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Building a Resilience Bank Account

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

05:59 min | Last week

Building a Resilience Bank Account

"Well come to episode forty seven of everyday. Buddhism making every day better I'm back. I took a few weeks off as is obvious from the. Missing podcast episodes that usually are there every couple of weeks? Just to sort of rebuild. rebuild. My strength my optimism and sort of developer. Resilience Bank, which is what we're going to be talking about in this episode. You know and I just. Explained what I was about to do on facebook post about three weeks ago I shared was probably more about four weeks. Now, a shared a post and a link to an article called your surge capacity is depleted and it's why you feel awful. It's an article written by Tara Haley. and. Shared my personal facebook page, and also the everyday Buddhism group I wrote I'm sure many of you have already hit the point where you're surge capacity is is totally depleted either just recently are months ago. And in the last few weeks, so this would have been. About a month ago I faced up to the fact that I'd been feeling off and awful for days on end. And feeling that way is something I am not at all familiar with as nearly incorrigible glass half full person. I totally identified with Tara, Haley's description about what she's going through and how strange it was for her being a high achiever to feel what she described as a quote anxiety tainted depression mixed with on we that she couldn't kick. And it was also along with the complete inability to concentrate. And I read that it was exactly the way I'd been feeling. So those of you in my everyday Sanga in everyday. Buddhism membership community know that I recently did face up to the fact that I needed to give myself a little break. And in in the article Tara Haley points out that expecting less of yourself is exactly what you should do to help yourself go the distance in this pandemic even though we don't know how long distances or what we're gonNA find at the end. Her article talks about this thing called them big use loss and it's why we feel so bad. And how it's news for Motif for many of us. and how we have no coping skills. Much like my recent everyday Buddhism podcast called six steps for coping with uncertainty with Gregg creech healy asked the question. How do you adjust to an ever changing situation where the quote new normal is indefinite uncertainty So, it's been a little over a month since I released the episode with Gregg. Creech and it gave myself time to think about. Writing, content having ideas for content or recording content. I. Also took time away from hosting the Everyday Buddhism Sanga or which we call the Everyday Sangha with gratitude for volunteer hosts from the Sanga who took over for me. Just a few weeks prior to recording the episode with Greg We lost our dog Bella. She was fifteen and the last dog in the House since we lost her litter mate brother back in April of two thousand nineteen. So I did realize that I was personally was dealing with a mix of this thing called ambiguous loss as well as the more tangible loss and grief of losing Bella. You know a while ago. I expected to snap out a feeling awful within a week or two into this past month of my break. But I'm here to report that just giving myself a little break wasn't a magic solution. I did what seemed to be all the right things I took more walk spent more time outside read more and. Let Myself. Sleep in. But it still seemed harder for me to focus and get motivated to do the things I needed to do. But see it's Haley's article She she she points out that this is very typical. she did interviews with an masten, PhD Pauling boss, PhD and Michael Madhouse md.. About. Our adaptive surge capacity that we call on in response to a short term stressful situation like a natural disaster and it's that adaptive surge capacity the it's it's met for the short term situation. So therefore, it has limits. And in this situation that we'RE DEALING WITH WE'RE WE'VE depleted that surge capacity because our emergency is no longer short-term, it's now chronic. And I've been hearing from friends family and Sanga members who feel the same way he in the Article Pauline boss emphasizes how are solution oriented culture and way of thinking is actually destructive when faced with the problem that actually has no solution. This time of ambiguous loss causes feelings of helplessness and hopelessness and a better way to deal with these feelings is not through trying to think our way out of them or find

Tara Haley. Bella Gregg Creech Healy Sanga Everyday Sangha Facebook Resilience Bank Developer Greg We Pauline Tara Phd Pauling Michael Madhouse
The Four Remembrances

Tara Brach

05:43 min | Last week

The Four Remembrances

"NAMA. Stan welcome. When I was in college many many many many decades ago. i. read the series of books that were written by Carlos Causton Yada about the Shaman Don, I know many of you. are familiar with them and had many takeaways but perhaps the most memorable. was built into this little quote right here. The Shaman Don Juan's teaching. How can anyone feel so important when we know that death the stocking us the thing to do when you're impatient. is to turn to your left and ask advice from your. An immense amount of pettiness dropped if you're death makes a gesture to are if you catch a glimpse of it. Are Few just have the feeling that your companion is there watching you. And A men's amount of pettiness dropped if you're death makes a gesture. So, this notion of death as an adviser is one that really actually goes through many many spiritual traditions. It's the wisdom of impermanent. and. When we open to remembering the truth that the slice of life is a flash, it's coming and going our perspective shifts in a very dramatic and usually very, very wholesome way. All pettiness falls away. And I was reminded of this. Recently I was Jonathan we're having dinner with a couple and one and one of them. The man said that he asked himself most days. How would today be different if I asked advice for my dad? What would I remember? What would be important today and he's just use that as one of his daily practices. And I think it's a really powerful one if we say, well, how would The rest of this day. If we really were paying attention to the reality that this life is command going and we don't know when. So, typically, we don't remember to tap into that wisdom we get into what I often call that that daily per transfer. Our concerns are way way narrow way small. Some years ago I saw this cartoon and it's got a graveyard and the bubble that you're reading coming up from under the ground. and. It says, Hey, I, think I finally decide what to do with my life. This is the caption pushes the late. Envelope to exciting new levels. Remembering what matters? So it's an all wisdom traditions, but I know that Since since college and it's deepened from in growing up that the more that I am. Intimately a radically sensing. Okay. This body mind is here now and it's going. Really the more I open to love. There's a there's a direct correlation to remembering death an opening to love. And it came clear in a certain way. When I was at a meditation retreat with harm and I went with a very dear friend and we had both been quite busy in our lives and we're thrilled that we're GONNA be able to take off a weekend and go to this retreat that was only a few hours away Virginia. And it was a lovely retreat. At the end of it took not Han it everybody get into pairs. buddied up with my Louisa, WHO's happens to be a teacher in our community here and he said, okay. Now, what the first thing to do is to bow and say Nam Nam Astaire's means I, see the the divine, the later or the sacred in you. So we did that then he said, hug each others who are hugging each other and he said now on the first breath as you're breathing reflect I'm going to die. I'M GONNA die in the second breath you're GonNa die you're. And then on the third and we have just these precious moments together. So. We did that we looked at each other and there was a level of. Presence and intimacy and love that was so fresh. It was so fresh. It was not an idea about loving. There were no barriers there was just in the face of hey. We've got these moments. The the loving that was always there just manifested in its full flesh. So love and presence in death and I don't think that at all as grim. into the slightest are at all as. You Know Morose. It's. It's really. The whole spiritual path is one of remembering and forgetting you've probably noticed. That we, we get inspired we get in touch with something we quiet down, we sent some wonders beauty or some tenderness. Oh. Yeah. This is why I do this stuff.

Nam Nam Astaire Don Juan Carlos Causton Virginia Jonathan HAN
Mahmudr in the Geluk and Kagy Traditions

The Wisdom Podcast

08:24 min | Last week

Mahmudr in the Geluk and Kagy Traditions

"Maybe we'll start with. Way Your interest in Mahamoud. Way Did that how did that come about? When was that? So since by had? I probably I got interested in Mahamoud per se early in Grad school or perhaps a little bit before that might regional interest in Buddhism back in high school days early in college was mostly in San and I always expected that would be the form of Buddhism than I ended up practicing but the as says avid my then girlfriend now wife and I ended up traveling overland India in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three into nineteen, seventy four, and then ended up at coupon monastery just outside. Katmandu where we studied where Rama Tipton yesterday in London Lumberton. And those famous co concourses which are still ongoing by merrily introductions allom Rim to the stages of the path of course. Llamas, OBA has a particular particularly in those days maybe a little. So I don't know He had a particular teaching style wary if you're at a month course, you could pretty much be sure that half the time was going to be spent in the lower rounds. So he did delight in. Those and Mama yesterday would, of course come in and remind us that we all had put a nature. So it was kind of A. Tough. Cop Nice cop routine and away. And you know he was he was a it was kind of overwhelming for me despite my interest. But as despite my having majored in religion in college and so forth. But. All the complication you know both the details of rim, how Karma works all the different realms, the scholastic arguments back and forth about beginning less mind an emptiness and so forth all of it was incredibly impressive. They were particularly impressive as practitioners as people who lived out what they had studied on what they were teaching but I I also began in in the few the few hours that were that I had hadn't disposal to to read. I think it was probably some poems by Miller wrap up where Branson book by John Blow Fouls, which just had a little bit of discussion. Mahmoud. and. The way the way I took it brightly. At times this reminds me a lot of ZAP it a bid, it short circuits all the detail, all the ritual, all the scholasticism. All those kinds of things that just tells you to realize the nature of your mind. So it appealed to me. Even that? Sort of a a hidden card. Yuba. Lurking inside this is fledgling gay look back. And I kept that in mind when. Year or so you're a half later I ended up graduate school at the University of Wisconsin, studying under shapes up SOPA. who was the first as far as I know the first Betton tenure at American University, certainly the first Tibetan guess. Who was tenured at American University and again to to study with guesses OPA both in the context of the graduate program that Wisconsin and at the deer park would a center as it's now called. Founded. In the mid seventies was too steep yourself in again are a great deal of the the complexity, the ritual, the richness, certainly of of the gaylord actual tradition and once again. The. Reading Mamo drawn decide what kind of balanced helped balance things out for me. So the number of the papers I wrote at Grad School, you know we're on the Mosit- as of India or or soccer punditocracy critiques of Mahamoud, draw various topics like that. So I, you know even in Grad school I I had this interest You know it sometimes said about Chinese practitioners. They're confusions during the day and Taoists. At Night I. Think a part of me that's was during the day and At night. Of course went when I began to discover that was that there was a whole Gaelic tradition of Mambo. I'd been vaguely aware of because it was a little translation that had come out at the library of Tibetan works in archives and. I read through that and So you know after I got Grad school sort of begun by my teaching career. I. Along with rank, of course, bring my dissertation into book form of pretty much everybody wants to do at some point are almost everybody wants to. Buy began to again sort of on the side begin to begin to investigate Gaylord Mabul dress, and so that's at least in terms of the genesis of this I. Guess That's That's how I would I would explain it. In a this dungeon have any. Teachers. Teaching. Mahmoud to you know you know during we went and saw on trump shays league. Once in Chicago he was notoriously late. He was typically drinking soccer when he was typically brilliant. So you know everything we had heard was true. And I think later in the seventies and into the eighties I began to to go occasionally to cognitive teacher but no, I did not have a regular. Teacher and I. I guess it's fair to say that I really never had a sort of regular teacher although in more recent years I've studied some weakening. European. Fortunately for us has his world had ordered in Minneapolis just. Just a few miles from where we live. So now, my my interest I mean I was interested in cognitive because if you're interested in mom will address even from the Gaylord stand going you clearly have to begin researching. Kogyo because. Even, some texts presents the. Is Fine Llamas. Book with. Alex. burs. The gala argue slash kagyu tradition of Mahamoud address. Implies that it's a kind of a sing credit tradition or a synthetic traditional might be a slightly better word So you and it's very clear that the first Panchen Lama who was one of the tutors of style on one of the truly great figures Gael history. He clearly was familiar with cargill literature and and it would seem with some Kogyo practices so. In my in the process of beginning to research, Ma Gala Mambo. Dry Inevitably had to begin reading at least a lot in In the calculator corresponded with scholars argue. Of various sorts Michael. Roy. David Jackson others. Of course the way these things work you you've you dig into you want your insulin gay look initially you dig into the cog you and then you get into the cockpit realize Oh God. All this comes from India and you've got to go back and look again at Sada. High and the other message you gotta look at the time. TRAS. Very, clearly, the textual a kind of sources for Mahmoud to discourse and behind that. Then of course, always these claims that there's a Sutra Mabul dry and so you begin digging around in sutures that may mention the word or may talk about ideas that are similar and so. I ended up going down this kind of rabbit, hole. That led me deeper and deeper back into Indian tradition and it started out as really odd. I'll do a few little translations and right any production suddenly was this Gargantuan projects that threatened to be about just about everything in. Indian. In Tibetan. Buddhism. Because in a weird way Mamo Dra, it was said, could be found everywhere in India, wants about bottles.

India Grad School Mahmoud. Mahamoud American University Gaylord Mabul Mahamoud Per Katmandu Mamo Dra Rama Tipton SAN Mamo London Lumberton Soccer University Of Wisconsin Panchen Lama Ma Gala Mambo Mama Gaylord Chicago
Mindfulness For Everyday Life

Secular Buddhism

04:50 min | Last week

Mindfulness For Everyday Life

"This first episode is about the word mindfulness. When we talk about mindfulness for every day life I think it's important to first of all define what is mindfulness? Why would we want to be more mindful? So let's jump into that I. I. Want to share some concepts and ideas that will help you to wrap your head around the overall idea of mindfulness. So, mindfulness is a set of practices that were inspired mainly by teachings from the east particularly from Buddhist traditions but it's a form of understanding the nature of our own minds You could say it's almost a philosophy a way of life and mindfulness enhances everything we do in our lives. So I want to jump into that for a moment Let's start out by defining what mindfulness is mindfulness. I'm sure you've heard of the word that's why you probably interested in this workshop in the first place. But when we hear the word mindfulness, it will probably make us think of some kind of concept to be mindful is and you fill in the blank what does that mean for you? When we're talking about mindfulness the way it was understood in the eastern traditions from which this practice comes from mindfulness is the non-judgmental observation of the present moment. It's a way of being imagine being able to sit with unexperienced that you're having. Let's take. For example, a strong emotion as you go about your day to day activities something happens, and let's say a you're driving in a car cuts you off the first thing you experiences some form of an emotion and this may be frustration that may be downright anger, but the emotion that we're experiencing is typically strong. Emphasis practice is the ability to observe the present moment in a non judgmental way, which is not to say if I mindful when the car coats me off I'm not going to be upset that's not exactly how it works. The way it works is when I'm driving in a car cuts me off and I suddenly realize I angry I can observe in a non judgmental way the emotion I'm experiencing without being angry at the fact that I may angry. Typically, what happens when we encounter a strong emotion throughout the day? We have a feeling about that emotion anger as an example is something that we typically feel aversion to. We don't like that we feel angry it's an unpleasant feeling. So when a when the feeling arises, we have an aversion to it, which immediately sets us up for a secondary layer of experience. There's the initial experience of anger that's what I'm experiencing, and now because I'm experiencing the unpleasantness of the anger, I'm also experiencing an aversion to my anger in other words I'm either mad that I mad or something along those lines. Mindfulness is essentially the practice that allows us to remain with the first layer of experience that we're having. It's a really powerful thing Viktor Frankl, the Austrian psychologist and Holocaust survivor said between stimulus and response. There is a space in that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom. Close quote. Now I really like this quote because it helps me to understand what's going on in terms of practicing mindfulness by like to think of my to day life as a series of stimulus and response, and all of us experienced this as we go throughout our day, let's just say you go to work your co workers says something to you or your boss says something to you, and there you go. That's the stimulus. Next is the response I may respond. And I'm not talking about necessarily responding with words it may be responding immediately with thoughts like I'm angry that my boss said this or did this and immediately when I experienced anger, that's another stimulus another response I'm experiencing anger that's the stimulus. What's my response to experiencing anger for most of us? It's an aversion to the anger that were feeling and this cycle goes on and on throughout our days stimulus response, stimulus response, stimulus response, and all day long on and on and on for our entire

Viktor Frankl
Mindfulness For Everyday Life

Secular Buddhism

04:51 min | Last week

Mindfulness For Everyday Life

"Welcome to the mindfulness for everyday life workshop. This workshop is split into approximately twenty episodes that are about fifteen minutes each. So this first episode is about the word mindfulness. When we talk about mindfulness for every day life I think it's important to first of all define what is mindfulness? Why would we want to be more mindful? So let's jump into that I. I. Want to share some concepts and ideas that will help you to wrap your head around the overall idea of mindfulness. So, mindfulness is a set of practices that were inspired mainly by teachings from the east particularly from Buddhist traditions but it's a form of understanding the nature of our own minds You could say it's almost a philosophy a way of life and mindfulness enhances everything we do in our lives. So I want to jump into that for a moment Let's start out by defining what mindfulness is mindfulness. I'm sure you've heard of the word that's why you probably interested in this workshop in the first place. But when we hear the word mindfulness, it will probably make us think of some kind of concept to be mindful is and you fill in the blank what does that mean for you? When we're talking about mindfulness the way it was understood in the eastern traditions from which this practice comes from mindfulness is the non-judgmental observation of the present moment. It's a way of being imagine being able to sit with unexperienced that you're having. Let's take. For example, a strong emotion as you go about your day to day activities something happens, and let's say a you're driving in a car cuts you off the first thing you experiences some form of an emotion and this may be frustration that may be downright anger, but the emotion that we're experiencing is typically strong. Emphasis practice is the ability to observe the present moment in a non judgmental way, which is not to say if I mindful when the car coats me off I'm not going to be upset that's not exactly how it works. The way it works is when I'm driving in a car cuts me off and I suddenly realize I angry I can observe in a non judgmental way the emotion I'm experiencing without being angry at the fact that I may angry. Typically, what happens when we encounter a strong emotion throughout the day? We have a feeling about that emotion anger as an example is something that we typically feel aversion to. We don't like that we feel angry it's an unpleasant feeling. So when a when the feeling arises, we have an aversion to it, which immediately sets us up for a secondary layer of experience. There's the initial experience of anger that's what I'm experiencing, and now because I'm experiencing the unpleasantness of the anger, I'm also experiencing an aversion to my anger in other words I'm either mad that I mad or something along those lines. Mindfulness is essentially the practice that allows us to remain with the first layer of experience that we're having. It's a really powerful thing Viktor Frankl, the Austrian psychologist and Holocaust survivor said between stimulus and response. There is a space in that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom. Close quote. Now I really like this quote because it helps me to understand what's going on in terms of practicing mindfulness by like to think of my to day life as a series of stimulus and response, and all of us experienced this as we go throughout our day, let's just say you go to work your co workers says something to you or your boss says something to you, and there you go. That's the stimulus. Next is the response I may respond. And I'm not talking about necessarily responding with words it may be responding immediately with thoughts like I'm angry that my boss said this or did this and immediately when I experienced anger, that's another stimulus another response I'm experiencing anger that's the stimulus. What's my response to experiencing anger for most of us? It's an aversion to the anger that were feeling

Viktor Frankl
Awakening from the Trance of Bad-Othering

Tara Brach

05:28 min | 2 weeks ago

Awakening from the Trance of Bad-Othering

"So, the title of tonight's talk is awakening from the Trans of bad ushering bad of the ring. and. If you've been with me for a while, you know it's a theme that I. Reflect on regularly and it's such A. Source. Of suffering. A start with a book that I really encountered recently from Dr Seuss and he wrote this when he was eighty and it was one of his last and it's called the butter battle book and it's got the UCS on one side who wear blue close in the souks where orange they live on opposite sides of a wall. And their conflict is that the UK's eat bread with the butter side up and the zoo cts with the butter side down on their bread, and this is very offensive and threatening to their cultural sensibilities. So it's a series of a growing mistrust in bad battering, and it leads to an escalating arms. Race starts with slingshots inside develops a slingshot and the other develops an even better one and the arms race goes on and on and their one upping each other until it finally gets to. A small red bomb that neither side has any possibility of defending against. And they all have to live underground with generals on both sides. Toys drop the bomb. And the book end in this is unlike any other ever read Dr Seuss the book and were the you who's a narrator asks his grandfather, the general for their side who's GonNa drop it? Will you are well he? To which GRANDPA NERVOUSLY REPLIES BE PATIENT Will See we will see. We're living in so much uncertainty. We don't know. What kind of primitive reactivity might? overtake. And what we do know is ultimately, no one wins when there's bad other spiraling when there's an office now. There's no positive social change is just that circling of violence and hatred. and. Whoever is on top temporarily? Whoever has the better slingshot for the moment has to organize resources in defense to maintain their power which they could do for days or for centuries. And everybody on some levels living underground because the danger in other words everybody has armor their hearts because their armor against the sense of bad Michelle there. So if there's a mindset of us. Against Them. A good us against bad others were watering the seeds of distrust and violence. We know this in our personal relationships I mean most of us have gotten caught at some point in that bad uttering dance of anger and blame maybe with a family member, your partner work colleague. Where each person is in some way triggered and whoever thinks it's the other started I it doesn't matter so much because in some way each is feeling hurt. A need to defend need to attack unmet needs. Each is feeling right and then they're blaming the other for causing trouble and pain. As they put out there blame that deepens the wounded an injury and there's more triggering. It just keeps going. So. It's not addressed in our personal relationships. The mistrust and anger and hate keeps US separate from each other in our own hearts armored we can't be really free. And we also know in the larger society that there's so much anger of right versus wrong. The good side bad side. There's so much dividedness right now this registered speaking whether. On an passion and anger masks for Co.. Are In of course, around the upcoming elections and social, justice movements and environment. You might be thinking this isn't just about a different opinion about butter side opera butter side down 'cause my side really is right and good that we're we're trying to protect against violence and hatred and destruction. And I know that mindset and feeling because my mind goes like that when are not? Real conscious on some level. There's that kind of a real rightness wrongness. But. Here's the thing. When I am honest and pause and deepen attention. To that perception of us. Them. It really is bad uttering and my heart is tight in contracted when that's going on, I'm not living from a sense of wholeness and away card sensitive. True connectedness with all of life of belonging. And that's why I call it a tramps, the transit bat other.

Dr Seuss UK A. Source Michelle Grandpa Partner CO
Finding The Rain Of Compassion

Tara Brach

06:13 min | 2 weeks ago

Finding The Rain Of Compassion

"Invite you to close your eyes for a moment. And the new be guiding you a very brief taste. Of. A Meditation I called the reign of compassion. And I invite you to on your own. Take the time. To drop into it more fully. Sitting away way that allows you to be relaxed and alert. Scanner Body see if you can let go of any habitual tension you might be carrying. Take a few full brass and let your mind settle. Like, to invite you to scan through. Family. Members or friends who are close to choose someone you know who's having a difficult time. Connect with your intention to awaken compassion toward this person. The beginning of rain is to simply recognize what most. Culture tension about. Their challenges. You might be remembering a mood that they're infrequently or some way they appear. Are Tone recent communications. Just began by. Letting. Yourself recognize this person's having a hard time. This is how I know it. And with that recognizing allow. Allow that experienced to be just as it is. Take your willingly pausing with the situation. We begin to investigate. What's it like being you? With Real Gentle Nash. So bring your curiosity. And your interest as you attend more closely. To what this person might be experiencing. You might imagine feeling with their hard and viewing the world from their perspective. You can make some. Inquiry asking yourself these questions if you're the person like what life circumstances are most distressing to here. What do you imagine? What's most distressing for this person? What are the particular fears or disappointments her church? This person's carrying. Maybe as you're being mindful an empathetic, you can sense what their belief about themselves in their life. What's the belief or they feel like a failure? Feeling, rejected. Insecure. Uncertain. Sense if you can feel and imagine. How whatever motions are strong pressure living in that? Maybe. How they're living with fear hurt anger. And feels like too much at any point just to use that noting to name the feelings and sense, you don't have to be the sink, you can be like the lake. dysle- be held in a mindful witnessing way. Can you censor the person who feels most vulnerable? You might even ask you know what? What is it that you most need? Do. You think this person most needs. Maybe from themselves or from others. And if at any point as you're investigating, you find yourself reacting. Then you shift and bring mindfulness and compassion to your own reaction. Naming it. Offering care. Tour. Sensing in what this person most need. Because this is what leads to nurture. This is how mindful empathy you've been feeling. Turns into compassion.

Transforming Your Relationship with Anxiety

Tara Brach

06:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Transforming Your Relationship with Anxiety

"So. I'm must stay and welcomed my friends. It said that when Adam and Eve left Eton he commented to her he said my dear, we're living in a time of great transition. And Have you noticed that it always feels like added in some. Some way that the times were in are uniquely intense and fast paced and stressful. Even knowing that. Historians will probably look back at twenty twenty with raised eyebrows. I just saw cartoon friend sent me of a woman. She's telling her partner. My desire to be well informed is currently at odds with my desired stay sane. And I think we understand. Given are off the charts Combo of current stressors. It's easy to feel like we're waiting for the bad stuff to go away. You know there's we're kind of waiting to resume real life. But actually, and there's there's a deep understanding in this that if for waiting if we're waiting for something different. We won't bring a full. Honest presence to what's actually arising right here now in our path. And it's only by doing that that we really wake up. And for many of us what's arising on our path? What's really asking for attention is anxiety. So this evening, I'd like to reflect together on how we can transform our relationship with anxiety. How we can arouse a presence said. Brings inner freedom and its outer expression what many people call love and action So as mentioned in the opening. For the first time in this weekly online class will be including some time for questions at the end. So I want to remind you that if you're on zoom and you have a question during the talk. Please rided in via the chat box to everyone and submit your question just once. Yeah. So feel free. Anxiety and fears been spiking over the last six months. It was already epidemic levels anyway round the world but you know the converging streams we do. We know the between the pandemic an unemployment. I'm aware that justice week tens of millions of people are facing eviction. Dude on. The streams of our children schooling and this growing awareness That's so profound around the globe of race based injustice and violence. And then the trauma just these last two weeks of wildfires of about three days ago. One of my friends home burned down. A hurricanes mean unless we're in denial, it'll keep coming. This is the crisis of our. So I've mentioned. On Saturdays I do this live such on this our people ask questions, and we really we explore meditation can help with all the different challenges, and of course you're all invited. So feel free to sign up on my home page of my website. What a wanted shares, how a good number of named The way that their past trauma is now being activated by current stressors and how much is just driving them into sense of real isolation and depression and fear anxiety. And of course, another stream for many in the United States is a gripping fear around upcoming elections. For many, the sense that so much is at stake for generations to calm for those who are most vulnerable for Democracy for earth. So as we'll explore tonight. If we want to heal and if we want to evolve and I'm talking about individually and as a species, it all depends on how we respond to the anxiety and fear that's arising so strongly. Because, here's what happens. UNPROCESSED FEAR is rise to violence and two more separation, and this is true and our individual alive to the glory. We have fears that we really have not attended to with mindfulness with kindness it ends up separating us from others. And it's true as a society and it takes the shape of war and all sorts of other forms of violence. So if we want to. Create a more loving peaceful world and I feel like we're here because we want to. We need to let. Attention to anxiety be at the center of our path. It's not like we're waiting for things to change. It's like this is what's arising this asking for our attention and if we don't pay attention. Are Primitive range will rule the day. So in him this intention to bring. To difficulty to let the difficulty actually way GOP our compassion wake up love in action. Is described as the body sought for aspiration. And I. Love it because it's such a powerful expression of really I think what we all long for one more most away that that whatever comes our way that helps us to deepen our love.

Anxiety Adam Eton EVE Twenty Twenty Partner GOP United States Depression
Translating the Buddhist Scriptures

5 Minute Dharma

03:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Translating the Buddhist Scriptures

"The Buddhist said. In the Middle Length Discourse One oh three. The vegetables agree on the meaning but disagree on the phrasing. But the venerable should know that this is how such agreement on the meaning disagreement on the phrasing come to be. But the phrasing is a minor matter. Please don't get into a fight about something. So minor. So this is talking about. Sharing the Dharma. On the original language that the Buddhist disciples were sharing it and they were disagreeing about the phrasing. In other words they understood and agreed upon the meaning of the Dharma but they're having problems with the exact words to use to express it. And the Buddha don't get hung up on the phrasing. And this applies. Directly to. Translating. When you're translating the the Ceuta's from the original Pali to. Modern English wore things you can do is get hung up on phase phrasing. And phrasing simply means the way that it's put into English the words that are used. And this is a problem because you can get really hung up on this if you. Have done translating I did translate in Bible College my background was in Greek and. Biblical. Translation. And I did I've actually translated the gospel of John a couple of times and I the saloons. And some parts of Matthew. And I think if America did mark too but I can't remember at hand and the beginning of of Luke. And one of the things that I realized. Is. That originally the less you know the more you think a literal translation is the correct way to go. problem with a literal translation is that the people the the people who are reading the literal translation aren't getting the message they're not getting the original message. So which you have to do is come up with a dynamic equivalence so that you understand the message in in this case poly. And then you translate that message from Pali into English. And that's hard to do to to use the right words and to convey things because you can get hung up on the correspondence between the words and not understand the correspondence between the connotations. For an example, I just just reading a translation from I B Horner. in the Vanilla where she was translating that the Buddha was pacing back and forth worth the word pacing has the connotation of be nervous like you're nervous in your pacing back and forth. And a better translation would be walking back and forth because that's walking meditation is what the Buddha was doing. He wasn't pacing he's completely elaborated individual he wouldn't be pacing. and. So the word the connotation pacey means going back and forth. But the connotation has the idea that you're stressed and to bring that across when you're translating is actually much more difficult than people realize and this is what makes translation so difficult.

Buddha Horner. Bible College America John
Mindfulness Interview With Dr Sarah Shaw

Secular Buddhism

06:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Mindfulness Interview With Dr Sarah Shaw

"Dr Sarah Shah, Faculty member, and lecturer at the University of Oxford. She has taught and published numerous works on the history and practices of Buddhism including an introduction to Buddhist Meditation and the spirit of meditation. Without further delay years the audio from my interview, with Dr. Sarah. What inspired you to write this book I something. That's always interested me. I always noticed that mindfulness gets described in different ways in different historical periods and then Chased Kim and Nicola as. Shambala actually. Asked me to do is short history of mindfulness to make it very short, which is very, very difficult at, but I enjoy doing something that's just always interested me, bitch. I read articles about mindfulness and they can be quite rigid about it's this or it's that or it's this. Anak must have hundreds of my computer on some of them are really quite dogmatic but what I liked to its way in different settings would just get his slightly differently and has a slightly different feel and application with an underlying threader voltages. Pull that keep things alive by soon changing formulations wraps looking at them in you setting so. That seems the mindful way to approach the subject. So I. Really. Enjoyed it. It's great. It's interesting how? Like you mentioned how? Many different ways there are to use the word right when somebody says, I'm trying to be more mindful. You almost have to ask what what does that mean to you because there are so many interpretations of what it means to be mindful I think the people. In what's one person needs may be different from another person so I wouldn't want to be rigid about how it should be interpreted. Well that's great and and tell me a little bit about your background with with Buddhism with mindfulness Where did you? Where did all that start your interest in this topic? I started meditation many years ago. When. I was at Manchester University and that's what I I really encountered word mindfulness in Buddhist searching. Amusingly my meditation teacher told me that he hadn't met many people who is so unmindful the tolerating needs to didn't. Have I think that's A. Problem for academics, you can get very over focused. News surroundings. So I was intrigued by then and I try to sit down I have ever since I'm not sure I've ever really found out what she chews. On still craft it enjoy trying to rouse. I love how the title of the Book you know brings up right away to things where where does it come from and what does it mean if you had to answer that short way to somebody in an elevator? How would you answer that? Where where does it come from and what does it mean? And I would say it comes from is, is any one place Lipa come from coolest A cells that cindy the only person who can be mindful and do something about which is on self. And what it means. I would say. An attentive alertness to. Worship brings health to the mind. Something like that. Yeah I like that I think it seems like sometimes at least the way at. That mindfulness has evolved in the West. there seems to be a tendency to think of mindfulness as an altered state. and. It seems to me like what you're describing as more of an altered trait. It's a way of being. I can affect everything that we do rather than thinking. Well, here's my normal ordinary life and when I mindful I'm separate from that. It's this other state that I'm in. It it would be nice to be mindful of time I think we will have lapses one consent it'd be mindful day life it helps. Hopes to be mindful in daily life and one one needs to, of course in meditation. So it's something that can be there all the time how you arouse it sounds different circumstances might be different but the quality. Certainly according to the Buddhist tradition is that when the mind is healthy and Alert. Does a Buddhist fishing called the epidemic and it says that when mindfulness is present, lots of other factors come into play too like. Confidence. In this. Huma. Balance a lot of these other qualities come in as well. Yeah. What's Nice as the moment that we are mindful of the fact that we're not mindful we've already started right? We've already. A good a good point. Yeah So, what would you say is the biggest Maybe, misconception that you've encountered about mindfulness. I'm. Really, think very much in those terms actually oddly enough because I am an academic, that's what we're trying to do a misconception. I would say that the notion that it's somehow something that is very different from daily experience and I think that's probably one and does something that. Is owned by anybody at. The. Particular A. Just, save it. Psychology knows what mindfulness is in a way to. Practice, space traditions. Up Stem tool that Everybody will have found some way of arousing alertness and the attentiveness of mindfulness under different circumstances.

Buddhist Meditation Dr Sarah Shah Dr. Sarah University Of Oxford Manchester University KIM Faculty Member Nicola Cindy Lecturer
Meditation: Listening to our Life

Tara Brach

05:33 min | Last month

Meditation: Listening to our Life

"Today's meditation is on listening to our life. And you might listen to your body as you feel your way into the sitting posture. And make sure the two qualities really we look for an sitting is at I. Comfortable. In other words a sense of easiest. And also alert. Awake. You find yourself settling in your posture. Literally is closed or partly closed. sear tension to primarily inwardly. Dan, breathing. Together, a long slow breath. So inhaling deeply filling the chest and lungs. Slow out breath. See if you can relax and let go with the out breath. Inhaling deeply again. A slow even out breath letting go. Letting go. Again, breathing in filling the CHASTA lungs. And with the out breath releasing. Relaxing letting, go. Then, allowing the breath to come back into its natural rhythm. Observing the BRAFF observing the body. Noticing if there's any areas of obvious tension or holding in your body. And take some rooms to give yourself that gift of letting go. If it's the shoulders. Since the possibility of relaxing them back down some. Softening. Letting whatever tightness or tension might be there flowed a bit in awareness. It helps to make sure the Hams arresting in a soft easy relaxed way. Let the chest. Be. Open. In. The belly soft loosening relaxing. Continuing to scan your body incense anywhere else that might WANNA. Let go a little. In widening the attention. Listening to the sounds that are here. You can listen not just with your ears. But with your whole awareness. Receiving the close in sounds. Like the sounds of these were. The sound that are in the room. And the space you're in? Spaces between the sounds. including the more distant sounds. Receptive. To the most distant sound you can perceive. Sensing the boundless awareness. That includes even the most distant town. Relaxing back into this openness. Simply listening.

DAN
Conversations with Samdhong Rinpoche and J. Krishnamurti

The Wisdom Podcast

05:33 min | Last month

Conversations with Samdhong Rinpoche and J. Krishnamurti

"And so in this country and I have a couple of characters coming in and true stars basically Chris. Moody and some don't remember Jay and Crystal Naughty has come up quite be in these podcast interviews I've been doing I think Barry, Magid mentioned him and a your a your friend Larry Rosenberg talked of Christianity quite a bit when we interviewed. So this'll be you know people who listen to this have been sort of encountering Shimon from different perspectives. So I was hoping you would tell us about the first time you met Krishnamurti was what was The first time I drove. By the stories rather charming, a friend of mine. I was living is a bachelor by the beach in a little apartment. In a bag of plastic, excuse me a paper sack ended up on my porch and in it where eight talks by Birdie, at the University of San Diego Nineteen Sixty eight. And a series of. Talks that the Ramdas just given in San Francisco a more or less than oral history of his journey to the east. And not having anything else to do I listen to these tapes over and over again for year, we just hang a little cassette on my bedroom door and listen so listen to. Alternately, between Rob Dawson. Story and then listen to Chris steaks and then I realized that found out that he was alive. And that he was living in, Ohio I for a good part of the year. I didn't even know that Ohio existed. It was two and a half hours north of Los Angeles Long Beach where I was living. So I, drove my though Orange Volkswagen up and sat in the audience and you know just that my first meeting was that was just just like everybody else sitting there going who is this guy? There's something riveting about what he has to say I don't get it. I don't understand in other something compelling. Often. Say IT'S A. Christie. gave me a headache. You know just because there was something oblique about what he was pointing to that I couldn't quite. Grass. So this happened for several years. I came up every year then when he gave his talks in Ohi- in the springtime. And then finally. When I showed up at the Grove where they he speaks or heads spoken throughout his life there in Ohio. Grove's trees there were video cameras read. Krishnamurti was quite shy about having his picture taken and didn't want to be the Sarah Attention. Etc.. For the same reason when I you know Buddha when for several hundred years after his passing, they didn't represent him as a person that represented him as the empty chair or footprints in the sand because for the same reason that didn't WanNa have pictures agents. Saint Saint so I'm a documentary filmmaker background in television. So I I asked the people that actually the woman that gave the announcements. If this was an house production just hired somebody they said, well, they hired somebody from from. Santa Barbara to record talks and I said well, I have some experience Navy I can help. And that led to a conversation. I've met with this woman her name is Evelyn Blau and have learn I became friends and so six months. Later we were playing going to Canada which was. A trip that Krishnamurti was going to visit one of the Sanders, their Canada. So that was my first real meeting one's. Going to his home in. Ohi- a times and then we actually started production of the first film that I did which was called A. Business the challenge of change. And it was the first biographical documentary that was on his life. Elections had just written the first of series of three different biographical books called the years of awakening which kind of exposed very early rather strange. USC early years how he was discovered. In quotes who is e? Etcetera Etcetera. Those books I read maybe twenty years ago those. Roads and. It was quite fascinating at a different time of meeting Krishnamurti than reading is his lectures very. Very different that again, that's the. I just finished writing and the Christian Rate Foundation is going to be publishing a book called. Unconditionally free and this is A. A sweeping history of Krishnamurti's talks from the very beginning, where did you come from? What is the mythology around the story? The all the kinds of things is the ASAKUSA society and then moving forward. What is the Mitra? Why was he had to be the new the next? The next? Buddha. ETC seper. So. Yeah. So that will be coming out in two months. So what was it about? So it seems like you had

Krishnamurti Chris Steaks Ohio A. Christie. University Of San Diego Grove Sanders Larry Rosenberg Shimon Canada San Francisco Magid Los Angeles Moody OHI Rob Dawson Evelyn Blau Santa Barbara JAY
Conversations with Samdhong Rinpoche and J. Krishnamurti

The Wisdom Podcast

04:12 min | Last month

Conversations with Samdhong Rinpoche and J. Krishnamurti

"And so in this country and I have a couple of characters coming in and true stars basically Chris. Moody and some don't remember Jay and Crystal Naughty has come up quite be in these podcast interviews I've been doing I think Barry, Magid mentioned him and a your a your friend Larry Rosenberg talked of Christianity quite a bit when we interviewed. So this'll be you know people who listen to this have been sort of encountering Shimon from different perspectives. So I was hoping you would tell us about the first time you met Krishnamurti was what was The first time I drove. By the stories rather charming, a friend of mine. I was living is a bachelor by the beach in a little apartment. In a bag of plastic, excuse me a paper sack ended up on my porch and in it where eight talks by Birdie, at the University of San Diego Nineteen Sixty eight. And a series of. Talks that the Ramdas just given in San Francisco a more or less than oral history of his journey to the east. And not having anything else to do I listen to these tapes over and over again for year, we just hang a little cassette on my bedroom door and listen so listen to. Alternately, between Rob Dawson. Story and then listen to Chris steaks and then I realized that found out that he was alive. And that he was living in, Ohio I for a good part of the year. I didn't even know that Ohio existed. It was two and a half hours north of Los Angeles Long Beach where I was living. So I, drove my though Orange Volkswagen up and sat in the audience and you know just that my first meeting was that was just just like everybody else sitting there going who is this guy? There's something riveting about what he has to say I don't get it. I don't understand in other something compelling. Often. Say IT'S A. Christie. gave me a headache. You know just because there was something oblique about what he was pointing to that I couldn't quite. Grass. So this happened for several years. I came up every year then when he gave his talks in Ohi- in the springtime. And then finally. When I showed up at the Grove where they he speaks or heads spoken throughout his life there in Ohio. Grove's trees there were video cameras read. Krishnamurti was quite shy about having his picture taken and didn't want to be the Sarah Attention. Etc.. For the same reason when I you know Buddha when for several hundred years after his passing, they didn't represent him as a person that represented him as the empty chair or footprints in the sand because for the same reason that didn't WanNa have pictures agents. Saint Saint so I'm a documentary filmmaker background in television. So I I asked the people that actually the woman that gave the announcements. If this was an house production just hired somebody they said, well, they hired somebody from from. Santa Barbara to record talks and I said well, I have some experience Navy I can help. And that led to a conversation. I've met with this woman her name is Evelyn Blau and have learn I became friends and so six months. Later we were playing going to Canada which was. A trip that Krishnamurti was going to visit one of the Sanders, their Canada. So that was my first real meeting one's. Going to his home in. Ohi- a times and then we actually started production of the first film that I did which was called A. Business the challenge of change. And it was the first biographical documentary

Chris Steaks Krishnamurti Ohio A. Christie. Canada Larry Rosenberg Shimon Grove University Of San Diego OHI San Francisco Magid Moody Los Angeles Rob Dawson Evelyn Blau JAY Santa Barbara Barry
Heaven and Hell

5 Minute Dharma

04:57 min | Last month

Heaven and Hell

"The Buddhist said. The Double Prada. I won twenty six. Some enter the womb. Evildoers go to hell the good good heaven. Those free from worldly desires attained, Nirvana? Now. It's not hard to understand the attaining. Nirvana. But what's the stuff about going to hell and going to heaven? That doesn't seem very Buddhist. And yet we find it in the Buddhist scriptures. This is because I think that. The. Proclamation of Buddhism within the West has been sterilized of anything smacking of religion. So that Buddhism doesn't seem religious. But Buddhism is a religion. Is a religion that tells you how to attain the best destination the best life. So it tells you how to live life now. So that, you have peace of mind. It tells you how to attain Heaven after You die and it tells you how to get out of the cycle of rebirth, which is called some Sarah in Buddhism through attaining Nirvana. So. Tells you these things. But we really here mainly in the West about the meditation and about finding peace and things of this nature. But this isn't the complete story of Buddhism see you get a skewed view of Buddhism. So, lately, I've been writing for PATHOS PATHOS DOT COM. And Have My. I. Have a column there called the Buddhist said. And every week I do two articles where I explore the Buddhist teachings from the Pali Canon the earliest scriptures of Buddhism. And one of the things that. I'm trying to help people. Understand. Is that Buddhism is a full religion. It's not just find inner peace. It's about avoiding hell it's about attaining heaven and ultimately attaining Nirvana. So. One of the things I explained in my articles is the difference between the conditioned reality and the unconditional reality. So we live in a conditioned reality. And that conditioned reality has five basic destinations. You have the hell realms you have the ghost realm, you have the animal realm, the human realm, and the heavenly. Realm. And those are the five destinations that you can go to in this conditioned reality. Now. If you attain Nirvana which is complete liberation, then you leave this conditioned realm and go into. What can only be said to be the UN conditioned. You can't call it. A realm realm is conditioned. So I, call it an unconditional reality but that is still saying maybe too much about it. We don't know. We only know what the on conditioned is it's unconditional born on made on created on fabricated. And it's with that understanding then you begin to look at the Buddhist scriptures used. Yes Buddha tells how to get out of the cycle of rebirth. But he also tells you well, you're here. And if you don't attain Nirvana, the best thing to do is to practice the Dharma. And the Dharma has three basic printings if you will you have the ethical training. The. Mindfulness Meditation Training and the wisdom. Training this is the insight into the true nature of reality. So the ethical will give you a good rebirth. What you want is you want to be reborn as a human because the divine places, the heavenly places to pleasurable for you to meditate and the hell places to painful and of course, by Hell I mean they're temporary. So they're more like purgatory 's all these destinations are temporary. Nothing is permanent in the conditioned room. The only thing permanent is the uncommissioned. So when she realized that what you do here, effects where you're going after your life. Then the Buddha says ethical standards is what you do to make sure you have a good rebirth. That seems odd to many people who think of Buddhism has just a meditation practice. But this is what the Buddha taught. He taught a way of escape from the conditioned reality, but he also taught within this conditioned reality how to get the best rebirth so that you can practice so that you can attain Nirvana.

Buddha UN
Finding Your Balance

Blue Lotus Buddhist Temple Podcast

05:40 min | Last month

Finding Your Balance

"Good Morning. We love and I'm here in Crystal Lake Illinois. And wanted to spend a little time with you. Hope Everyone's fine. And Hope you're. Dealing with all the different new things coming up in your life like being students online or live for a combination of the two. Or going back to work or continuing to stay home and work from home. Or looking for a job or Trying to to decide what's the next course you want to take or thing you want to learn online. We have lots of things going on these days and I hope you're finding a way to be. Peaceful with that and have Have some dispassionate equanimity could time to work on our equanimity, right? That's the quality of balance. and. Taking a step back and being able to see things. Without. So much of our self involvement being able to be a little bit dispassionate. Find Balance and everything. So I always like to think of it as back away beck away from Mecca way not not out of indifference at all but out of. That Maybe we sometimes can be too aggressively putting ourselves in the middle of a situation. Really we are more of A. We can be more of a bystander and be more valuable to people in the situation. and. You know that feeling when you when you realize oh I, wish I just kept my mouth shut and not. Made that comment on facebook or not said something that you know that that made the situation not better but probably just. kind of hit the hit something that just immediately. Created. Created. A. A little minor explosion and a conversation or relationship. And sometimes that's because we we aren't able to become have that equanimity at work. You know there's a little. There's a little bit too much of our ego in a situation. So we just need to say something that maybe probably would be better if we didn't say it. I know that's one way I look at equanimity. Does back away? Think about the situation think about it a little bit more. find her own balance with an it without getting carried away by the emotion of the moment. And we can work with equanimity in so many situations and I think it's a beautiful quality for us to develop right now. Because we have a lot of opportunities before we we feel like. We are free from the effects of the pandemic. That's going to be a long time before free from the economic effects and the psychological effects and the physical effects. The way it's changed our landscape just physically the people we've lost. Maybe the people who were recovering from covid nineteen and the the. The. The long lasting effects that they might be having to deal with and how it affects our society in the long run. So develop equanimity along with compassion and loving kindness and. I am so which is no harm. So, we can have our hands full just with. seeing how we can those are the best ways we can be people in this world is to work on those qualities work on a deeper understanding of yourself. And then that's what it all comes back to because we have to know. What our little triggers are we have to know. We have to know about ourself. and. Then we can be more effective in a more Compassionate person for the rest of the world. So. Let me start with my wish. And I think that's good guidance I hope everyone's memorized it. Okay. He working on it if you haven't because it can be there for you when you need it. Or. The Saint. Francis prayer. May I become at all times both now and forever. A protector for those without protection. A guy for those who have lost their way. A ship for those with an ocean to cross. A. Sanctuary for those endanger. A lamp for those without light. A place of refuge for those who like shelter and a servant to all in need. By by means of this meritorious deed, May I never join with the unwise only the wise until the time I attain the Bonna. That close to you because that gives us. Wonderful Advice. And it also gives us a challenge. You know to reach out to be to be able to. See clearly what's going on in the world where we can help

Crystal Lake Illinois Facebook Mecca Francis Prayer
Loving Ourselves Into Healing

Tara Brach

05:20 min | Last month

Loving Ourselves Into Healing

"Stay in welcome. It feels really lovely to begin with that Nama stay as as many of you know anonymous day means I see the divine in you and in me in an all being shin what an amazing way to. To encounter ourselves in the world. You probably know that in the West instead of novice day the handshake that open hand showing on that you're not carrying a gun. It's such a it's such a big difference, and so this is one cultural appropriation that our world desperately needs this one of a sincere anonymous day. This is. Part two of a series of talks I'm not sure how many on radical love. Radical. Love is a love that that season cherishes the shape gruden each live. The way the sacred lives through us. And I thought, maybe I'd start with the perspective of young Human Caesar. Some. Comments on love by little people aged five through nine. Glenn Age seven says a fallen in loves anything like learning how to spell I. Don't WanNa do it. It takes too long. Manual age eight I, think you're supposed to get shot with an Arrow or something, but the rest of it is supposed to be so painful. Love is the most important thing in the world but baseball's pretty good too. That's Greg Aj. I'm in favor of love as long as it doesn't happen when dinosaurs is on television that's Gel h six. Love is foolish but I still might try sometime. That's floyd. Aged nine one more. To people promised to go through sickness and illness and disease together. That's Marlin Age Dan. There you're gonNA see a little bit the imprint of our culture on our sense of what love is and will probably stage of development to. Radical. Love is fully evolve in the first talk I that game on this really reflected radical love is as the expression of true spiritual awakening and also the grounds of meaningful social transformation. Many no, it's the heart of the civil rights movement of black lives matters. Really, of all movements that seek A. Compassionate world at the core of them is this love and reverence of live. So We in that I talk we reflected on the the barriers really what stops. And how to begin to deepen our attention. This talk I thought we'd continue by looking at. The primary layer of our barriers to love and it's really. Our reaction to the life we call self the live. That's right here. And as we know far from that that Phnom stay that honoring or. Cherishing the life right here were often in great resistance whether it's the form of neglect or judgment or hatred or shame, but we don't have. A very evolved and loving relationship with ourselves for the most part. So it feels really critical to look at this like how can we? Move towards more tenderness, more open heartedness with our own be. And the key understanding is. That you can't be down on yourself for war with yourself. and embrace the world because the life that's right here is part of the world. So. I thought I'd be gin with a story. Some of you at least will remember from way back at civil the teen Rabbit Marie little to you. Real isn't how you're made said the skin horse. It's a thing that happens to a child loves you for a long long time, not just to play with, but really loves you then you become real. Does. It hurt the rabbit. Sometimes said the skin horse for he was always truthful. When you're real, you don't mind being hurt. Does it happen all at once like being wound up he astor bit by bit. It doesn't happen all at once the skin horse you become. It takes a long time. That's why it doesn't happen often to people who break easily or have sharp edges are have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time, you are real most of your hair's been loved off and your eyes drop out you get loose in the joints super shabby. But these things don't matter at all because once you're real, you can't be ugly. except. To people who don't understand.

Glenn Age Gruden Greg Aj Rabbit Marie Baseball
Sticky Hair Monster

Secular Buddhism

05:09 min | Last month

Sticky Hair Monster

"Now let's get started with the podcast episode. So in the last podcast episode, the Zenko on shared is called Joe Shoes. Mu. And I want to share a couple of thoughts about this. The the Cohen itself goes like this Joe Shoe was a famous Chinese and master who lived in Joe Shoe the province from which he took his name one day a troubled monk approached him intending to ask the master for guidance a dog walked by the monk asked Joe Shoe has that dog a Buddha nature or not? The monk had barely completed as question when Josue shouted Mu. So I want to share some thoughts and he starts come from the Book Zenko on's, and this is a book written by Gyo May Kubo say the of all the Cohen's Joe. Shoes Mu is the most famous. It's extremely popular with Zen Masters who frequently assign it to novices if the student tens properly to business mu comes to resemble a hot iron ball stuck in his throat, he can either swallow it nor spit out the importance of shoes mu is it's succinct one syllable revelation of Buddhism. So little background here, and and and again, all of these thoughts come in from the book Zen Cohen's Baio Make Kubo say. He says, Mu, is the negative symbol in Chinese meaning not or no thing Mu. Is also a basic concept in oriental philosophy. There is a relative mu and an absolute mu, the relative mu and Chinese characters is the opposite of you. The letter you which means is the absolute mu of Zen Buddhism transcends is and is not in order to understand this Cohen. It is necessary to be aware of this distinction when the monk asked, Shoshu has that Dog Abboud nature not he was asking not only from the standpoint of his own troubled mind. But from the Basic Buddhist teaching that all beings have Buddha Nature Joe shoe realized this his Mu as an answer was a blow aimed at breaking or untying the monks attachment to that teaching. The essence of Buddha's teaching is non attachment. All human troubles and sufferings without exception are due to attachment even attachment to the idea of non attachment is attachment. Joe Shoe wanted the monk to transcend the relative world transcend the teachings, Transcend Mu, transcend Buddhism, and gain the free and independent world of enlightenment. Satori or enlightenment is this new dimension or perspective in life ordinary human life has always attached to the relative the is and the is not good and bad right and wrong. But life itself is constantly changing the condition of society changes right and wrong often changes. Every situation is different according to time and place. So static concepts are not appropriate to life this thus mu is crucial offers no surface upon which the intellect can fasten. The word mu must be experienced as the world So those are the thoughts from the book Zen Cohen's Baio Make Kubo say regarding the specific Cohen Joe Shoes Mu. And I I wanted to share this. Cohen because as the book mentions, it's most popular, perhaps the most famous of the Cohen's. But to have a little bit of background, you need to understand the answer. So essentially, what's happening here is you have a teacher who's being asked a question by a student by a novice monk and the question is so out of place because. You know the Buddhist teaching of Buddha nature is that all beings have buddha nature. So it's like someone coming law coming along and asking a very obvious question which he should know the answer to according to the teaching that all beings have Buddha nature. The answer to the question does a dog have Buddha nature is obviously yes. But josue knew that he was asking this question that should be obvious. So instead of giving the obvious answer, he gave the answer that the monk was not expecting by shouting Moo or no, or no thing. And in the tradition of Cohen's and in the tradition of Zan, this is kind of the shock and all approach the shock and awe is that that's not what I was expecting. So here you have this novice monk asking a question, get an answer that he's not expecting. And it leaves him confused and that's the exact state that Cohen's and oftentimes Zen in general want to leave you in because it's trying to break you free of the conceptualization 's that you're making in your own mind.

Cohen Joe Shoe Joe Shoes Josue Kubo Buddha Gyo May Kubo Zen Masters Baio Shoshu ZAN
Learning to Respond, Not React

Tara Brach

04:59 min | Last month

Learning to Respond, Not React

"To begin with a quote that's pretty much anonymous although I've seen versions of it from Christian philosophers and Buddhists and Gandhi. This. Is it the thought becomes the word? The word manifest as the deed, the deed develops into the habit. Habit hardened into character character gives birth to destiny. So Watch your thoughts with care and let them spring from love born out of respect for all beings. So this is an expression of Karma which really is saying that causes lead to a fax that when we have certain beliefs and thoughts. They create certain feelings then turn into actions and the actions become habits and those habits end up really creating our sense of identity and if they're really hardened turn become our destiny. And we tend to keep repeating and repeating and repeating we're creatures of habit. When they create our destiny when they're based in fear these habits, they really become the block and our lives to accessing all. We can be to accessing happiness and creativity, and in a deep way a sense of our spirit. I say that one of the deepest. Expressions of despair that comes my way as when someone will report that I've been repeating the same pattern of pushing people away are grasping on or undermining myself or whatever it is all my life for as long as I can remember. There's a real feeling of despair because how can I ever change? So deeply grooved. So tonight's reflection will really be on how we can awaken from these habitual chains of thinking feeling and acting us stimulus reaction cycle that we get caught into that really combined our lives and the title of the talk is really the freedom of responding not reacting. Okay And I think this is a very universal. Theme in terms of transformation because every one of us if we're in any way suffering. Were suffering because there's some patterning that has locked in this rooted in fear and the we keep playing out over and over again and it's confining our sense of being. That's why we're suffering. So the way I'd like to structure this is around. Three key teachings that have. Really, shaped my my life, my spiritual life in a very deep way and I think of them as invitations each of these three teaching surveys of in a way free ourselves are waking up out of a chain-reaction. Okay. And the first one the way I language it it's really please don't believe your thoughts. That's the first one. And the second one is pleased just pause and come back into presence. And the third one is pleased. Remember love. In some way whatever but remember low. So. That's going to be kind of the architecture if you will of our of our reflection together these invitations. But. We'll begin by taking a look at what happens in our brain when we're caught in the stimulus reaction chain in the ones and they're in there very often relational where we get triggered and we go into this this chain of reactivity. and. My favorite illustration comes from Dr Dan Siegel who's a psychiatrist, his friend also, and he's one of the leaders in what's called interpersonal neuro biology and what Dan does is he says think of the brain and he says any print picks up his hand like this. He says think of the brain like this that your wrist leading into the palm of your hand it's like spinal cord going into the skull. So this is the brain stem. And then he says, this thumb is your limbic. System. And this has to do with arousal and emotions and relationships. You've got the brain stem that's really regulating your body and it's fight flight freeze. And then you've got the thumb that's emotions. It's Olympic system and he says these forefingers, Casey it like this is the Cortex, the frontal cortex. This is what lousy us to perceive the outside world and think and reason, and the prefrontal Cortex is just the kind of bottom part of my knuckles right down here is really the source of mindfulness atonement empathy compassion. So this is the brain.

Dr Dan Siegel Gandhi Casey
Right Mindfulness

5 Minute Dharma

04:33 min | Last month

Right Mindfulness

"Buddha said. Now, this is the noble truth with the path that leads to the of suffering. It is simply this noble eightfold path that is right view right intention right speech right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right meditation. Today. We WanNa talk about right mindfulness. So the next question is obviously what is right mindfulness The Buddha said, and what is right mindfulness it is when a practitioner meditates observing and aspect of the body or an aspect of feelings or an aspect of the mind or an aspect of experience being ardent, attentive, and mindful putting away worldly longing and distress. This is called right mindfulness. So, we want to look at this passage, a little closer I. The four things that he mentions are actually called the four applications of mindfulness. There's a whole a Buddhist scripture dedicated to that. The mudgee Cayenne is number ten, Sutin number ten it's called the Sada Patana Ceuta. Saudi is the word for mindfulness is translated mindfulness. It means to remember to be present with what's going on. It means to look at experience as it arises. So. There's four things that you apply your mindfulness to the first is observing aspect of the body. So that's the physical body that would include your breath, your seating position, the the walking that you do the city in the lane down different postures, things of this nature so that be the first. The second is observing an aspect of the feelings. Feelings might better translated maybe feeling tone. Basically, there's three there's pleasant, unpleasant and neutral. These are the feeling tones. So in everything that you encounter, you get a feeling tone from it. It's built in as a as a response to stimulus. So you think thought you get a feeling tone you see an object, you get a feeling tone you smell something tastes something any of those things produce a feeling tone. And those feeling tones are one of three kinds pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral. The pleasant ones we attached to the unpleasant ones we are averse to and the neutral ones we tend to ignore. The third one is observing in aspect of the mind. So this is the quality the mind the leaning of the mind whether DHS deluded contracted things of this nature. So you're trying to pay attention to the how the mind is its quality and the last one is observing an aspect of experience. So this is probably the translation that most people would find odd or unusual. The Pali Word as Dhamma and Dhamma has multiple applications and basically what it sane is. It's asking you to compare to observant aspect of experience and compare it to the Buddhist teachings. So, you're trying to see the aspects, the four noble trues in your experience you're trying to see the factors of awakening you're trying to see these aspects. In your experience, and then that also tells us how to pay attention. It tells us to be ardent which means to be dedicated. It tells us to be attentive that means to be focused to to to keep your mind there and mindful means to be observant. Not, just aware are not attentive it means to be more aware it means to really take it in. To observe it to notice if will. and. The last one is putting away worldly as long and distress that basically saying non distraction. Longings, desires things at the state your for things of the world.

Buddha Cayenne Sada Patana Ceuta DHS
6 Steps for Coping with Uncertainty with Gregg Krech

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:42 min | Last month

6 Steps for Coping with Uncertainty with Gregg Krech

"Another minute as the months of the pandemic drone on and on and with it the continuing uncertainty finding places of pieces becoming all important focus of life for many of us I. Think. In I shared with you in the previous episode that I've committed to a more consistent daily meditation practice as a way to take positive action rather than focus on all that is wrong in our country in the world. And the other thing I did was to reach out to my teacher and friend Greg Creech. One of the leading authorities on Japanese psychology to talk with me on this podcast episode about uncertainty and transitions. When we talked on the phone about what advice sir practice he could offer to podcast listeners as we whether this time of great uncertainty he said something that really struck me. He said it's not a mass issue. It's your personal situation and attachment, and then he went on to say that everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, it's an individual thing. and. So with that brief lead in I want to welcome greg to this podcast once again. Hi, Greg thanks so much for joining me. Are Wendy thank you for having me. It's nice to talk to you again. Okay. So Great I would like us to focus much of the conversation today and I think I mentioned this when we talked on one of your recent articles coping in the garden of uncertainty. And also, if we have any time left, maybe you could talk about your recent series focused on the challenges post posed by this a pandemic, which was life not on hold right is that correct? That's correct. I though, if you could unpack what I just shared from our recent conversation which I hope I quoted you correctly even if you remember what you said it's not a massive issue at your personal situation, an attachment and then everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, it's an individual thing. So can you talk more about those concepts Greg? First of I do think that it's an unusual situation because in terms of the pandemic that the whole world. Is suffering from this and obviously Some people are suffering in different ways or more or less but but we out all are exposed to the situation and. and. So I'm not trying to suggest that that there. Is Anything but a global. Threat to our lives into our health and but I think in terms of how we cope with it. It it really is very much an individual issue has to do with our own practice. It has do with what presses are buttons It has to do with what We. Miss that gives us a sense of impatience and agitation because we have such a strong desire to have X. and we can't have it right now because the conditions of of our lives in the world. So in that sense, our ability to work with the situation to cope with it. To find a way to accept what we can't change for example. Though those kinds of things that are coming up our individual issues and the kinds of things that will which your buttons or agitate you or. Frustrate you. At an extreme are probably not necessarily the things that are going to have that effect on me but I have my own things and so to that extent, the the. Solutions that were looking for while we can talk about vaccine as a solution to medical problem but the solution to our practical and spiritual issues that we're facing in our own minds really is a question of of coping with that as an individual and I think of it similarly when I think of coping with the issue of death. All right. Right. That We we all will die It's a given but But how we die in how we face in cope with our own individual death is something that we can't share with anybody else right it's something that we have to work with. As individual. And I think net sense the situation we find ourselves in now. Is is somewhat parallel to that. Yeah that is that's really

Greg Creech Wendy
Steps for Coping with Uncertainty with Gregg Krech

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:40 min | Last month

Steps for Coping with Uncertainty with Gregg Krech

"Drone on and on and with it the continuing uncertainty finding places of pieces becoming all important focus of life for many of us I. Think. In I shared with you in the previous episode that I've committed to a more consistent daily meditation practice as a way to take positive action rather than focus on all that is wrong in our country in the world. And the other thing I did was to reach out to my teacher and friend Greg Creech. One of the leading authorities on Japanese psychology to talk with me on this podcast episode about uncertainty and transitions. When we talked on the phone about what advice sir practice he could offer to podcast listeners as we whether this time of great uncertainty he said something that really struck me. He said it's not a mass issue. It's your personal situation and attachment, and then he went on to say that everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, it's an individual thing. and. So with that brief lead in I want to welcome greg to this podcast once again. Hi, Greg thanks so much for joining me. Are Wendy thank you for having me. It's nice to talk to you again. Okay. So Great I would like us to focus much of the conversation today and I think I mentioned this when we talked on one of your recent articles coping in the garden of uncertainty. And also, if we have any time left, maybe you could talk about your recent series focused on the challenges post posed by this a pandemic, which was life not on hold right is that correct? That's correct. I though, if you could unpack what I just shared from our recent conversation which I hope I quoted you correctly even if you remember what you said it's not a massive issue at your personal situation, an attachment and then everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, it's an individual thing. So can you talk more about those concepts Greg? First of I do think that it's an unusual situation because in terms of the pandemic that the whole world. Is suffering from this and obviously Some people are suffering in different ways or more or less but but we out all are exposed to the situation and. and. So I'm not trying to suggest that that there. Is Anything but a global. Threat to our lives into our health and but I think in terms of how we cope with it. It it really is very much an individual issue has to do with our own practice. It has do with what presses are buttons It has to do with what We. Miss that gives us a sense of impatience and agitation because we have such a strong desire to have X. and we can't have it right now because the conditions of of our lives in the world. So in that sense, our ability to work with the situation to cope with it. To find a way to accept what we can't change for example. Though those kinds of things that are coming up our individual issues and the kinds of things that will which your buttons or agitate you or. Frustrate you. At an extreme are probably not necessarily the things that are going to have that effect on me but I have my own things and so to that extent, the the. Solutions that were looking for while we can talk about vaccine as a solution to medical problem but the solution to our practical and spiritual issues that we're facing in our own minds really is a question of of coping with that as an individual and I think of it similarly when I think of coping with the issue of death. All right. Right. That We we all will die It's a given but But how we die in how we face in cope with our own individual death is something that we can't share with anybody else right it's something that we have to work with. As individual. And I think net sense the situation we find ourselves in now. Is is somewhat parallel to that. Yeah that is that's really

Greg Creech Wendy
Right Effort

5 Minute Dharma

04:09 min | Last month

Right Effort

"The Buddha said. Though, this is the noble truths of the path that leads to the need of suffering. It is simply this noble eightfold path that is right view right intention right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right meditation. So, we've been looking at these eight parts today. We WanNa look at right effort. So again, we go to the Buddhist scriptures and the Buddhist said, and what is right effort. It's when a practitioner generates. Enthusiasm tries makes an effort exerts the mind and strive so that bad unskillful qualities don't arise. They generate enthusiasm, try make an effort, exert the mind and strive so that bad on qualities that have arisen are given up. They generate enthusiasm, try make an effort exert the mind and strive so that skillful qualities that have not arisen do arise. They generate enthusiasm, try make an effort, exert the mind strive. So that skillful qualities that have arisen remain are not lost but increase mature and fulfilled by development. This is called right effort. Let's look at those a little more detail right effort than deals with generating enthusiasm. Another translation has generates desire for the idea here is that you have to generate something you have to stir something in you a desire for skillful qualities a desire to get rid of bad unskillful qualities. This is something you stir within you. A desire that you have. To develop. which goes to show you that not all desire is bad selfish desires bad but benevolent and altruistic desire is not. Next at says to try. Not, try here nother transition has endeavour it means that you make an effort. It means that you apply yourself and matter of fact, the next one make an effort. I. Like one translation says activate persistence. So not only do you endeavor, but you activate persistence you stick to it. And that stick to it of Nece is what makes it successful? The next one is exert the mind another translation says applies his mind and yet another translation one that I particularly like exerts his intent. That means that he is intent on doing something. He is put his mind on achieving something and that would what he's trying to achieve here in using right effort is to have skillful qualities to make sure that they increase and to get rid of bad unskillful qualities. And the last one is strives that means he upholds intent as one translation puts it. He sticks to it. He strives he keeps with it. These are the things that right energy is talking about. The aim of energy is also specified as four things. The first is so that bad unskillful qualities don't arise. The second is so that bad on Sofa qualities that have arisen are given up si one eliminate bad unskillful qualities. The third is so that skillful qualities that have not arisen do arise you want to cultivate them you want to plant the seed and cultivate them. And lastly, so that skillful qualities that have arisen remain you don't WanNa lose them in other words. So they're not lost. But rather rather just holding onto them

Buddha Nece
Malcolm Smith: Translating The Tantra Without Syllables and The Blazing Lamp Tantra

The Wisdom Podcast

04:41 min | Last month

Malcolm Smith: Translating The Tantra Without Syllables and The Blazing Lamp Tantra

"When they came to bet who brought them, what their purpose in what they're why this important and then we'll get into the ticket volumes that we've just published nephew. Okay. So just a brief resume at some point after shocking money but A. Passed away into in near Bonnet, it's not really clear exactly when shocking anybody is one of the twelve teachers, specific absorb Chen with beginning with the Buddha Dhamma and the first e on and going through a succession of eleven further manifestations which shocked many but it was the last however shocking anybody did not. Teach Chan directly by there is a, there's a prediction somewhere. that that garbage was going to come and teach the vehicle beyond causing results. So, typically speaking in, Buddhism we divide in Tibetan Buddhism. We divide generally speaking to there's the the Janas into three. The first two shelby on my hyeon are considered to be the vehicles the 'cause. Then within my on itself, there's a subdivision into cause and result vehicles and so on is considered to be the vehicle a results. specifically however, zone Chan in the grand tradition of Buddhist triumphalism proposes that it's the it's it's the vehicle beyond causing result. So, really there's three things. So anyway, garb doors Jay we don't exactly know when he lived chugging. I'm Kinda Norbu. Calculated that garb door jay was born in fifty five ad based on his his understanding of calculation but we don't really know with any certainty. in any event, and then there's three different lineages absorb chance. So we have what's known as the someday lineage. Has a long lineage twenty-one Masters from Garb Door J. DOWN TO SRI sing. Ha, and there's long day which has more or less the same short lineage as Medoc de which is the third series. So that would be the mind some people translate this as mine series, space series and then. INTERMIT- instruction series. Now, originally, garb door according to the low Joo Chan Mo of the intake. Garb door Georgia taught six point four, million, Shlo- Kaz, zone Chen not all of that was translated into Tibet into Tibetan a lot of it was left in India. of those six point four, million Schlaug is absorbed Chen and some tax. You've see this Tonga's Montjeu she meter who is his immediate disciple who was a pun vita from Nalanda supposedly who came to debate him and. Lost and in his humiliation over being defeated debate by a young boy. was going to cut out his tongue but garb Georgia said, you know don't do that instead you need to write this tech called Tex called troops some gum. which is very interesting text, actually and in many ways and forms the sort of structural basis in particular for tax like runs I'm choking deep does introduction to my outta systems and so on and so forth. Anyway without getting too far afield module meter divided up zone teachings into what we call the three series. This is according to the larger Chen Mo in the Human Jake, then the his student. Assure Sing, haw- then took the intimate instruction series and divided it into four cycles. The seventeen contras out of all of these there's a vast number of contras seventeen years. The route tax or the young Song Lana May. Core that is the other Lee secret unsurpassed cycle so that so the and the term Ninty by the way actually comes from the draw challenger because the draw. George describes these. Taxes being. Many people, translate Mantilla's heart essence while this has become kind of a standard convention, we have to understand here that actually the word. Ning means something like center. It's like when we talk about the heart

Joo Chan Mo Chen JAY Bonnet Georgia Nalanda Tonga Mantilla Ning Triumphalism Lana May George Shlo- Kaz LEE India. Tibet
Translating The Tantra Without Syllables and The Blazing Lamp Tantra

The Wisdom Podcast

04:11 min | Last month

Translating The Tantra Without Syllables and The Blazing Lamp Tantra

"So welcome. Malcolm. Thank you for joining us again Daniel. Again. Good. See you and so I thought. Before we get into the actual text I thought just for the general audience if you could talk a little bit about seventeen contras When they came to bet who brought them, what their purpose in what they're why this important and then we'll get into the ticket volumes that we've just published nephew. Okay. So just a brief resume at some point after shocking money but A. Passed away into in near Bonnet, it's not really clear exactly when shocking anybody is one of the twelve teachers, specific absorb Chen with beginning with the Buddha Dhamma and the first e on and going through a succession of eleven further manifestations which shocked many but it was the last however shocking anybody did not. Teach Chan directly by there is a, there's a prediction somewhere. that that garbage was going to come and teach the vehicle beyond causing results. So, typically speaking in, Buddhism we divide in Tibetan Buddhism. We divide generally speaking to there's the the Janas into three. The first two shelby on my hyeon are considered to be the vehicles the 'cause. Then within my on itself, there's a subdivision into cause and result vehicles and so on is considered to be the vehicle a results. specifically however, zone Chan in the grand tradition of Buddhist triumphalism proposes that it's the it's it's the vehicle beyond causing result. So, really there's three things. So anyway, garb doors Jay we don't exactly know when he lived chugging. I'm Kinda Norbu. Calculated that garb door jay was born in fifty five ad based on his his understanding of calculation but we don't really know with any certainty. in any event, and then there's three different lineages absorb chance. So we have what's known as the someday lineage. Has a long lineage twenty-one Masters from Garb Door J. DOWN TO SRI sing. Ha, and there's long day which has more or less the same short lineage as Medoc de which is the third series. So that would be the mind some people translate this as mine series, space series and then. INTERMIT- instruction series. Now, originally, garb door according to the low Joo Chan Mo of the intake. Garb door Georgia taught six point four, million, Shlo- Kaz, zone Chen not all of that was translated into Tibet into Tibetan a lot of it was left in India. of those six point four, million Schlaug is absorbed Chen and some tax. You've see this Tonga's Montjeu she meter who is his immediate disciple who was a pun vita from Nalanda supposedly who came to debate him and. Lost and in his humiliation over being defeated debate by a young boy. was going to cut out his tongue but garb Georgia said, you know don't do that instead you need to write this tech called Tex called troops some gum. which is very interesting text, actually and in many ways and forms the sort of structural basis in particular for tax like runs I'm choking deep does introduction to my outta systems and so on and so forth. Anyway without getting too far afield module meter divided up zone teachings into what we call the three series. This is according to the larger Chen Mo in the Human Jake, then the his student. Assure Sing, haw- then took the intimate instruction series and divided it into

Joo Chan Mo Chen JAY Georgia Bonnet Malcolm Daniel Nalanda Tonga Triumphalism Shlo- Kaz India. Tibet
Loving Kindness Talk

Everyday Zen Podcast

05:14 min | Last month

Loving Kindness Talk

"Last week, we been doing the practice of. Sending love and kindness to ourselves. and. I hope all of you have been enjoying that practice I'm sure you've done it before. And we've been. Saying I think in different ways all along in this study. that the practice. Of loving kindness is a little bit counterintuitive. It isn't quite. What it seems to be. So when we`re Practicing, to send loving kindness to ourselves, it's not exactly. That we're trying to love ourselves and feel you know. Warm. Love for ourselves. As much as as it is this practice of generating loving kindness we're trying to undo. something. In ourselves. That is stopping up our hearts. So, if you are practicing sending kind loving kindness to yourself and you discover that you're not feeling so lovey dovey about yourself and maybe you're frustrated. Don't be frustrated just do the practice. It actually is working a lot better than you think because it's not really so much about your feeling. A lovey dovey feelings about yourself. I heard from at least one person in this last week. Who told me a very long time? She has been trying without too much success. To send loving kindness. To someone. been having a really hard time with for a while. And it just hasn't worked at all. But when she started sending love and kindness to herself. She found that her feelings for the difficult person. Improved quite a bit which surprised her. She had no idea that that would be the result. So it's interesting how the practice works. It's usually unexpected in its effects. I think Sharon tells a story in her chapter about someone who? Tried and tried and tried to practice love and kindness for someone and complete failure, but then she. saw the person and found that she had kind feelings toward the person completely unexpectedly. So Just keep. Doing the practice it has affects. Anyway. Tonight I would like to go into the practice of loving kindness for a difficult person. And so I'm. Going to. Help us through. Aversion anyway of some of the stuff that charon sharing at the end of chapter five. And an on page. Seventy nine, she says something that to me. Seems so important and so basic. To this practice. She says this. To develop loving kindness toward a person with whom we have problems. We must first separate our vision of the person. From the actions they commit. That may upset are harm us? So when you read that little sentence, you know it reminds you. Of How automatically? We. Fall. Back. On the illusion. Of A person. Of Our. Belief you know in persons are starting with ourselves. Even though. We've been contemplating the teachings forever and ever, and they always say over and over and over again. There's no such thing. As a person. In the way, we imagine a person to be. So if someone. Harms us. And we believe. Hold on one second I'm going to. Put everybody on. Yeah. Someone. Harms us. And we believe that there's actually an existing bad person over there who has harmed us. And now we're upset with that person but that is actually not the case that's really not what's going on. There are actions and consequences. Yes And the harm we suffer is all too real. Yes. But Actually It makes no sense and it's completely counterproductive Unin. Always. To blame the harm. On. An actually existing person.

Sharon Unin