Entrepreneurs

Leaders, dreamers and persistence - listen here for stories on business ventures, the visionaries behind them, tales of failure, and the never-give-up attitude that ultimately leads to success, from audio broadcasts aired on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Vernon Lockhart: Art On the Loose

Revision Path

05:57 min | 18 hrs ago

Vernon Lockhart: Art On the Loose

"All right. So tell us who you are and what you do. My name is Vernon Lockhart. I am a designer. I call myself a creative therapist. I am a exhibit designer, a brand developer interactive designer. Artist. and. I. Am the executive. Director of a program project called project as Moses out of Chicago. Now. One thing that I've been doing for everyone kind of just the start of these interviews during this pandemic kind of just doing a check in to see how folks are doing. So how are you holding up? You know we're given the space in times we're in we're I'm holding up pretty well I think one of the saving grace for me in a lot of this is. When you grow up on from the lane of saying boo as I grew up in a very rough area in Saint Louis and you know we faced adversity every day so. You know you have the coronavirus in things like that now. But for me growing up, you had to face all kinds of threats, potential adversaries so Well given the circumstances, I I commute back and forth caring for my mother who affectionately call a baby girl just can't for. So that's probably one of the key challenges but as far as. Things go we still have a lot of clients that we work with online and for project ASS? Moses alive things virtually with the students given the circumstances I'm I'm very grateful and feel very blessed to will be functioning at full capacity. What does a regular day look like for you now? So for me, a regular day would be getting up one thing that I don't have to do as much in. Okay. With this is not commuting back and forth so much. But getting up saying my prayers getting some breakfast getting on my laptop, looking at emails checking the circumference of the day clients. Immediate needs doing those usually that takes me up until about mid day I usually try to schedule any meetings I have around thirty two noon referee and then any errands I have to run out of usually do air early evening I'm a southern boy living in a city. CHICAGO. So I still have a yard and in a house and things like that. So you I'm out cutting. And things like that towards the evening. So I would call it a pretty normal southern boy day usually my average day but I'm a businessman at the same time. So you know it's a balance between the two but that's an advocate from. So speaking up about business you have a design firm called art on the loose is that right? That's correct. Tell me about it. When did you first start that? So are Donna loose very interesting. We been in operation. Now for about twenty three years I started in the late nineteen I'd say about ninety six and tonight six roughly. And we I was actually working at northwestern university in their at their center for Public Safety Division and we will working on a lot of. Copro shears and things like that in. So it was kind of mundane just no adventure knitted all in myself in one of. Colleagues that I work with addicts Ner we had conversation as I wonder do more I want to be free. I would have some creative freedom here in we started talking about doing our own design work. And in our conversation start playing with name ideas in that I mentioned you know I wanna be free I want to be loose in a good way right as a heart let's let's and so we kinda because we were both artist and he says so let's just call the artem loose in. That's how the name was born in banding Hannah came from this whole Superhero Ultra N-. Staying that I was called as a key going up still combat to this day and so we use kind of empowering. The word artem lose but also with the whole color Palettes, we used our background is how we grew up to create the the business name and I have to just this quick story about ultraman lousy key kids were were calling me ultra because my it was pointed they call me the football hero Alterman. I was like you know and I came home from school I'm I'm one of ten kids, right so I came home from school that I was upset and I start crying to my mother baby girl and I told her what the key is will call him the main she say at wait a minute isn't all tremendous food bureau SABA come home from school to watch ultraman every. Day, and she said I thought he was a superhero say he is. He says we'll take that negative and make it a positive and so I literally went up to my room and start designing year Alterman on and I, went back to school they pop my collar and was like they were like ultimate success right on alternate and so at three sixty beds. So it started all Japan. And took that negative in Medan deposited but also is one of my personal experiences and Brandy. In power of branding, and so I took that icon and symbol. Even. If you look on our business site, you'll see that iconic symbol for for ultra mass I knew. To this day in and I got my design in artistry from my mother, my mother went to design marks. So that's how artem loose in the name came in existence with the story behind it to

Alterman Moses Chicago Copro Artem Vernon Lockhart Medan Saint Louis Developer Interactive Designer Northwestern University Japan Director Executive Donna Hannah Public Safety Division
The Amazon Formula To Sell 8-Figures & Beyond with Jeff Lieber

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:01 min | 21 hrs ago

The Amazon Formula To Sell 8-Figures & Beyond with Jeff Lieber

"Jeff say what's up to fire nation and share something interesting about yourself that most people don't know hey, what's up fire nation? Jeff Lieber and yeah let's see. I. Guess Back in two thousand fourteen kind of a funny story is I was working at nine to find nine to five job and what happened was is I was had that entrepreneurial bug I've been listening to podcasts like yours and other people. Knows you know looking at different business models and then I stumbled upon the Amazon business model at that time and I learned like the steps to source of product and all you're choosing what product to get started with and out of all the products in the world I was what would be the coolest sexiest product I could bragged my friends about and of all the products under the Sun I chose to buy a twenty foot. Container of Puppy pee pads or training dogs A. Matt and I spent almost like seventy percent of my life savings fifteen grand at the time on that container wired it to China had no idea the risks that were involved with that and luckily they did ship me a container of way too many puppy pads to sell and. Took me about a year to sell through that container. Thank goodness. It worked out and survived. So well, if they were on the market a few months ago I would have bought one Gaza we do have a a new puppy in our life is name as gas and we love him dearly and he has needed some pads as he's learned how to get to house train but I'm happy to say where we're past that stage for the most part now knock on wood but in fire. Nation as I shared in the introduction, we're talking about the Amazon formula to sell eight figures and beyond. So I mean you had that nine to five. Jeff. Back in two, thousand, fourteen, he decided to take the leap. So when exactly did you get started selling products on Amazon? I. Mean I know you said you start with a puppy pads move onto the next point from that and how did that experience actually lead you to starting turnkey product management? Yes. Of intention was not to start turnkey. Product management that came a few years later. So luckily, like I said that product ended up selling decently well, but I ended up launching additional pet products and then my sister had an idea for baby products brands. So we launched that and my friend's dad had an idea for with an awesome patented dog toy. So we launched on kickstarter and Bernard up on that and then So all of a sudden I was doing a ton of stuff and then had a few friends from college who Had Awesome products. They did you know sunglasses and wash on kickstarter and we're doing awesome on shop and sales channels like that. But they were struggling on Amazon and they saw me having success with Elaine product like bubby bads and they're like, why can't we do that? So I I ended up helping them and they just said, can you just manage it for us? Can you just do it what will pay you and I was like sure and so that was really the first consulting client. But. It was just a friend and it was fun. You know working with them and ended up growing them to over six figures in their first year and then they referred a friend and they referred a friend and now I had five clients as well in addition to all the brands. So needless to say I was. Almost envious of my previous nine to five job that I had quit because I couldn't do it all and I was like man, why did I even quit I'm like so stressed out in overwhelmed in managing way too much stuff and so I just said what what really would make me the happiest and what am I the best that and that was selling on Amazon. So what I did was decided to sell my stakes out of all may their companies in about nine month period and solely went in all in on turnkey product management gave it an official name and That was about three or four years ago and built a team hired me on my sister, my cousin, a bunch of great great people along the way, and now we're helping a lot of companies to scale their their businesses on Amazon seven and eight figures, and beyond

Amazon Jeff Lieber Matt China Official Bernard Bubby Bads Elaine
Defining Purpose, Vision and Mission with Ken Coleman

The EntreLeadership Podcast

03:30 min | 1 d ago

Defining Purpose, Vision and Mission with Ken Coleman

"I'm your host, Daniel Tardy and my guest today is longtime friend fellow Ramsey team member, an Ramsey personality, Ken, Coleman, I, remember the first day that I met him. He wouldn't shut up about what he believed. He was called to why he was at Ramsey and what he was going to do with his life was borderline obnoxious but I admire it when he started at Ramsey solutions well, it's initial job here wasn't exactly in line with his vision, but I tell you after years of doing it the right way being diligent being teachable and pushing for what he knew was inside him the reason he was put on this planet today few years later he's on fire he's absolutely in his sweet. Spot spinning everyday. Now, helping tens of thousands of people all around the country figure out what their purpose is just like he found his as soon as you can tap into the thing that you're doing everyday being completely aligned with who you are and why you exist it's magic. In fact, I'm going to tell you it's a multiplier on your business as a leader. You figure this thing out the purpose why are you here? You can have more energy more fun. Your team's going to be happier you can have more alignment your vision is going to be clear that's going to lead to more resulted ultimately, you'll help more people that's what it's all about and it all starts with getting really. Curious. I knew before I came to Ramsey solutions I wanted to get into broadcasting, but I didn't want do sports broadcasting. I didn't WanNa do nightly news. So your traditional journalism broadcasting I knew that I, wanted to. Be In a situation on radio and television and the television dream is is building. Where I just wanted to interact with people and be a counselor and a coach I liken myself. To kind of a three headed animal on the show. The Ken Coleman Show on every phone call I am. A. Counselor a coach and a cheerleader. and. It's almost always in that order. Because you gotTA listen. In perceived dig, discern all those things and you hear the problem you hear the challenge of the need, and then you've got to come and begin to coach and teach. And Guide if you will, and then at the end, you know it's Here's your homework assignment. You've got this I believe in you get after it and that's the cheerleader thing. So I had a sense. Of very clear sense. Of what the content was, which was what had helped change my life. When I went through, you know at the age of thirty, one, thirty, two, I'm faced with a real career crisis in that this fire in the belly I had had for public service in politics went away. And I had been aiming towards that and making progress towards that since the age of sixteen. So was a really confusing time for me and so in that time of wrestling through while I know that it's not politics I'm not one, hundred six, you're what it is. And this isn't very difficult to understand. But when clarity doesn't exist confusion reigns, right? Right. You know confusions runs like a cockroach Dila Corner when you turn the light on room and so going through the process that I went through getting Pete Richardson was really informative in my life and some other people and I went through the exercises that Pete told me to do. It was really a self-awareness deep dive. It's a that process gave birth to what I'm doing now. So I was I wanted to give that clarity to somebody else to a lot of somebody else's

Ken Coleman Ramsey Solutions Ramsey Daniel Tardy Pete Richardson Wanna Wrestling Dila Corner
How I Built Resilience: John Zimmer of Lyft

How I Built This

05:24 min | 3 d ago

How I Built Resilience: John Zimmer of Lyft

"We I spoke with John back in two thousand seventeen but now fast forward a few years and like most of us John is dealing with challenges he never anticipated. But when we spoke a few days ago, he sounded pretty optimistic. Personally, I'm doing okay I. Think you know the business has had a tough time but has seen some really strong recovery since the bottom? We were down about seventy five percent at the peak. In terms of rideshare rides, we now return to little. Half. down. which is actually good progress. We've always been a very long term minded company. We've had hard times before we've always been the challenger brand, and so actually I think moments like this are opportunities for us in our team to shine and so happy to share some of that with you. Yeah I WANNA I wanNA talk about that. Let's let's first talk about like kind of drill down to some of the challenges i. There's no question that this has to be the most challenging time in your you know in your leadership of lift I think it's the most challenging time for any business leader founder around the world today for variety of reasons and as you mentioned, it's been a tough year four left to have some layoffs in May I think about thousand. Layoffs which could not have been easy for you to go through. So as you began to see the pandemic having a significant impact on on your business, what kinds of conversations were you having with your your leadership team with your co founder Logan about ways to kind of begin to to build resilience? What are the conversations that we've had or one of the challenges throughout is how many different audiences groups of people that were working to take care of throughout this right so we have our drivers, we have our riders, we have our employees. With an employee's, there's those that are working in person to help drivers at Parisian centers and there are those that could work from home. So all different populations that we want to take care of. Investors as well who who are judging those decisions we make. So I think that's been a really interesting conversation also the conversations around short term thinking versus long term thinking there are short term decisions we need to make in order to preserve the long term mission that we have as a company. In. Those have been really key decisions. You talked about the dot was very, very difficult. It forced us to make hard decisions some of which I think actually. In hindsight were very healthy for the business but very difficult to make especially for people that are all in this tough time where where the market is difficult those were not easy decisions. Let's talk about some of the short term decisions that you had to take. I mean you are publicly traded company So you're obviously countable to investors and it's everything's on the table you have to review can't hide anything first of all, just to keep the business operating and to. Get. You through this time because this is going to be a challenging year and maybe a recovery next year for you we'll talk about that a moment but you knew this was going to be a tough year. So was one of those decisions to retain as much cash on hand was that one of the initial decisions that you had to take? Yeah obviously. So we look at the cash that we have on hand. We also raised our first debt to add cushion. Quite, a strong position where lucky that we went public when we did. Have a you know near nearly three billion dollars in the bank. What we did to start as we ran all different scenarios we said Okay if we were seventy five percent down for six months or two quarters, you know what would the situation be like for cash if we were down, you know for four quarters what would it be like for cash? We ran the the worst case scenarios, the medium case scenarios and the best case scenarios, and then made the decision that you know raising the debt was kind of a no regrets move but then also to your point preserving the cash that we do have on hand. Making decisions about expenses that we had in the office that were more of a luxury making decisions around certain teams. That we needed to tighten up for example, on on the operating side there were some markets where we had to close some of our centers. What are you finding out from users like why what is what is it? That is preventing them from using lift? Is it basically that they just don't have anywhere to go or is it? Is it the fear of being car with somebody else? It's a mix of both you know. I I think it's people changing their transportation behavior, their actual transportation behavior, and then secondarily It's obviously the questions around health safety and I'd love to walk through what we're doing on on that end as open. The APP we ask both driver and rider to confirm that they're wearing a mask. We ask driving rider confirmed that they haven't been in contact with anyone has covert, and we ask everyone to keep their areas clean and open. Windows if possible. So that's gone a long way. If you zoom out actually the fact that half as many rides are being taken now as before I'm actually quite happy within a strange way because I know many people that are they're not going into the office that's a huge change in transportation. So the fact that one out of two rides are still present even in this environment show some flexibility in the model because we've seen different. Types of rides we've seen a lot of essential workers using this way more because there are other options. Potentially public transportation are things that they're more concerned about from a health safety perspective,

John Founder Co Founder Logan
Guy Raz on pursuing business ideas

Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:51 min | 3 d ago

Guy Raz on pursuing business ideas

"Interviewed some of the top entrepreneurs in the world to date. So let's just dive into this because I know my audience fire nation, they want to know what we need to do to. Develop ourselves to start a business to pursue big ideas. What's the next step? The next step to pursue a big idea is hard work I. Mean I mean coming up with an idea right and imagining your product on the shelves of store or or you know improving someone's life or people talking about it? That's the easiest part starting a business that is easiest part when you come up with it. The hard work begins the next day when you. Sit at a table and you start to map out the business plan and then you start to figure out How am I gonNA pay for it? How am I going to get a distributed? How am I GONNA? Make it get a made. How am I going to get it going now? The key and the trick to doing this is to think about about it in the same way that In the same way of an African proverb, there's an African proverb that says the way to eat an elephant is one small bite at a time, and that is essentially the story of creating founding and creating a business. It is one small problem sometimes large problem to the next to the next incident to the next. and. Essentially it's a never ending story running and start starting running a business is about solving problems in a day to day basis but they become more manageable over time and so really to take your idea and to get off the ground, you've got a breakdown down your. Your problems you've got to break down your ideas in smaller chunks and tackle. The challenges one at a

Language Apps Emerge as Lockdown Leaders

Business Wars Daily

03:17 min | 3 d ago

Language Apps Emerge as Lockdown Leaders

"Do wonder just we w Brown as you present business wars daily savant device ACC September. See there while some of spent pandemic free time baking sour dough bread or painting watercolours others chose more. Academic pursuits including learning new skills and even new languages online learning surge during lockdowns linked in learning, which offers online courses. Three times as many people used its offerings. This July compared to last language APP duo lingo also benefited from bad behavior shift. The company lured learners with the promise of letting you quote, learn a new language for free. Forever it's number of US users jumped nearly one hundred, fifty percent between March, twenty nineteen and March. Twenty twenty. The duo lingo look is based around Games bite lessons, include listening exercises, flash cards, and multiple choice questions to help you hone new words and phrases answer a question correctly and you get points. Other exercises make you race against the clock. The APP also connects users learning the same language. So they can practice communicating one study found that thirty four hours of duo lingo learning could get you as proficient as a university class even. Before the pandemic, the APP had become something of a pop culture phenomenon I. Well, it's fun and it's also widely known for its quirky sentences and phrases. Duo Lingo users may find lessons teaching them how to say bow down before your God or what a rude Dolphin along with more useful turns of phrase according to Buzzfeed the company is using artificial intelligence to help improve its interface and become more effective in helping people learn. And it seems to be paying off the startup reached Unicorn status in December and has thirty million active users. But now, brand new online language company is taking a different approach to can is betting that the free time people are voting to online learning during the pandemic is going to evaporate as our lives gradually returned to their old frenetic pace. So why not pare down the language learning process to help you understand enough words to get by the companies headed by Taylor Niemann formerly of meditation APP head space and car leasing. APP. Fair investors just gave the two can't team. Three million dollars in seed funding to give it a shot to can isn't an APP but a free Google chrome extension install at the language you Wanna learn and Voila instant immersion. You'll start seeing words and phrases pop up as you browse you'll pick up vocabulary faster when you see it in context to Kansas plus you're saving time feeling bilingual take quizzes to measure your proficiency and earn achievements to keep you motivated to can currently supports Spanish French Italian German and Portuguese. Now too can won't make you fluent, but it will help you learn enough okabe learn to communicate the team says. Expansion packs give you topic specific collections of basic words and phrases. So if you break your leg in Mexico you can talk your way through the hospital at least one hopes. To can has a long way to go before matching dueling goes. Status, but it's vision for the future goes way beyond the language arena. Nieman. Told Tech Crunch that the company could apply the same concept to history science math or even general information perhaps then schoolteachers might actually encourage students to bring their phones to class imagine that.

Twenty Twenty W Brown United States Taylor Niemann Buzzfeed Kansas Nieman Mexico
Monica Royer, founder and CEO, Monica Plus Andy

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:46 min | 6 d ago

Monica Royer, founder and CEO, Monica Plus Andy

"Hey Everyone Danielle. Here I'm excited to get into this episode with our guest and curly will be back next week today Monica royer joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Monica Andy An organic baby and children's clothing company. Monica had the idea to launch her company literally from the hospital after she gave birth. Who've with the mission of being the most thoughtful children's brand ever created and as we'll get into entrepreneurship definitely runs in her family Monica. Thank you for joining us today welcomed skin from the couch Danielle. Thank you so much for having me. I'm super excited to be here. Thank you. So I just WanNa say that like literally I think one of the days after I had told our team that I. Was Pregnant I had a call with Monica and I was like only slightly panicked about the fact that I was maybe a first time mom and really had no clue what I was doing and was like everyone keeps telling me I need a lay at and I don't even know what that is and Google that and Monica was like such a calming presence and literally knows this case inside a now. Thank you so much what we're is really excited to welcome people into Motherhood, in new, parenthood. So congratulations to you. Thank you. So let's start with an easy question scam your resume. To actually take back to what you can't see on link to in, which is that I came from a very hardworking family and so at the age of twelve, my mom was the manager, the ultrasound department at Good Samaritan. Hospital in Downers Grove and she's like you're gonNA start volunteering. So she went an air sign me up I was working at the front desk outpatient registration and that at fourteen she was like job permit time. So we went I started stocking the shelves at now very defunct retail store of which I. Can't even remember the name but work ethic with something was really important to my parents and so I spent all the time before I graduated from college with all of my summer jobs in the hospital. So physical therapy like you name it I worked all around the hospital when University of Illinois in Champaign Urbana graduated and I immediately got a job in the pharmaceutical industry. So I spent the first decade doing absolutely nothing related to what I'm currently doing but I worked at both Pfizer and Novartis for that decade which was. Very different from currently in that I launched. Monica. Nandy officially in July of twenty fourteen. So now this is my new baby and what I've been most recently working on what's something that we can't Google about you or look up on Lincoln I originally wanted to be a marine biologist. nine or ten old I would have told you wanted to be a marine biologist terrified of the ocean look at seeing but being in it. So that was sort of a non starter, the marine biology career, but I remained totally obsessed with like orcas. Great White Sharks in my very favorite place to travel as the San Juan islands outside of Seattle, marine, biologist, and pharmaceutical industry. This is all very, very interesting. So we're GONNA get into your family. And the support system that you've built around you. But I when I was talking to you a few weeks ago, you were talking about your mom and how her story had such an impact on you tell us about what it was like growing up in your house. What kind of expectations were there? Yeah. So my mom is an immigrant from India. She moved here from India's her dad was dying of Emphysema and some money home when she was nineteen. Years old as I have always a revered both of my parents Andy I always say that will never win the lottery because we did the first time by the parents that we got. So a massive amount of respect for both of them. But my mom, there was something about the family that she came from her family was very matriarchal in in a society in India that was much the opposite in. So my grandfather had nine children altogether the first. Five of which were girls as in India, like at that time most people wanted boys but my grandfather really cherish having girls in he educated each of them like they were boys and so when my mom came here, she came here on sheer well of the education that she had received and so education was of the utmost importance specifically for my mom mom was the only person in her family to marry outside of her Indian cultures or a dad is. Know his ancestors from European background and so my brother and I were so close growing up because we were so different from everybody else we were between world instead of fitting into any world in particular and so I think that unique experience really shaped the adults that we became.

Monica Royer Danielle Founder And Ceo India Google Downers Grove Good Samaritan San Juan Islands Pfizer Emphysema University Of Illinois Nandy Andy Novartis Seattle
How 3 Simple Phone Alarms Changed My Health, Wealth, and Relationships with Eric Partaker

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:43 min | Last week

How 3 Simple Phone Alarms Changed My Health, Wealth, and Relationships with Eric Partaker

"Eric say what's up to fire nation and sure something interesting about yourself that most people don't know aright. Well, yeah. What's up fire nation how excited to be here? This is this is an easy one about ten years ago. I was boarding a return flight to London, and shortly after the cabin doors closed I sent something wasn't right and as the plane descended I had a lot of pressure building in my chest. It soon became pain. Went through the my left arm my whole left arm went completely ice cold by colleague. Next to me he touched my my arm and I remember he said Jesus feels like it's been hanging in a meat locker. Let's Yeah I said too. I said to my I said Lewis. Like something's up man this. This is I'm scared Can You? Can you get some help? And? Louis jumps over runs to a flight attendant. And flight attendant comes overseas on I'm sweating at this point you know feeling really nauseous and she she asks us there's a doctor on board and. at I'm just you know feeling worse and worse doctor comes running over luckily I. Hopefully, there's always a doctor aboard flight nominee knocking lucky. There was one for me he came over. Took my vital signs and he just said immediately he is he said we got to land the plane like a sap i. think he's having a heart attack and when I when I heard those words, you had a heart attack. When you're when you're thirty, five, thousand feet up in the air these are not the words you want to hear. No. You're about as far away from help as you can get and I remember when that plane. On the movies when they talk about something like feeling in an eternity like life is going in slow motion I mean that was exactly what it felt like. Because at the sense, it probably didn't take that long but it felt like forever and I was just terrified on the way down that. My heart was gonNA stop completely I kept having to stop my head like James I'm going to get so close to say the in it's going to be lights out and obviously. I mean, you'd be an absolute magician if you had invited someone to your show who had actually died, right so That wasn't the case we a pain emergency lands. By the way out of a quick side note here I was just too curious to not Google this so. Apparently, it costs about one hundred and fifty thousand dollars to emergency land applying for the airline and I think my ticket costs like one, hundred, fifty bucks. So they did it. They did really poorly with me on that flight man, but you know what I will say to make you feel better if you need it, they likely have insurance for that. So the people who got screwed are the people who should get screwed, which are the insurance companies. Are True. So so plane touches down -mergency response team Russia's on board takes me into a waiting ambulance administered nitrates right away to open up the arteries. And then the ambulance sped off to a local hospital. Did you even know where you are like? Did you even know like what city you're in? No, I had no idea. Yeah. I knew when I got into the ambulance because everyone was speaking trench. Man Because that's the thing about flying over Europe. You're like I I literally have no idea where we're going to descend so that Eric is super interesting my friend I'm gonNA share something else that people don't know about you actually as you might be moving to Puerto Rico at some point in the future the I'll day unconscious. So that'd be super cool as well. So man what a way to kick off this interview of three simple phone alarms that changed Eric's health wealth and relationships, and we already can see that he needed a little change in his health. So talk to us about these three phone alarms that are going to elevate our health work in home fronts. So this is dead simple. And it was driven by that story. I just shared 'cause I have been obsessed with achievement prior to that point for ten years while at Skype Bill we we sold skype to Ebay I two thousand five for about four billion dollars at McKinsey and company. And then a few of my own businesses, but it was like achievement at all costs, right? So including the cost of my health and relationships and And after that, I need any something had to change a new. I needed some some balance and I literally I took my phone one day and I said, okay I'm GONNA put in some alarms and I'm going to label each alarm to reflect what like the best version of me would look like to power the relevant segment of the day and so let me give an example and when you're setting alarm on your phone, for example, if you have, I found, you go into the alarm. And you'll see a section called label and you can actually name the alarm whatever you want, and if you have android, you can go in it's called name you can label it whatever you want so. So for years. Now at six thirty, am the first alarm goes off and it says world fitness champion and I'm not a will fit as champion I never will be but like that's not the point, the point is that for me, that's the phrase that expresses my best on the health front, which is one of the key three areas you get your health, your wealth, or if you want to refer to it as work and your relationships.

Eric Skype London Google Europe Mckinsey Lewis Louis Russia James Ebay Puerto Rico
Khan Academy: Sal Khan

How I Built This

06:58 min | Last week

Khan Academy: Sal Khan

"Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood.

Sal Khan Pat Brown Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana Founder United States Airbnb David Dukes Affi-. New Orleans Jefferson Parish School South Asia Bangladesh Mary Representative President Trump Metairie India
How Arsha Jones Started An ECommerce Empire with Less Than $100

Side Hustle Pro

06:17 min | Last week

How Arsha Jones Started An ECommerce Empire with Less Than $100

"Guys welcome back to the show. This is Michaela and I am so excited to introduce you to today's guest. Today's guest in the hot seat is our show Jones and our show. Hey, our show. Thanks for coming on the show you guys are. One of the people who I've learned the most from this year. Yes. I'm a part of your facebook group as you know. So is a serial entrepreneur and master of many trades. As we speak she's currently operating and managing capital CITCO keeping us all fly through the tease in the trap brand building Iowa's APPs for APPs by the pound all while running the designed blog and facebook group rant bill. So so on this episode, you'll learn how arshile created her first online business with less than a hundred dollars and is now an ECOMMERCE extraordinaire. The welcome to the show our show. Tell us. Tell us more about who you are and what you're currently working on. So. My name name, the journals like you said just. As hard to kind of Embrace that term entrepreneur. You know I put it in bio because it's the easiest. Thing that people can understand without you. Know me having to explain any further but I just you know part of me just doesn't feel like one I'm just a more of a creative. Think of these great ideas and I say how are bring this to light you know so I don't think of me. Oh. I want to create all these businesses I think while that'd be a great product that I could sell, and then it usually turns into something else So each thing that I've started historic off one thing and kind of morphed into something bigger you know. But definitely on my plane is just to be a creative lead who has the ability to see ideas before they're made and know that they be profitable and be fine. You know 'cause this for me it's like. The money is you know but I enjoy the process of it. It's fun to me. To see these things come to live come to life rather and so So that's GONNA. Margot here is you know entrepreneurship is kind of the side It's kind of the five part that happens along with being creative but I just a maker at heart maker. If, I didn't have this I probably be a crafter or. Someone at home like gluing things to get. Definitely have. Creative. Brain and five and like. You know you remind me of the quote unquote the phrase bias for action like you see that on a lot of people's by like. Like I love meeting people who really epitomized that because when you think of an idea, you're like Oh let me let me so I had this. Thought those product together. But before we get into the business as a little bit where are you from like how? Up Bridges Lewis's creative Well, Wa was born raised in Washington DC and I currently live in Maryland but it was partly because of my parents so. You know like most parents you know their idea of they were coming raised with the idea that she would come trade and I'm going to get a government job or something more steady. You know engineer doctor lawyer or something like that But my father kind of wanted us to go into a different direction in. So he kinda pushed us into the arts. Okay. So from a age I would say like eight or nine I always had eager to draw actively or play an instrument actively So. I played the cello. for about eight years amongst other instruments but kind of my heart was in art. So I kind of chose that as a thing I wanted to do. So I did art all through high school until school and then graduated went to these you in Richmond and gut graduated with a BFA. What I didn't realize was that I, didn't really have a plan for my life. And it wasn't like that in college I was like wait. So I'm supposed to like pain control like has wanNA. Make money. Like never even dawned on me that I'd like need a job I love. And so this is around the time that. kind of the DOT com boom had happened. So I learned fairly easily how to design websites and so that kind of kind of figuring out the creative side always had was able to keep a job based on the web design skills that I saw graduated with a BFA. Like I said. With his huge creative background but my but but my day job was web design So that kind of got me into building websites, understanding design understanding how the Web, works, understanding marketing. Social, media and and all that fun stuff and that led me into blogging. Okay. So then because I would get, I would feel questions about the blogging, hosting in how to set up a website and so I put blog. Okay. I'll put a blog. And I'll get all these affiliate links and click. Well. You know I figured out the system and I was making like a passive income about a thousand dollars a month and I was like, wow okay. If I had this thousand dollars a month bright IF I sell a product than I probably can like take another thousand dollars. and. So And for launched, I ended up launching capital. because. Capital city, we sell a wing sauce called capital city Mumbo sauce, and both of is in A. Wing sauce that we originally created is this assaults that you can get here in Washington, DC, metropolitan area

Facebook Washington Bridges Lewis Michaela Jones Engineer Doctor Lawyer Margot A. Wing Iowa Maryland Richmond WA DC
Breaking Through as a Challenger Brand in a Dominating Industry with Michael Landa

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:21 min | Last week

Breaking Through as a Challenger Brand in a Dominating Industry with Michael Landa

"Michael say what's up to fire nation and share something interesting about yourself that most people don't know probably feared asked people my office they would not know was trying to think earlier is one thing that they definitely would not know about me and that is that up until about I'd say probably a couple of years ago I could still do a standing backflip in my office. So Yeah. I kinda grew up as a competitive gymnast when I was in high school and then I was non-american swimmer. So I mean swimming was really my main sport. But I competed a lot on the floor exercises in gymnastics as well, which is something people most people don't know about me. I've just always had this feeling that if I ever tried a standing backflip immediately tear my MC l. that's just a thought that I I don't know why I had that thought that's why I said for years ago try. Not Going to happen. So fire nation as I shared the talking all about teaching an old dog new tricks and my guest today has launched a company called New Loewe, which is a combination of the words nutrition and love. So that Super Cool New Loewe and why Michael I mean, you went to business school why did you decide to start a pet food company before the PETRIE company? Kind of the Genesis of the Food Company was a company I started? Before new I, I'd spent the early part of my corporate career working for big companies. I used to work for is your oxen in General Electric, and then most recently with universal studios in. Two thousand one that I was in L. A. and I was taking a quick break and. I found I. Don't know how many of you have been through the experience of trying to find a pet sitter for your pet. I went through an experience, sperry the detail, but basically led me to leave universal and start what became the nation's largest at home pet sitting dog-walking training business. Is based in Los Angeles and we. I spent about a decade running that company and was it was in and of itself was a really cool business about one, hundred, eighty five. Pet Sitters dog walkers doing roughly eleven thousand a month all over Greater La, and you know the significance of that was I was you know we're on the front lines of feeding a large population of dogs and cats whether parents were traveling and over the course of the decade I really started to see a huge demand for pet sitters who could administer at home insulin shots, and this is for diabetic dogs and cats, and we eventually it started to stress the business where I couldn't hire that tax and and trained my sitters to give shots fast enough and you know one thing I was trained academically as a biomedical engineer. So I I can be annoying and in my ability to kind of. Dig for root causes and that's exactly what I did in this case is you know I started asking myself like what what's happening why are so many pets getting sick why are so many dogs and cats getting diabetes and? I went out and talking to vet schools and scientists around the country and you know what I learned wasn't I'm GonNa say it wasn't really rocket science but it was you know essentially that are pets are living in in their own version of fast food nation we have you know we we have a country where four. A large large conglomerates control over eighty percent of the pet food sales in the United States and you know these are the very companies that make candy, chocolate, Jelly and cereal right. These are these are the four that control eighty percent of our pet food distribution the US. So you know. Really. The majorities are really low in meet their high in carbohydrates, these high glycemic ingredients. They're marketed very well but unfortunately, dogs and cats can't use the food for themselves otherwise, they choose products that are high in meat. That's one of the reasons you know I. Before I even gave it much thought I was leading Los Angeles moving to Austin Texas and I started new Loewe with the objective of creating a food platform. That's more species Pacific for dogs and cats at high in meet low in carbs and look like

Food Company Los Angeles New Loewe Michael Universal Studios Diabetes General Electric United States Petrie Company Austin Texas
Should You Offer Chat Support in Your Business?

The $100 MBA Show

06:05 min | Last week

Should You Offer Chat Support in Your Business?

"Like I mentioned that the top of the episode chat support is a great solution. We've been doing chat support under Ninja for over four years. Now we offer twenty, four, seven life support, and it's one of the hallmarks of our company. It's one of the big reasons why our customers stay customers and the reason people choose us over our competitors but there was a lot of work that needed to be done before we were ready to offer chat support. There's some foundational work you need to do and things you need to consider before you make that switch. It's also important to understand that once you offer chat support. It's one of those things that you want to offer it. It's really hard for you not to offer it again. So once people get used to a certain level of support, you might start with email. Then you'll at chat support if things are not going right or you didn't set yourself up properly and then you remove chat support this disgruntled some customers and really can affect their experience and mega make him feel really took something away from them that they're used to maybe enjoyed. So there are a few things I want to highlight that will help you get prepared to launch chance support in your business the right way. First of all, why would you want to offer chat support in the first place? Why don't you just stick to email more and more every single day every single month every single year chat support is becoming the new phone support. Prefer to chat. Now, text than to get on a phone call it's often faster to solve a problem get questions answered through chat suppor- think about it most people don't make phone calls or take phone calls or get phone calls that often but they sent a lot of text messages and facebook messages and what's happened all that stuff. It's a way for you to go back and forth with your customer live and get them a win in that moment in the moment, they reach you the moment they visit your website allows them to make a decision quickly rather than the hit your website, and then they're like, oh, I, have a couple questions. Let me see if they have. An e mail or contact form and most people don't even go that far they're just leave the website and check out a competitor. But if you have chat support allows them to say hey, I got a quick question. Let me just ask right now there's somebody right there and that question could be very simple. It can be somebody overlooked it could be something that's on your website or on your your sales pages, and the answer that question could make them feel confident enough to make a purchase right then and there it's also a huge benefit a huge benefit for your customers that already paying you. They feel like you always have their back and you're just one message away. And flat out chat support is just fun. You can send him Ho- Jeez and Jeff's funny images, and you can really express your brand and your style through Chad. The email really doesn't do as well. A lot of our branding is done through chance support a lot of our customers become customers because we're like everything like your style on chat your team really made me feel comfortable and welcomed in a professional yet casual way. So what are some of the things that you need to consider before you say Yep, let me go ahead and go chat support. The first thing I want to say to you is a Lotta people think okay. What software do I need to chat with? You know there's a lot of chat software out there whether it's intercom. Or. Fresh desk or Zen desk or help scout there's so many out there. Right and all the offers are pretty much assume depends on your needs not gonNa really get into that right now that's the easy part. But what are the things you need to consider is your customer base where is your customer base? Do you serve only a national market the covers maybe A. Few time zones or your customers international around the world. If that's the case you need to make sure you're able to offer your chat support twenty, four seven throughout the day. So you can cover the entire globe that means having at least three people on chat or on your customer support team. Each of them have an eight hour shift. Now, some people they start with five. It is week of chat versus seven days a week, and that's a good way to get into the game. But if your customers are global, you need to consider the fact that you can't just offer chat certain hours of the day. Those hours could just be in the middle of the night for somebody else and it's just really not a benefit at all you also. Have to take a look at if you have the manpower, the staff to be able to handle the amount of chats are getting. Now if you're on email support right now, this is not a good measure. Why? Because email support takes a little bit effort for the customer to actually send an email they'll probably go through a few other hoops or maybe how the tutorials or Do, a little bit of Reading for trying to figure it out themselves before they email, and this is while I will start with mail because it lowers the number of support requests but also drastically lowers the number of presell emails or chats or you'll messages. So as soon as you offer chat on your website, it's Gong to invite more conversation. That's a good thing because you're. Getting in touch with their customers and you're making connections, but it's also something you need to consider because if you were getting, let's say a hundred emails a day in email support. That's no indication of how many messages are going to get in chat because that's really going to open up the floodgates because now it's easily accessible. People can easily chat with you and send a message. It's not always easy to predict, but the traffic to your website is really a good indicator forgetting getting over one hundred thousand visitors to your website. You're going to have a good amount of those people chatting with you asking questions out say ten percent is a good measure at least ten percent people are going to reach out and ask questions especially, if you prompt them to ask questions, which is really cool. You noon chant. Throwing the pricing you can ask, Hey, you got any questions about pricing or choosing the right plan for yourself chataway with us. If you think about that, if you have if you have one hundred, thousand visitors every month that means ten thousand people chat with you every month now you might think that's a law is a lot and it's better free to over estimate and be ready for the traffic.

Facebook Ho- Jeez Chad Jeff
A conversation with Lilli Gordon, founder and CEO of First Aid Beauty

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:21 min | Last week

A conversation with Lilli Gordon, founder and CEO of First Aid Beauty

"Hey everyone. This show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The skin is still working from home for the time being because of open nineteen. Today Billy Gordon is our guest on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of First Aid beauty a clean beauty company on a rescue mission to solve skin challenge. This first aid beauty has also recently announced an initiative to rescue college graduates from their student debt through a new million dollar commitment called the FAB. Lily, thank you for joining us. Welcome to skin from the couch. Thank you. I'm excited to be here. Let's start with the question that we ask everyone, which is skim your resume for us well, I have to. Degree in math from potent college and. Graduate Degree in MBA from the University of Chicago my first job was in the operations research section of Arthur D. little, and then I left there to work for a startup company called analysis group in Economic and financial consultant firm where became a partner Asking me to go way way back. This is how we learn interesting things. Okay. So then at the time business did not late nineteen eighty s early ninety nine Hayes corporate takeovers were giant thing shareholders and boards of directors. CEO's of major pepper corporations were battling with each other. So I got into the business of corporate governance was giving advice to large companies institutional investors I was doing a lot of writing in academic journals. I was truly a talking head during that point Amana joined the Bass family. For the best family from Fort Worth Texas in we raised over almost two billion dollars to do corporate governance investing activists investing it would be called today. From that point I made a totally unexpected segue into the beauty business and became a partner for fresh well-known. Company, into that for number of years we sold to your May. I moved on after a couple of years did some consulting hop back into the worlds of corporate governance? As a partner in a startup hedge fund, the founder of the Hedge Fund was killed in a tragic accident about a month and a half after I started and I was like, why am I gonNa do and I decided to start my own duty company in that was first beauty and this has been my last job and here we are so we're GONNA get into a lot of that. But before we do that, I'm just curious like what is something we would all be shocked to know about you. Know How shopping this is, but I'm totally addicted to sit DOCO and. Meditate but pseudo going Ken puzzles are literally my meditation when I want to turn off all the noise. That's interesting because that part of my brain that would really stress me out I always think it's interesting when people are really good at pseudo 'cause I am not will I said it's not surprising because given my analytical in my math background figures that would be doing something like that for relaxation. WanNa Kinda dig into your career. You've obviously you quite dirty that switched such industries, which roles and really just curious. You've spent half of your career in finance economics. As you said, your math major, how did you find beauty? What made you feel like this was the right category for you. You know a good friend of mine is always advised me to be a river in open to opportunities and when I was in that fallen with the Bass family, it was actually winding down and I had a lot of time on my hands. And I was a big fan of fresh, which is a Boston based company in literally on the weekends but was rainy debt. Let's go visit fresh because just loved to smell everything and see the store and I got to know the founders.

Founder And Ceo Partner Bass Family Founder Hedge Fund Billy Gordon Boston CEO Lily First Aid Arthur D. Little University Of Chicago Fort Worth Texas Amana KEN Consultant
A $300B Industry and Growing: Find Your Opportunity in the Online Course Industry with Greg Smith

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:01 min | 2 weeks ago

A $300B Industry and Growing: Find Your Opportunity in the Online Course Industry with Greg Smith

"Greg say what's up to fire nation and something interesting about yourself that most people don't know how low fire nation. So excited to be back. Something that most people don't know. If my wife knows this I watched the movie, the founder of McDonald's story. So I cried during that movie. This there's a reason. My wife doesn't know I was a little embarrassed to admit I. cried during that movie at the scene where you know you might not expect any tears. When the original guys not the see the founder of the move in the movie. But the original guys who created it are in a parking lot and they've sort of chalked out and mapped out the the shape of their kitchen and they're passing trays and Burgers like mock trays and burgers around. For days trying to optimize how the flow of food through the kitchen is going to go to build this optimal system. Really brought tears to my eyes because to me it was like entrepreneurship at its best like just people who are so passionate about something that they had to get it just right and they were willing to like spend days in this parking lot doing something that everyone else would probably think they were totally crazy doing and yet then came up with the McDonald's system out of it. Man I. Love that you have such an entrepreneurial heart in that direction. That is super cool and as you were kind of describing that I could definitely picture that scene unfolding and just being like man these guys just really care and they're so committed and fire nation. That's how you have to be by the way. That's how Greg is with his company think havoc and that's why we've just today as you're listening to this started. An amazing year, long partnership because we've been using epic now for years and years and years the podcasters paradise and we love them for all of those reasons because it's just the best core software to use you. Now, we've even getting together and you know speaking of like putting together the perfect system we still have, of course, a lot of tinkering to do because that's what we do by. We've come up with this amazing five. Day course challenge completely for free fire nation. If you knew how much time Greg his team myself and kid of putting behind the scenes to make this amazing course challenge for you, which by the way is free like you'd be blown away but it's just because Greg hair his team cares kate nine we care and that's why we really hope you do take that action and get over to think epic dot com slash fire we'll. Be Talking more about this challenge. At the end of the episode, we have a lot to cover today we're talking all about the three, hundred, billion dollar industry and growing in how you fire nation can find your opportunity in the online course industry with, of course, the best person to talk to about this with Greg Smith. So let's talk about the recent events because we do live in a different world than we did year ago. How has these recent? With cove in the such affected, the online course membership. Yeah, it's had a long term impact on it and it's been amazing to see it happen obviously so much tragedy in the events that have happened and are happening. But on the if you're on the side of creating online business and in particular in courses and membership sites, it is it is wild there's so much changing their so quickly. I see first of all, it's like the future has we've just been teleported into the future. All the projections people had for twenty twenty, five twenty. Five years from now are happening right now, and so the market size is exploded. Really really quickly in terms of more people, creating courses, more people, taking courses, and to be honest it's a little bit like the wild west out there in a good way and that there are so many people who are taking courses for their first time ever now that there's a a new way of looking at things. So it's it's it's easier to get started than it's ever been, and it's created this environment where I mean really if you're starting most online businesses or an especially in courses in memberships. been any better time to get started

Greg Smith Founder Mcdonald Twenty Twenty
The Value Of Understanding Your Cultural Enemy

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:20 min | 2 weeks ago

The Value Of Understanding Your Cultural Enemy

"Now, amongst other things, Steve's is the former chief creative officer overt vein media and he was talking about brandon programming. This idea that branch should think of themselves as media companies and then create content or branded programming that is consistent with the brand message but is also in a format that people want to consume and one of the ideas that he touched upon this idea of identifying your cultural enemy which I thought was pretty clever because a lot of people have trouble describing what it is they want their brand to be be the what it is or what they aspire for to be but. Most people do know what they don't like. So if you can identify what type of culture, what type of organization, what type of brand is not what you want to be then it's much easier for you to stop getting clarity on what it is. You do want to be at the very least you can identify the actions you don't want to take the actions you want to avoid so that you don't become like your cultural enemy even if you don't end up with total clarity on water these your culture is at least you'll understand what it's not gonNa be, and you'll avoid it becoming your cultural enemy. So question for you, who is your cultural enemy? Already. That is for today I do thank you for your

Steve Chief Creative Officer Brandon
What Everyone Forgets About Money

Optimal Finance Daily

04:44 min | 2 weeks ago

What Everyone Forgets About Money

"What everyone forgets about money by Crowning Chris. RINING DOT COM. Washing dishes was how I earned my first paycheck when you're fifteen years old and don't get money from your parents to buy things then you have to work. So there. I was scrubbing dishes in the filthy kitchen of a small family owned Italian restaurant, and it's where I learned a little life lesson work is nothing more than trading time for money a medium of exchange. You provide one hour of time to an employer and they provide an hour's wage. I quickly discovered teenagers time isn't worth all that much a measly four, twenty, five per hour. Not long after starting that job I wanted this blind melon album. You might remember their catchy song no rain. One Saturday afternoon wandering the aisles in K. Marts, electronics, department I saw it for sale. Cool. I'm getting it. The price was sixteen, Ninety, eight for whatever reason I did the mental math to figure out the album didn't really cost me seventeen dollars. No, it costs four hours on your feet washing never ending streams of bus tubs overflowing with half finished plates of meat balls is this CD worth four hours of my time. In this case it was but more importantly, you realize the money tucked in your wallet isn't money at all. It's time disguised as money. In fact, it was Benjamin Franklin who said time is money but in our hectic day to day lives, it's easy to forget this. When you spend your money, what you're really doing is spending your time, which means if you waste your money, you waste your time. anyways throw my teens I worked a series of jobs, bagging groceries, stocking merchandise theater concessions, and mostly saved my earnings my time to precious and then I went off to college started a career and forgot what I learned. have. You heard that saying from Texas big hat no cattle meaning you can look rich but be poor. It's hard to believe people who make lots of money are poor. But then your tax preparer tells you they see plenty of families making three hundred thousand dollars and living paycheck to paycheck Thomas Stanley profiles. These folks in the millionaire next door, the doctor lawyer types who drive fancy cars living exclusive neighborhoods and take exotic vacations they look rich, but it's an illusion. It's the families who make one hundred, thousand dollars spent forty thousand and have a million dollars in the bank who are rich. Isn't the worst irony that the simplest way to get rich and have lots of money to spend his by not spending lots of money. But just because it's simple to get rich doesn't mean it's easy spend less than you earn and invest the difference that simple would makes getting rich so difficult is that spending less than you earn takes discipline the median retirement account is worth twenty, five, thousand dollars, and so the problem isn't paying people more money they'll save more give people more money to spend and they'll spend more money. I know this because back in my twenties, I spent just like the next person you think acquiring loss of material possessions satisfying all your superficial desires is the key to happiness. It took me years to relearn what I knew as a teenager. The things you buy with money that you surround yourself with aren't things at all it's your time. And research shows it's having control over your time that makes you happiest not money and things. So, most people have a choice. You can trade time for money and money for things, or you can trade time for money and then use that money as a tool to buy back time. That's why you save and invest, which reminds me of what stoic philosopher Seneca said quote. It's not that we have a short time to live but that we waste much of it life is long enough and it's been given to us in generous measure for accomplishing the greatest things if the whole of it is well invested. But when life is squandered through soft and careless living, and when it spent on no worthwhile pursuit death finally presses and we realized that the life which we didn't notice passing has passed away and quote. What he's saying is when you're about to die, you realize life is time and doesn't that make time your most precious resource. Here think about it like this see, you've worked forty hours per week for the past ten years. You've traded twenty thousand hours of your time. That's forty hours times, fifty weeks, times, ten years, and on the other side of the trade is everything you've consumed sure necessities like food clothing, shelter and healthcare but probably a bunch of other stuff you've totally forgotten about buried in the back of some closet. Was it a fair trade? Maybe it was maybe it wasn't but people are always telling me they've earned million dollars over the past ten years and have nothing to show for it and it makes them sick. They're not complaining about wasting their money. What they're complaining about is wasting their time. Trade wisely.

K. Marts Benjamin Franklin Thomas Stanley Texas Seneca
We're All In The Same Ocean, But Not The Same Boat

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:07 min | 2 weeks ago

We're All In The Same Ocean, But Not The Same Boat

"We're all in this together we're all in the same boat. How often have you heard comments like that? In recent months, the problem is the whilst with certainly old sailing on this same corona virus ocean when not in the same boat each of us have different capacities to weather the storm whether that's financial physical or emotional, and if you wanNA take the metaphor a bit further. Even. Though we're all silent on the same stormy coronavirus ocean. The storm has a different intensity depending on where you are in the world you I need to talk to a couple of people from different countries around the world to understand how different the impact is from one country to another and so yes, we are all dealing with the Corona Vars, but we all have different capacities to deal with it number one and. Number two the ferocity of how it's impacting on AL lives differs from person to person place to place I just think that's an important perspective to keep in mind at a time like this and probably always, and yes, this is really just a message to myself

Corona Vars AL
When the Business World Shifts Gear, Use It to Accelerate Your Business with Agie Sihotang

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:19 min | 2 weeks ago

When the Business World Shifts Gear, Use It to Accelerate Your Business with Agie Sihotang

"Augie say what's up to fire nation and sure something interesting about yourself that most people don't know fire nation I hope all of your healthy. Most people don't know about me most people don't know that I'm not a big fan of sweets I don't really eat dessert but if you come to the negotiation table with Fried Bananas Boba Drink, you will definitely out negotiate me Oh brother come down to Puerto Rico I will bring some fungal which are fried planes and you're GONNA be in heaven and everybody's GonNa win. I will lose for sure. So, fire nation has shared the we're talking about when the business world, the shift gear, which of course, it has, we need to accelerate our business and we're going to use this shift to do just that. Now let's just be honest covid nineteen. Was Cry and it is Cray Cray. So if our e commerce business was hurt because of this pandemic, what can we do? You are absolutely correct a lot of people were hurt by it are still hurting by well as the title says, shift gear adapt to the surrounding s an example a lot of Amazon. Sellers were affected in March in mid March because Amazon. Announced that it was limiting the fulfillment by Amazon or the FBI shipment meaning you can't send most of your products Amazon warehouse to store and to have itself. Through the FBI program as a customer, you might have noticed just delays in your products being delivered to your house, but as third party sellers, the couple or the few weeks that restriction created so much damage because people rely on the system. So it was a nightmare for most people they had to lay off some people they had to close them some of their categories or businesses or products that they're selling I, feel bad for them. But what I found, some creative entrepreneurs started to do the fulfillment of the sales themselves. They might have to store the products and their house or even their apartment. Some even started to look for a third party fulfillment company, which is pretty simple. By the way all you gotta do is Google Third Party fulfillment company in Los Angeles or New York wherever they might be and they will be able to fulfil your sales like an Amazon warehouse would be some even started to look into other platforms to sell it. So when the business world shifts gear, they used it to accelerate their business. Now, this this is when as a business owner business leader as an entrepreneur, you wanna have a fluid model in your business. Like water water always adopts to its vessel right so no matter how weird looking the vessel is water will always adapt to it. I understand that a lot of ECOMMERCE businesses are on survival mode right now. But don't be discourage. In your line of Business or category, there are gaps in the marketplace. There are problems in the marketplace that have never been faced before and you can adapt to them and fill the gap. You just have to look and ask everyone you're in business with to see what kind of gap you can fill and use it to accelerate your business. I believe instead of being an online seller jail d you need to be an online solver people have problems, people have problems, businesses have problems, some that they've never ever faced before. We're all new to this. We've never experienced anything like this unless maybe you you were alive hundreds of years ago, but I doubt it. So once you are creative once you become creative and listen to your surroundings, you'll be able to take that inner problem solving drive that most of us wrote in our first resume fire nation. If you are able to provide the best solution to your customers biggest problem, you're going to win a period. It doesn't matter the time it doesn't matter what's going on in this world you will. Win and I love how you put this Augie adapt or die. I mean I'm GonNa get old dramatic air adapt or die. But the good news is fire nation were human beings. We've been adapting for seventy thousand plus years and we're GONNA continue to do so and this those e commerce business owners the do adapt they can adapt that are not just going to survive, but they're going to thrive in this new world that we live in, and now I love the phrase Augie your network is your net worth. How can We properly use our network to provide solutions for our customers. I am an absolute believer in that I absolutely believe that we need to use our network at least to do three things. Number one is to generate revenue. If ten people know what you do right now and you create the amount of business that you're generating right now, multiply it most businesses, not all the most are a numbers game the more seat you throw out there the more trees you can expect to grow proper watering is needed I get that number's game. Number to create opportunities I mentioned earlier that everyone has a problem be a problem solver. If you're an online seller, you are shy in talking to people well, be a problem solver be an online problem-solver. You can still do that the more variety half a your network, the more you can build something.

Amazon Augie Business Owner FBI Cray Cray Puerto Rico Google New York Los Angeles
Tantra for High Performance with Victoria Redbard

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Tantra for High Performance with Victoria Redbard

"As I mentioned in the introduction will be talking about entre for high performance and my pronouncing that correctly Victoria is tawny tra-. Yeah. I like the way act and you sound with your accent. Very. Cool. We're GonNa Fun Conversation Today and I WanNa Know What this New Paradigm leadership looks like. So break it down for us. What does that mean the New Paradigm leadership and what does it look like? It's the kind of a change in the economy know it's like A. With, things have been in this overpowered I'm it's. Like building fair and kind of creating from that place stress on I think that this new pattern is coming through is just like this place of abundance in giving and Really. Comes in where we are in this place of like the love with ourselves and connection to to every pot about like no pot of us get left behind and when we create from that place like awareness that flow site from the expansion of a renewed like organic state is so much that can. Change the way that you know everything that the ripple effect on from there is huge. Do want to really dive into this mentality about abundance versus scarcity because let's be honest. You know twenty thirty years ago. There is some reason as some understanding why people had this scarcity mindset we all like lived in these small towns spread out across the world and it was like well, Hey, if like I opened a car dealership next to the other car dealership like. Like if I sell a car that means he or she's not selling your car like this mindset of scarcity was pretty prevalent in the world, and then of course, the Internet came in changed everything. Now, we just have this opportunity for abundance because there's so many pieces of Pie. In fact, you know there's like all this abundant pieces of the pie for everybody in every niche and that's why I. Love talking to people who are really carved out these specific cool niches in their life and they're able to have an abundance mindset around that. So I really love the world the we've evolved into and I. Want to dive more into this as we kind of have this conversation. But let's go to get into how tantric practices can actually change the way you lead your company like how can we apply? Your expertise in tantric practices for fire nation leading their businesses entrepreneurs love that that she something that I'm really exploring right now I feel like the the major pace of Light Hal i. do things a little differently is like really by trusting in like the energy of Aeros United States like these energy in our body it's like this life force energy is always there and I feel like we get to have a choice with it and I think most the time when people think about our energy like there's like a fear of it you know it's like arousal it's Yet it's kind of like this overriding energy and I think that when we start to gain mosque with, it actually allows us to kind of build on that plane abundance that we just spoke. Oh, so it's likely coming back to that baseline of life thought we come from sex we come from this vibration that is a much deeper than the polarity that that is built around. And often even the way that most people having sex in the world right now is from this place of like not wanting to feel their emotions and wanting to just jump like away from any kind of feeling to do the job. And I feel that. This is really about you know building from. mcclay solves. expansive energy I think one of the reasons why people are so fearful of their Kenji because it is expensive in if we think about like. Times that we felt contracted triggered or. Via and we make decisions in our business from that place. It always kind of leads to like a string on effect of war things going wrong in the business more problems to kind of do with because we've made these decisions were placed feel or as I feel like when we come into this bicycle arousal this kind of. Energy that's actually naturally pumping body and we're not leaving any mess behind. It's someone's like we get into this state so. In the big difference in May when people masturbate pleasure and they kind of just rushing with disco to get little Gaza. Pushing possible without of their emotional body to. His goal so they can have a stress relief. On. The other side of that is when we actually like slowly build the energy in the body and allow the parts of is that have been behind that day possible is it might be vulnerable must. Micro survival scarcity that she kinda come back to ourselves really like a rise from that play when people go into that kind of orgasmic state from the is this You know it's like I would connect into that dot oneness feeling that. Feeling of unity with everything and they're not operating that place of scarcity competition or any of those places, and that locked the non-effective that flows that comes into. Everyday life into your business is huge and he started light bring that every single moment of my life in the way that I describe I'm seth pleasure is to conduct like be with the body in in every moment rather than actually just like going into my body and I'm going to have an orgasm I'm GonNa Pleasure I'm GonNa have arousal right now it's like as she would've out of my body want to be with me. And so it's one of listening to the body and I feel like we saw to do that in a business. Then when not going to be stuck in these making decisions from fear spies or you know thinking like we need to compete against others, we kinda going to be disconnected your essence and entrust for that and You know trust that we're actually really supported moving from that place. I think that's rijn if like everybody was was making business decisions from that kind of expansive flow state when I'm influence, I have the experience like now all my decisions Econo- the right decision is a con. Get it wrong when I'm in

Victoria United States Kenji
You Can Also Learn From Those Still On The Journey

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

01:53 min | 3 weeks ago

You Can Also Learn From Those Still On The Journey

"Past week or so of being doing these one on one Kohl's, which is something that oil offered is part of the one thousand episodes celebrations and as I said at the start of that I don't pretend that go to Lance's but I am pretty good asking questions and if I do that between the two of us, we might just be able to help you some sort of clarity on where you're going and that's pretty much the way it's played out over the over the past week. And what really come to realize during this week and more so than ever I think is that you don't need to have arrived to be able to help other people on the journey. I think sometimes, we look for advice only from those that have achieved what we deem to be success but the reality is that we can learn as much not just from people who failed but from people that are still on the journey, you don't need to go to only those people have already arrived at the destination seek their advice on how to get there. You can actually learn just as much from people who are at various stages along the same as you or even a different journey. and. I think that's an important message also for people in terms of offering their advice and offering their teaching, it's not just the people that are looking to learn. It's the people could actually take I feel that I've in this past week or so. The risk of sounding a little league testicle I? I've helped a few people along the journey even though I don't necessarily think for one second that I've reached my destination or that I've necessarily achieve what I need to achieve along my journey. So I think there's a lot of you out there that probably feel like you don't maybe have a lot. To offer in terms of teaching others but the reality is even if you haven't made even if you have an achieve success regardless of where you are on your journey, you still have the ability to teach others and help others along the way or

Lance
The GREATEST Wealth Strategy of All Time with Reshveen Rajendran

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:36 min | 3 weeks ago

The GREATEST Wealth Strategy of All Time with Reshveen Rajendran

"The greatest wealth strategy of all time who is not going to press play on this I mean fire nation if you're listening to this right now you obviously did I'm excited chat about this because there's a lot we're going to be covering and you have quite the story forest US brothers. So let's dive right into the story because I want to know how does a person go for making a million dollars a year to a million dollars a week break down for This year collected to combat a once and what happened was Tony Robbins became speaking been. Talked about how to dominate me say there's one Gorby said if you give more than every other person to give more Salvia yourself more than every other person in your industry, then you dominate and you win. Any. Seat John I think sometimes you know. Sometimes gets in your body in your soul. So like did quarter really really sunk in men how do you? How do I give more than everybody else and then really really stood something thinking my spirit is this something in my soul. Came back. Entrepreneur on file. Also, fire on fire to give money every single person all day in my industry and dude, you know like if you seen my actions like the action that. Are Given so much a neural. Brunton did something you said give your best stuff for free? I need this things man I need this do things I get my best offer free contrary what entrepreneurs beliefs And I. meet. Sure that I guess more than everybody else out there that nobody would even catch up what else doing this Halloween four million dollars in a year to generating a million dollars in a single week in the month of June I mean fire nation. This is one of those lessons you just have to really absorb just like rush Wien absorbed at Tony Robbins quote so. Eloquently it is critical to recognize the fact that when people don't know you when they don't necessarily have the opportunity to trust you yet they're not just going to lay down their hard earned money to invest in a product or a service or coaching from you like whatever that might look like you need to earn that trust and what better way than what rush Wien. Is talking about by giving the best of yourself for free to completely out serving your competition to such a level that you absolutely dominate and rush, and you're talking to fire nation. It's it's a massive audience around the world and a lot of people right now are saying, well, how do we even get started like I'd love to make a million dollars a week heck. I'd love to make a million dollars a year mean I'd love to make a million dollars over the next five years. That's a lot of money. But what would you say is the best way for somebody listening right now who has very little to get started generating income for themselves. Good. I. Love This. I. Love Your Question Man I love Christian and Syed. I have. I run my company Eramet Company. DEEM RUSH DOT COM check me out and stuff but ironic company in John. I wanted to share with you that I have this vision sue big in my vision is to create the largest community of givers in the would. That's my vision. That's what I've actually set my mind to do. In you know, it's very interesting that you asked me the question because just yesterday somebody actually asked me the same question, right? He is like. So again, a swimming bullock following me and yesterday somebody actually means wishing. He's like rush. Why don't you reply? Why don't you reply to messages right. So again, let me read you this exact messages crazy man, right so You to play I know you told me give more or you didn't know this but I have nothing to give men I will surely stop giving once not growing. Right see the problem is is in many people always see I will give I get rich I will give what I have the knowledge I will you know I will do whatever it takes but. When heavy but he meant you give when you have nothing. I don't know if it makes sense like what I'm seeing. Make sense but you know it's like. Women people tell me that. I was giving when I started growing I'll stop the meeting when I actually make money doesn't make sense. To me is like telling me like he made, I'll stop eating right excising. When I get expect right? Like Dude, you get the six pack because you're eating right and because you are

Tony Robbins United States Gorby John Eramet Company Brunton
Opportunity Through Persistence with Cordia Harrington

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Opportunity Through Persistence with Cordia Harrington

"Hey, guys you know what I love about America and the free, market? Enterprise. What I love about business leadership is what I love about Andre Leadership and that is that we believe that great success can come from humble beginnings. You guys know this. You know in our country, it doesn't matter what your skin color is. It doesn't matter if you're male or female. All. It takes passion drive and a desire to make a difference. You may say why don't have enough money to get started? I don't have enough education I. Don't know the right people guys. I'm telling you those are all just excuses. From the Ramsey network this is the entreleadership podcast where we help business leaders, themselves, their teams and their prophets. I'm your host Daniels Hardy and my guest today is Accordia Harrington she's the founder and CEO of the Bakery Coast today they've got multiple plants and customers around the world including. McDonald's Oh Charlie's pretty big deal. But. It didn't start out that way and like a lot of great success stories that start with really humble beginnings accordions is really not that much different. And all began for her and a small town in Arkansas. I started my first business in Russellville. Arkansas. Do you know where that is i? Know Arkansas. Russell. Okay. Well. Down a beautiful town on a lake about halfway between Little Rock and Fort Smith and my first business was a real estate company concept one realtors and foretelling we use tweet emblem on a real estate vine. Yeah. Little. Did I know? And that began. With the good fortune of having bartered for office space from a doctor that had a big empty building and least my chairs and my desk three dollars a month for the deaths and a dollar fifty a month for the chairs and I was in the real estate business us all five hundred, eighty, seven dollars to buy plywood signs to put in front yards and it grew and it was so much fun. The ladies that I hired. We were the first off you mill business in Arkansas, and the men bankers would literally come by to see what we're doing. And we would stage houses. That's before we knew what staging was and we would try to rearrange the furniture in houses so that they showed the best and it took off so you're showcasing the houses to make them look great. That's very common these days. What was it uncommon? Totally people thought we were so weird to come into their house and stake some pictures down in rearrange the furniture Abed we were trying to give them the best opportunity to get their house sold. You know back then houses there eighteen hundred square foot house two car garage on an acre of land with a lakeview guess how much it was I can't even guess forty thousand, you're really cloak. Thousand. and. So you know and there were lots of properties available and not very many buyers. So it was it was an interesting business in the only reason. I. Got Out of it. I. Loved it. I loved working with the families helping a find a home bettering their life but the people that moved to town the For your family bought the local McDonalds. Daniel. But when I grew up, I didn't know you could own a McDonald's and when I found out, they owned it. I was like all. That is cool. They lived on a Beautiful Lake House they drove a Mercedes than they had every weekend with their family. So for me I thought Gosh this would be so great. They didn't like living in Russellville they wanted to move I love Libyan Russellville K- I can imagine a real estate you weren't necessarily your weekends with wasn't a thing and you're just grinding all the time. So was it was the opportunity for flexibility? What was what like when you kind of had the dream I mean Mercedes is nice but was like drawing you to them exactly. Well, unfortunately, I went through a divorce and my children were one three and five when I did that in having a job that I could be off on the nights and weekends was very motivating. I was driven to spend more time with my kids and yeah I, mean the perks looked nice to but are really wanted quality time with my. Kids an and in as much as I love real estate, it was just impossible. So many business owners I talk to really the family is the reason that they get into owning their own business. You know maybe they work at a corporation at its ninety hours a week than ever see their family, even the money can be nice but I mean, you look up and your kids are. Little and they start growing and you go I'm missing out on their lives. Curious to hear from you how you continue to keep that value as the business grows and scales because there's a little bit of the grass is greener on the other side. If I have my own business, I'll have the flexibility and the autonomy, and it can also be that same dragon that takes you away. From your family if you're not careful yet you're totally right and I haven't the greatest respect for restaurant owners because when I did buy my first McDonald's we were unable to stay in. Russellville that just wasn't the way McDonalds did things and that was offered the chance to buy the EFFINGHAM. Illinois McDonald's where that is I know effingham driven through there once okay. Most people have driven by. Again, a big town of ten thousand people and we had an interstate McDonald's that I purchased. At the time I paid a very high price for it. This was nineteen, eighty, nine paid a million, six, fifty, four it and I had to figure out how to grow sales in order to make that Walker, twenty, seven, thousand, dollar a month payment. And the only way to do it was to drive more sales as you know, that's the way it. But if you'RE GONNA ten thousand, how do you find more people? Yeah. I can imagine I mean the supply and demand kicks in a real way. What was it? An existing store was this new store? It was an existing store in the man was retiring and it was a good store because it was in the middle point if you're driving from St Louis Chicago. Great Place to stop get a bite to eat go to the restroom. Great Location. But again, how do you grow the sales and so? Back and that day an eighty nine we didn't have cell phones, but we did have CB radios. So we began to have some fun get on the radio and go hey, good buddy. If you're driving a bus stop by, we'll give you a free meal if you bring your bus

Russellville Arkansas Mcdonald Andre Leadership Founder And Ceo Effingham America Mcdonalds Beautiful Lake House Daniels Hardy Abed Russell Bakery Coast St Louis Chicago Fort Smith Accordia Harrington
Opportunity Through Persistence with Cordia Harrington

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Opportunity Through Persistence with Cordia Harrington

"I started my first business in Russellville. Arkansas. Do you know where that is i? Know Arkansas. Russell. Okay. Well. Down a beautiful town on a lake about halfway between Little Rock and Fort Smith and my first business was a real estate company concept one realtors and foretelling we use tweet emblem on a real estate vine. Yeah. Little. Did I know? And that began. With the good fortune of having bartered for office space from a doctor that had a big empty building and least my chairs and my desk three dollars a month for the deaths and a dollar fifty a month for the chairs and I was in the real estate business us all five hundred, eighty, seven dollars to buy plywood signs to put in front yards and it grew and it was so much fun. The ladies that I hired. We were the first off you mill business in Arkansas, and the men bankers would literally come by to see what we're doing. And we would stage houses. That's before we knew what staging was and we would try to rearrange the furniture in houses so that they showed the best and it took off so you're showcasing the houses to make them look great. That's very common these days. What was it uncommon? Totally people thought we were so weird to come into their house and stake some pictures down in rearrange the furniture Abed we were trying to give them the best opportunity to get their house sold. You know back then houses there eighteen hundred square foot house two car garage on an acre of land with a lakeview guess how much it was I can't even guess forty thousand, you're really cloak. Thousand. and. So you know and there were lots of properties available and not very many buyers. So it was it was an interesting business in the only reason. I. Got Out of it. I. Loved it. I loved working with the families helping a find a home bettering their life but the people that moved to town the For your family bought the local McDonalds. Daniel. But when I grew up, I didn't know you could own a McDonald's and when I found out, they owned it. I was like all. That is cool. They lived on a Beautiful Lake House they drove a Mercedes than they had every weekend with their family. So for me I thought Gosh this would be so great. They didn't like living in Russellville they wanted to move I love Libyan Russellville K- I can imagine a real estate you weren't necessarily your weekends with wasn't a thing and you're just grinding all the time. So was it was the opportunity for flexibility? What was what like when you kind of had the dream I mean Mercedes is nice but was like drawing you to them exactly. Well, unfortunately, I went through a divorce and my children were one three and five when I did that in having a job that I could be off on the nights and weekends was very motivating. I was driven to spend more time with my kids and yeah I, mean the perks looked nice to but are really wanted quality time with my. Kids an and in as much as I love real estate, it was just impossible. So many business owners I talk to really the family is the reason that they get into owning their own business. You know maybe they work at a corporation at its ninety hours a week than ever see their family, even the money can be nice but I mean, you look up and your kids are. Little and they start growing and you go I'm missing out on their lives. Curious to hear from you how you continue to keep that value as the business grows and scales because there's a little bit of the grass is greener on the other side. If I have my own business, I'll have the flexibility and the autonomy, and it can also be that same dragon that takes you away. From your family if you're not careful yet you're totally right and I haven't the greatest respect for restaurant owners because when I did buy my first McDonald's we were unable to stay in. Russellville that just wasn't the way McDonalds did things and that was offered the chance to buy the EFFINGHAM. Illinois McDonald's where that is I know effingham driven through there once okay. Most people have driven by. Again, a big town of ten thousand people and we had an interstate McDonald's that I purchased. At the time I paid a very high price for it. This was nineteen, eighty, nine paid a million, six, fifty, four it and I had to figure out how to grow sales in order to make that Walker, twenty, seven, thousand, dollar a month payment. And the only way to do it was to drive more sales as you know, that's the way it. But if you'RE GONNA ten thousand, how do you find more people? Yeah. I can imagine I mean the supply and demand kicks in a real way. What was it? An existing store was this new store? It was an existing store in the man was retiring and it was a good store because it was in the middle point if you're driving from St Louis Chicago. Great Place to stop get a bite to eat go to the restroom. Great Location. But again, how do you grow the sales and so? Back and that day an eighty nine we didn't have cell phones, but we did have CB radios. So we began to have some fun get on the radio and go hey, good buddy. If you're driving a bus stop by, we'll give you a free meal if you bring your bus

Russellville Mcdonald Arkansas Effingham Mcdonalds Beautiful Lake House Russell Abed Fort Smith St Louis Chicago Daniel Illinois Walker
How To Consistently Reach Your Sales Quota

Journey to $100 Million

04:39 min | 3 weeks ago

How To Consistently Reach Your Sales Quota

"What's up? Everybody Needs Kevin Daisy. So we are fairly new at sales as far as the station is concerned having professional. salespeople. We're about, I guess a year and a half into it I. It was Eric and I always sell in the business. then. We had a Glenn who came on about. Not, even a year and a half ago. Now, if our sales professional and we're looking to hire more so we're kind of quickly scale on this up. But we have a very basic system as far as what we're looking for. What the monthly quota is. An and they should be bringing in and it is super basic and as for me, it still works I know we might get more sophisticated as we grow in the teams grow and we have managers and things like that. But right now it's it's super basic. So interesting lay it out for you. and you can see how all this may be different than your model or if you don't have a model because you're disowned for yourself. something you can think about doing. SARS is very. Is. Five thousand dollars a month. In monthly reoccurring revenue. That's the theme here monthly reoccurring revenue five grand every month, not five gram once or twice or ten times, and then Kinda sit back. Five men every month. That's all we care about. We want those results. If you do the math on that, if you're GONNA do five grandmothers salesperson. Times twelve that sixty thousand dollars of monthly reoccurring revenue. So that means a month thirteen. We've collected sixty grand. From the clients that you've brought in as a salesperson here. At Mont Thirteen but take that that book of business. Times another twelve and that seven hundred, twenty, thousand dollars. So a very successful salesperson in their first year should be over half a million at least. And that's what looking at. That's the kind of success we need to grow this business. Now we do have ramp up period. said. You come on with us for as a salesperson which we're hiring right now as recording this for sales. There's a ramp up period so The first few months. Washington. The first four months or not one hundred percent of that. So we actually sort out with about a two week training period. A month is twenty, five percent of five grand, which is twelve fifty. Then he gets to fifty percent seventy percent and then the fourth full month. After a two week. Period you're expected to bring in five thousand in monthly recurring revenue. So right now, this is a very basic system and it works. We don't care about how many phone calls you made. We don't care about how emails you sent. I don't care if you want to network in meetings or not doesn't matter to me. It's. Can You bring in five thousand a month in New York consistently. And again, this reoccurring. So this is contacted. Using on twelve month. So, as predictable cash flow that we can count on for at least next year. So. That's really how we're building up our sales and growing the company. In if I can just hire another person and they can achieve that. Five thousand per month each. Then, we're in really good spot and we're growing very quickly. So. That's what we're trying to do again right now is very basic, but it works for us. We've had other people tell us different things and don't do like do it like this. Do like that. But for us is working out, well, we also pay salespeople a salary plus the commission net. And we do the life for that the life of the account. So. We've got a pretty good system going also the salespeople here they're not account managers. So they can build a book business and then keep building it not managing. There's accounts. Our operations team which according to the episode on that but. Operations seems takes over that relationship and the responsibility. So the salesperson continued yourself. Now, they can touch base and and reach out of the client of course, but it's not really the responsibility so. They Cabal. You know what you're tracking with sales was important for us the results, how much can you bring in per month and for us the minimum is five grand per month. And that's going to set us up for success. We were

Glenn Mont Thirteen Kevin Daisy Eric New York Washington
Interview With Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

How I Built This

04:35 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

"Tell us a little bit more about Kiwi Co for people who don't know what what you do tell us about your your company. Yeah. So we design and deliver hands on experiences for kids, kids of all ages. So we have different experiences and products that we develop for Newborns and infants alway through to kids at heart. So teens and even grown ups and these hands on experiences they range. So science experiments, games, kids making play projects that encourage imaginative play. And they're all center around this idea of how can we encourage kids to see themselves as makers And I. Think the the best known as the Kiwi crate and inside like you get pipe cleaners and different OV- like Styrofoam balls and I think that's probably the best known product that you guys make. Right the Kiwi crate. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that's our flagship line. So qe crate is geared for early elementary age kids. So five to eight and it's very project base for Kiwi crate. There are at least two different projects and it's usually one that's a science and engineering focused project and one. That's more be more of an art in creativity designed focus project. So let's say one project overall. It's about arcades and one project might be you create a mechanical arcade cloth that you can actually grab things with and the other side of the crate might be a project where you're making your own yarn pom Pom Creatures, and then you're actually taking your claw, you're trying to grab those creatures as well as whatever else is around your house too. So it's a combination of discoveries along with hopefully A. Little Bit of delight and a whole bunch of fun which I love and tell me I i. know that you launched this in twenty eleven and at the time I guess you were like you were in charge of the fashion portfolio. For Ebay. How did the idea come to you? So it was born mainly out of personal needs. So my my career has spanned consumer products and technology mostly ECOMMERCE. So it started my career in India proctor and gamble and then had been at pay pal at. Ebay but when we started the company, so two thousand eleven, my kids, my oldest two kids were almost three and almost five and I really want to give them especially the hands on activities. It was a way for them to really see themselves as producers and not just a passive consumers as kids who could actually kind of problem solve and make something, and so I started to pull together different and inspiration and I was like, Oh, my gosh, is taking a long time like I need to. Amortize. My effort and so I would invite friends and their kids, and one of the MOMS actually said, you should start a business around this and it was one of those things where I think long story short is that we found that there are a lot of parents who are well intentioned very busy. They want enriching activities for their kids and if it can come. To them in a convenient format from a trusted brand, and that's something that actually really resonates and then if you think about it from a business perspective, if you can get a subscription service to work, it works really well right and so if you consider all the elements of subscription service or you're considering lifetime value if you're able to drive down their cost of Acquisition then you're able to provide something that is not only valuable to the customer, but ends up being something that works really well all the business side to I I imagine when the Middlesex business for a moment I mean I imagine that when it became clear that the pandemic was GonNa shut down huge parts of the economy like most business owners you probably. Anticipated a downturn for Your Business and first of all, how did you prepare for that possibility? Well, to be completely frank, it was a little bit of madness say kind of the beginning. So we were a little bit ahead of the curve and having folks work remotely. But then as people started to shelter in place was definitely a scramble you know we had to see. What the impact would be to the business, and so we've definitely became more conservative. So very quickly we decided to basically pull back or remain conservative on marketing spend. We were looking at things like hiring and figuring out what we wanted to do that. So we held on hiring but then we're also tracking the business and what we actually started to see pretty. Quickly is a pretty decent uptick in the business. I think the combination of parents being home needing something to engage kids we happen to be a good

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