Coronavirus

Get your need-to-know COVID-19 news from around the globe. Listen to the latest developments and breaking news, aired on talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Military suicides up as much as 20% during pandemic

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 16 hrs ago

Military suicides up as much as 20% during pandemic

"CBS is reporting that military suicides have increased by as much as 20% during the pandemic, Analysts say soldiers are dealing with Cove it war zone deployment. National disaster, civil unrest and for some of them. The pressure's too much. Senior Army leaders say they've actually seen a 30% jump in active duty suicides this year in the army, and they're looking at shortening combat deployments.

Army CBS
Gottlieb warns of "very dangerous season" ahead as virus cases rise

Glenn Beck

00:42 sec | 16 hrs ago

Gottlieb warns of "very dangerous season" ahead as virus cases rise

"You're taking to prevent the spread of Corona virus should help during flu season and Margo Moreno reports wearing masks, social distancing and washing your hands will go a long way to keep the flu from spreading to, But with Kobe 19 straining hospitals. Oh, you chief covert officer, Dr Dale Brad Slur says it's more important than ever for Oklahomans to get their flu shot. Each year employee increases the number of deaths in our state, and it also increases hospitalizations, so anything we can do to reduce the number of influence of cases we have in our state is going to be very, very important. Doctor Brad Slur says The flu vaccine is recommended for everyone over six months of age flu cases usually start to increase in October.

FLU Flu Vaccine Dr Dale Brad Slur Doctor Brad Slur Margo Moreno Kobe Officer
Dr. Anthony Fauci: US 'not in good place' as country averages 40,000 cases per day

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:35 sec | 13 hrs ago

Dr. Anthony Fauci: US 'not in good place' as country averages 40,000 cases per day

"Concerned about Cova 19 cases rising as the weather gets colder. Here's a BCS Sherry Preston. We're not in in a a good good place. place. That's That's what what Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci says says about about Corona Corona virus virus numbers numbers in in the the United United States States right right now now is is the the time time actually actually to to double double down down a a bit, bit, And And I I don't don't mean mean close close when when I I say say that. that. People get concerned that we're talking about shutting down. We're not talking about shutting anything down. We're talking but common sense type of public health measures that we've been talking about all along. He says he has a real concern in Florida, where Governor Rhonda Santis lifted nearly all pandemic restrictions over the weekend. Carrie Preston, ABC. NEW time. 9

Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fa Sherry Preston Carrie Preston Governor Rhonda Santis Cova United States ABC Florida
New York City Bolsters Social-Distancing Enforcement to Fight Coronavirus Clusters

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:22 min | 13 hrs ago

New York City Bolsters Social-Distancing Enforcement to Fight Coronavirus Clusters

"And state officials make up numbers showing an alarming rise in covert cases and portions of Brooklyn and Queens? Get some people doubt the latest reports about Corona virus, Whether they believe them or not, the city is taking action. The Health Department will require social distancing flexi glass barriers and the wearing of masks at private schools in the affected areas. And it could get worse. We're will not essential businesses and a number of private schools be shut down and areas in Queens and Brooklyn that continue to spike. Bob says, Well, you may have to. They manage to crack down again and close summit in non essential businesses, which is going to hurt the people. But Gotta do something to get it under control, according to the Health Department and alarming increase in places like Graves and Ryan this morning, an 86 street also Midwood Borough Park. Bensonhurst, Sheepshead Bay flatlands. In Queens, Far Rockaway and Kew Gardens, although if you ask, Frankie says he doesn't believe any of it. People don't seem to be getting sick. I don't. I think a lot of it is political lives hype. And I don't think my neighbor's a word. But there is another trend that is not good hospitalizations for the six day in a row statewide, continue to slowly take up. Two hospitals in Brooklyn, one in Queens reporting increases. One

Queens Brooklyn Health Department Sheepshead Bay Midwood Borough Park Kew Gardens Frankie BOB Graves Ryan
Worldwide coronavirus deaths near 1 million

AP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 22 hrs ago

Worldwide coronavirus deaths near 1 million

"Nearly one million people have now lost their lives to covert 19 worldwide As of Sunday evening, Johns Hopkins University puts the count at more than 995,000 people nearly 205,000 in the US the world's highest total by far. But doctors are getting a better understanding of how to treat the disease. While more deaths are expected this fall because of the recent surge in infections, there are signs that death rates are declining in that people who get the virus are now faring better than those in the early months of the pandemic.

Johns Hopkins University United States
Labor Day celebrations responsible for uptick in COVID-19 cases in Washington State, Seattle area

The Gee and Ursula Show

00:28 sec | 13 hrs ago

Labor Day celebrations responsible for uptick in COVID-19 cases in Washington State, Seattle area

"Labor Day celebrations are behind the state's recent uptick in covert 19 cases. Kyle Radios Miley Katie has the latest earlier this month. We were seeing some daily case counts in the two hundreds. In the last week, an average of more than 500. New cases were Reported each day with one day topping nearly 1000 on Sunday, 439 new cases were confirmed in Pierce County Health officials say they believe a local uptick is the result of Labor Day get together,

Miley Katie Pierce County Health Kyle
James Cameron Says ‘Avatar 2’ Filming Is 100% Complete, ‘Avatar 3’ 95% Finished; Praises New Zealand COVID Response

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:38 sec | 13 hrs ago

James Cameron Says ‘Avatar 2’ Filming Is 100% Complete, ‘Avatar 3’ 95% Finished; Praises New Zealand COVID Response

"Cameron has some big news about avatar to the director shared a brand new update about the status of the upcoming Avatar sequel. While on a video call with Arnold Schwarzenegger ahead of the 2020 Austrian World Summit environmental Conference, Cameron revealed that the sequel is complete. He shared that they lost about 4.5 months of production. Due to the cove in 19 pandemic. Cameron also opened up about Avatar three and said he's currently in New Zealand, shooting the remainder of the live action scenes and ads. They're roughly 95% done with a third movie Avatar to the way of water is expected to hit theaters December 2022 Nickel

Cameron Austrian World Summit Environm Arnold Schwarzenegger New Zealand Director
Some Midwestern states have more than 25% COVID-19 positive test rates: report

The KFBK Morning News

00:58 sec | 14 hrs ago

Some Midwestern states have more than 25% COVID-19 positive test rates: report

"Headline. Reuters this morning on we just heard ABC on their network newscast indicate this positive covert 19 test rates top 25% in some Midwest States. Excuse me and Scuse me in some Midwest states. We're seeing the number of hospitalizations go up a cz Well, But you know a couple of things to keep in mind. And I'm always troubled by the reporting on this story, because it sometimes doesn't give you both sides of it. And the other side is this We're doing. We're doing more testing. So if you're doing more testing than statistically, the number of positives coming back is going to go up, right? I mean, if you're going to get more positive if you test more people, secondarily L A Times front page this morning talks about how l. A county The number of hospitalizations has been dropping and consistently dropping and continues to drop. So you know you've got a tail of two stories and depending on where you are and what region urine in the country. To keep it all in perspective. So anyway, I just thought I'd bring it up. That was in Reuters this morning.

Reuters Midwest ABC
With schools online, software to catch students cheating is big business

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:08 min | 20 hrs ago

With schools online, software to catch students cheating is big business

"Not only teaching. That's happening remotely for millions of students testing to and many colleges are using software to watch students take those tests, big providers, include respond, US, proctor, you and PROC. Some of them use webcams to track how? Students move their heads or is or touch the keyboard anything out of the ordinary flagged for teachers to review todd feathers recently co wrote a piece about a rebellion against this kind of surveillance for motherboard one concern false positives. Once you start the exam, they're all kinds of environmental factors that can lead to false positives. If you're a parent who has a child in the room, you're much more likely to be looking away from your screen or moving around than somebody who doesn't have A. Child in the room if you have adhd or some kind of anxiety disorder that's tied to taking tests, you're likely to exhibit behaviors that fall outside of the norm of other people in your class, and all of this can lead to being flagged as suspicious activity, and we have heard from students who have cried during tests because they're anxious about them. embiid flag alternatively I should say also heard stories from professors about students who go to all kinds of creative lanes to cheat from home. And have been caught as a result of using the cast off wear. So you talk to students who are really worried about privacy surveillance the potential for people to sort of fall outside the spectrum of what the Algorithm thinks is normal behavior. But not in fact, be cheating. You also spoke with a student of color who couldn't even take the test because the software didn't recognize his face. This is a problem that is not just related to this kind of software. A lot of these digital proctoring vendors don't create their own facial recognition technology. They are licensing it from other companies that specialize in s in facial recognition has been shown over and over again in different settings to not be good at recognizing people of Color, not be as good at recognizing women and to struggle to the point of absolute failure when it comes to people who don't identify one gender or another. What are the companies says about these criticisms I mean some students have protested the use of these the software campuses how have the company's reacted? Directed with a response that is pretty common across a lot of different technologies, applications of technologies, which is it. This software is a tool the company's give it to universities and two professors, and all they're doing is providing a quicker more efficient way for professors to identify possibly suspicious moments during an exam. There has been a lack of response directly to the criticisms about the invasion of privacy and about the way that it can negatively affect people who are underprivileged or from certain ethnic backgrounds. Right. Now, we're, of course in this moment where a lot more college students and students in Pre K. through twelve are at home taking online classes if and when we all get to get back together again, do you see these companies continuing to thrive and they're being an enough demand? A million dollar question I think that it's a pretty fair to say that once students are back in classrooms of all types this will not be quite as widely used as it is now but that being said, some of these companies are looking for other ways to expand. Their customers for example, Puck Toro has a recently announced a partnership with McGraw Hill, textbook maker to integrate its services into some of those online textbooks, and there are certain kinds of assessments, assessments for certain professional certifications such as nursing, which do require as part of state laws that the exams be proctored, and so if those aren't taking place in a physical room or even if they are, but there's the option to do it online. A space where tools like this are not only a possibility there arguably required by law.

Puck Toro Mcgraw Hill Todd
The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

Short Wave

09:53 min | 21 hrs ago

The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

"In August more than five months into the pandemic Jordan. Bennett. was about to see some data she'd waiting for for a long time. Yeah. No a truly I was really excited because there hasn't been any data on American Indians or Alaska natives since the start of the pandemic from the CDC that's right. Until last month while universities had released a good bit of data about Covid and its effect on some. Native, American and Alaskan natives. The CDC really hadn't Jordan would know she's a reporter and editor with the Public Media News organization Indian country today she's also a citizen of the Navajo nation and she's been covering the pandemic since the beginning as well as a twenty twenty census and all of Indian, country no big deal just all of Indian country Yeah. The whole. That data that she'd been waiting to? was released by the government as part of a weekly CDC report in mid August the title of the top red. COVID nineteen among American Indian and Alaska Native Persons in twenty three states and when i read it, it was Kinda already something that I knew and a lot of native public health experts already knew and what I was really looking for is you know what is new that they gave to us the report said because of existing inequities, native Americans and Alaskan natives are three point five times more likely to get the corona virus than white people but anyone who'd been looking at tribal nations as closely as Jordan had could have told you that they were. Being hit especially hard for example, at one point earlier this year, the Navajo nation, which spans parts of Arizona New Mexico and Utah The nation's now reporting nearly four thousand in nineteen cases in a population of one hundred, seventy, five thousand had an infection rate greater the New York State. Eight PM curfews on weekdays and on weekends a fifty seven hour lockdown, not even the gas stations are open. That was just one tribal nation that got a lot of attention. Many others had infection rates that were also higher than the hard hit states in the northeast like the Colorado River Indian tribes in Arizona and California the Yakima in Washington state or the White Mountain Apache tribe in Arizona. And data from the states where many of those reservations are located weren't included in the CDC report, which gets it a larger problem. If there's data had you know where the impact is, how do you know where you could send testing to where there's a lack testing? You have to have that data in order to create policies into also figured out how to distribute vaccines. This episode was the CDC does and doesn't know about Covid in native American and Alaskan. Native tribal nations and how Jordan is working to get more data to the people who need it most I mattie Safai and you're listening to shortwave from NPR. This report from the CDC which linked to in our episode notes does say two important things. The fact that native Americans and Alaskan natives are more likely to get the virus. That's one. The second thing is that compared to white people young folks in those communities people under eighteen tested positive at higher rates. When it comes to these findings, the CDC did make one thing clear. Here's one of the researchers on the study, Sarah Hatcher it really important that the. This disproportionate impact. Likely driven by versus stinks social and economic inequity not because of some biological or genetic. Persisting social and economic inequities we're talking about access to healthy food housing income levels, stuff like that. Here's Jordan again the and other just like public health infrastructure or in like the lack of investment in the public health infrastructures in native communities and you have over credit households, anders a number of inequities that this pandemic is bringing out. More on that in a bit. But first Jordan says that the CDC report is notable for what it does not include this report did leave out tons of cases right now it only looked at twenty three states and it didn't include Arizona. Is One of the hot spots in Indian country. And they account for at least a third of all the cove nineteen cases according to the report. They also left out states like Oklahoma Washington. California Colorado thousands and thousands of cases. And researchers from the CDC were up front about leaving all that data out. Here's Sara Hatcher. Again, our announcement is really not generalize beyond those twenty three state overall. And we're not really able to speculate whether we expect the overall rate to be higher or lower we. The reason some states got left out was because the they recorded about race and ethnicity including that for native, American, and Alaskan Native Cova Cases was incomplete and that was really at least surprising to me because. I like how can you not capture this data right here you have Arizona where you know again, the Salt River Pima, Maricopa Indian community Healer River, ending community, White Mountain Apache their cases are thousands You had the tone, nation and Navajo Nation and the possibly Yawkey tribe. There's just thousands of cases in this one St. So many gaps like in this data as well. I think just points to how the CDC doesn't really know tribal communities and know that Indian health system and how it's built instead up. So, let's talk about that. Now. It's much more complicated than this. But basically, when tribal nation signed treaties giving up their land, the federal government promised to provide them with healthcare and set up the Indian Health Service, a government funded network of hospitals and clinics. To deliver adequate healthcare to tribal nations but that's not what's happening right now and what the pandemic is very much highlighting. For years the IHS has been way underfunded per person the federal government spends about half the amount of money on the IHS. Medicaid. And that's part of the reason a lot of tribes over time have step to establish their own privately run tribal health clinics. So throw history. They all IHS. But then tribes wanted to you know take hold and own and operate their own healthcare. So that's how these tribal health clinics came about. At this point, the large majority of healthcare facilities are operated by tribes about eighty percent in those facilities are encouraged but not required to share data that they collect on the virus but Jordan says, that's something a lot of them do not want to do not with the federal government or even with reporters like her even now as a Navajo WOM-. In as a Navajo reporter, it's also difficult for me to try to get the data. Because then I understand that like I grew up around my background is in health and so I I know you know it's because of settler colonialism but also research to a lot of times and medical research you have researchers going in parachuting in parachuting out and they don't give back that data it at least from everything that I've seen the past several months trust is like the main factor in this That's one thing trust. There's also the reality that doctors can get race or ethnicity wrong in California where it's pretty prevalent from what sources tell me some doctors will just check a box on native people because of their surname, their surnames, more likely to be coming from like a Hispanic or line next or origin like Dominguez or Garcia or you know today's assumed there Um Latin x but they're not, and if those people wind up dying that seem incorrect data can wind up on their death certificate right? You don't know what's going on or the pact of the pandemic if you don't have that data if you don't know what the person died from. How are you going to prevent it and prevent more from dying from it? These factors lack of trust underfunded public health infrastructure, racial classification all add up to a picture of the pandemic that isn't complete. For example, there's an alarming lack of covid hospitalizations data for native American or Alaskan native folks stuff like if somebody was admitted to the hospital, the ICU or even died compared to white people, CDC only has about a third of that information for Alaskan natives and native Americans and I think that's just again it just goes back to how well you know the state health department or even like the CDC or the public health experts they're not these tribal communities

CDC Jordan Arizona Federal Government California Alaska Covid Reporter Indian Health Service American Indian Colorado River Indian Bennett. Sarah Hatcher White Mountain Apache Tribe Oklahoma Sara Hatcher
New York City principals union votes 'no confidence' in de Blasio, Carranza

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 1 d ago

New York City principals union votes 'no confidence' in de Blasio, Carranza

"Two days to go until elementary schools reopen the heads of the New York City of Principles Union have taken a unanimous no confidence vote against Mayor de Blasio and Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza. They're beef they're handling of their covert time reopening plan. The issues have been ongoing. So, says the president of the Council of School Supervisors and administrators, Mark Cannizzaro. But he says Friday was a turning point with a city giving teachers more leeway to work from home without consulting principles. If something is going to affect The school leaders and how they run their buildings. The first group of people to know about this should be school leaders. Now the union is asking the state education Department to intervene. It would be helpful to have some, you know. Some fresh eyes in here to take a look. No confidence vote has no legal weight on the union says Principles will be in their buildings for the start of school.

New York City Of Principles Un Mark Cannizzaro Council Of School Supervisors Richard Carranza Mayor De Blasio Chancellor State Education Department President Trump
Coronavirus Live Updates: World Approaches One Million Deaths

AP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 1 d ago

Coronavirus Live Updates: World Approaches One Million Deaths

"People have now lost their lives to covert 19 worldwide as of Sunday evening. Johns Hopkins University puts the count at more than 995,000 people nearly 205,000 in the US the world's highest total by far. Get doctors are getting a better understanding of how to treat the disease. While more deaths are expected this fall because of the recent surge in infections, there are signs that death rates are declining in that people who get the virus are now faring better than those in the early months of the pandemic. Meanwhile, on the

Johns Hopkins University United States
American Airlines CEO Doug Parker on federal aid: "We need laws, not bills"

Talk 1260 KTRC Programming

00:23 sec | 1 d ago

American Airlines CEO Doug Parker on federal aid: "We need laws, not bills"

"The CEO of American Airlines is holding out hope Congress will act to help his industry. Our plan actually is to get Congress and administration to come together and get relief package passed. Little includes support on CBS's face. The Nation, Doug Parker noted There is bipartisan support on the issue of helping airlines continue. So whether the Corona

American Airlines Congress Doug Parker CEO CBS
Gottlieb warns of "very dangerous season" ahead as virus cases rise

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 1 d ago

Gottlieb warns of "very dangerous season" ahead as virus cases rise

"Commissioner, Dr Scott got leave also on CBS's face The Nation. Said he's concerned about the rise in covert 19 cases and hospitalizations. Whether it's reflecting what he describes as a labor day bounce or points to a dangerous season ahead. We were always facing heightened risk of increased spread of Corona virus as we head into the fall in winter. Now we're there was starting to see that increase, and we're taking a lot of infection into a very dangerous season for this virus.

Dr Scott Commissioner CBS
World Approaches One Million Coronavirus Deaths

AP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 1 d ago

World Approaches One Million Coronavirus Deaths

"One million people have now lost their lives to covert 19 worldwide as of Sunday evening. Johns Hopkins University puts the count at more than 995,000 people nearly 205,000 in the US the world's highest total by far. Get doctors are getting a better understanding of how to treat the disease. While more deaths are expected this fall because of the recent surge in infections, there are signs that death rates are declining in that people who get the virus are now faring better than those in the early months of the pandemic.

Johns Hopkins University United States
California Principal Brings Food To Students Cut Off From Meals

All Things Considered

03:41 min | 1 d ago

California Principal Brings Food To Students Cut Off From Meals

"California to meet Juan Vaca. He is the principal at Global Family Elementary School where all of the 453 students receive free or reduced lunch. We have like 98%. You know that next and we have students. They're newcomers are English language learners. They're newcomers coming from other countries. With very minimal language, very minimal educational experience, no schooling, So we try to find ways to actually make sure that we're also holding them in a way that they're actually have the support that they need to be able to be successful. His school has always had students who needed help getting food or enough food, but things got worse when the pandemic hit. Families had to figure out how we're going to supplement this food that used that we usedto get at the school. It's it's kinda is difficult, exactly. Ah, fathom to think that we take something simple things like like lunch and meals and breakfast for granted, because it's it's expected. It's there. And once we've removed and you give him something else, different avenues, Actually, Tina lt's thinks it's kind of difficult and target our job. I think to find ways to toe mend that and connect families to these three services. This summer, Vaca worked at a food distribution center at another school in the area. But families from his school couldn't make it usually because they lacked transportation or were quarantined. So he got creative and what I would do is I would go check in the morning at that school and make sure that everything was going well and what I would do that would bring food back because I knew that there's families would be Needing this food and I would have. How's it at my my sights and parents know that they could come and pick it up or I would drop off on my way back to my school? Still, that wasn't enough. A vodka and a staff of global family got even more hands on teachers would buy groceries for struggling families and do wellness checks. Eventually, vodka arranged a food drive at his school twice a month. He says. More than 100. Families show up each time. They're very thankful. They always think us and they always wanna wants the next one. And because fellas leave with a lot of bags like it's not just here's two apples Here's to. No, it's There's a lot of food and I think they're very grateful. I think it's sometimes isn't words Don't don't express what they're feeling. I just 1000 face that. They're thank you says a million words and I just feel like it's stick followings right Vodka says the drives are a chance to check in with students and their families. That's where he learns how they're adapting to distance learning amid the pandemic. It's tough because you have these students were having to take these rolls right of the roles of making sure that they can't Mom and dad has to be quarantined. And now you have a kind of to fend for yourself. So it's it's one of those situationally. They're very grateful, very grateful. We provide them but it it's not consistent. Right. Well, it's not. We're not there every single day without we're not sure we're not there with them. 24 hours a day and we could provide one need, but we could try toe help him overcome one obstacle, But there's still so many more. Despite the challenges, vodka remains optimistic. The food drives continue as do the check ins. He says. He learned a lot in the early days of the pandemic and has adapted to this new normal. We needed. Just continue working and making the drive striving, Tio what we're doing in regards clothing, the Snowden security gaps and making sure they're At least some of their basic needs are met to the capacity that we could provide. So that's one less thing. They have to worry about that Swan vodka principal at Global Family Elementary School in Oakland, California.

Juan Vaca Global Family Elementary Schoo Vodka California Tina Lt Oakland Principal
The CDC releases guidelines for Halloween

Purity Products

00:21 sec | 1 d ago

The CDC releases guidelines for Halloween

"Us out with new guidance for Halloween, hoping to prevent trick or treating from becoming a cove. It's super spreader event. It says. Forget about treats handed out from homes or from cars and crowded indoor costume parties, haunted houses or hey, Ryder tractor rise with people who aren't from your household Cove in 19

Ryder
Prince Charles warns virus may devastate students' futures

All About Real Estate

00:25 sec | 1 d ago

Prince Charles warns virus may devastate students' futures

"19 crisis Has Prince Charles out with a warning, The Prince of Wales says up to a million young people in Britain may need urgent help to protect their futures from the ravages of the pandemic, and he calls current times uniquely challenging across Britain. Corona virus cases are accelerating and politicians or even debating whether to keep British university students from returning home for Christmas.

Prince Charles Britain Wales
Prince Charles warns virus may devastate students' futures

Community Matters

00:25 sec | 1 d ago

Prince Charles warns virus may devastate students' futures

"The cove at 19 crisis Has Prince Charles out with a warning. The Prince of Wales says up to a million young people in Britain may need urgent help to protect their futures from the ravages of the pandemic, and he calls current times uniquely challenging across Britain. Corona virus cases are accelerating and politicians or even debating whether to peep British university students. From returning home for Christmas.

Prince Charles Britain Wales
Military leaders say active-duty suicides up 20% during COVID-19 pandemic

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 1 d ago

Military leaders say active-duty suicides up 20% during COVID-19 pandemic

"Have increased by as much as 20% this year, and some is incidents of violent behavior. Well, they've spiked a service member's struggle under the Corona virus ward at more zone deployments. National disasters and civil unrest. While the data is incomplete and causes of suicide are complex, Army and Air Force officials tell The Associated Press they believe the pandemic. Is adding stress to an already strained force senior army leaders who say they've seen about a 30% jump in active duty suicides so far this year to say they are looking at shortening combat deployments. That would be part of a broader effort to make the wellbeing of soldiers and their families. The Army's top priority winds news

Army Air Force The Associated Press
Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | 1 d ago

Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

"The pandemic could hit working moms worse than Dad. CBS's Mira Reuben reports, a Dartmouth College economist tells The New York Times. With many daycare and schools closed. Working moms may end up being forced to make a choice to stay home if they haven't already been laid off and a director of a charity serving disadvantage. Women in England says the pandemic will take women 10 years back in the workplace.

Mira Reuben Dartmouth College CBS Director The New York Times England
Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 1 d ago

Pandemic Will ‘Take Our Women 10 Years Back’ in the Workplace

"Reuben know things take over 19 women may find their place in the workforce more at risk, A Dartmouth College economist tells The New York Times. With many daycare and schools closed. Working moms may end up being forced to make a choice to stay home if they haven't already been laid off. And a director of a charity serving disadvantage. Women in England says the pandemic will take women 10 years back in the

Dartmouth College Reuben The New York Times Director England
Under 10 Percent of Americans Have Covid-19 Antibodies, Study Finds

CBS News Weekend Roundup

00:24 sec | 2 d ago

Under 10 Percent of Americans Have Covid-19 Antibodies, Study Finds

"A new study suggests many Americans have yet to be exposed to the Corona virus. The report published online in the medical journal, The Lancet, says less than 10% of US adults and had any bodies for the virus. Through the end of July, It was based on a study of more than 28,000 dialysis patients. It also found black and Hispanic patients and those living in lower income neighborhoods were more likely to have the antibodies.

The Lancet United States
Haunted Halloween drive-thru experience now open in Orlando

WIOD Programming

00:19 sec | 1 d ago

Haunted Halloween drive-thru experience now open in Orlando

"Friendly drivin Halloween experience is now open in Orlando. The Haunted road on Lake Picket Road was designed with physical distancing measures in mind from contact free check in by license plate to immersive drive in Sean's tickets for the Haunted road started 15 bucks, and they must be purchased in advance online with

Lake Picket Road Orlando Sean
Public health crises collide: Substance abuse linked to COVID-19 susceptibility

ABC Perspective

00:28 sec | 1 d ago

Public health crises collide: Substance abuse linked to COVID-19 susceptibility

"Meanwhile, experts say there is a second public health crisis intertwined with this pandemic. And that's the substance abuse crisis. Opioids, tobacco and cocaine increased the risk of death from covert 19 this from a new study published in molecular psychiatry funded by the National Institutes of Health Drugs like heroin, Oxy, codeine and fentanyl, slow down the breathing rate. And substance abuse, combined with the covert 19 infection could be deadly because the virus makes it harder to properly taken oxygen

National Institutes Of Health Molecular Psychiatry Cocaine Fentanyl Codeine Heroin