clearing books and a clear hit spice and that mental real estate to process what's happening even though it hurts. I march. You can move forward and it's not so much even about the anger but it's just that sadness engraving can make us put into glasses on just wanna go backwards to feel safe again because we don't dismiss the person, we miss the rituals routines Sunday night dinners at their house the family you know everything that you lose when you lose a break-up. So you've got this massive gaping hole in your life now that you desperately want to fill again with what you love and no. So you just have to be strong in that time and night context is critical because if you keep trying to hang out with them or you don't want to be rude if they're hanging out with us shut night, do that for how long is I fifty days just to establish a routine in the habit

ZOE Partner Jimmy Stein Australia United States Lupi
Interview with Brittany Packnett Cunningham

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

06:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview with Brittany Packnett Cunningham

"Thank you for being here. I just have so many questions for you. You're someone who I admire everything that you're doing especially during this time. So the first question I wanna get to is you served on the Ferguson Commission as well as President Obama's Task Force on twenty first century policing. We talk all the time about how it's important to have a seat at the table. My having a scene at those tables went insights did give you about policing in America. I think one of the most important insights is that a very people who are suffering most from the injustices have to be at the center of the conversation about what the correct equitable and just version of our communities actually looks like I think from a more detailed standpoint. One of the things I really learned or rather was confirmed just how much this is really systemic issue that there are people who enter that profession because they have altruistic motives and they. Want to help their community and what they find is that they've entered a system that frankly was not built to truly serve and protect all of us equitably, and that covers up and is permissive to so many violent acts in our communities. Lastly, I think F from a policy standpoint on of the things I really learned was just how dispersed policing policy is there are over thousand police departments in the entire country and so yes, there is work that has to. Be Done at the federal level and the Department of Justice needs to take great care to pay attention to those things were. There are also a number of things that have to happen at the level of the state legislature that governor, the state Senate, and there are many many things that have to happen locally that often it is near to are appointing and hiring police chiefs that often it is local police and fire boards who are approving police union contracts that. Can Be worded in ways that are not transparent to the public and can actually subvert justice. So these are the things that we have to pay attention to at every single level, federal local and state to remember that if we are honestly truly going get to a place where we dismantle systems that do not work for us and replace them with systems that work for all of us, we have to be diligent at every single level of the police say conversation. I love how you went through just. When we're looking at elected office public office. Criminal Justice Reform, police reform it runs through so many offices and this is why people really need to pay attention to who they elect because these people really do have a strong impact on policing in America. So thank you for walking us through that certainly. So I wanna get into something that a lot of people actually dean controversy. The words defend the police. This is scary to so many people at the beginning of the movement that we've seen over the past few weeks. There wasn't a lot of support for defend the police. But over the past few weeks, we've actually seen support increase in your own words. What does it mean to defend the police and why is it important? So. What people have to understand is that defunding the police is half of the equation. It is a necessary rallying cry to provoke people's imagination and belief that there could be more. But once you move the money and you divest from traditional structures policing that have continued to carry out violence in black brown indigenous communities. You'd have to move that money and reinvest into the things that truly keep our communities safe. So the journey that Minneapolis is going through right now is a great example. If this they said, we're going to dismantle our current police department. They were led to that by not only their city council, but by the organizers activists that made such a radically imaginative future possible by. The organizers like the first black student body president at the University of Minnesota who compelled her schoolmates to push the school to disconnect and end their contract with the Minneapolis apartment followed by the case, twelve will system that did the same. So what we're seeing as Minneapolis is on this journey of reimagining reconstructing public safety in their city is, yes that is managing a police department and then it will happen in phases. I think. So often when people hear defunding the police, they get scared because immediately here kind of the chaos of Gotham without the protection of Batman and that's what we're talking about. This will have been in pieces will happen thoughtfully and most importantly, it will happen with the. Leadership of the community because the second step there is to actually gather the community and the mental health experts, the community organizers, this safety experts, the public health experts, gathering those folks together say, what are we going to design in place? Where should the money that used to go to policing go instead? So when we see a school district like La Unified, school district, one of the largest invitation where we see them say that they're going to end the practice of having police in schools that's tens of millions of dollars that can then be reinvested into different aspects of education that our young people desperately need into creating systems of restorative justice into creating systems, support, and mental health care. And counseling for young people in ensuring that, there are no more schools that have lease officers, but no counselors and mental health supports.

Minneapolis America Department Of Justice President Obama Ferguson Commission Senate La Unified Dean President Trump Gotham University Of Minnesota
Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

Latina to Latina

04:48 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

"Yana. Nino thought BS planned to spend the summer before her first year at Stanford Medical School doing contact tracing working retail. But when her job search a dead end, she went back to seasonal fruit picking work. She's been doing since she was fourteen. At the end of one long day she tweeted about farm workers like her being paid seven dollars for two gallons of blueberries. She then asked how much do you pay for your blue various? I had talked to her I did and learn so much about her path to medicine as a first gen college student indigenous rights farm worker's Rights on. We'll consumers need to know about the people who make their food possible. Jeddah. Where are you right now? I'm Linden from California Palo Alto our new you're back at school ivax going out here. I always remember those summers during college going home in it's. It's so strange because you have all this independence when you're at school and then you come home and your parents. Treat, you like you're still in high school, right? Right and every time I go home. It's just there's just a large expectation fairly for my mom is my own expectation that I should be like helping my mom in linked doing some chores and like lightening her load guy at school it's like you're right like complete freedom I do whatever I want whenever I want. Do you perceive your mom to have a heavy load Yeah absolutely. I think she's our only period and. I think that you know we go to work and she has to come home and make them some meals for everyone. There's five of us and she kind of like cleaned for Yooglie of she loves house being cleaned. So I help out with all those things whenever I can. To Lot Yeah You're born you're born in Eastern, Oregon, you grew up in eastern Washington state. Told me about where you grew up. So Eastern. Washington is very different from Seattle. I think that's why. Like columnists conception that I. Get is that the thing it's just like satellite super rainy it's actually not. So eastern Washington Eastern Oregon both desert in the rain shadow of. E mountain range. So we get like very little rain, it's very conservative. There's very little diversity out there I think the main communities of color that live out there my farmer communities in the needle in communities I think it was a great place ago by the you grow up because it is so rural. There's so much nature around there so much like the outdoor activities to do Saigo peron alarm really enjoyed around a lot of fields. So my working in the field I love Eastern Oregon eastern Washington I would love to go back someday is that the plan to go back? Yeah. Absolutely. How old were you when you started working in the fields? I was fourteen years old. What was your first day of work like? I. Think I was super excited for my first year. We're ten years ago. And they all super excited because I would get to contribute. Tie Household I, think the causes for me was like, okay I can use this money to go to my mom to make your life easier and then she would let me keep some of it so that I could spend it on what I wanted to nature's like take my siblings than I on a shopping spree for for school. So he went to buy school supplies in. We were very excited like Bonnie backpacks unlike brand name markers and stuff like that. I have three younger siblings. So they were all little and they were excited because we had never done that like I think I'll. Getting. The bare minimum that we need for school and now it's finally like being I was able to get them whatever they wanted. Is there a story from childhood that captures who you were as a kid. I think one story though remembering like me, my mom and my sister was. Going to do this activity called Battle of the books where there's a selection link. Eight books that read it's handling a quiz bowl style where you just like recall parts of the book and I've always loved reading and so we were remembering that I read all the books like my sister was on my team even though she was two years younger than me in the elementary school and she was like, yeah, you just carry the team and you like because remembered everything and I think that that was super emblematic of just who I was of like my love for reading my. Or. Competitive data. Just like a real enjoyment for school and like why The promise of my mom always wanted to go to school didn't get the chance to and so. She was always telling me and my siblings like, Oh, you go to school a you do all in school. It's GonNa take you to a Lotta places in. So I guess those just carry me through life

Stanford Medical School Washington Oregon Yana. Nino Yooglie Eastern Jeddah Saigo Peron California Palo Alto Seattle Bonnie
A Conversation With Rep. Ayanna Pressley

Hysteria

05:29 min | 3 weeks ago

A Conversation With Rep. Ayanna Pressley

"Representative Presley. First of all, we love you. So you know it's going to be a hard hitting interview. With. We love you. Let's let's get into it. Okay. So president trump has clearly included playing up unrest in cities in part of his reelection strategy. He's even gone as far as to imply Democrats are to blame for escalating violence at protests, how Progressives and Democrats push for police reform in a world where an attempt at pursuing justice is spun as a rush to anarchy by right wing media and used as an excuse to become violent by law enforcement officials. Say It's thrilled to be here with all of you. Thank you. I'm big admirers in the ends of the two of you and glad to be with you today. You know what can I say about Donald? Trump. These already the dog whistles anymore there are just blaring horns you know wrapped up in incendiary soundbites and cruel policy in calcium administration. So it's very predictable. This is an old play in this sort of in movement building work you know we're used to it. How do we advance policy? The way always advanced policy as a nation nestor movements you. Know a lot of people when they reflect back on those grainy images, those black and white images of protests and demonstrations. In the nineteen sixties, they will define the progress came out of that solely as the voting rights act in the civil rights at but honestly that movement was the blueprint for every progressive piece of legislation thereafter. So this is how legislation is moved its through movement building and social transformation. That is why now things like inviting qualified immunity which bill that I introduced representative Justin Amash are now part of public discourse that is from organizing mobilizing. Conversations around reimagining our budgets to actually value black lives that has everything to do with the power of movement building, and so we have to continue to do that. We're in this moment of national reckoning on racial injustice is a culture shift occurring people. Now, a very unapologetically affirm that black lives matter but now that has to translate into power shift that is reflected in who we elect to office the laws that we right in the budgets that right those are the only. Receipts that matter. So if you believe that black lives, matter than black representation matters than black data matters, then black home ownership matters black entrepreneurialism matters in. So that's how I seek to legislate is in a very precise way and I'll in here by saying the disproportion hate heard her that has been foisted onto black Americans for generations was not naturally occurring. It was legislated was precise in codified lawmaking until the path forward must be one where we are also precise reverend. Barber. Poor. People's campaign someone that I look too often and just someone admire tremendously. Grateful for his moral clarity and conviction says for moment of reckoning the demands, a third reconstruction, and so that's what we need to be squarely focused. Dohrn is what does that third construction looked like and how do we enlist everyone from organizers to lawmakers as community builders in that reconstruction of a better word equitable world IANNA and I'm calling you Iona because I've known you since the ninety s and that's just how it's going to be. When you when you were telling me what's what? Let's not forget? This week. Joe Biden gave a speech and he released an ad where he made the point to clarify that contrary to what the trump camp is saying about him. He doesn't actually like property destruction that has occurred were some protests have occurred? By doing this Biden, allowing trump to control the conversation. Let me just say this there is an effort to infiltrate into undermine the impact of the black lives matter movement, and the fact that these motivation efforts have continued, which is constitutional. Right to assemble to peacefully protest descent is the ultimate patriotism. James Baldwin said I extensively paraphrase like I criticized this country America because I, love it just that much. She can and must be better. I think we have to be careful to make sure that our movements are not co-opted the people that I see in community who are the four of these movements bay, our community builders, not destroyers and the people that are doing that are infiltrators who won the black lives matter movement to be aligned to be mischaracterize. The people doing the work of justice seeking our peacekeepers you know and I, also think it's important that we not completely rewrite history and sanitize what these movements have looked like in the past. No. So people will bring up Dr King and they'll bring up John Lewis. Will John Lewis was who practice nonviolent peaceful protests almost died on that bridge in many times thereafter in fact, many advocates have said we don't know how John Lewis made it out alive because they always focused on.

Donald Trump Joe Biden John Lewis Representative Presley Movements Bay Justin Amash Dr King Iona President Trump Representative Dohrn Barber James Baldwin America
Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | 3 weeks ago

Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

"From Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny. Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Very. Excited to present our. September. This month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up and fought against injustice and for a better world today, we're talking about a woman who doesn't often receive the recognition she deserves for her behind the scenes activism. As a prolific activist, she had a hand in society changing work major civil rights leaders turned to her for her organizational skills. Let's talk about Ella Josephine Baker. Sisters in the struggle for human dignity and freedom. I am here to represent. The struggle that has gone on for three hundred years. Ella Baker was born on December thirteenth nineteen o three in Norfolk Virginia. She grew up in North Carolina on the very same land where her grandparents were enslaved a few decades earlier. Ella's mother was part of the Local Missionary Association. She helped feed their hungry neighbors and encouraged women to be a force for positive change this activism and kindness stuck with Allah. Ellis studied at Shaw University in Raleigh North Carolina and graduated as Class Valedictorian nineteen twenty seven shortly after she moved to New York City in Nineteen thirty ELA joined several women's organizations and served as national director of the Young Negroes Cooperative League that organization focused on supporting the economic development of the black community in nineteen forty Ella started working as a field secretary for the N. Double A. C., p. she moved up to work as director of branches after just three years. She later also served as the president of the New York. City branch. Then in Nineteen fifty-six, Ella Co created the organization in French. Which bought the oppressive Jim Crow laws in the south. The following year a move to Atlanta to help with Martin Luther King Junior's Organization the southern Christian Leadership Conference. At that time, the SC L. C. was a brand new venture. It was created after successes like the Montgomery bus boycott black leaders including Martin Luther. King Junior created the organization to assemble more boycotts and. Throughout the south. But for the venture to be successful, it would take a masterful organizer while Martin Luther King Junior took the reins as the SEC's public figurehead Ella worked behind the scenes setting the organization's agenda and framing the issues. She organized the crusade for citizenship a campaign to support voting rights. For African Americans, she also helped Rodney Atlanta s ELC headquarters and even served as a temporary director for several months after the resignation of the previous office holder, Ellis desire to focus on the issues and to have influence over the. Direction often clashed with the group's main. Right, as ellos considering resigning in nineteen sixty radical act of civil disobedience inspired her to take a new direction on February first black college students in Greensboro. North Carolina where I'm from refused to leave a lunch counter. Worth's where they'd been denied service for Joseph McNeil Franklin McCain and their to college dorm mates that time was February first one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty. The day they walked into a Greensboro. Woolworth's and sat down at the segregated lunch counter. Ella wrote a letter that encourage students across the south to join forces and take similar acts of protest. She also organized a meeting at Shaw University for the students who spearheaded the citizens from those meetings, the student nonviolent coordinating committee or Snick was created. snick would have a profound impact on the civil rights movement. Ella encourage snack to focus on practicing group centered activism rather than leader centered activism in contrast to the SE L. C.'s leadership style with Mlk at the forefront. Under, this method, of Leadership Snick ran many successful initiatives including the nineteen sixty one freedom rides and the nineteen sixty, four freedom summer and Mississippi L. continued her activism through the sixties. She was also a consultant for the Southern Conference Education Fund and organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic. Party she later returned to New York City and continued her work until she passed away on. December thirteenth nineteen eighty six. She was eighty three years old. Ella Baker was an incredible driving force behind much of the public civil rights work. We learn about in school while she never sought the spotlight she was committed to improving life for future generations

Ella Ella Josephine Baker Ella Co Consultant North Carolina New York City Greensboro Martin Luther King Shaw University Ellis Martin Luther Kaplan L. C. Southern Christian Leadership Raleigh North Carolina Woolworth Joseph Mcneil Franklin Mccain Atlanta Montgomery
How Philanthropic CEO Carmen Rojas Learned to Lead as Her Full Self

Latina to Latina

06:14 min | Last month

How Philanthropic CEO Carmen Rojas Learned to Lead as Her Full Self

"What would you do? If you had millions of dollars at your fingertips let me clarify what would you do if your job was to take that money and spend it in ways that would make the world a better place that's the question that Carmen row house is confronted with every day. Carmen is the president and CEO of the Marguerite Casey Foundation. She stepped into the role justice cove nineteen hit, and this moment is inspiring big questions about generosity giving and the future of philanthropy. Permanent. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this. Oh thank you so much. I'm such a fan of you of your show and so I'm so glad to be here. I. Love When Interview Start That way? much of your career has focused on improving the life of working people across the country what about your own upbringing drew you to this work? My mom immigrated from Nicaragua and my dad immigrated from Venezuela they landed in San Francisco and the immigrated at this really weird moment and Hyman US history where it was the peak of the civil rights movement, the peak of the Labor movement, the peak of the feminist movement, and so my parents with middle school education's both from very rural places came to San Francisco and we're able to make lives for themselves in for us for their kids that were so far beyond the things that they could imagine. So my parents. For Middle School and I got a PhD from Berkeley I. Think a lot about how that time that my parents emigrated SOC shaped the opportunities that were available to me, and how from that moment to today we've seen that window of opportunities shut for the vast majority of people both immigrants people of Color. Native folks black people that this moment in time we were expected the squeeze the juice out of a grain of sand. And I looked around me and one. was exhausting to be one of the only women of the very few women of color one of dot of Latina's in rooms and just made it very. Sort of. Clear decision to really focus all of my energy on making sure that I'm not going to be the only one that I won't be the last generation of people that gets to benefit and enjoy from these moments in time and to try to figure out ways to create more moments in time for more of us to be better off. Growing up how was generosity displayed in your home? My mom is one of seventeen and my dad is one of ten. Seventeen all birthed by the same woman, all birth by the same woman. My mom was the first one of her siblings, the MIGRATES, united, States, and my dad was as well and so my mom tells these really amazing stories. Her siblings were sisters especially wanted to come to the United States. She would like work all day work most of the night, spend the nights like filling out immigration paperwork, taking them in for seventeen siblings and our house really became sort of a beacon I can't remember a time in my childhood where we didn't have other people living in our house. My Mom, my mom worked cleaning office buildings. She worked sewing clothes worked at last LEVI's factory in San Francisco, our? House? I feel like was what what I think is true philanthropy this desire to give this desire to open up. Some might think of yours but others think of hours so that so many more people can enjoy the ability to live lives of dignity. When did you first learn about philanthropy as a formal concept for disseminating help? Yeah. I was an Undergrad I. got this really interesting fellowship at this organization in San Francisco called the Green Lining Institute my summer project was to try to figure out in the state of California of all of these institutional donors how much of their money went to organizations led by people of Color and immigrants and it turned out these numbers haven't changed much but it's like less than five percent. and. So my job was to call us institutions to do the tally board and be like, okay, blessing one percent and it was really striking to me because philanthropy is one of those things that is benevolent and powerful we think about is inherently something good to give but we don't ever tell the back story like philanthropic institutions again, like my own are often built on twice stolen wealth wealth that's extracted from our economy on the one side and on the other side, won't that people aren't paying taxes into our social safety net into our government to actually try to resolve some of the instant issues that foundations are trying to solve. Once it became visible to me that these institutions existed that these people were giving money and that they were only giving money to sort of social service programs are to help people from the base of generosity. But these were actually shaping our political and economic experience. We can tie the rise of charter schools to philanthropy. We can tie the rise of privatizing public goods philanthropy wants it became visible to me. It was something that I couldn't unseen and I. Now am in a really interesting position because I in this moment the moment that the covert moment, the economic crisis moment, the social unrest moment. Has Really, invited me to think about philanthropy as this intermediary step

San Francisco United States President And Ceo Carmen Marguerite Casey Foundation Nicaragua Middle School California Hyman Berkeley Venezuela Green Lining Institute
Musicians: Barbara Strozzi

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:17 min | Last month

Musicians: Barbara Strozzi

"Barbara Stroke Z.. Was Born in Venice Italy in sixteen nineteen. Her mother was Isabella are Zony a servant in the household of the famous poet Giulio Stroke. while. Giulio became Barbara's adopted father. It's possible that he was also her biological father. Either Way Julia was a profound influence and source of support. Barbara's life. When Barbara was young she received an education in music composition. Truly used his connections with Venezia's artistic and cultural elite to provide his daughter with opportunities. In. Sixteen thirty seven Giulio created a music focused branch of an intellectual organization he attended. Barbara hosted the group performed some of her music at the gatherings there. She was also exposed to other academically minded musicians, some of whom dedicated volumes of music to her. Barbara I launched her composing career in sixteen, Forty four with a volume called first book of Madrigal's she dedicated the book to the Grand Duchess of Tuscany. She wrote so that under an oak of gold, it may rest secure against the lightning of slander prepared for it. In other words she was ready for some serious criticism perhaps particularly due to her gender. But the musical community ended up largely appreciating her work though she did face some accusations that she was a cortisone. Barbara's music was typically secular while many other male composers of the era focused on creating music for the church. Barbara was one of the most influential secular composers of the time and gained a rare amount of public recognition for a woman in her position. The men in the field generally wrote more music than she did but Barbara ensured that more of her music was published than there's. From Sixteen, Forty, four to sixteen sixty four Barbara published eight books of music. The one of them has since been lost. This high volume of work indicates the Barbara's music was well liked however, after her father Giulio passed away in sixteen, Fifty, two Barbara may have faced some financial troubles. She was Julius only air but didn't seem to receive any money after his death. Publishing. So much music may have been an attempt to find financial stability even after Giulio passed away Barbara's work was profoundly influenced by him. Mustafa of her compositions were based on texts perhaps a result of her father figures background in poetry. She used a technique called risky to Tibo llandough meaning she emphasized the words in her music with minimal musical accompaniment. Barbara's bold. Experimental style influenced music for generations to come and cemented her place as one of the few female Italian composers at the is still studied today. Not, much is known about Barbara's life after her final publication in sixteen, Sixty four though she occasionally liked to sing her own work and associated with famous opera composers of the era. She never performed an opera she also never married, but she did have four children who she raised as a single mother. Her two daughters joined a convent and one of her sons became a monk. Barbara Strokes he passed away on November Eleventh Sixteen, Seventy seven in Padua Italy.

Barbara Giulio Stroke. Barbara Stroke Z Barbara Strokes Barbara I Giulio Madrigal Venice Italy Venezia Isabella Grand Duchess Of Tuscany Padua Italy Tibo Llandough Mustafa Julia
The Nineteenth Amendment Turns 100

Can We Talk?

05:32 min | Last month

The Nineteenth Amendment Turns 100

"On this centennial of the nineteenth amendment. Celebrate the persistence of the suffragettes and also recognize that the generations long fight was marred by racism, classism and anti-semitism. In this episode of Can we talk will explore the role of African American and Jewish women in fighting for women's right to vote and the lessons we can learn from the history. Judith Rosenbaum talked with three historians and she's here now to share those interviews with us. Hi, Judith Honey. So who are we going to hear from? I? I, will hear from Ellen de Boys. She's professor emeritus at Ucla, and she's been researching and writing about the suffrage movement since the early nineteen seventies her newest book is suffrage women's long battle for the vote. And true to the title of her book, She talks a lot about how drawn out this fight was and the incredible tenacity of the women who fought for the right to vote I take a long time that it took the stubbornness and consistency of the leaders who refused to give up to use the quote that was used against Elizabeth Warren. Nevertheless they persisted. Several generations lived and died without winning the vote and still did not give up. So I would say democracy is frequently if not always imperilled must be regularly defended or it will be lost. Alas I would say our constitutional order which we think of as being like the sun in the morning in the moon at night may not be eternal and we must act for. And finally, that in our activism, you really have to take the long view and not be discouraged because we're GONNA lose a lot like, Allen I too have found both wisdom and warnings in the suffrage movement. After the two thousand sixteen election I turned to history since as a historian that's what I tend to do and I was really drawn to the stories of the suffragettes. They gave me some perspective and reminded me to take the long view. I was worried about the next four years while these people who worked tirelessly for decades and many of them died before seeing the fruits of their labor. I asked Ellen how they sustain the Movement for so long she reminded me that while women were fighting for the right to vote, they made plenty of other gains along the way. So we have education, we have professions women are. Their lawyers their writers artists. So much so that by the time selfridge calms, it's almost like. To put it in a good way. It's like the icing on the cake to put it in a bad way. It's so overdue of women are a quarter of the labor force hold visions of the American economy couldn't exist that working women. So let's leftist politics and the question is why keep women out of politics? The other thing I would say is it's important to remember that along the way there are suffrage achievements of the most important of which are that many of the states west of the Mississippi are granting women are women are winning their activism. Right to vote, they have full voting rights. They are voting for president, a women of Colorado vote for president in every election starting in eighteen nineties. I the time that this effort to change. Suffrage state-by-state slightly crosses the Mississippi and arrives at victory in most powerful state in the union. York in nineteen seventeen over four million women, vote. So they already have the vote. These are important victories but Ellen, and I also talked about the failures of the suffrage movement especially, the racism that emerged in the fight over the Fifteenth Amendment the Fifteenth Amendment granted African American men the right to vote in eighteen seventy right prior to that suffer and abolitionist worked closely together and rallied around the call for universal suffrage that is voting rights for all. But in the lead up to the Fifteenth Amendment when it became clear that the Republican Party would only support suffrage for black men the movement split. Some were willing to accept the compromise voting rights for African. American men but not for women and some were not and this created a really painful rift. That's when the famous. Between abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass, and suffrage leaders, Susan B., Anthony and Elizabeth cady stanton was shattered. Yes. Stanton and Anthony News that the opportunity an amendment wouldn't come around again for a long time. They were enraged that after decades of activism both against slavery and four women's rights, women were being told to wait and they and other white Selfridge's felt it was unfair that quote unquote on educated black men would get the vote before educated white women. Here's what Ellen says about Stanton's public response. Stanton's particularly. Speaks over a period of a couple months really drawing on a lot of racist rhetoric and it's very painful. She was in her sort of core elitist. And that had a racist element to it, but it also had anti immigrant element to it too. She thought as she used to say women like herself shouldn't have to wait to get the vote until the daughter of. Blacks in butchers she said got vote.

Ellen Judith Rosenbaum Elizabeth Cady Stanton Mississippi Classism Judith Honey Ellen De Boys Elizabeth Warren President Trump Republican Party York Ucla Frederick Douglass Allen Colorado Anthony News Susan B. Anthony
Women's Equality Day with Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester

The Electorette Podcast

05:03 min | Last month

Women's Equality Day with Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with representative Lisa Blunt Rochester, of Delaware. She joins me to discuss women's equality and the importance of empowering other women and in the context of commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the nineteen limit. We'll talk about how we can learn from our past and create inclusive movements that lift up all women. Representative Front. Rochester. Made History herself and her two thousand sixteen election to Congress as the first black woman and the first woman of color to be elected to represent the seat. She was also a member of Vice President Biden's victory vetting committee, and we discussed that process as well as the strengths that Kamala, Harris brings to the ticket. Lastly, we talk about what moved her to run for office herself and it's truly a moving powerful story and I'm so. Thankful that she shared it. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with representative Lisa Want Rochester, or a Flint Rochester. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much and I'm so excited to be here in. This is what I think about the ratification of the nineteenth amendment and women's Equality Day now that passage was so crucial to what women have today and where we are today, but I can't help but imagine where we might be today had that movement. been more inclusive you know. Yeah Yeah I think about that because we have record number of women running for Congress record number of women in Congress, right I wondered like what can we do now? As we move forward to make sure that that we don't repeat those mistakes you know Jen I. think that's a perfect place to start because I think by looking at the past if you if you learn from it you can grow. It's interesting. I've heard people talk about this centennial as not necessarily a celebration but more of a commemoration in and it was a feat in to itself. I mean when you think about the effort and the the marches and the efforts that folks may particularly women at that time. But we also think about the fact that for women many women of color that the opportunity to vote really didn't come. into the sixties and so you think about as you said, what what could we have achieved head we been more unified then and you can think about that and dwell on it, and then say what are the lessons learned and I think the fact I got elected in twenty sixteen I came in at the same time is Donald Trump and I had never run for anything in my entire life and. You know it was a Delaware had never elected a woman. Delaware had never elected a person of color to Congress. We only have one seat and so at the time that I decided to run I had served in state government had run our urban league here I had lived around the world and raise my children but it was really the unexpected tragic death of my husband who went on a business trip ruptured his Achilles Tendon, after playing a game of basketball before work meeting and then blood clots went to his heart and lungs and it just it just shook me to the. Core, and I had to find my purpose still on his planet and you know wasn't until like a year later I was I felt like I was numb just kind of going through the motions and I, started noticing other people that were you know having challenges like in my own city of Wilmington there was a lot of they were talking about the the the gun violence and then I saw a dad and three kids in a supermarket in front of me, and he had to put a bunch of grapes because they were nine dollars in that lake. Shook me out of my own. My own sadness and I think you know Donald Trump capitalized going people's anger or sadness or you know the challenges they were facing an inspired native run not knowing who was going to be president or what I was going to be facing and I think after he won and we had the women's March I think that was a watershed moment because it showed the possibility I mean the diversity of the crowd from you know black and Latino Latina in a trans in Muslim and Jewish like it was everybody there together and people haven't led up since then and so I went in two thousand sixteen by Twenty Eighteen Emily's list an organization that helps women candidates which helped me. They saw a thousand percent increase in women's interest to run for office. So I do think we can learn from the past. I. Think. We can still commemorate and celebrate but we gotta take that and turn it into action and that's what's happening right now, and that's what gets me excited about this hundredth anniversary is that it's not just about Jay, let's celebrate this moment it is about how do we do the work and how do we? How do we change the course of history and and in people's lives? So yeah, it's an exciting time

Lisa Blunt Rochester Congress Representative Delaware Donald Trump Kamala Jim Taylor Skinner Vice President Biden Lisa Want Rochester Flint Rochester Achilles Tendon Jen I. Basketball JAY Wilmington President Trump Harris
Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

07:06 min | Last month

Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

"In June nineteen sixty four freedom summer also known as the Mississippi Summer Project was a volunteer campaign across America to attempt to register as many black American voters as possible in Mississippi. News coverage of freedom summer shed a light on the white supremacy and police brutality that black Americans face. We. Don't Tuesday night the finding of three bodies in graves at the site of a damn near Philadelphia Mississippi where three civil rights workers disappeared six weeks ago. Over the past few weeks we have been experiencing another freedom summer. Minnesota are saying to people in New York two people in California to people in Memphis to people all across this nation enough is enough cell phone videos and social media are once again providing glaring spotlight on the inequities and injustice that are woven into the fabric of American society. In this special season of the browns to politics, we are diving into the past in how is impacting our present and future. For protests to political campaigns and youth involvement change is in the air and the fight for liberation continues. We'll be hearing from some of the Black Women at the forefront at today's movement who are fighting for change in making history to ensure that we have justice for all. Her name was even floated as a potential. VP. Pick for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's. It is no surprise that would ever congress is debating issues of equity and justice. Congress will lease voice is one of the strongest and most prominent today we talk about her work as a college student, a member of the Black Panther Party and what Congress is, do we to fight systems of oppression to reshape reimagined our political world? Congresswoman Barbara Lee thank you so much for joining us and happy belated birthday. Breaking very good happy with you. I'm really excited to talk to you today and for our listeners, the congresswoman is such a legend and all of her work that she has done in. Congress over the years especially for Black Brown and indigenous communities by I have to ask you this question because it's something that I just wanted to talk to you about for so long is. You were a part of the Black Panthers. What was it like being? Black Panther I actually was not a member of the Black Panther Party I was what they call the community worker community workers had a lot of responsibilities as the Black Panther. Party. Members and remember the Black Panther Party began as a result of police Gupta brutality and the African American community. I mean. They stood down the police because things, police, murders, police Retali- as we know now were occurring then and they were the first organization that really took the police on, and so it was out of that that the Black Panther party formed, there's the Bible programs because it was not only an organization that address police brutality, but it was an organization that addresses chemic-. Racism and poverty. and. So what I did, and which was really phenomenal work and I was a single mother on public assistance with two little boys. I helped sell newspapers like math a newspaper on street corners I actually participated in the breakfast program for children who didn't have whose parents didn't have enough money to buy food and that's actually the breakfast programs from the federal government. Actually. Started as a result of the of the models that the Black Panther party you. I also really worked with you. He knew then did the research on his book Revolutionary Suicide. It was really phenomenal project I got to know Huey Newton Bobby Seale, Elaine Brown, Erica Huggins Joan Kelly, who just passed away and many of the leadership of the black. Panther party because community worker and student I was very involved in a lot of the work with party members. I actually brought Shirley Chisholm got involved in politics through the first presidential the first. Time. A black woman ran for president and that was sure children who was the first African American woman elected to Congress and so the Black Student Union president I invited her to come to milk college where I was attending and I got involved in her campaign by herb insisting that I register the vote and I had a class go because I didn't WanNa work in any of those campaigns. Well, bottom line is working her campaign and got the Black Panther party really involved in voter registration efforts. I. Was the one that went and asked Huey Noonan Bobby Seale to consider becoming politically active around early Chisholm campaign and they did. So I worked on all phases of the black. Panther. Party and all the different divisions I actually bag groceries. You know the panthers had a whole ten point program which again, the Free Breakfast program for the kids They started the Community Health Center Movement by instituting the George Jackson free medical clinic they did sickle cell tests. In fact, there was the Black Panther party that raises awareness about sickle cell disease as a as a disproportionate impact African Americans Fast Board Twenty Twenty people in the African American community and Black and Brown news still struggling disproportionately as it related to food security food desert healthcare disparities, unequal education. I. Helped. Start. Actually I wrote the first proposals for the Black Panther Party community learning center. They establish a Black Panther party school and so I was very instrumental in working on that project. So I did a lot of work with the Black Panther Party and I can just speak to how phenomenal they were and how necessary they were and how we should as we move forward. You know there's this Symbol in a gun and Andy. In government in Ghana called and Copeland. If the bird beautiful bird looking back holding an egg in her mouth and like in order to move forward in order to blackboard and you have to look back, we have to know our history we know where we've been and we have to build upon that so that we can move forward it. Now a wonderful young people in the Movement for Black, flags, or dreamers all the movements that are taking place are a continuation of what I see as the civil rights movement of of today, as well as what Black Panther Party actually started as it relates to stand down and and thing that that policing in our community. chain stop disproportionate killing black, and Brown people

Black Panther Party Black Panther Party School Panther Party Congress Black Women African American Community Black Student Union Congresswoman Barbara Lee Mississippi Huey Noonan Bobby Seale Philadelphia Mississippi Joe Biden Minnesota Browns Shirley Chisholm Memphis Ghana Panthers New York
How Therapist and Healer Christine Gutierrez Came Back Home to Herself, and Wrote I Am Diosa

Latina to Latina

04:27 min | Last month

How Therapist and Healer Christine Gutierrez Came Back Home to Herself, and Wrote I Am Diosa

"Healing, deep loving yourself coming back to Seoul. Those are big promises Christine. Yeah. So what I tell everyone is that this is a lifetime journey. This is not just a one time thing. This process of coming back home to ourselves and healing deep is something that's like an appealing right it's up constantly unfolding process right? The most. Essential thing that we can do in our life is take the time to he'll take the time to look at the wounds of our pass how they're affecting us in the present so that we can make conscious shifts to create what we actually want in our life. What is the sole call? For me, the soul call is this ancient voice within this voice. Often, times whispers and sometimes yells at you to take the next right step to walk away from a dead end relationship to take the leap to your path that you've been wanting to take up perhaps have pushed to the side and it's always a voice as orienting you towards your better. Good. What did your soul call sound like a first time that you heard it the first time that I can remember hearing yet as an adult was when I was in a really toxic relationship in college and I remember hearing. You need to get help you need to get support and it was very authoritative and loving presence. Essentially, it was for me to sign up for therapy that was the first big step in my journey of unpacking Hal. My childhood abused has had affected me in my early adult life that's a lot to unpack that unpacking happen overnight. That's the thing that I make very clear in the book and also all the work that I do, which is that this is a grounded approach to healing, which means that this unpacking needs to be done with patients. allowing your soul to guide the way and taking a step by step and being guided by train therapists and healers, and really giving yourself the space to heal depending on what kind of background you've come from, and if you have a history with trauma than you need to be incredibly gentle with yourself because it can take a while. When you started doing that excavating. My Gosh I found a felt like you know broken bones and. Dirty closets right like it was dark and memories I found memories of. Of Situations in my childhood name calling just like all the things that I had went through I had both and abused present in my home, and so it was navigating kind of those in emotional terrains that I was able to find and remember these specific kind of thorns in the timeline of my life that I needed to go attend to because they were untreated emotional wounds and so when I remembered those memories, it allowed me to go back and journey to give love to those. Parts of myself, where did you get help? You know it's an integrative process first foremost I, felt spiritual support. I always felt this kind of spiritual presence of love that was guiding protecting me also within my family though it was complex, there wasn't energy of love that was part of that. But then inevitably, it was my my first journey into therapy college I took off a semester of school when I went twice a week and then I went on a journey of both Healing and also simultaneously therapeutic healing, and that also that passed me becoming a licensed therapist and becoming a healer Christine. What happened that made? You realize oh I don't just want to heal I. Want to help others heal. From, as early as I can remember, I always wanted to help people and so that kind of seed that was planted in me as a child I kept on this to that in that morphed into, you know being a mentor and then going to school and studying therapies become a licensed therapist and then proceeding into this kind of merging of ancient wisdom with healing modality modern therapy.

Healing Christine Seoul
Stop dancing to the sound of your oppression | Madame Gandhi

TED Talks Daily

06:16 min | Last month

Stop dancing to the sound of your oppression | Madame Gandhi

"It's Ted talks daily I'm Elise Hugh News it carries tremendous power to connect us to ourselves and one another but only a tiny percentage of music producers identify as women which means the songs turn up in our cars or in our ear buds can end up spreading harmful ideas about women. In her Ted Twenty Twenty Talk Madame. Gandhi sheriff's an alternative track. It features something refreshing. So, often I'll take a fitness class or go to a music venue. Or really anywhere that plays music in the background and I'll find myself loving the rhythms and the maladies and the beats. And then I take a second to listen to the lyrics lyrics that, for example, place us in a position of subservience that we would never tolerate in any other context and I am Aghast at the degree to which we normalize sexism in our culture I listen this music and I'm like. I don't want to have to turn up to the sound of my own oppression you know music. Is One of the most powerful forms of communication. Because it has the potential to either uplift or oppress. Music caters to the emotions music caters to the soul music opens up our soul. It opens up our channels to receive information about somebody else's walk of life to inform our own roles, and while I have no problem with male fantasy. What I do have a problem with, is that according to a recent study only two point six percent of all music producers identify as women that means an even smaller percentage identify as trans or gender non? Conforming. And what does this matter? Because if we don't own and control our own narrative. Somebody, else will tell our stories for us and they will get it wrong perpetuating the very myths that hold us back and I'm here to tell other people how to make their music. But I am here to provide an design the alternative. One Strategy I take in my music. Is Making up lifting energetic progressive global beats. And placing lyrics on top of them that genuinely described my life's experiences without contributing the oppression of anybody else. It's funny because it's the same reason as to why we excuse so many problematic lyrics it's because we love how beats make us feel. An example of this is my song topnotch turn up. Off My phone notification. So why have more time no bubbles to trouble clear state of mind. One thing the no. I'm not here to please hair tied up properly what time is not your property when I'm productive like my own. Give, grow room, breathe basic lights and her liberty free from insecurity the world projecting onto me please not trouble me. When I am focused the future is already know this fighting against the corruption. Let's go to turn up in my top is one I I wrote this. Not. I want to keep making sex positive beautiful music about joy and freedom. I want us to embrace our own pleasure just as much as we embrace our own pain I want us to celebrate the authentic nuanced multidimensional aspects of our human existence. Rather, than perform false narratives of degrading sexuality in order to feel accepted or loved and another strategy that I take in my music, it's a combat. The misogyny that exists on the Airways is to visually depict the very word I wish we lived in in the music video for my song. See me through which is like A. Queer electronic arm song I cast of my dear friends, Anya and diva to play the role of the lovers because they're married in real life. But what you don't know is that they also behind the camera consenting directing the entire video. Music should be safe and accessible for all to experience. It's not about losing the sex of or swags that music has it's about writing messages that infused tenderness and positivity into music that motivates US and challenges us. And while we musicians absolutely have the responsibility to make music that isn't disempowering the consumers can be part of the change to firstly we get to choose which songs we WANNA. Mute and which song you WANNA turn louder. We get to see I respect myself enough to say I don't want to listen to this and I don't want this to be in anybody else's space either. Secondly we can simply ask ourselves does this music or this message contributes to the oppression of somebody else why am I tolerate eating and finally we can all be choosing to make playlists or DJ music that provides the right vibe or mood that we're looking for in that moment without the problematic messaging. Why does this matter because it's teaching? Algorithms are streaming systems in our world exactly what it is that we do want to listen to. Creating long-term. And a feedback mechanism that the entire industry. This is not a message. For, just a small group of people, this is a message that affects everybody because when we protect and liberate our most vulnerable genders we liberate everybody.

United States Ted Twenty Twenty TED Gandhi Anya Elise Hugh A. Queer
Why The Tax Collectors Cinthya Carmona Defied Religion to Pursue Acting and Find Herself

Latina to Latina

04:21 min | Last month

Why The Tax Collectors Cinthya Carmona Defied Religion to Pursue Acting and Find Herself

"Did you always know that you want attacked? I. Was always a performer. I was always an artist. I. I had this thing when I was a kid or I was a little bit of a spy. I would just watch people. I would just really watch people and I've always been really fascinated with human behavior and I would like go home and like write down. Things that I saw my parents they used to argue a lot growing up and things were kind of crazy and I would just sit there and listen to everything that they would say, and then I go on my own and I would like reenact their arguments. I was always very strange in that sense, but I'd eat know that acting was thing that I could do I grew up in a super religious I never said in an interview before but my family and I grew up as Jehovah's Witnesses I always say very religious I'm telling you. So You understand my ends Jehovah's Witness. So I am well-versed and so growing up being. An artist wasn't acceptable in this religion. It's like that's not what you do. I'm not saying that it was forbidden, but it's just like that's not the path you're supposed to take right and and so I didn't really have that outlet I played a lot by myself and I would create these plays with my friends and like I said, you know just little spy. And my my real first. Outlet as an artist. Was Dancing. So I was always very physical, I've always been a very musical person and so growing up, I just found performing in dancing and you know also something that wasn't allowed for me to do I didn't go to dance classes I didn't have that I just had a lot of natural talent and just practicing a lot by myself at home and watching all kinds of you know vhs, videos I'd watch some like dance videos that my mom had from the eighties. and. Again, I would want to be like them I was you just imitate them. So I started as a dancer and in school I just got into every dance team cheerleading squad anything possible that I you know my parents didn't really have to take pardon and after a while they got used to. Okay. This is something that she's doing. Let's let her get too excited I went on. In high school to be captain of a dance team where the teacher owned one of the top down schools in Miami Miami Lakes at the time and she gave me a scholarship as long as I I worked for her where I got just free training training for like four years while I worked part time as a teenager in her studio and growing up I was really lucky because. I, have a mother, Dina? Who happened to be a talent agent and a manager for Dylan Villa talent in Miami and since I was born, she always used to say Cynthia is going to be an actress and my parents would laugh at her like you're crazy. That's not going to happen and as a kid I started showing these tendencies. He's like performance tendencies and she would tell people like she's going to act. That's. Her thing. She would try to send me out on auditions. I'll never forget later she told me this when I was like nineteen that she would call the house and say like, Hey, we want to get Cynthia into this commercial. We would love to see her for this other and my parents would say, don't ever call here. Again, we were not gonNA. Tell her and just hang up the phone. At a fear it wasn't until later on in life I was like sixteen or seventeen that she sneaked me away to go to acting workshop was my first acting workshop and I had no idea what I was doing I just went in there and I had to do this monologue about this young girl who was looking at herself in the mirror for the first time. Like really talking to herself and seeing herself is what I mean for the first time like looking at her insecurities into seeing just really having that moment with herself and I did it and I connected to it on a different level that impacted me so much more than dancing ever had dancing was a beautiful way to express myself but acting really accessed my soul and that's when I kinda hit the bug I connected to something emotionally on a deeper level that I said, this is what I need in my life.

Cynthia Miami Miami Lakes Dina Miami Dylan Villa