Fashion

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Lulu Kennedy on London's Young Creatives

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:10 min | 4 d ago

Lulu Kennedy on London's Young Creatives

"Welcome to be Oh F- lives. Today we are talking to Lulu Kennedy, the Godmother of British fashion who last night celebrated the twentieth year of Fashion East, the initiative that she started two decades ago, which is probably had. As much impact on the course British faction as. The Great Fashion Colleges It's like a it's what what do they call it fan baseball. You have the team that produces the you know shapes young players that can go on into the major leagues. Have a sort of. Home team will feel seat or something like that. Anyway. Let's. Kind. Of thing. That's what fashion aces so so great to talk you congratulations. Anki. Yeah. Mid Twenty S. What did that Guy Twenty years you twelve when you started doing? It's actually quite it's quite shocking in a way and. Put off to the last minute kind of even dealing with it. Because it's just been, you know one of these tons. But exhibit. A reminds me when I turned fifty I, just Kinda put it to the back of my mind is just. Beginning. I think that's where Jiang otherwise you might feel at wellness under pressure I just didn't really want that. But it seems to me that that that. You'll ability to deal with. Pressure and the overwhelming elements of the fashion world. A, I've been the things that you've to me of. Its voice felt like an incredibly stable nurturing. Supportive. person in the in the fashion world and and I. Often thought you haven't really had the do that you should have had been I I feel trumpets should've been blown a lot longer and harder for you monitor it yet I'm. Okay. Thank you. I'm always much happier just lacking around in the shadows in the background, I'm. Yeah. I'm not really I don't I bring front of House I'm putting on the talent the talent the focus is like, of course it's lovely very kind words people saying I'm writing. As we turned twenty and I really appreciate it. But I I'd WanNa make about me. The. Yes pretty incredible. The, rest of the world can do that. In twenty years ago, tell me about how fashiony started what What was the original concept on? What were you responding to at that time? So I just moved back to the from Naples and I was working not gotta remember line and was. Just. Chatting to this guy at turns out here insists incredible alantic Lane Katrina Bryan he's not coming on. Help. Me Decide what to do that this incredible space I was just how cools after one day I wanted to come back lucky I did back on to you. And that was very typical to make I was kind of not really sure to I wanted to stay. To be honest I had no fashion background training navin experienced doing but he got any house was staying in Renton renting his big industrial experts warehouses for fashion I I'm seminal. United line-up. Them fully gowned tonight. That was my first door adult. Yeah. Mind violent mind was blown and I. I was living in shortage gotten all these incredible characters. Because of the time it was MT waistline It's incredible creativity because with. So. There are laws nine these incredible fashion designers but without any real kind of context. I just need you. I need and. So has the jazz and people who in France. Could you could you hustle warehouse and that is honestly how it started weakening to my boss knock on his door hang my friends talented. You'll love. Could we just borrow warehouse show Katie Grand Styling and he was like he's Already know, but she's always the punch. Very Fun. Honestly, this is my very naive very on A. Without a plan kind of just wondering my. I wanted to be doing, which was helping my friends, and that is honesty how it started in sounds like making it up, but it just started from. Knock, on the door. Hey, can I borrow house an anti loved it. So much the fashion we helped lint. He was lying these kids were amazing and I want to give something back. This is a big property owner developer. It's very much as it was when you put. It. Just became his pet project. It was enough to do to give back I. Guess you just don't really find patrons.

Great Fashion Colleges Jiang Lulu Kennedy Katie Grand Developer Navin Naples France Renton
An Interview with Ari Seth Cohen

Dressed: The History of Fashion

04:57 min | Last week

An Interview with Ari Seth Cohen

"Today dress listeners we are thrilled to welcome. To the show are as the creator of the widely acclaimed blog turned international movement advance style, and if our listeners are not aware of advanced style, Google it immediately and prepare to be amazed and inspired super inspired and as the title suggests are a start of the street style blog advanced style in two thousand eight with the intention of quote capturing the Sartorial Savvy of the senior set. and. He has dedicated the last twelve years to celebrating the unique stylings of incredible individuals age sixty plus who have made the art and act of dressing a lifestyle and personal philosophy. While advance style may started as a blog. It has now also become a wildly popular instagram page as well as three books and those are titled As Stale Advanced Style older and wiser, and the most recent advanced love. There is even at advance style coloring book and a documentary. I didn't know there was a coloring book and I definitely want to get my hands go. So Ra's work has been incredibly important and bringing visibility to women including models in the fashion industry, and we are excited to welcome him to the show today to hear more about the meteoric journey of advanced style and the lessons he's learned from his many muses along the way. Ari Welcome to the show. Are welcomed address. It's such a pleasure to have you here with us today. To be here. Thank you so much. So I believe you were actually in your late twenties. When you start at advance style I, think you started in two thousand eight. So you were not in still are not exactly a member of the you know the stylist set over sixty. that. You've taken as your muses. Can you tell us a little bit about the origin story of advance style and how you came to create this wonderful what started as a blog I always had an interesting clothing in that came from spending so much time with my grandmother bloom. Who is my best friend and like the most magical thing that I can imagine doing was going through her wardrobe and seeing her caftans, addresses and old hats and gloves in going through the bureau drawers. Seeing, the vintage rhinestone jewelry and I think because I was so connected to her she was my best friend that each one of these items kind of held a special power to me and. I learned early on that you can transform your mood with clothing. We we played a lot. You know in her closet at night where my grandfathers had closed schools. And you know dressing up was really a joy for me and a way to kind of a certain might individuality and my creativity because I always felt a bit different when I was younger than everyone else and so it was a way for me to like own the difference in owned Strangeness Weirdness Eccentricity and I used to flip through my grandmother scrapbooks in see images. Of Her and her family members dressed up in the nineteen thirties forties in Iowa in although they didn't have a lot of money everybody had szeged elegance or she's great has gloves and I was really struck by these images and we watch movies together in when I was really young I started to draw pictures of my grandmother and her friends and some times even imaginary older. Women with really wonderful style. So this was kind of the roots of the project and then I went away to college my grandma with wasn't feeling very well, and so I went back and forth from San Diego my hometown to Seattle where I'm going to college studying art history I would help my grandmother and when she passed away in two thousand and eight I really had. So much grieving to do I mean it's the biggest loss I'd ever experienced. But I also knew that I needed to do something that celebrated you know our relationship kind of continued this connection that had that was so deep and profound, and when I was really young, my grandmother told me that I should move to New York if I wanted to do something creative she had. Studied at College in late thirties, early forties and became a librarian, and she always talk to me about the style on the streets in the creativity. So when I moved to New York in two, thousand eight after my grandmother passed away I started to see all these incredible women on the streets of New York. City in wanted a way to connect with that kind of energy. Again in also deal with the loss of my grandmother. So I was about healing and then I realized that these images that I was taking have the power to shift other people's perspectives on getting older.

New York Google RA Iowa San Diego Seattle
109-year-old spent his final years knitting tiny sweaters for injured penguins

Dressed: The History of Fashion

02:43 min | 2 weeks ago

109-year-old spent his final years knitting tiny sweaters for injured penguins

"Wanted to start today's conversation with a bit of a heartwarming story upward the DOT com and the title is one hundred and nine year olds spent his final years knitting tiny sweaters for injured penguins. And if this sounds like incredible and adorable, it is all of those things because it's exactly what it is A. Little sweaters knitted for penguins. On Tell you all about it at one hundred and nine years of age. This is a quote from the article. Alfred Alfie date had more than enough reasons to spend the remainder of his days living his most relaxed life guilt free however, date the oldest person in Australia at that point in time was in two, thousand, six, fifteen, sixteen I believe he chose to use his free time putting out some good into this world and he found the most doral to do so putting his generous and still nimble fingers to good use. The centenarian volunteered to use his knitting skills to help protect little penguins exposed to oil spills which prevent them from staying dry. So he actually had been knitting since nineteen, thirty two. And he says the article he says I think I'd been in here at the retirement home for about twelve hours might have been thirteen before two of the nurses came to me and said, we believe you can it and then they asked him to start knitting sweaters for these penguins. And, it's for this program called knits for nature which helps Rehabilitate Ping. Wins who've been exposed to oil spills and basically the knitted sweaters keep the pink from. Their beak from like being able to like lick or like get their hands on these covered feathers because obviously ingesting that oil would be deadly. Oil also damages their feathers and it makes them more susceptible to colds. Nets for nature is an initiative of the Philip Islands Penguin Foundation which raises money to protect and support Philip Islands wildlife and according to the website. The last major oil spill near Phillip Island was actually in two thousand one, four, hundred, thirty, eight penguins were affected ninety six percent were saved. Thanks to these jumpers. Sweaters are known like England Indiana Australia. So he was knitting sweaters for them up until his death at the age of one, hundred and ten in two thousand sixteen website has a special place dedicated to him. I just thought this was a nice and uplifting way to start this week's conversation. If you WANNA learn more you can go to Penguin Foundation Org dot a U and you can even when you go there you can download your own rehabilitation jumper pattern and start knitting yourself

Philip Islands Penguin Foundat Penguin Foundation Alfred Alfie Rehabilitate Ping Philip Islands England Indiana Australia Phillip Island Australia
Cathy Horyn on Why Fashion Media Must Evolve

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:40 min | 3 weeks ago

Cathy Horyn on Why Fashion Media Must Evolve

"Ala Kathy. I'm good you. You're in Virginia. Farm. Yeah. You're Minova Farm in Virginia and made avail in. London. and. Roundabout now could be looking forward to seeing each other at fashion shows as we have done for the last. How many years? We. Want to exit. Thirty five. Something, like Nineteen eighty-seven age is not. About you were at the Detroit repress. Short News. used. And I was limited. From magazine in Canada in Toronto Canada. And we could never have anticipated what's happened to the world because? We read about things like this in history and And you know industry is being so savagely impacted. By everything that's happened and it's it's great that we're talking today because I subscribe to new magazine. you write for the. Your magazine and you've just done this enormous piece interviewing designers about the here and now their lives and. The future of the industry, and that's exactly what was supposed to be talking about today. So that's put certain. I can say to you. Tell us what you've been doing with. China's for the last. Well it started out. You Know Stella Buckby at runs the cut we were talking in now late April I think about like what do we WANNA do? For All this book Ended up being part of the. The main magazine in the preview section of what's happening in the fall. But anyway, we started talking about that and I said, you know I really just I want to talk to the the leading designers you know the the big creative minds and. Where we sort of going I, mean, it just feels different even now and I think about how we all felt what on March second and March third when we were still in Paris in winding up with. No the Balenciaga show in the retail show the last days and felt so innocent but then it felt quite different by the end of April. With Europe. All shutdown down the US at least New York Shutdown So, anyway, everybody you know it's it's Raff Simmons Marc Jacobs. Nikola just gear Mutya Rico Kuba. There's there's twelve or thirteen, and all and Everybody was home. So I had lots of time to talk to them, and they had lots of time and we talked in some cases, three times over the summer or rejects dinner we had emails that kind of thing. So it was fun. Now was there a consensus? Among people what the future holds I think you have a different view specifically of how people want will probably want address. Some bring that up pretty clearly like mmj at. I think a lot of people are really concerned You know the the. What's going on with the fashion system people have been talking about that at Nauseam for a while. So that came up a lot RAFF had a lot to say about that I think they certainly spent the month of March and April thinking a lot about this Marc Jacobs a lot and he put some of that up on Instagram to. You know coming off at incredible show that he did in February in New York and just thinking and you know he he had to lay off people on his designed team and others had take salary cuts. That the problem across the industry. And so they were talking a lot about that, and then of course, Allesandro from Goodie. Brought his his instagram out a one was mid may saying we're GONNA go to two meetings to to runway shows a year. So I think a lot of the stuff has been brewing. Yeah, and the bottom line is I, mean to me. I think it comes through in the pieces. It's all an individual choice. You know like you know Michael Kors has made his decision. What he's GonNa do I think Gucci's made their decision to Michael Burke for this piece is the CEO of Vitale and you know. They're gonNA. You know he thinks that the traveling runway shows the future. So all that concerned about you know how big the shows I think I think in the long run we'll see a I mean in the short run will see. Pause, as as we as we deal with the pandemic and we don't know what quite the end game is on that. So I think we've seen a lot of experimentation in the last six weeks two months with digital perform digital shows and presentations and. I think going forward. You know you know it's a huge industry i. think that's the thing is bleak as it seems is a huge industry.

Marc Jacobs Instagram Michael Kors Virginia Raff Simmons Minova Farm New York Canada Stella Buckby London. Vitale Europe China Mutya Rico Kuba Detroit Gucci Toronto United States Nikola Paris
Stella Jean Asks Do Black Lives Matter in Italian Fashion?

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:15 min | Last month

Stella Jean Asks Do Black Lives Matter in Italian Fashion?

"Hello everyone. This is Tim, Ron Ahmed founder, and CEO of the business of fashion. Welcome to the latest episode of B. O. F. Live today I'm here with the designer Stella Zhong who is joining us from. and. We're here to talk about a very important topic of his see that we have been discussing at length here on the OH F- Few months much of the discussion around the black lives matter movement in fashion has been focused on conversations in the US and to a certain extent here in the UK where I'm based but Stella has been playing a leading role in driving the conversation around black lives matter in Italy, and so we're delighted to have her with us today to help paint a picture about how this conversation is very important. Conversation has a very unique tone and history and contacts that differentiates it. From some of the other countries, of course, the core conversation is rooted in the same goals around achieving better racial equity for black professionals in fashion. But initially, there's some specific contexts and situations that make the conversation. They're a really important one to consider outside some of the other conversations that we've been having. So I'm delighted to have Stella with us here today and Stella. Before we dive into the topic at hand I want to start with you and your personal background and history just for those listeners and viewers who don't. Already aren't already familiar with your work. So could you just you know in the first instance take a moment to you tell us your personal story How did you grow up? Where did you grow up explain a little bit about your background. And then we can get into a little bit about how you got into the fashion industry. Okay Imran. Hi Hello. Thank you for having me. So I'll will tell a bit about my story. Fashion come for me from two different personnel seed I. He has begun as a personal necessity born in Italy of the early eighties and struggling be being so So diverse from my fellow citizen as motivated me to find a way to show people not to be afraid of different cultures and color by instead to see them as them as a chance to grow better and together I know that it might may sound dock sequel but I don't use shown with an esthetic proposals by as a tool to fight again, any cultural agregation, the passionate snowboarder. So you can accept you the beauty without prejudice is a low made to talk to fashion without preconceived opinion just beauty. That's why my work reflects might make you Saggio repeal every page in ways in which to. Culture I white. Republican onside. Probably in the Italy than together. So this marriage are opposite creates a new I bridge, which I've always considered red during my child took. Advantage, and it took me a long time to change my mind. But thanks to many krantz mentor role model and fashion obsolete, which has been my terrapin escape. I've discovered the precious uniqueness of being diverse convene, conveying a new concept of multiculturalism applied to fashion, which promotes cultural sober without ever compromising once on identity, and then there is the second. Reason is the need to put forward and and preserve the multiculturalism which comes from the fact that I've I've always had to actually my mother comes from eighty and my father from Italy. I was born in Rome I spent you years in. And I was March tied at such a great country was known just for some wrong reasons or its way extreme poverty charity yet. Believe me after immediate emergency cases else should come in a totally different form in order to a- long-term action considering that this population of so many cultural resources which would allow them to rise up again on without the need charity action while they need is a someone who decide to believe in their capacity give them the opportunity to work for the Indian plays, their own skill this should be. The the power of fashion. This is a knowledgeable of fashions potential as cultural activity to provide significant opportunities for doesn't work for man and woman around the word. That's why I created my lab founded the laboratory will. Not Show any.

Stella Zhong Italy Stella United States B. O. UK TIM Ron Ahmed Founder CEO Krantz Rome
Rebuilding Lebanons Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:06 min | Last month

Rebuilding Lebanons Fashion Industry

"Ille- I thought we could start with you and what what I'd like to do in the first instances. If each of you could introduce yourselves and your businesses describe where you were last week when the. Happened and just described it the impact on you personally, and your business is just. So we understand a bit better out different parts of the industry are being impacted by this crisis. Or? When a? Guy And I'm CEO of the. Up. actually last Reduced or Tuesday exactly around the that. Happens that we're talking exactly at the same time. When. The explosion hit Beirut. Two weeks ago. Exactly last Tuesday same time same day. We were was ill at our headquarters where I'm calling from. A end, the actually the whole team was in office since we're working late. To prepare for our next presentation ready to wear brightly presentation and our next. Ready to wear presentation, which are you beginning mid and end of September The. Whole team was in the building and actually some people that were in the city had visibility on the boards. So knew what would be happening they so Fire going out of the etc.. And managed to prevent it. We were actually sitting where in the middle of downtown Syrup surrounded with buildings exit. So we don't have reusability on the. And each one was doing his own thing in meetings, the normal activity, the office, and the bump hit us by big surprise. And what was most striking was not knowing where this Bohm was hitting us from 'cause we were sure that the game just the from around the corner from strength and. From the how how strong it? Sports, we had some injuries blood the throwing around the glasses shattered the. You, name it. And it was a panic and. Then I received a goal thinking someone was going to ensure that we are safe. And little did I know they were telling me that they were even hit and they were like sixteen to twenty years away from us. So I was like what the hell is happening. Are we being bombarded from all over the place? Or what's going on and go right or am I going to get another bomb or go left? There was an inserted so I I. Guess what you're saying Elliot's at the time you did nobody knew where the explosion head come from nobody knew, Luke. Stump. People that had visibility to the court were sure that the game from there because they saw flames coming but people that. Don't are on the other side of the city. Don't have the visibility on the court had no idea where it could have come from because it was so strong that I can assure you that anyone thought that the explosion was just under their building without the dark and just thinking about it now just bringing. So many bad memories was such an end shock. So violent that really it's undescribably violence that even when I think about the times of war. and. Of course, in our organization, we talk about resilience because my father which founded this company founded this company through time four and we used to hear the stories of what this do live under the violence under the track on their missile is on their explosions except the. I never imagined that the show will be that strong. Because I think everyone was already tense and this game in such. A way such brusque way and it target each and every single person directly or indirectly in their home in their workplace in their safety on in places that we never thought that could be hit even in the biggest time of war in Lebanon and it came him so. Really the damage is for sure. Physical. There is a lot of damage linked to property destroyed exit there. But of course, it came into people's heart. Brought in the feeling in his heart that some generation they forgot and other generations which never knew.

Beirut CEO Bohm Lebanon GUY Elliot Luke
Lily Cole on Why the Fashion System Needs Reform Now

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:23 min | Last month

Lily Cole on Why the Fashion System Needs Reform Now

"Hello this Zimran Ahmed founder, and CEO of business to fashion and welcome to live. On this episode I am thrilled to have with me a face that I. I got to know when I first started sneaking into fashion shows here in London about a decade ago. lily. Cole was an up and coming model and those days and she's gone on to have. A career in the fashion industry. But in in addition has become an activist of sorts has studied. At some very very well known universities and has recently published a book which is called who cares wins reasons for optimism in our changing world and so I'm delighted to have lily here with us today. Welcome Lily. Thanks for having me links to see. To, see you to Of course we're GONNA talk about your book, but you have such an interesting backstory that brought you into the fashion industry. So I thought we could actually start there and then get to how you decided that writing a book was kind of something that you wanted to do and how it connects back to some of your experiences and fashion. But so to begin with, you want to just tell us I'm sure it's you know everyone has their origin story and I'm sure. You're you're tired of telling it but. How how did you first get into this weird and wonderful industry? Irish a group in London. and. I was fourteen years old. Just, doing my thing hanging out with my friends in central. London I one evening and a scout from stool agency CRA Benjamin. Hart. Came over to me, he was very looking model himself this very handsome oatman was approaching. And then he talked about the agency had did I want to muddle and gave me business cards and within a year I was kind of flying around the doing I mean even that year I, started walking the next things really took off. The moment when you? Feel like you really realize that you're going to become quite a big deal. In fashion, Industry Missouri Specific Opportunity that you you come. Yeah. It's probably a few. Sixteen A. Nose Service Fifteen. New York and opened anesthesia legis show a campaign with Steven, Meisel and at the time I'd never heard of him. You know I didn't know anything about fashion. So I didn't I didn't know what the meaning of of that was. But when I was in New York for the show kind of sense, the buzz around. Him and his work that I'd worked within. A sense of it and and then I was remember another moment when I was in back in London. And was. was on a motorbike going between shows, which were as you probably know, tons of shows I was trying to fit like five a day sometimes, and so is getting annoyed between shows like it makes them and I had this moment on the back of his motorbike probably fifteen sixteen years old going through central London and seeing my face on the side of these red buses. What? It was quite made it feel real in a very surreal way how I went from Bash into writing a book, which is obviously a big jump by the book writing about fashion and how the experiences I had in bashing took journey along winding journey that I'm still on in which the book is a product. So after a few years working the fashion industry, I started to become more and more wet of some of the challenges with different supply chains I was made aware of the few the companies I was working with they were having are damaging impacts on the people or the environment within which is working. With a charity, Cool Developmental, Justice Foundation who still work with WHO drew my attention to cotton and how cotton farming can be really destructive but I feel very. Conflicted I guess because I thought quite responsible. So what I was appetizing into watching. And I decided instead of focusing on the negative which you know of course, we can I wanted to focus on the positive and the fact that there are different ways that supply chains can be set up and managed

London Meisel New York Hart Lily Zimran Ahmed Cole Justice Foundation Founder CEO Steven
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:59 min | Last month

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal. I one hundred percent agree into because of that I think about what the solutions, all the problem. I always come back to equity. And that's ultimately I think about risk driving for and I think what makes this time so ready Angry special in many ways, is that the asking leadership to support us with? Of. Traditional tax. Supporting. Mental. Internships I think already doing now is we're actually asking our structures like quite literally reopen is themselves to include us and then from where all collectively dying today. Tearing structures, things I. think that's really the only way that detained from a call out that house structure best is the Cha I'm. Deploying mechanisms to. Erase. Racism, I I think it is about equity. Entering do you have anything to add to that? Now I think this are. Really great points. I. It's definitely. A lot of things that Lindsey and my style and the executive or have been working on in terms of. What our goals out of its in having a long term strategy with friends is really essential. There's no way you can teach someone to unlearn something that was you know systematically in place for all of this time. So it's essential for us to not only educate work alongside people who are really willing and ready to make those changes. Over time in for us, it's a three to five year period with benchmarks and timelines and touch points. To see where are in how they are evolving

Founder Black Fashion Council Harlem Sandrine Charles Salting Sandrine Charles Charles Henrietta Galina Brandon Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay United States Brandis Daniel Chief Executive NBA Consultant Lindsay People Chairman Executive Editor Branston
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | Last month

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Black Fashion Council Founder Henrietta Galina Brandon Sandrine Charles Sandrine Charles Salting Harlem Charles Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay Brandis Daniel United States Chief Executive NBA Consultant Chairman Lindsay People Executive Editor CEO
What Circular Fashion Really Means with Levi's

Good Together: Ethical, Eco-Friendly, Sustainable Living

03:58 min | Last month

What Circular Fashion Really Means with Levi's

"Okay, welcome to good together Paul. We're so excited to have you. I'm really excited to be talking to you all today. This is a great time. We've got some exciting exciting product and it's a really. I don't know it's an interesting time to think about changing the way we've been consuming changing the way we've been designing making, and so it seems like a nice inflection point for all. Just sort of. Pause. -olutely. Absolutely I think right now we all are faced with more time than ever before on our hands. It's giving us a great opportunity to be mindful like you just mentioned. BSO listeners were super excited to how Paul Dillinger the together podcast Paul is the vice president head of global product innovation in premium collection design, for Levi, Strauss and company, and I love that we're having the chance to talk with Paul for many reasons. But one reason is because when we think about heritage craft American brands that are known for products that last a long time I. Think everyone has Levi's pop into their head and I'm not just saying that I think has just been a brand that we've all trusted for years. So the fact that we've is is taking a step towards circular fashion were super excited at So Paul I wonder if you wanted to give us a really brief intro of yourself and sort of what you do at Levi's. Sure. Thank you for that introduction I. It's a fancy title and it's but it. It's easy to say I'm a fashion designer. That's that was my training to undergraduate and graduate school. In my MFA in fashion, design and I designed clothes but leave there's a recognition that beyond just the seasonal cycle you know spring clothes fall clothes in spring shows fall shows beyond that just a six month normal fashion cadence. There are some design challenges that take more time. There are some opportunities that you you can't. Really you can't. Tackle problem resolved delivery in in just two seasons sometimes the real. Big changes they need a little more time to be cultivated research developed. And thoughtfully executed and those sorts of projects fall to me. So rather than designing. For next fall or next spring I'm thinking about a systems based approach to changing the design method allergy entirely five years from now or new materials that might actually deliver value ten years from now it's more of a it's a the fashion skillset, but I'm a Senate set to longer view. And and which is interesting because we're the company that straddles this company that straddles. The fashion versus utility space. You Know Levi's were essentially a tool I for minors to make. You know up to. The Goldfields in and and our but. Our value was predicated on technical innovation, right it was the adding the copper rivet to a garment that was wearing out in certain spots and we added that rivet and it made it strong in those spots and we patented it, and then we became like the. Created. This whole this category world's biggest purveyor of Denim, which then slowly changed from being a tool being object of faction. So at once we're this company that has invented A. Thing and durable both in the form and also emotionally durable that people love their genes. Last may become good friends. We're also part of the fashion cycle and we do seasonal product and we try to stay relevant instead of trend and and and and and resonant with the with contemporary consumers, and so there's a dynamic tension in the Levi's in this sort of struggled under. It's sort of carefully weaving those together.

Levi Paul Dillinger Vice President Goldfields Senate Strauss
Michael Kors on Why He Left Fashion Week

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:59 min | Last month

Michael Kors on Why He Left Fashion Week

"Hi this is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business fashion and welcome to the podcast. This week our editor at large sits down with the American designer Michael Kors discusses his plans for Fashion Week September in fact Michael Kors won't be doing a normal show at all like some of his counterparts in Europe including salary in Gucci Michael is questioning. The efficacy of the current fashion show drill calendar, and so he's decided to present in a completely new format launching globally on October fifteenth on the brands social and digital platforms. He talks to Tim blanks about all of this including the confusion around the nomenclature various seasons and how he wants to clean up to. Here's Tim blanks with Michael Kors inside fashioned. Hello everyone and welcome to the live today with told me to micro-costs from New York. Hello Michael Hello. Bear Ray to cedar great to see you and we are doing this instead of actually seeing each other in September. Yes. That's that's that's the God's honest truth. Unfortunately, what are you planning to do in September when we would have been seeing each other? Well I have to tell you long before. The pandemic. I really kept thinking to myself. I'm screeching in next year to my fortieth anniversary. So it. It has been time me to sort of reassess think about things and I and I just after forty years Tim I've seen that I really think the system has certainly been broken. We can't always just do things the way we've done them in the past. I fake. You, know everyone I think realizes that the whole systems mixed up doesn't make sense. So I certainly have my wheels turning about that prior to the band. And then of course, being in lockdown, you really start to analyze and I go back as someone who has been doing this for so long and once in a while back to the future is a good thing. And you know for many decades the New York collections were after the Paris collections ended. In fact, they were a week after Paris ended. And I think we never whenever inundated the consumer with too much information just as in September. Here, in the states, we have Labor Day, and it's you know the world opens up again hopefully, right? At why are we confusing the consumer? And the press with a new season when they haven't even absorbed the one that has just arrived in the shots. Adjusted it makes sense to me. And you know more than ever of course where people are they're not planning months and months ahead. You know we really are living in a time where fashion is very much always has been though it's about the emotion that you're in. So. Are you starting to land your wardrobe in May I? Don't think so I don't know who you are. You don't have a life. So I thought to myself. Well, we used to do this after Paris it allowed or journalists and retailers. And consumer to have a breath. And then. In October, it really became the perfect moment. To show a new collection without cutting off the previous collection that had just arrived shots.

Michael Kors Tim Blanks Gucci Michael Founder And Ceo Paris Michael Hello New York Imran Ahmed Europe Bear Ray Editor
Fashioning the Enslaved Servant, an interview with Dr. Jonathan Michael Square

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:59 min | Last month

Fashioning the Enslaved Servant, an interview with Dr. Jonathan Michael Square

"Thank you so much for joining us today Dr Square. Welcome to dress. You so much for having me. I'm excited about the conversation. Yeah. Me Tell and what that conversation is. Really kind of going to center on today is part just part of your research for a book that you're working on currently. But. Before we get to that I'd like to ask you first how you came to the feel of fashion studies because this is something that I've started recently asking all of our guests. We actually get a lot of questions from people about like how do you become a fashion historian or fashion scholar and I, think it's really really interesting and compelling to hear about all of the various different passes study that kind of leave some of us to what we do. We'll April I was actually born fashion. I love that. But in all seriousness, nurtured a lifelong interest in creative expression. My parents went to art school in I grew up around their art. So anyone who's known me for a long time will tell you that art and fashion. They've always been passions of nine. There was a moment where I like dabbled with being a fashion blogger. Do remember fashion bloggers. Before influencers pre influencers. Exactly like if you Scroll Deacon. Some. Items, you'll see me trying to be a fashion blogger. I cringe. At, those posts. But I won't delete them because I have like this historians archiving in post like just like jump into your head from that moment. But in any case, didn't really start to identify as a fashion scholar into like the tail end of my doctoral studies and did a PhD in history it in my you. Know what I was doing. Created a digital humanities projects. Fascinating freedom. Admitted to be like online resources, people who are interested in the relationship between fashion, the fashion industry in. Slavery. In also being from the Vienna of always been interested in the history of slavery in my own history is an ascendant of enslaved peoples. So this my current research, digital humanities, projects, sort of Mary's those two interests. So but I would say dead, you know it's through that project. I became less a fashion consumer, a lover fashion in that became a real fashion scholar off the tonight fashioned myself. Myself into a fashion scholar, and we will definitely at the end when I ask you how people can find. You can tell people and direct people to that resource, which is still online. You know you're talking about being a historian and an you have remarked me in the past that our research is incredibly important to you, and that you I'm quoting you both fetish is and theorize the archive. In what way does that inform your research particularly, the research that you're doing right now yet, that's a great question. I mean. I think fashion designers, I don't think I know fashion designers use textiles in is story I used ticks in in a Lotta ways. I. Think it's the same intellectual work. In different mediums, my research based in part on abject analysis. So this chapter that we're going to describe amusing to as coastal worn by enslaved valets as appointed departure, but really the grist of the research lies in analysis of archival documentation. In historians, we're taught to think critically about the archive as an epistemological space. Was not just a repository of dusty. Oh documents. It's a place where knowledge is created. It's also a place where some narratives or privilege in other narratives are excluded are sidelined. In, all comes down to power. You know the word archive comes from over in ancient, Greek, which I will not bother butcher. On Your podcast. But the word means to be I, are to rule. So a lot of words that convey power in control whether it's Monarch are hierarchy or anarchy sort of the Ri- from the same word. So archives are about power. In the archive in those who control, they'd have the power to save bonaire to. Are To control. The way history is told whether it's historical figure our nation. In my particular case, it's a for profit company. In Brooks brothers particular. Its archive is run by a DC based marketing firm in corporate archive known as the history factory. It was founded in nineteen, seventy, nine in the history factory helps construct corporate identities and build brand narratives, and so you can think about the survival of Brooks, brothers. Archive is being indebted. To this firm. Founders of the history factory actually restyle to brooks brothers in the late Seventies. Early Eighties when the company was on the brink of bankruptcy, you know people weren't really buying suits anymore and they really had to restructure. In. This firm basically archived at his own expense. It doesn't they believe that it was important. For the history of the company now myself getting lost in. The weeds, the research? When the company was bought by Claudio Delvecchio. Awesome Brooks sputters, enthusiasts, he paid for the the BECO IT expenses. In History Company, she still advises Brooks Brothers. The often tell them to focus on innovation in nonconformity on, of course, their brand strategy sort of ACLU's any connection to slavery, but you can think about the survival of Brooks is being due to like the generosity are the largest of these like to wealthy white man who have emotional connections to the brand

Brooks Brothers Brooks Dr Square History Company Aclu Claudio Delvecchio Vienna RI Mary
We Went to Goodwill Everyday for A Week. Here's What Happened.

Allow Us to Rethriftrodeuce Ourselves

06:33 min | 2 months ago

We Went to Goodwill Everyday for A Week. Here's What Happened.

"Welcome back everyone welcome back. I'm Nina I'm Shannon we did a thing. We did. So. This was your idea Tomo. Tell them what it was. Yeah. So it was like Hey Dina we have a lot of time on her hands. Let's go to the store every day for a week and you're like. I. Already do that. Let's do it. I do I didn't realize I was doing it until you kinda called me out on it. It didn't really start off as a challenge for me. I found myself with some extra time that I've been home since March I was a selling machine, right? Like people are a buying mood right now. So I kept going back to restock stuff and then you call me out on it and I noticed how much I was going and so you're like, let's make it official and do a goodwill challenge where we went to goodwill days in a row and we wanted to see what we found in how we felt. Yeah. I feel like it was more of a challenge for me than it was for you. You're dislike dislike no big deal. Aw, who do this right here right now. I like Tuesday it was like redone. Yeah. I. All right. So let's tell them where we went. Okay. We feel like we started off strong because on Monday we went to bins and the actual good bull story that is connected to in on Waterloo and that was a good day but I feel like the bins kind of out a little bit. Yeah. And then the next day we went to state road, and then we of decided to go our separate ways for the rest of the week and I went to state road again, just to kind of check it out see what was going on see if there's any new things pop in. then. The end of the week I went to the Canal Fulton store and the Jackson store. So I was all over in multiple counties. Yeah. You sure will. Really weren't counting. Okay. So that's nice. We had a nice variety. We weren't sure if we're going to do the same exact goodwill every day, but realistically, it just didn't work out that way. So we kinda mixed it up. Let's get to the good part then. Okay. Let's talk about what were the main lessons takeaways what did you learn throughout the experience? Okay Honestly my one is I need to get back on a budget because by the end of the week I was like, oh My money. So I think that in the beginning of the year I had like a hard goal of being on a budget and having an amount that I was going to be spending monthly, and then with everything happening with the world I kind of got away from that because it didn't really need to budget for places I wasn't going, and then now I'm back out and I'm Kinda, gone gangbusters and just like vinyl too much. So that's kind of my number one is get back on a budget. That's a great point I. Remember you had a really good budget plan we talked about it before i. Even had remember you said you were going to set aside some money for sustainable brand right I need to get back on that train. Well, did you have fun? Yeah I, S- I had fun until it didn't. But I'm a grown I'm not as patient as you are. So I think like I'm very much like. At a certain point I'm done and I need to leave the store but. I think when we were together, you're there a little bit longer you know. So even just like are you okay you can leave you know and I felt bad because I'm sure you could tell that I was like so ready to leave but you definitely stay in longer than I do I'm just like sometimes I can do like thirty minutes forty five minutes but you're a good hour and a half girl if you're going hard, you know. So it's just like that's hard for me to to look. At a certain point he was like, okay let's go and you're like, Oh, I just got started on this. Yeah. Yeah that raises an important point about finding your balance as a thriftier because everybody thinks that you have to do marathon thrifts because that's just kind of how it is you WANNA, go to every corner you wanna see everything you don't want leave anything behind but I think you have to find that balance that works for you because then you will start to hate it. I like I like both like now that I have time on my hands I it's nothing for me to go in for an hour and a half. But when I'm working outside of the home and I'm not as flexible I'm in and out in our like thirty minutes looking third fifteen minutes paying fifteen minutes trying on. So it's like it's a quick process and so I could tell like I was like chicken you're putting off a lot of nervous energy right now because I was trying to do my car edit right? Like I'm going through my carton folding everything and taking pictures of everything and you're just like you were grandpa like pacing back and forth. I'm like you can leave. You know that I thought that I was getting away with it because at mask on it was like she can't see my face. I'm good shed and didn't even need to look at you the energy you were putting out like I was like Oh. My God. Am I gonNA get grounded I feel like I'm in trouble right now you say you're GonNa Kinda scared. So. Nervous that I like kind of shook it off Mike. All right. Talk Myself Out of it like you don't have much today you don't different our show. So yeah, I'm such a impatient person sometimes no I think that it's just you. I totally get that like there are some stores that I would never want to be in that in there for that long and so I think it's fine. Everybody has their different comfort level where everybody has a different comfort level and you just have to figure out what that is and that way you won't. You won't hate it right now. Yeah. So I did I did have fun I did get tired but I felt like it was a true. Thrill and treasure hunt. But besides that. So one of the first takeaways for me was that it really reminded me of how much stuff we consume. Oh, I know seeing new stuff every day. Made me both happy because I was finding really cool stuff. I was also felt like I was saving things from landfills. But I was also shocked by the sheer volume of stuff. One store can put out every single day. Like we knew that goodwill put out thousands of stuff a day especially at the bins. But when you see it happen and kind of unfold before your eyes it's like a remarkable thing, right? Right because I'm a here yesterday and now there's more and then like I'm still I'm there for two hours and then they over they rolled out like three or four carts like it's a lot harder stuff that we have in this world.

Canal Fulton Jackson Store Shannon AW Official Mike
LOVE Magazines Editors on the Fashion Magazines New Role in Culture

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:38 min | 2 months ago

LOVE Magazines Editors on the Fashion Magazines New Role in Culture

"Hello. Welcome to. Live today we are talking to Ben, cobb and Pierre Lay who are co editors of? The Astonishing new issue of love magazine I hesitate to even Cooler to magazine it is volume one and volume two. of Hud covid will books basically a fashion magazine like you've ever seen before and they are a remarkable time capsule of this remarkable time, and so I'm really looking forward to talking to Bannon Pierre about how this came together. The obvious question is that this. Book these books raise because I'M NOT GONNA call magazines. What what is what is the place of a fashion magazine and this particular moment? I think the role of a fashion magazine right now. As. Bringing its community together and drawer and yet network together. To, really move forward. As a as a unified thing, I think it's about coming together with your community and all moving forward are not leaving anyone behind i. think that's the world. Today. Now as as I've worked my way through the hundreds of pages in in these books. What strikes me is that. The hierarchy that we used to in fashion of Edison fashion end said. Creative director, whatever it doesn't seem to exist in these pages I, think that what we are. Looking at. Here is something is quite a new way of approaching putting together magazine almost. I guess it's almost the way that people used to do things you know in in the high the idealistic height of the sixties or something. I, how how do you feel about bad. Yeah. Million questions also. Suddenly I, feel like it it was a great way to share without having to thirty compromise because someone was above us all below us. It was real conversation between everyone. So that's what we call the love collective because it was really about sharing. Ideas sharing concepts and sharing philosophy and bring that forward in making the issue. So when we completely Removed the key I think it's It's sending out night a good message about what people in fashion actually are in how they actually work, which is a lot of people working together because they love fashion. So. But by. Kind of restricted in the situation by the fact that. We you we everyone was in lockdown because of covid nineteen and. He you ban you make it very clear on your editors, Lhasa and Co. edited Katie Grand I'm also writes about this very, very Very. Very. Honestly that you were old ill with coded nineteen while you were making this magazine and and L. Like. Not just sort of. You know not just a came and went you will and Came into this situation as the new boy on the team. I mean. I. Never. been working with love longer than I I'm I joined in January has been. You know contrbute saying I'm parts of the family for longer. But yeah, I mean I'm sure you know let's hit from but I'm sure of very strange environment. You know a lot of. Three senior members of love who in a very, very L. were convex. I think that was. In some way you know I, don't wish on anyone on. Glad we could go through the together. It would have been very difficult. Dying. Three out process with able ready. Didn't understand what you were going for. Being, able to share information. You know literally every morning we would speak with each other how he feeling house today. And because of the nature of of this virus. Everyone out very different symptoms as long as operating in very different rhythms. When someone was not feeling good. we we stepped up and filled and DOT rall. On old came together when I wasn't feeling well. the same thing. It was a really going back to earliest this collect and saying it was. Logistically as well as philosophically dot was the way through this. As well as coming together as a collective intelligence which. I think is really you know it's all hands to the pump for everyone.

Together Magazine Bannon Pierre Pierre Lay BEN Director Edison Lhasa Cobb Katie Grand CO.
Chicken Nugget Money

Pop Fashion

05:16 min | 2 months ago

Chicken Nugget Money

"Her magazine is going further into membership. They've been doing membership for a little over a year and small pockets of their publications. The concept is they want to rely less on advertising and create more of a revenue stream that isn't reliant on that. The latest is cosmo unlocked. From Cosmopolitan magazine it's unlimited. Digital Access adds an exclusive newsletter for two dollars a month. They said it's cheaper than chicken nuggets. That is true. I appreciate that that's a good reference point for me. I detect zero lies. For Twenty dollars a year, you can get access to the website, the print magazine and the Newsletter Sarah for twenty dollars they throw in the print version to without any membership you can access up to four free articles a month, and they've put the rest behind a firewall. So you could still access some reporting, but they're starting to kind of go in this general membership direction not across all their banners they're just kind of experimenting with a few. Lisa. Is this a good idea? I hate it. Oh No tell me why Well look if I'm thinking like a magazine executive I, love it because in the olden days like twenty years ago you would just by subscription to a print magazine and that was it. I mean this is a similar price point. This is not offensive in terms of. Your pay walls that I have seen right so that's fine. The problem is that me as a consumer, I'm getting totally subscription to out like the biggest part of my budget in terms of just simple line items is just like subscription subscription subscription it's the music streaming it's the TV streaming. It's you know the tech tools that I use online it's the publications that I subscribe to and. I think if you can get people and have them forget that they're paying every month and it's just a little bit like two dollars and it dings and it just goes through I think you're GonNa get a reasonable amount of money. But? I don't think it's. A replacement right now for finding advertiser dollars because I think a lot of people especially in this economic environment right now don't have a lot of. Emotional bandwidth to be tracking all their subscriptions. I like us idea I disagree with you. Because I went journalists to get paid. That's true and I hear you that all of the subscriptions were kind of subscription. Doubt Idea agree with that but they're kind of getting more into a few youtubers have patriotic levels and I've been thinking about subscribing to that because I think that they're putting out great content and there is I, think an advantage to being a member where you get closer to those creators you get just more of what they're putting out because it does something really great if phil something or it. Gets you excited about something or you just think about this great people doing like time management projects that help keep you on track but the thing is the membership has to be worth it yes and I'm personally going to be very selective about. Who I want to latch onto I don't know personally if cosmo appeals to me to be a member, I really want to latch on to a personality versus a corporation. I would like to support an independent artists or a group of artists that are putting something out to the world or some. VEGGIES and entire company that I do not know. Yeah. You you make an interesting point there because I do want to clarify that I. Don't hate this because hearst is doing with Cosmo I hate it because it's hard to manage for me as a consumer but use something interesting, which was you're supporting several creators on Patriots and Patriots a platform that aggregates your subscriptions. So you make one payment amount which I appreciate I do and I think I think the I think what publications should be doing. Working with other publications to build a platform to manage to bundle my subscriptions and be able to buy one off articles for the ones that I don't subscribe to all time bundle that. That is a free idea. Also, why didn't they start this ten years ago like the seems like such low hanging fruit that. Two dollars a month you're a member you get exclusive whatever why wasn't this happening ten years ago I don't understand. Like late teens, early twenties. Lisa it would have been a really easy birthday or. Whatever gift to give me the cosmos subscription to the exclusives Done Twenty Bucks I don't think it's a bad idea. I think it's a good idea but people are going to be selective about who they want to align themselves with or spend that like Doug it money with which I understand I get it. We only have so much attention. We only have so many dollars especially right now

Lisa Print Magazine Cosmopolitan Magazine Cosmo Phil Patriots Doug Sarah Executive Hearst
Chicken Nugget Money

Pop Fashion

05:02 min | 2 months ago

Chicken Nugget Money

"All right. Let's get to fashion news first story. Her magazine is going further into membership. They've been doing membership for a little over a year and small pockets of their publications. The concept is they want to rely less on advertising and create more of a revenue stream that isn't reliant on that. The latest is cosmo unlocked. From Cosmopolitan magazine it's unlimited. Digital Access adds an exclusive newsletter for two dollars a month. They said it's cheaper than chicken nuggets. That is true. I appreciate that that's a good reference point for me. I detect zero lies. For Twenty dollars a year, you can get access to the website, the print magazine and the Newsletter Sarah for twenty dollars they throw in the print version to without any membership you can access up to four free articles a month, and they've put the rest behind a firewall. So you could still access some reporting, but they're starting to kind of go in this general membership direction not across all their banners they're just kind of experimenting with a few. Lisa. Is this a good idea? I hate it. Oh No tell me why Well look if I'm thinking like a magazine executive I, love it because in the olden days like twenty years ago you would just by subscription to a print magazine and that was it. I mean this is a similar price point. This is not offensive in terms of. Your pay walls that I have seen right so that's fine. The problem is that me as a consumer, I'm getting totally subscription to out like the biggest part of my budget in terms of just simple line items is just like subscription subscription subscription it's the music streaming it's the TV streaming. It's you know the tech tools that I use online it's the publications that I subscribe to and. I think if you can get people and have them forget that they're paying every month and it's just a little bit like two dollars and it dings and it just goes through I think you're GonNa get a reasonable amount of money. But? I don't think it's. A replacement right now for finding advertiser dollars because I think a lot of people especially in this economic environment right now don't have a lot of. Emotional bandwidth to be tracking all their subscriptions. I like us idea I disagree with you. Because I went journalists to get paid. That's true and I hear you that all of the subscriptions were kind of subscription. Doubt Idea agree with that but they're kind of getting more into a few youtubers have patriotic levels and I've been thinking about subscribing to that because I think that they're putting out great content and there is I, think an advantage to being a member where you get closer to those creators you get just more of what they're putting out because it does something really great if phil something or it. Gets you excited about something or you just think about this great people doing like time management projects that help keep you on track but the thing is the membership has to be worth it yes and I'm personally going to be very selective about. Who I want to latch onto I don't know personally if cosmo appeals to me to be a member, I really want to latch on to a personality versus a corporation. I would like to support an independent artists or a group of artists that are putting something out to the world or some. VEGGIES and entire company that I do not know. Yeah. You you make an interesting point there because I do want to clarify that I. Don't hate this because hearst is doing with Cosmo I hate it because it's hard to manage for me as a consumer but use something interesting, which was you're supporting several creators on Patriots and Patriots a platform that aggregates your subscriptions. So you make one payment amount which I appreciate I do and I think I think the I think what publications should be doing. Working with other publications to build a platform to manage to bundle my subscriptions and be able to buy one off articles for the ones that I don't subscribe to all time bundle that. That is a free idea. Also, why didn't they start this ten years ago like the seems like such low hanging fruit that. Two dollars a month you're a member you get exclusive whatever why wasn't this happening ten years ago I don't understand. Like late teens, early twenties. Lisa it would have been a really easy birthday or. Whatever gift to give me the cosmos subscription to the exclusives

Lisa Print Magazine Cosmopolitan Magazine Phil Cosmo Patriots Sarah Executive Hearst
Cozy Clothes and B.O. Woes

Forever35

05:14 min | 2 months ago

Cozy Clothes and B.O. Woes

"And you know. I just want to take a minute to say like. Thanks for going along. With this podcast ride with us during this quarantine. We're glad you're here. I, don't know just thinking about that like sometimes. I marvel at the fact that there are people hearing this I know. I talked about this like once every three episodes where I'm like we have listeners, but it's so cool and I. The spencers ups and downs and I feel grateful that there are people. Going along for the ride with us, totally, it's nice to know you're all out. Yeah, yeah, it really is a really. It really is like I I imagine. If we did not make this podcast, I would feel much more alone and. Isolated and so a really appreciate I agree. How's it going over there? Cat. Never called you unless. It's going okay. I I realized I'm. Getting into this mode I, think especially now that I'm so focused on working on my book that. Like, I'll be like. Oh, it's the late afternoon. I have not like I have not even been outside today. So today I was like okay I must go on a walk. Get forced myself to go on a walk. Just to? Be Able to be outside and those really nice out today. But you have the hours just like slip away. Time feel so meaningless it really. Really does. Are Are you still like motivated to put on regular clothes every day. So the answer to that is no, however I did. Put on regular clothes yesterday, which is like. A day when we recorded a lot of podcast stuff, even though we weren't GonNa, see each other. I love your clothes, and I even splits on some purview. Actually Oh, wait I'm sorry who is I, know I meant to tell you? I forgot to tell you I'm telling you now. A! Recording interview and podcast away, and you were like dressed incented. The whole was I was I was wearing. Wearing linen. In like Biz cash, but. I was I was included on your like. Your slim fit Khakis and like just a sensible. Tory burch flats. No, I did not a Ha-. But I was not in leggings. Or you know pajamas as I am right now I'm in my pajamas. Makings. So the answer to your question is not. Usually, Yeah I've been I've been thinking about that lately. Because I feel like busy Phillips went on like a big like was a big advocate. Look, I follow along with busy Phillips as life three actively Phillips soon to be podcast. I'm so excited I think with. One of our past amazing? Yes, I think that's GonNa. Be a great. And one of her raiders. tearoom concern yeah. I'm excited for that podcast. Maybe busy can talk more about this because she was like a big advocate of. Getting dressed in quote unquote real close. Hate I to advocate for getting dressed in real close every day. Do I do it now. But I think it's a good idea. I. Mean Look Yep. We don't practice what we preach here. I, you know I will say I did acquire. Some like come Fi. Non. Athlete. Clothes like the linen overalls I have a pair of. Soft cotton, drawstring pants from blue and gray that I wear quite often. I wear them. Those I've read them today I wore them today. Actually so actually I'm kind of walking back my statement I. I have I have like pandemic close. That are just like cosy comfy clothes, but they're not leggings. and. I will also say I, stopped wearing under wire bras I only wear i. have like Chew Brawl. Let's that I rotate. Okay, so I think this brings us to kind of a new genre. which is your pandemic Wardrobe like? Because, my pandemic wardrobe. Is when it's not like likings and like pajamas and like sweat type outings. It is these short universal thread shorts. I bought at target last year. Some sort of like Tankeea toppy thing I, guess you could also just call that a tank top and. Taking top. Kreis. But you know like sometimes. It's a loose shirt. Something that the Tang yet sometimes yet. Thank you avi.

Phillips Chew Brawl
Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on Where Fashion Goes From Here

The Business of Fashion Podcast

08:05 min | 2 months ago

Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on Where Fashion Goes From Here

"Hi, this is Ron Ahmed founder and CEO of the business of fashion and welcome to the podcast. Each season after fashion Mumbai. Sit Down with Tim planks, and we hash out what we've learned what we've observed and what we've taken away from the latest season, a fashion shows of course this season was completely different, but it was still worth having a catch up with Tim to explore. Fashion goes from here here's. Tim Blanks inside fashioned. Everybody a welcome to be oh ethel lives. I'm here with Tim blanks our editor at large, and you know usually around this time of year, Tim and I have spent. Several weeks on end in the back of a car. Navigating Fashion Week. And so we thought well. We can't do that this year, but Tim, I've still been keeping in touch of course and We usually record podcast conversation. Just reflecting on the fashion season that was and so we thought well. There's still a lot to talk about so I asked him. To join me, welcome Tim. I am Ron. How're you doing good? Good I like your shirt. He said mutually good. I'm seeing. New, thing glamour. Lack Raw Glam rock. Okay Difference. I'm not capable of climate, but I am capable of Glam rock some. Well. Our conversation today is called where it is fashion. Go from here and I know it's something that's been. On your mind a lot, it's certainly been on my mind but before we dive into that specifically you were I guess four months foreign a bit months into lockdown now or limited I, I sort of I date the transitional moment I came back from Paris on Much A. Figure that March the was the day that you could feel the storm, clouds had kind of well and truly Gabid of the fashion so I kind of date everything for much. The I think the last time that we saw anybody actually in our flat was March the seven nine. And said however many citizens. Zana's how how however long it is since we haven't seen anybody. and everything's being done like this kind of digitally signed the last time you and I saw each other in person was record our podcast for the end of that season and I. You know I don't know. I. Don't know if you remember what we talked about. It was obviously a very strange moment, and we didn't know what was about come, but one of the questions that we were grappling with. was whether we would all look back at that fashion week in and wonder if it was irresponsible for all of us to be sitting in a snuggled up next to each other at fashion, shows and dinners while this. Virus was spreading and what we know now tim is virus was spreading. It was readying actively in Italy and in France just as fashion week was going on so looking back now. What what do you think? I. I wasn't thinking irresponsible I mean there was. But because you know, we live Italy the the day we left Italy giorgione cancel the show. And Joe Digitally and there was a little bit of kind of. Huffing and puffing about that and Oh let's so dramatic whatever and I and then the airport in Milan at night was like. The fall of Saigon It was just so crazy. Wasn't people trying to get out of the country? Where was people trying to get out of the county? No because they were panicking about virus necessary. Just it was a set. It was sense of. Some enormous. Ominous! Force? and then getting to Paris and finding that you know people were saying. Shall we shop wait? You'll have a show in nothing. Really the either a couple of shows cancel. was still you know I always competitive? This that whole moment in World War Two that was? One that was a sinkhole. The phony war before the war actually started. There was moment where everybody knew that was going to be a war, but it hadn't happened, so they were kind of. Suspended animation and that's kind of what it was. Td that this because. I don't think anybody knew it was gonNA. Be As bad as it turned out to be at coins. But still it was a solo. Remember I was in the I. Requirements often before his show. He said to me. You think this is the one. And I said well. Do you and I just didn't know that point, and and you know what the weird thing is. Allocating many months later, this March April may June five months later. We still don't know because I. Feel, the feel it. Still the the doctors who will leading out shaping our opinions on this I don't think. Completely show what it is at dinner would. It just it just feels you know when you read. Eddie meteorologists is so excited by this virus, because it is such a challenge and a multi focal. It's just this incredible. Opportunity to delve deep into something that human beings have never encountered before and inside the fashion industry has just kind. I'm concerned is still like everybody else is still not this dilemma. What's going to happen? But I think we do know that this is the one I mean. There may be others at come after this based on what I've been reading, but this pandemic is shaping up to be you know one of those. Collective experiences of complete. Change, yeah, an and I think it's at fifteen million cases now. You know hundreds of thousands of people at I mean I think it's as you said I. Don't think any of us knew back then. How bad it was going to be, but it's certainly. It's certainly shaping up to be much much worse than I think. Many of us expected I. Mean I think when I was talking to a couple of CEO's in this over closing. We thought we were closing our stores down for a couple of weeks. And then obviously that turned into months. And you know the all the talk about first-wave second-wave I am using the Spanish flu as a as a as a sort of. Precursor. You know the fact that the first wave was in the full in there was a summer at the second wave was in the following fool. Could Lord I mean. We have no idea of what we could be looking at in. Another four or five months so. Yeah. It's A. It's being A. It's been a challenge I. Think Real, good huge challenge for the everybody on every level of every life almost everywhere in the world. And the nothing like that has ever happened.

Tim Blanks Founder And Ceo Ron Ahmed Paris Italy Ethel Mumbai Saigon Milan Joe Digitally Editor Zana Eddie Meteorologists CEO France
A Perfect Intersection of Disaster

Pop Fashion

05:24 min | 2 months ago

A Perfect Intersection of Disaster

"Hello Lisa. Hi. Lisa. Do. You know what I did the other day. You eat a hot dog again now. You're not going to believe what I did. ooh, wait! No, no, no, let me think about this. Did you watch a sporting event? No, but it is just as surprising as that would be. Guesses. Lisa I wore a t shirt outside. We have reached that level of the pandemic. The Pants denic is wearing me out. We, we have okay. Do you have shortness of breath I did not have shortness of breath. Do you have a fever? I did not. Do. You have diarrhea. No, thank God. I'm just want to make sure that Cova hasn't gotten into your brain. It may have girl I just may have other symptoms like may wear a t shirt and public. This is where it's gotten us like all you wearing a t-shirt in your house like two weeks and you were like this is my won t shirt, so you washed it and then war outside you wear to the grocery store. I have to t shirts. Thank you. One is a DOJ cat. Quote, says Bitch I'M A. And the second one Alan is, it's always sunny in Philadelphia reference. These are my two t shirts. And you guys decorum I do not wear t shirts in public, but. The PATS DEMOC is getting to me Lisa. Weight but I but I need more. How'd you feel when you were out in public? I need to know where you went. What else did you wear it with the naked? A war it with Yoga Pants Lisa. Oh No. Oh, no did you take a fuck them all before you did? You know what I'm talking about right? Yeah I do I do. Car. Are you going to be okay? I don't know at least at the thing is wearing me out. Do you need to buy my birkenstocks from the next time? You wear, though Lord. Lord with a T. You know because you have decorum I. appreciate that we both have. It's always sunny. T shirts, even though I have like thirty five t shirts and you have to but something stuck with me once a woman a peer of mine. made a comment about how flip flop should only be worn in your house or at the beach like it actively in the sand? Okay, she said this while we were out in public, wearing jeans and flippy floppies. With me and from that day, that was probably like twenty time. I will not wear flip flops outside unless I'm like in my yard arm, APP beach. Aware another Sandal aware another shoe, but I don't just like run out to the store and my flipflops right, not even. So I feel like you and I have similar rules for fashion except mind stopped in my ankles working out my body. Stopped at your neck. It's amazing how someone will come in and say something small, and just like flip things for you like that's a new role. I'M GONNA. Live my life by you know what I mean. Yeah while I was also upset because at the time. She was dating the guy that I wanted to date. What's her name? Let's go after her. No, no, no, she's on our side now. Okay! Good! Yeah, because she's. She's my ex Zax which makes you by the transit of property friends. Exactly exactly we've both gotten un-engaged from the same guy, so holy Shit, Oh special episode. She's on our side about her. I'm glad you're laundry is going to be okay. It's all going work out Lee. So we are just crossing boundaries. I did not anticipate in March. I just did not anticipate this. Up Brief MISSTEP and you're GONNA. Learn from your actions and you get back on track. I feel like we need. To pivot from the original plan I wanted you to start with like Oh, the avenues and get out of the way, but it sounds like we should pivot and make you talk about handbags. Now let's do. Pan Stomach fashion and art lack there of. I fashion story. Do you need your purse? This is based on an article by Lou Stoppard for the New York Times called the Phantom Handbag. It starts out once upon a time. I didn't leave the house without it now of course because of Covid nineteen I no longer really leave the house I haven't carried my bag for months. Lou poses the question. Is this a permanent change? Or will the bag comeback again someday? So the bags back your carrying around now may be different than your designer or higher end bag, or just like the purchased schlep around a lot. A lot of people right now are taking around backpacks or totes. And prediction is that the market might change slightly that people will want canvas shoppers, something that is waterproof cross body bags with adjustable straps, so people can go. On or cycling like it's very practical.

Lisa I Lou Stoppard T Fever Cova DOJ New York Times Pats Alan Philadelphia Yoga Covid LEE
an Interview with Costume Designer Mona May

Dressed: The History of Fashion

06:33 min | 2 months ago

an Interview with Costume Designer Mona May

"Are Seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common. Every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion podcasts where we explore the WHO when of why we wear, we are fashion, historians and your host April Kellyanne. Cassidy sacree so dress listeners, please accept this interruption to our regularly scheduled fashion history mystery, because we are bringing you a very special interview with the costume designer behind one of the most iconic fashion films of all time and April, as you know my personal, favorite clueless, which just this past Tuesday July nineteenth turned twenty five years old. And I have to say you guys. You all know someone who's very excited about this. Today we are joined by Mona, May, whose prolific career in film and television spans over three decades, clueless might be Mona's most famous film, but her work includes also rummy. Michele's high school reunion never been kissed a night at the Roxbury haunted mansion, and really the list just goes on and on. And April listeners please excuse me while I full on fan girl out because I mean I don't even know where to start, but my admiration and awe of Mona make goes back decades and is really threefold. I have seen clueless. Over one hundred times. At least an I can quote it from beginning to end I know there's a lot of people who were there with me, and then there's this added layer of me being costume designer myself. But also a fashion film lover I mean from Azzedine. Alaya to Calvin. Klein to that unforgettable yellow plaid suit clueless a fashion levers, dream and one that still resonates to this very day cast. You are not alone in your excitement for today's guests, so let's get to it Mona. Welcome dressed Mona. We are talking to you this week in celebration of the twenty fifth anniversary. Anniversary of one of the most iconic fashion flicks ever clueless, which debuted twenty five years ago this past Tuesday and which you, as a costume designer played such a central part. You and your work is currently getting so much well deserved attention. Yes, I'm really happy. I'm just you know. I'm just kind of flying high on all the kalisz diversity and you has been. I mean. My instagram is blowing up. which is so cool, you know it's funny because it's people are discovering ym in the weird way. God washrooms. Are you did that Enron Michelle and never been kissed and wedding singer? You know so like Sh-. The lavas pouring and it's so nice I mean the numbers are jumping up and it's just really great to you. Know we as cautioned designers, we are behind the scenes, and nobody really knows what our job really titles I think. It's kind of hard. You know what war goes into it in the preparation, and really all the creativity that has really come from Ma to create these characters from pages of the script they. They really just kind of very vaguely are described to us, and we really have to kind of be the psychologists kind of like a you know a detective to find out who they are deeply. You know their psychology were they went to. School may be no place in live there in right now and you know where they shop apartment they have you know once their journey right now in the film you know. Article to character to you know so. It's really a lot of lot of details that goes into. People don't really understand you know I think it's. It's one of a mysterious job in the way Oh. Yeah, absolutely so I. Mean You said you're making the rounds? You're all over vogue. You're all over instagram. People are are recreating favorite clueless moments. And I mean what does it feel like to have been part of a film that is still so much a part of pop culture even to this day after two decades it still so fresh and so relevant, and so loved is incredible I mean it's truly it's like A. One lifetime situation lighting that one can have that that something. Do you do out of love? You know because you don't set up to do the best session film of the universe but right. Thing, you know you, you I mean I. Am at fashion designer from training, and then I got into the question. Quebec doorway, and you know when I met amy on the pilot pilot and get picked up tablet. We creatively just connected so strongly. She loved it I was in Europe. I grew up in Europe. Seven different point of view fashion more European, and that's what the film needed. So when she wrote she called me, said the girl. I really want you to do this. To bring something so fresh and fashion forward something that's not on the street. Because of the time it was all grunge. She knows all everybody was wearing their. PLATIN- Baggy Pants, and was oh. Kurt Cobain Nirvana and of fashions in the street, so those nothing to go from everything had to be invented, not taken from the runways Paris Amina Milan share. Would the only probably daddy flew her there? She probably had the tickets in the on the day and was able to know things that she liked then everything had to be translated into the high school. Because you know amy is director of the night. I want this to be very useful, very. Very very sweet, very feminine. You know girly and that's kind of what we are changing from French fashion. Forward. Of course, it had to felt high school's head to sell their young girls because they had to feel pick, and I think part of the love for this film to the, even though they're a high fashion, and that is amazing of funded. As they felt authentic, the they really were beloved in the end that you knew who share was nearly the aunt was and out of. That feeling that emotional feeling thing, and that's why the film has lived so long because it's such emotional connection that people have to film you know with the fashion with kind of making you feel good. You know talking with a friend the other day like where does movies? We need more of those you know. The never been kissed. Michelle held to lose a guy in ten days. Almost fun movies. Movies that which none of watch and feel good, and it's okay, and it's a little bit of mystery and fun, and and Automo-. I miss those movies. You know I will miss those yeah,

Mona Michelle April Kellyanne AMY Europe Cassidy Enron Azzedine Alaya Roxbury Haunted Mansion Kurt Cobain Michele Klein MA Quebec Doorway Paris Amina Milan Director
U.K.'s Princess Beatrice borrowed Queen Elizabeth II's dress and tiara for wedding

AP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

U.K.'s Princess Beatrice borrowed Queen Elizabeth II's dress and tiara for wedding

"Palace revealed that Princess Beatrice were vintage dress loan to her by her grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, the second at her wedding to Eduardo Capelli. Mozzie, the queen's granddaughter and the property tycoon were married Friday at the private family event in the Royal Chapel of All Saints at Royal Lodge, Windsor. The 94 year old British monarch and her husband, Prince Philip, 99 attended along with their parents and siblings of the bride and groom. The palace said guidelines to stop the spread of covert 19 were followed at the Sermanni music was played. But there were no hymns and no singing. Not even during the national anthem. God Save the Queen. Syria. Shockley, London,

Queen Elizabeth Palace Royal Chapel Of All Saints Princess Beatrice Eduardo Capelli Mozzie Royal Lodge Prince Philip Shockley Syria Windsor London Sermanni
Brooks Brothers files for bankruptcy

Pop Fashion

03:47 min | 2 months ago

Brooks Brothers files for bankruptcy

"You having a bad day. Every retailer in America. Absolutely. Tell me more. Let's talk about the list of bankruptcies. Since the last time you and I talked I Lucky Jeans G Star Rob Off Though Brooks Brothers chapter eleven. This was not a surprise. They have been struggling for a little while now, but I wanted to delve into this company just a little bit because it's an American brand. We have very few brands that are made in the USA. Have such a big heritage. They are two hundred and two years old for our country. That's pretty big deal. Nothing lasts for two hundred two years. Right that's almost as old as the Dang country. They filed for chapter eleven with plans to permanently close fifty one stores. There are a number of companies that are interested in possibly buying the company including Simon Property Group, Simon Property Group is interested. They are the company that owns all those malls. And the crazy thing about this is they just sued brooks brothers a few weeks ago and then dropped the suit for not paying the rent for not paying their rent. They took him to court for almost nine million dollars in unpaid rent, and then they dropped it and I'm guessing. They dropped it because they realized that this was about. Come around the corner, right? They have been slowly closing stores over the past two years and two thousand eighteen. They had nearly seven hundred stores globally now they have five hundred. They're saying of course because PAT stomach, but the truth is pants off changed over the past few years. Literal Pants think of all those Khakis who's wearing them anymore like the static for what you wear to work has changed really in the past decade, and they have stayed the same brand, which in many ways as good because they have a visual heritage and history. Eh, with apparel. They dressed Abraham Lincoln. They've dressed many many presidents. They also have. A history that I was just made aware of this week. I don't know if you know about this. Lisa but I did some research because I got a tip from friends that Brooks Brothers has a complicated history with slavery. This is not something that they talk about so there's not a lot of information out there on it, but I did find an article from Smithsonian magazine that said quote Brooks Brothers was the top of the line slave clothing slave traders would issue new clothes for people. They had to sell, but they were usually cheaper. Ooh, that is complex. I did not know this part of their at all. Do they ever like apologize for that? They don't talk about it. Because if you don't talk about, it never happened right. Wow, but they made the clothes said. They've made their clothes in the United States, but this past May. They started shutting down some of their factories, their factories New, York north, Carolina and Massachusetts were all starting to slowly closed down so. People knew that they were going to maybe off. Start off shoring some of their apparel, but it was in limbo. What was going on with the company and they really weren't saying anything yet, but the writing was on the wall less than an hour ago. Bloomberg reported that authentic brands group put a bid in for the company. Authentic brands. Group owns a bunch of brands including barneys. New York forever twenty one fredericks of Hollywood nine West Jones New York, juicy couture and sports illustrated. That's all over the

Brooks Brothers Simon Property Group New York America Smithsonian Magazine Pat Stomach Bloomberg Abraham Lincoln York United States Usa. Lisa Hollywood Jones Massachusetts Carolina
Neiman Marcus Chief Executive on Coronavirus Bankruptcy

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:37 min | 2 months ago

Neiman Marcus Chief Executive on Coronavirus Bankruptcy

"Interesting that you position it as not a fundamental business problem given not. The the business you say with generating more than four million dollars in EBA. But people were speculating about a neiman marcus bankruptcy long before the corona virus, condemning actually happened you. Why did why did a bankruptcy not happened before? And what was it specifically about this situation that you made you in? The board realized that it was finally time to pull the trigger. So the the speaker I don't comment on speculation. People love speculation What what I see is bags into fact shows that the business had declined, and over the two and a half years for eight quarters we had positive grows, and we had positive profit growth, and so that doesn't lead you just saying that a business that generates ninety percent of adjusted it'd be that, and that is growing is anywhere near or close to a bankruptcy, and there are many ways which we successfully did a year ago to extend the maturity of your debt, and so we had another four years until that was. was you and on the path of growth and growth that will talk about from a digital standpoint is such that you can scale with limited investment, and so there was no sign for us especially with the extension of the maturity of that of a bankruptcy in the short term, because the business it sells didn't have a no I, so, when John a lot of business opportunities, and so you're not GonNa talk about growth opportunities about challenge that I set for the organization, but China's said for myself, but in a poetry he is not a problem it's it's just the flip side of it. I think what became clear. Here is in a moment where we close all stores and where we didn't went to reopen them, and when we knew that when we reopened them, the economy would be different and the uncertainty attach. We were not going to be able to maintain business model that was not going away to sixty, five million where to be paid and bronze. Need Trust and we are based on trust. If you have a company that is saying or what they earn too dead and using cash to fund the debt service, not to invest in any cap, ex or in, just a buying and being in Venturi I think the they would have been substituting office. You're not having the trust into the business. Now institution like DIS. typically companies have advanced notice because they know they have a business problem in the land bankruptcy. We obviously hadn't planned for this outcome. And, what's remarkable to me and gives me a lot of confidence in our businesses that we were able to get a dea with? Seventy five plus percent of our. Secured creditors to convert some of that debt into equity, but not old there that and there's a belief from creditors or the vast majority. In a binding agreement that it is in their best interest to own the company. Into see, go forward and in exchange for feeding the debt that we are owning them and so that there was A. You only have those situation. When the debtholders believed that owning the company will be a better outcome for them than claiming

Neiman Marcus China John Dis.
Gucci Launches Off the Grid, Its First Sustainable Collection

Pop Fashion

03:46 min | 2 months ago

Gucci Launches Off the Grid, Its First Sustainable Collection

"Is kind of like a fun story so Gucci is releasing a new collection. It's called Gucci off the grid. It is the first from its circular lines. which is, it's the name of the larger like group of collections, but it's also like a fashion term right so something that is circular means that it's designed with recycled and organic and sustainable materials in mind, and it's used as many times as possible before hitting the landfill as its final resting place, so if we think about buying secondhand clothing that's contributing to these circular cycle fashion instead of the the linear path because you're helping things, stay within our little ecosystem. Anyway science lesson over. Gucci's collection is let's see recycled organic bio based and sustainably sourced the main material for the collection. According to fashion united is one hundred percent regenerated nylon. It's called economy. I. Think I'm saying it right? It's made from recycled yarn that's made from nylon scraps, and those on scraps come from everything from like old fishing nets to carpet to like scraps from Gucci's own facilities It can be recycled allegedly infinite times. Who Knew Mind? My mind other materials include metal, free, tanned leather, recycled polyester, thread and linings recycled brass, recycled gold coatings for hardware am solvent free adhesive, so they're throwing every sustainable trick in the book at the stuff in this collection. The company also has two programs through which it saves scraps from its factories along with other sources to be able to recycle them us again, so they do this for nylon and leather. The collection was designed by creative director, Allesandro Michelle and the line features genderless luggage, accessories, footwear and ready to wear items. You've got jacket sneakers. CAPS tote bags, backpacks belt bags. That's you can get it off There's a lot of orange and a vibrant blue and some basic items, so there's something for every style. If you have the money I was checking out some of the online and noted that they don't have prices that are particularly higher than Gucci's standard products at the collection will be sold on Gucci's website, and on the far fetched website for the first two weeks before it starts to spread from there Carin. What do you think of this whole? This whole circular sustainable effort? It's a good shot. More companies need to do it. I'm glad to see. Fashion houses are starting to engage with it. I don't know if this makes up for the sins of the past for Gucci, but credit where credit's due like. If they're trying, also if it's catching on, it becomes more normalized that this can be done and I am. I hope other fashion houses see it as a challenge and the the best sense of the term that people can kind of rise to the occasion. As what can we recycle what can be used? What can we experiment with so although I around? I think it's great I liked it. It's going to be a little. Limited at first with Gucci and far fetched, because it builds up awareness to that it is about marketing technique that people can kind of like focus on that. They're doing this this experiment so I. I'm glad that fashion houses are starting to take this on.

Gucci Allesandro Michelle Director
Carbon pollution from the fashion industry is on the rise

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 months ago

Carbon pollution from the fashion industry is on the rise

"When you shop for new clothes, you're probably not thinking about the climate, but making apparel creates carbon pollution, and the industry's emissions are on the rise as people by and discard their clothes more frequently. The problem is made worse by the rise of fast fashion closed cheap to make and cheap to buy. But chin-yen of the World Resources Institute says apparel companies are starting to take climate action. Many companies globally are setting targets, and then really trying very hard to reach those targets yen co authored a paper that can guide the industry. She says the biggest challenge that clothing brands often outsourced manufacturing to companies in other countries. Those companies may rely on others for raw materials which. which makes it hard to measure and reduce carbon pollution, so a lot of these brands are doing is to educate an engaged the suppliers. I think that's what we want to see him. We're seeing more and more for example. Levi Strauss helps. Its suppliers obtain low interest loans for renewable energy, efficiency projects, and Nike is helping manufacturers from fossil fuels to solar and biomass. Yene says Moore suppliers get involved. It will help reduce carbon pollution throughout the industry.

Levi Strauss Nike World Resources Institute Yene Moore