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Cree author David A. Robertson on writing everything from graphic novels to a memoir

Unreserved

06:29 min | 2 d ago

Cree author David A. Robertson on writing everything from graphic novels to a memoir

"I want to go to my trap line one last time he says. I cannot breathe. I know he hasn't been to his trap line for almost seven decades. We've been on a journey as father and son for thirty years, and for the first time, it feels like we've found our destination. And I think maybe we've been headed there all this time. Whatever choose exists between us. The end of our journeys in front of us. That's David Robertson reading from Blackwater, family legacy and blood memory. One of three books he has coming out this fall. To say, he's prolific is a bit of an understatement. The cree writer based in Winnipeg started writing in two thousand and nine and has already published more than twenty titles from the Governor General Award Winning Picture Book when we were alone to his graphic novel series the reckoner to his first novel, the evolution of Alice published in two thousand fourteen it seems like he can write in any genre for any age group. David Robertson is my guest on the show today. Thanks so much for being here, David All. Thanks for having me. It's a pleasure. So this month you published your most personal book to date a memoir called Blackwater family legacy and blood memory, which we just heard a bit from. And it chronicles the story of Your Dad's returned to the family trap line Norway House creed nation in northern. Manitoba. So first off most people wait until they're a lot older to write a memoir So why did you want to write now? Yeah. That's a great question and there's there's probably a bunch that goes into that answer. One of them is that you know I've been talking about my dad and I for the last eleven years ever since I was a published writer I found that when I was public speaking all of my talk somehow came back to my father and I and and he's played such a big role in. My own development my understanding of you know who I am as cree person. There's one time I was giving this lecture at University of Manitoba couple years ago where I was the same thing talking about my life in my father and our relationship, and then a professor came up to me after and said, you really have to write this down and so. Money as a writer I'd never thought about writing actually my own story and that really kind of jog something me were. I decided that that was something I. needed to do. The other part of it is that you know my father at the time was declining I mean he was still himself and he was still my dad but he we knew that our time with him a short it was getting shorter and I really wanted to start working on this because it was something I always wanted to do I wanted. To document his life and and our relationship the teachings he gave me for myself and for my family and so all of this kind of came together and made me feel this agency to write the story now, and certainly when we went to the trap line together two years ago, it felt like the framing for the story had happened because I think it was where we were journeying to. All these years together. That's that's where we were going to and so when we got there, it felt like the right time to document everything that had happened between us and in our own lives and teams like such a special trip to be able to go on. Yeah I mean it was I I. Don't know if I could even put it into words. I. Tried my best in the book but it was blackberries in the title of the book and I really did feel that blood member was something that played a big role into why Blackwater why this trap line my dad grew up on felt home to me as soon as I stepped off the boat onto the land. I just felt like I'd come home and I, know that watching dad, you know amble up the inclined towards this big boulder in the middle of this clearing I know he felt like he was home to it was incredibly emotional intensity emotional moment for us and it turned out that it was the only time it could have happened because you know dad passed away just this past December and it made me even more grateful for spending that time with him and being able to write. About that experience through his words in my own and did you learn anything you know anything about yourself while writing a memoir I know that you know when you when you go into material like this, you sort of have to dig back in sort of excavate your own life and sort of reexamine things maybe in a new perspective did you learn anything about yourself? Yeah. I think anytime you revisit your past and learn more about the people who came before you. You're inevitably going to learn more about who you. Are you know I've always said and I've learned from my dad, the process of you know understanding ourselves and who we are that journey starts well, before we were born starts with understanding who came before you and know certainly in this book, it talks about my grandmother and my dad and their lives before I was born and my dad's after I was born and all of that plays into forming a sense of identity. It helps to you to understand more about yourself and there's things in even researching this book that. I learned that kind of. Forced me to re contextualize my life in my identity. No. When I was a kid I, always believed that my parents drew grew up intentionally raising me to be non indigenous to protect me from. You know what they felt would have experienced growing up in the city in. Winnipeg. As a cre- kid and in the process of researching this book and a lot of that research was just sitting down with my dad spending hours with him talking he said that's not true. I. I never wanted to tell you what it meant to be original. But I never told you that I didn't want you to be my goal was to model that for you. But to give you the tools that you need to figure out for yourself and one of the things that always sticks with me as you said, how to teach you how to be crea- you are cre-. So nothing I can say can make you more or less cre-. Your journey is defined what that means. For Self and his role was to kind of guide me in a way to that understanding and I think he did that.

Writer David Robertson Winnipeg University Of Manitoba David All Manitoba Norway House Self Alice Professor
C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

The Book Review

05:41 min | 3 d ago

C.I.A. Operatives in the Early Years of the Cold War

"Scott Anderson joins us now from the catskills. He is a contributing writer for the New York, Times magazine, and the author of many books. His latest is called the quiet Americans four CIA spies. Of the Cold War tragedy in three acts, Scott Welcome back to the podcast. Thanks much nice to be here. So you are allowed on the podcast to talk about your previous book Lawrence in Arabia which came out in twenty thirteen hand, which of course feels like now centuries ago which makes it clear to our listeners are longtime listeners that this is not your first. Book. Involving spies I'm curious what what's the draw for you but I think Speiser inherently fascinating in not just to an awful lot of people and of thought about what is I think it's the the allure of having a secret life. I think that I think that for an awful lot of people this idea that you have a whole separate identity is really fascinating New People. What I was drawn to in both the Lawrence and with in the quite America's the foresee a officers I follow is that in both cases, this was at a time when individuals out in the field had a tremendous freedom of action. So it wasn't. People sitting behind desks following policy that they're actually out in the field doing crazy stuff. You also have a personal connection to the story right in terms of what your father did for living you talk a little bit about that. Sure. My father was agricultural adviser for the Agency for International Development, which was a branch of the State Department. I grew up in. East. Asia in in Korea and Taiwan as Indonesia. and. So this was the nineteen fifties, nineteen sixties when I came along American government workers abroad often in those sorts of countries often were two hats whatever their official job was my father's job as agriculture adviser but it was also part of this great anti Communist crusade was happening around the world. So the upfront hearts and minds, soft power aspect of my father's work was working on agrarian reform in line with countries like these countries were were the land was was had been controlled infra centuries by all darkies. But the the more hard power in the darker side of what my father was doing was was setting up rural vigilante squads, home guard militias to watch over the local populace and to make sure that they weren't being swayed by the communist in certainly in countries like Taiwan or South Korea. If you were exposed or accused of being a leftist, your life was not going to go. Well, you know I'm now getting a sense of why one of the four characters in your previous book was an agronomist perhaps. That's right. Yeah it's well It's it's an interesting thing because. It just for national development was often used by the CIA as a cover because. Are Out, in the field, they're not, they're not saying, I'm destined to capitol there often out among the local population and probably have a better sense of what's happening. Outside what you one thing I'll say I've noticed over time in different countries. I've been almost invariably the ex Patriot community that knows best what's happening in the country are tend to be the people are out in the field in often the Middle East is the oil guys. They have a sense much more than than people sitting around in the capital. Let's start with frank wizner. The first person you mentioned, and this is not the the first book to be written at least in part about wisner who was he and what made him. So central to the story wizards amazing Turkey was a corporate lawyer who was working at a Wall Street firm when even before World War Two broke out and he quit his law firm to join the navy, he ended up being an operative for the office to teacher services, which is the the wartime intelligence agency of the of the army that they owe asset kind of the precursor to the CIA. That's right. That's right and he ends up being A. Kind of the first American to to to witness. The Soviet takeover of country in Eastern Europe, and this was in Romanian to summer of nineteen forty. Four So full year before the war ended and a wizard was on the ground as a as an oasis operative and just watch the strong arm tactics did really a matter of weeks led the Soviets to take control the country he and he was sending cables back to Washington telling telling them what are so good allies doing he sees the say he has the same experience in eastern Germany at the end of. The war in watching the way the Soviets for taking over, he goes back to his law from for couple of years for the complete unhappy, and then when the CIA starts up in nineteen forty seven, they have this idea that they wanna start a covert operations branch of of the CIA called the Office of Policy Coordination and frank listeners chosen to head that the name was deliberately chosen to be really boring. That's right and in fact, the name itself, the Office of policy coordination was was so top secret that even you can't even say the name out loud for twenty five years. So in that role wizner e created, what what he called the mighty world, which was this vast covert operations umbrella of a operating throughout the world and everything from hard power aspects of it like dropping dropping partisans behind the iron curtain to everything to cultural stuff voice. Of America. Radio Free Europe that was all came out of the Office of Policy Coordination.

CIA Office Of Policy Coordination Lawrence Frank Wizner Office Of Policy America Taiwan Scott Anderson Times Magazine New York Agency For International Devel Writer Middle East Washington Radio Free Europe Asia State Department Germany
Structuring Your Novel by K.M. Weiland

The Rookie Writer Show

05:11 min | 3 d ago

Structuring Your Novel by K.M. Weiland

"Hi Welcome to season two, episode thirty, two of the rookie rider show I'm your host Air Brown and today we're GONNA be talking about structuring your novel by Cam Weiland. A little about Cam Weiland I'm going to quote her author page here. Km, wiling lives in make believe world's talks to imaginary friends and survive primarily on chocolate truffles and espresso. She is the award winning and internationally published author of the Acclaimed Writing Guides, outlining your novel, stretching your novel and creating character Arcs when she's not making things up she's busy mentoring other authors on her award winning blog she makes her home in Western Nebraska. And Also on the website, she says that you can call her Katie you visitor site and sign up for the newsletter list. You can download a free writing craft book entitled Five Secrets Of Story Structure How to read a novel stands out. In that book while in says, you will learn and again here I'm quoting. Why the inciting incident isn't what you've always thought it is what your key event is and how stop putting it in the wrong seen. How do identify your pinch points and why they can make the middle of your book easier to write and how to ace your stories climactic moment every single time end quote. If you haven't already, I would also urge you to check out wildlands podcast helping writers become authors. Which incidentally is also the inver website, the website itself is very easy to use and chock full of free resources like the aforementioned book. No surprise that has been listed on writers digest one a one best websites for writers every year since two, thousand, fourteen finally for today's Title I would suggest that you consider checking out the accompanying workbook for what it's worth I got the digital version of the book and the physical copy of the workbook. So I could easily job. Thought at them but you do you. Okay. Down to business. Here are my three things number one. Two halves of the same hole wildland reminds us that beginnings and endings are the true heart of your story and that satisfying beginnings and endings mirror each other in some way. Boiling it down to its most essential. She says, quote, the beginning asks a question and the ending answers it and quote, and the ending must answer that specific question or according to island. The whole book will feel, okay number two, the two big types of questions. While you will have a specific question that you need to answer, there are two main types of questions, plot questions and theme questions. I'M GONNA. Use examples from Wilde's book to illustrate the difference between these two types. Okay. Question example this is quoting your book will margie stop her self destructive lifestyle of drugs and liquor before she loses her soul mate Tom Forever, and that's a question, the question and I'm GONNA use the same scenario the example would be will margie. Find self worth or piece. Okay. A couple of notes here. I novels often have both a plot and Athene question. In fact, I would say they almost always do secondly, no matter what type of question it is while end advises that should be a question that can be answered with yes or no by the okay. A dare note if you write more literary works and ending that leaves people debating whether it was a yes or no can be a huge win. Examples of this include doubt by John Patrick Shanley and state of wonder by an Patchett. But for most books, you want people to have a clear idea about the answer to the question. Yes or no so I think she's right there. Okay. Number three, the end. Despite, the fact that while end isn't enthusiastic plotter planner. And strongly advises outlines obviously, she still writes several endings. This leads us directly to today's quote this her quote thanks to the ever important outline. I never begin a novel without knowing how I want it to end and yet I almost always write three or four endings before I find the correct one stories even intricately outlined ones evolve as we create them the nuanced ending we have in mind at the beginning might no longer be appropriate once we reach it and quote while offer strategies for coming up with different endings, things like using Beta readers setting aside temporarily. But she also reminds you and here comes a bonus quote quote in many ways endings are one of the most fun parts of the process by then all the puzzle pieces are available to play with. You know your characters inside out and you've got a pile of one hundred pages or more to prove that you can do this. So enjoy yourself if more than one ending is necessary have fun playing with the options and take advantage of the opportunity to rebel and your story world just a little bit longer and quote that's cantwell it. Okay today's hack. Is it ever too early while and advises us to put in our question early ideally setting up that question remember a yes. No question whether it's the plot or both from the very first scene doesn't have to be entirely in the first but start that process. From the GECKO okay I hope this was

KM Cam Weiland Wilde Air Brown Nebraska John Patrick Shanley Cantwell Margie Athene Tom Forever
Brian Stelter on Fox News

The Book Review

04:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Brian Stelter on Fox News

"Brian stelter joins us. Now he is the anchor of CNN's reliable sources, the host of its podcast and the author of a New New York Times bestselling Book Hoax Donald, Trump Fox News, and dangerous distortion of truth Brian. Thanks for being here. Thank you so much. So you used to be my colleague here at the New York Times way back I don't know when exactly did you leave The Times? twenty thirteen. Well. So the moment I remember was in twenty eleven when this early documentary about the Times came out called page one and there was a line in that documentary in which the leat David car says, I still can't get over the feeling that Brian stelter was a robot assembled to destroy me. I, haven't forgot that line. Because I wonder if you're secretly three people you host. A Show on CNN you write a daily newsletter you host a weekly podcast you have two small children, and somehow you wrote a book on this extremely fast moving subject. That is Donald Trump. How did you handle that the two small children is the fun part they keep me saying you know David used to say I still miss him so much used. To say, what do you think the story is that I should tell us to say to sources you know if you were writing the story what would you right and that is what I was doing with folks at Fox News and these themes kept coming up especially last year, which compelled me to go and try to get a book deal I think it. was last that I wanted to do this and more that I felt like someone had too i. hope that doesn't sound too cocky but it's true. There's some things in life. You just feel like the gotTa go tell this story and I think the only untold story of the trump era that's left maybe is the story of his boxers addiction so I did. Carve out time in between my other jobs and and frankly wants the pandemic send us all home. Put us on lockdown just grateful that my wife was able to help with the kids when I was having to finish the final chapters of this book. So what is that story the relationship between Donald Trump and Fox News obviously, it's the full subject of your book. People who are even casual viewers are news consumers are aware that there's a close relationship there yes. I think we all are aware that the president gets fed information and misinformation from Fox but I think it's even more extreme and even more dangerous than people realize it happens more often and the connections or even cozier than than folks realize I oftentimes in coverage. Of the White House reporters leave out what I think is the key piece, the key ingredient, which is he got that idea from Fox. He gained that idea from foxy gained that conspiracy theory from Fox and with this pandemic this year staffers at Fox told me they felt like the coverage was hazardous to our viewers. The coverage was dangerous. The coverage was unforgivable. I really just tried to step away just the Messenger for these anonymous sources mostly anonymous did speak on the record who felt like the coverage is hurting the country. All right. So a defender, a Fox News skeptic cure might say so what trump follows Fox News is leads you know democratic presidents in the past have taken their cues from the editorials editorials of the New York Times. What's the difference? I think. It's so much more intense. Now, Fox's influences constant when trump threatened North Korea, and said, he had a bigger button than Kim Jong Un. It was because of a Fox segment when he grants pardoned, it's because Fox when he attacks big technology company because of Fox, when he raged about migrant caravans, it was because of Fox and it's not that he's getting the best possible information still from the best sources in the world know he's getting it from a bunch of of. Who oftentimes misinform him think? That's one of the differences between this White House and past white houses Braga Obama was he washed ESPN in the evening rather than MSNBC tours w Bush might have watched some Fox but he wasn't consumed by it. The way that this president is so it's an unprecedented relationship really is

Trump Fox News FOX Donald Trump New New York Times Brian Stelter David New York Times CNN President Trump Kim Jong Un White House North Korea Msnbc Braga Obama Bush
The Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo Review

Books and Boba

04:52 min | 2 weeks ago

The Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo Review

"With, the heart of an ad with tail and the visuals of a classic Asian period drama. The empress of salt and fortune is tightly and lushly written narrative about empire storytelling and the anger of women a young royal from the far north sent south for a political marriage alone in sometimes reviled, she has only her servants on her side. This evocative debut chronicles horr- is to power through the eyes of her handmaiden at once feminist high fantasy and a thrilling indictment of monarchy. That's I remember when this book got a buzz. The Library Journal said it was the day of the month buzzfeed said it was A. Pretty much like the fantasy novel of Spring Twenty Twenty. So I was really excited about it plus handmaidens tail and a political drama. Yeah. Sure. That's that sounds like something that I'm really interested in. Yeah. I mean my main thing is. I don't know if the handmaidens hill comparison is that are descriptive of what this story really is because to me, it definitely was a pro woman story, but I don't really know if I got handed until vibes besides the fact that there's like a handmaiden it you know I actually got more of. The handmaiden, the Korean movie. I got more of that five because that movie is It's told multiple multiple perspectives and us the story is not what seems like and you kind of have to like piece together everyone's motives and how their plans and motives like fit together. So it kind of reminded me more of that movie. Yeah, which is also based on a book. It's based on the fingersmith Sarah Waters, which I highly recommend. It's it's great. Yeah. It's also queer, which is you know this book is also very Queer Zaveri Queer friendly story. There is a lot of different characters on all sides of the LGBTQ spectrum I guess we can start with just how the story is set up. So the story is told through I guess, would you call the second person narrative? Is that what this is or now I? It's third person narrative right? Actually it's third person and then when it switches to flashbacks, swin rabbit is telling the story that's first person right so but basically the main character or the protect I mean tonight even protectionist right like the. I guess perspective character. Through the story. The main character is a monk or in this world, a cleric named chief who is coated as a non binary they go by them pronouns and their. Magical. Talking Bird companion who is actually like a supercomputer right? To go there like a bird that can remember an archive everything it sees and hears you know I had to Google what a what a hoopoe was his Like through context clues was like, okay, it's a bird but what this bird? Looks like Google Google. It was I mean right off the bat and we can talk about this later. Now we want but it's this book is Novella it's really short. It's one hundred and twenty eight pages I wanNA say or it's it's less than a hundred pages I'll wet. Okay. So I just checked how many pages it was on kindle. It's one hundred twelve pages. Okay. So even less yeah, and in those short on a pages, it does a ton of world building and I know this is something that you and I have thoughts about. But like to me, I feel like it did a lot of world building through giving really sparse details. Requiring the reader to kind of fill in the blanks. Right off the bat, you have a talking bird which took me a while to figure it was a bird. you have supernatural hungry ghosts. Yeah. And like implied magic in the world to there's allusions to Mejia's and whether magic like we mentioned. So like right off the bat it Kinda throws you into this world that the reader has to figure out what's going on through context lose. Totally independent of the actual narrative because I think even without the like fantastical. Does also stand alone on its own as like A. Story of political intrigue. In. Rebellion Yeah.

Spring Twenty Twenty Google Bird Library Journal Buzzfeed Sarah Waters Mejia Kindle
Vanessa Branson on her latest book, One Hundred Summers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Vanessa Branson on her latest book, One Hundred Summers

"Vanessa France, and welcome to the writers. Thank you. Thank you. Now of course, you'll family name is well-known because of the entrepreneurial success of your older brother recovered, and in this book you give us a wonderful portrait of the whole family going right back a couple of generations. Search should we start with your grandparents? Golly well, Kim I just state why I wrote the book in the first place because I think it's context utilizes why I wanted to go back and look at my family. I actually started writing it on the twentieth of January two, thousand seventeen. It was the morning of Donald Trump's inauguration and I was so thrown by. I was quite frightened actually, or we were all very fearful about what was going to happen and everything all my values and everything I felt I stood for being threatened by this man to power. And I wanted to I couldn't articulate why I felt so nervous. And I wanted to really ground all where all those values came. and. So by looking back, I wasn't gonNA rush by myself a tool I just wanted to ground where it came from. So I started back with the birth of my father he was born nineteen eighteen. And roll the sort of serendipitous. It was exactly one hundred years before I started writing the book, and there were these mighty seismic changes back in one, thousand, nine, thousand, nine, hundred. I wanted to serve slot the family into a historical context as well. Because the both sets of grandparents came from different worlds didn't they? Yes. Nothing. That was one of the things that I was excited to investigate. My father's family was really quite educated and very good fun actually and very playful. They weren't in the grammar school boys and they all went to Cambridge. And they were ventures and travelers and extraordinary. My my mother's family was more of middle class but I was very interested about the class in England as well and how we've always felt as a family now, quite sort of class less than I wanted to find out where that came from because I think they were quite horrible to your mother, I yes. Well, she was sort of show. Girl you can imagine I mean they were they were slightly snobbish. My grandfather was a high court judge in he wasn't landed. He didn't have a stately home, but he rented one and they had lots of staff and long drive and they did shifting with the right people and let's say and then my mom turned up and she was on the stage and I think they would rather said. That they're blue eyed boy they're DEB's delight as they called him at fallen for this rather so crazy. Well. described it herself as a flippity Japan but. Anyhow it was a very enduring marriage and Utah wonderful stories of the courtship and all the rest of it. It's very beautifully done, and clearly they had a huge amount of affection for each other. And for their children, how would you characterize your childhood? Well, it was sort of heaven really the with very little cash. My father wasn't very successful barrister in he was slightly forced into it by his father and. One of the defining characteristics of all of us which is really was really interesting to sort of nail is that we're all dyslexic and both my parents are dyslexic. They just found schoolwork in academia very difficult and my poor father was sort of shoehorned into being a barrister and he shouldn't have been. So he was there was never much cash around but. They were just sort good fund, my parents and. They both been through the war and I, think life was just to you know they'd seen such terrible things experience really quite a lot of hardship and they just wanted to live for the joy of life again and they gave us that in bucket foles and just embraced all K- also adventure and people and everyone was welcome and we had very very happy childhood action. It sounds like this wonderful big messy household with just lots of lots and lots of animals the countryside I mean does sound so much fun. Tell me about your siblings then well, my brother was born in nineteen fifty and I wasn't born until nineteen, fifty nine, and then we have assisted in the middle. and. We've sort of space do and Richard Got Adhd and he was very very energetic and rather than sort of repressed him I think my parents soon realized that I mean in Heaven Forbid Kids nowadays would be on Ritalin or something and they set him challenges and so my earliest memories were keeping Richard Busy sending him off on on really long bike rides and really difficult things to keep him occupied for the day and lots of mealtimes. My sister just lovely to me and. I wanted to be held on Halloween because of the things. We teased relentlessly and there were lots of sort of games but. Missed quite interesting. Now in my mom's still alive, she's ninety six and I'm sure a lot of people listening to this all recognize this but we all still fall into type as if we're still ten years old. And we'll. We'll want Mommy's attention you know, and we'll still play all roles and it's it's possible.

DEB Richard Donald Trump Vanessa France Cambridge Japan Golly Mommy Utah Adhd England KIM
Jeffrey Toobin on Writing About Trump

The Book Review

05:37 min | 3 weeks ago

Jeffrey Toobin on Writing About Trump

"Jeffrey toobin joins us now from northern Connecticut. His latest book is called True Crimes and misdemeanors the investigation of Donald, trump, it's already a New York Times Bestseller Jeff Welcome back to the podcast. It is a pleasure to be here Michelle. Well, we are talking about probably an unpleasant topic you've been covering this regularly for the New, Yorker, talking about it on CNN, the investigations of Donald. Trump plural I think and the impeachment process at what point did you think to yourself? Okay. This should be a book as well. Right at the beginning you know I have a special interest in fun for independent investigations of the presidency. I was one of the prosecutors in the Iran Contra -CATION in the Lawrence Walsh Investigation wrote my first book opening arguments about that did a book about. The Starr investigation of Whitewater Lewinsky in the Clinton years and so I know that the behind the scenes, stories of these investigations are always interesting. But what was a nerve ing as I started in was that I didn't realize that Muller which completely shut down all access I had to trust that eventually, I would get access to the Muller Office, but it was incredibly unnerving journalists to. Spend almost two years working on his side of the investigation really from the outside even though you've written about impeachment, you've written books about investigations. This book feels different and I'm curious to hear your take on what makes this book in the process of writing the book different from those previous books. Trump makes it different? The president is such an enormous figure in American history, his complete disregard. For norms his constant lying his inability or unwillingness to play by rules that Democrats and Republicans have played for all of certainly my conscious life it makes everything about these last three and a half years just feel different from anything I'd ever covered in anything I've ever felt as a citizen we've had conservative presidents. We've had liberal presidents, but we've never had a president like trump and. Both he as a protagonist in my story and the people who gravitate to him just make it totally different. Okay. Here's one way in which it feels different to me and I'm curious to hear your take and it's about trump but it's also about the reception of trump among Americans or certain group of Americans and it's that every single time there are some kind of event trump takes. Some action that seems to be a game changer. There's this expectation or there has been the expectation. Okay. Well, now, this is the end of this changes things, and that goes back to his not filing his tax returns during the campaign, but then I think the next point was with access Hollywood tapes and it's been that way ever since where where something will happen and people will say. Well now, that's it. You know there's gotTa be a consequence and then there really isn't a consequence I. Think you're right in part I mean you know and and you can go through others whether it was praising the white supremacists in Charlottesville standing by Vladimir Putin, in Helsinki, and disparaging the American intelligence agencies firing James Comey which seemed like complete departures from how we expect presidents to behave. Another theme of my journalistic career has been the evolution of the Republican Party that if you go back to Richard Nixon the turning point in Watergate was when seven Republicans on the House Judiciary Committee voted in favor of impeachment and then ultimately Barry Goldwater Hugh Scott John Rhodes went to Nixon and say we can't support you anymore those three famous Republicans The Republican Party has turned into a trump call. And the ability of the president to do absolutely anything no matter how outrageous and retain the support of that forty percent of the country. Is. Something we've never seen before it's been building through the past couple of decades, but I think that's what accounts for the phenomenon you describe, which is no matter what he does the the political architecture of our time really never changes anymore because fifty five percent of the people are appalled forty forty percent of the people stick with trump and thus we have the election we have. So you're saying it's essentially the fact that he's not held. Accountable is a result of the fact that the party has sort of been entirely captured by trump. He has captive and very loyal audience among Americans, and then presumably the other arm of that is what's happened with the media and that certain is catering to and delivering that message. I. Can just add one thing. You know a lot of people like what trump is doing. It's not like this forty percent says, well, you know it's bad that he fires Komai. It's bad that he says, all these races. Thanks their gladis says racist things. I. Mean there are a lot of people in the country who have the same attitudes and I think that's what's chilling for people like me who was. I like to think is not a racist, but the way trump behaves in public it's a feature, not a bug people don't support him in spite of his excesses they support him because it's

Donald Trump President Trump Jeffrey Toobin Republican Party Michelle CNN Lawrence Walsh Investigation New York Times Yorker Connecticut Muller Iran Richard Nixon Muller Office Vladimir Putin James Comey Starr
Interview With Ta-Nehisi Coates

Longform Podcast

06:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Ta-Nehisi Coates

"Tallahassee welcome back to the podcasts what numbers this? Number seven. I think it might have been six. It's crazy. I can't even remember it used to be when we did a new one I would go back and listen to the old one. To See what we talked about before make sure no repeat myself. I just can't do it anymore. I can't listen to six. An, our audio. Preparation, so I gotta go off my My Memories. Yeah. It's been a lot. It's been a lot I WanNa say I feel very fortunate. I feel honored really that you are willing to have this conversation because I know you recently. Lost Friends Chadwick Bozeman, who is you know the world is experiencing that loss but I know you're experiencing it in a different way. Thank you for taking the time to do this even despite that. Now it's okay I mean we had committed before and. It's an experience to. Meet somebody. And you know I don't want to overstate Khushab was like a really private dude. And I think whenever you have people who are up at a certain level certain currency. That people try to deal in in you know overstating their proximity. So you know this wasn't a cow who I talk to every day or anything. But we did know each other we did it on. You know pretty much in the same circle. You know this guy met. Jesus. Nineteen Ninety seven ninety eight when. The students in the fine arts building decided to. Take, the administration building at how to prevent. Called it the absorbing of the fine arts college into the broader Liberal Arts School Indus- turn basically terrifies into a program as opposed to independent, which was crazy because. So much of what you know how a calling card is turning out autism Donny Hathaway To puffy to Tony Morrison just this long history. So it seemed crazy anyway him you another close friend of mine basically led the takeover and. are coveted for the hilltop for. You know some like at the beginning of my career I've probably been working for David. been mentioned several times. You know in other caucuses we we've done a couple of years at definitely maybe a year two years something like that. But anyway else coming in for the student newspaper and I say all that to say to watch him. On this arc. To see him you know student plays at Howard. He was always such a serious serious office. An intense and probably like the dude, I would least. Be Likely to pick to become. A major Hollywood leading man not because he lacked the talent. But he was so serious I'm. Dead dead dead serious about his art in and you know he really really didn't play and didn't have time. For Shenanigans. So just watches I mean he's one of those. Really really rare case, there's so much in the world it makes people feel like. Taking shortcuts in messing around and And Chad. Rare case that did it on principle and. Basically you know. Hard work you know. I know when people pass folks alight. They say this I never did any wrong or you know, etc. That's not what I'm saying. But I I was privileged to watch his as office. By went back and watched the onstage interview you did with him at the Apollo. And one of one of the things you said there was you sort of started off by saying because it was about Black Panther obviously, and and you said something like I didn't know that I needed this movie until I watched it you know and Kind of wonder how much of that? Connected with him being in that role or just. Yeah. No I mean. I would that was part of it. You know what I mean chat always had like this kind of you know otherworldly About himself. When he got past it's not like I was like, oh, he clearly can't this. You know what I mean is I said it was unexpected. You would be on this rise like this. I. Guess I'm more doubting. The system Hollywood. I think like an by point or somewhere around I point started writing a comic book. So it was like crazy. You know that you know he would be Erin I'll be right in the book and then I just so proud of that. So You know and even at that moment. He agreed to do conversation at the I mean you're talking about you on a billion dollar film. Again I knew. That they were. Promoting film it you know how exhausting? Because I think this was after they had gone on this global tour promote I knew how exhausting that was. After they had done grueling Toyota, he would just sit there and you have to remember what we know now was he was diagnosed about it. Yeah. Yeah. So he's been diagnosed with. You know what I mean and he sits up on stage in. But we had a pre call? His Russia with very very assistant. You know about that. You know we cheat the time limited data and I'm like, okay I'm. Trait. Up there with that, we got on the stage he has so much to say. And you can tell if you look at the interview, he just has so much to say and I think there was some point isn't Chin who has a black me the mask could come the and wants to get. Out At enchanted signs it. You know he was very conscious about what they're meant. And what what their moment met and it is. I just spe is it is hard to be sitting here talking to you about this in the past tense. Yeah. He has so many lighters just enviable qualities that relatively brief moment you know he really was king you couldn't have picked a better person to to carry it.

Hollywood Liberal Arts School Indus Tallahassee Khushab Chadwick Bozeman Donny Hathaway Toyota Chin Howard Tony Morrison David. Apollo Russia Erin
David Gilbert Reads Three Days By Samantha Hunt

The New Yorker: Fiction

06:26 min | 3 weeks ago

David Gilbert Reads Three Days By Samantha Hunt

"David. Hi Deborah Welcome back. It's great to be back. So three days came out in two thousand, six more than fourteen years ago but you told me that you think about it at least once a month. I do think about this story I mean, I, Love Samantha Hunts writing so much and and all of her stories tend to kind of sink into me and remain in my body because she's such a visceral physical writer and. This story in particular has always stayed with me and. The the feeling of the story will just kind of percolate in strange moments and sometimes I'll have that feeling around like I don't know where that feeling is coming from. They'll be like Oh. Yeah that's right. That's that's a three days Samantha. Hunt feeling. What do you think without giving too much away what do you think is driving not feeling well, I think it's her writing in general, which to me just gets under the skin in a really interesting way that I don't see done very often and writing, and she's doing so many interesting things with time and memory, and also I love very tightly constructed the matic stories and I think this is one of those stories too. So it was such a pleasure to return to it in a way in which I was trying to really take it apart a little bit because. Often with those kinds of stories they can be airless and they can kind of take out the feeling quality that you want but she does that come reckless thing where it's thematically so tight but it also is just full of emotion So it's one of those stories that I just marvel at like much of her writing or like how did she do that and? So it's it's both like jealousy profound jealousy I like, Oh, I didn't. I can't do the Samantha Hunt thing and also just the memory of the situations that she comes up with that are always kind of dreamlike So they kind of become part of your own subconscious What's interesting to me about three days as it is so tightly constructed, but you don't realize it when you read it for the first time until you get to the end. And see everything was was leaning you there. For sure and then just how she uses family and myth in such an interesting way and just the level of control that she has going back through it I noticed more things whereas like, oh, that makes so much sense to have that particular paragraph right there. As editor, you get to page three and you think why on Earth did they do that here and let's take it out and then you get to page fifteen and you have to put it back. Yeah for sure. We'll talk some more after the story. Now, Here's David Gilbert reading three days by Samantha Hunt. Three days. It's starting to get dark. Beatrice Fox along the highway from the bus depot up to her family's house. She avoids the Roadway by walking just outside the guardrail in the long dry grass. It's been mad down by road salt and rain strewn with trash and the surprisingly bloated body of a dead raccoon. Beatrice imagines that car and truck passing hold someone she wants new in highschool. Inside their cars, they're shaking their heads and asking his that Beatrice with allergy she doing with a bloated raccoon carcass. BEATRICE TURNS UP THE DRIVE She hasn't seen the farm and more than a year. After her father died, she moved away to the city not for any good reason just I change and now she likes it there. She likes the fact that all the humiliations involved with entering her thirties as a single woman are happening behind her clothes department door out of the view of her family and everyone she has ever known. There are some weathered plastic, dwayne Reed Easter, decorations a hip high bunny rabbit and a bright green egg wired to the front. Porch. It is thanksgiving, and so from the road where Beatrice stands, it appears that in the time she's been gone redneck clones of her brother and her mother have moved in and had their perverted redneck way with the house. The farm is now an island in a sea of big chain stores. While the surrounding firms were plowed under one by one and turned into shopping centers, her parents had stood by. They had waited rather than selling their land as neighbors all had, and now along a ten mile strip of parking lot stores, gas stations, banks, and supermarkets. Their form is the last one left. It isn't much of a form. Beatrice his parents had given up farming seven years before when when morning beatrice his mother had told her father. I don't feel like getting out of bed. He looked her over and holding her John His hands. He studied her face for a long while before saying, yes, I can see it right there in your forehead as if there was some word written across her brow, a word that excused her from farm work for the rest of her life. Within a few weeks, Beatrice's father had become an expert crossword puzzle solver. He'd even considered writing a novel before realizing that soon, they would be broke. Beatrice his parents had to start working or sell the farm, and so they made a decision they leased their land to a conglomerate soybean operation and applied for jobs in the new industrial park. Her father got work as a loan adjuster. Her mother got a job in advertising working in the satellite. Office of a company called mythological development which turned myths and sometimes history into marketable packages used for making new products and ideas more digestible to the consumer public. Her father didn't like having an office job. He used his sick days as soon as he got them. But Beatrice, his mother had always been very dramatic someone who swooned or leapt without provocation. The sort of person who would sing while grocery shopping and then wonder why people were staring at her. She flourished during the brainstorming conference calls that were a regular feature

Beatrice Fox Samantha Hunt Writer David. Dwayne Reed Easter David Gilbert Editor John His
David Gilbert Reads Three Days By Samantha Hunt

The New Yorker: Fiction

05:04 min | 3 weeks ago

David Gilbert Reads Three Days By Samantha Hunt

"David. Hi Deborah Welcome back. It's great to be back. So three days came out in two thousand, six more than fourteen years ago but you told me that you think about it at least once a month. I do think about this story I mean, I, Love Samantha Hunts writing so much and and all of her stories tend to kind of sink into me and remain in my body because she's such a visceral physical writer and. This story in particular has always stayed with me and. The the feeling of the story will just kind of percolate in strange moments and sometimes I'll have that feeling around like I don't know where that feeling is coming from. They'll be like Oh. Yeah that's right. That's that's a three days Samantha. Hunt feeling. What do you think without giving too much away what do you think is driving not feeling well, I think it's her writing in general, which to me just gets under the skin in a really interesting way that I don't see done very often and writing, and she's doing so many interesting things with time and memory, and also I love very tightly constructed the matic stories and I think this is one of those stories too. So it was such a pleasure to return to it in a way in which I was trying to really take it apart a little bit because. Often with those kinds of stories they can be airless and they can kind of take out the feeling quality that you want but she does that come reckless thing where it's thematically so tight but it also is just full of emotion So it's one of those stories that I just marvel at like much of her writing or like how did she do that and? So it's it's both like jealousy profound jealousy I like, Oh, I didn't. I can't do the Samantha Hunt thing and also just the memory of the situations that she comes up with that are always kind of dreamlike So they kind of become part of your own subconscious What's interesting to me about three days as it is so tightly constructed, but you don't realize it when you read it for the first time until you get to the end. And see everything was was leaning you there. For sure and then just how she uses family and myth in such an interesting way and just the level of control that she has going back through it I noticed more things whereas like, oh, that makes so much sense to have that particular paragraph right there. As editor, you get to page three and you think why on Earth did they do that here and let's take it out and then you get to page fifteen and you have to put it back. Yeah for sure. We'll talk some more after the story. Now, Here's David Gilbert reading three days by Samantha Hunt. Three days. It's starting to get dark. Beatrice Fox along the highway from the bus depot up to her family's house. She avoids the Roadway by walking just outside the guardrail in the long dry grass. It's been mad down by road salt and rain strewn with trash and the surprisingly bloated body of a dead raccoon. Beatrice imagines that car and truck passing hold someone she wants new in highschool. Inside their cars, they're shaking their heads and asking his that Beatrice with allergy she doing with a bloated raccoon carcass. BEATRICE TURNS UP THE DRIVE She hasn't seen the farm and more than a year. After her father died, she moved away to the city not for any good reason just I change and now she likes it there. She likes the fact that all the humiliations involved with entering her thirties as a single woman are happening behind her clothes department door out of the view of her family and everyone she has ever known. There are some weathered plastic, dwayne Reed Easter, decorations a hip high bunny rabbit and a bright green egg wired to the front. Porch. It is thanksgiving, and so from the road where Beatrice stands, it appears that in the time she's been gone redneck clones of her brother and her mother have moved in and had their perverted redneck way with the house. The farm is now an island in a sea of big chain stores. While the surrounding firms were plowed under one by one and turned into shopping centers, her parents had stood by. They had waited rather than selling their land as neighbors all had, and now along a ten mile strip of parking lot stores, gas stations, banks, and supermarkets. Their form is the last one left. It isn't much of a form. Beatrice his parents had given up farming seven years before when when morning beatrice his mother had told her father. I don't feel like getting out

Beatrice Fox Samantha Hunt Writer David. Dwayne Reed Easter David Gilbert Editor
Author Chat With Suzanne Park

Books and Boba

05:35 min | Last month

Author Chat With Suzanne Park

"So we're here, which is the park, the author of the perfect escape and low that first sight. Thank you Suzanne for joining us today. Thanks for having me. This is gonNA. Be Really Fun. I hope. Okay. Ask You all your deepest darkest secrets on this past summer. Little nervous. Person To make fun. So. A little bit about where you're from. Well. I was born and raised in. Tennessee. So in a town right outside of Nashville. At the time. Of the town didn't have that many non. Mostly, just white people at this in this town and I think slowly Shirley over the years they've increased it to about three percent. A pretty. Pretty. Big Waves are making their but Yeah. So I was born and raised in this town, but we did most of my schooling in Nashville. So. Yeah, eighteen years of my life spent. In the south. Are you also living in Tennessee right now or have you relocated. Yes. So after After high school I moved to New York for school, and then after that moved to Los Angeles for Grad School so I've moved. To those two cities in then found a position in Seattle and lived there for a number of years in the move to La. About. Eight years ago so I consider L. A. my home now but definitely have I still have a lot of friends. In Nashville and I do like to go visit. We kind of had the same trajectory because I'm from Georgia. And then I went to school in New York and then I moved to La and now I'm here. I totally understand when when people ask where are you from? I'm like I don't know I'm from like four different places so. And I've lived in a at least all of those places for a number of years. So New York, I was there for seven years for in La collectively I was there. Twice that I've moved here over ten if you combine everything and then Seattle also along time so up. So I consider all the my home to some degree but yet Nashville I do consider like my hometown. You had the opposite I was born in Toronto and then moved to L., A., and I've been here since. An immaterial house one psalm barely Canadian. About delay wondered about like like what does that feel that? Place. I. Mean. One is for your entire life living cities. I've lived in DC lived in San. Diego. But. I've spent at least twenty five years of my life in La specifically in San Gabriel. Surrounded by Asians all the sites. In Georgia and Tennessee. Is there anything about Tennessee that YOU MISS I'm this the food. Something I. It's true and even when in La, you really can't find good southern food I. Mean you fine food that is like southern adjacent, but it's not the meeting threes in it's not. Just. The just the type of food they have there's just hardier and it tastes how main I guess I just really appreciate that either foods and when I go back home we you know I love just eating southern food like shrimp and grits in. Whatever? Put it all on my plate biscuits gravy. If you can let you get a lot of fancy shops making southern food. Yes. That's right. I mean Collard Greens are not too fancy and yet somehow they add all these ingredients that make it almost too fancy and I'm like it's Turnip Greens like. It shouldn't have all these. It shouldn't have eighteen ingredients in it but but somehow the the the La way of doing it in it's also. Very, organic in. Raw when you eat it. So both of your books are set in Seattle. And you said that you're now in La do plan to write a book set in. La Anytime soon. One of my books, the one I'm riding for release next year the Young Adult Book Coming Out Ju I'm twenty, twenty one that one is partly in La. In. That book is about A. Social Media DICTA teenager who shipped off by your parents to go to digital detox camp in Iowa. So the beginning part is placed is end La, and you have a little bit of La. some some discussions about just the environment there when she shipped off, you can see the contrast of it though of so partly I guess the La based and that that's been a lot of fun to write because it really had the opportunity to write about both what I know about l.. A. In love about La but then also go with the stark contrast her being on this in this detox camp that's on a farm and Harketting through a fine. Yeah. the smaller town feels. So I've enjoyed that one a lot

Los Angeles Nashville Tennessee Seattle New York Suzanne Georgia Grad School Collard Greens A. Social Media Dicta SAN Shirley Toronto Diego San Gabriel Harketting Iowa L. LA.
Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

The Book Review

05:26 min | Last month

Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

"Kurt Anderson joins us. Now he has a new book out. It's called evil geniuses the unmaking of America a recent history. Kurt thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. All right. So your previous spoke to this was fantasy land and I feel like there's a connection where did you leave off in that book and pick up in your new book? There's definitely a connection and they really amount to kind of a two volume history of the screwing up of America the last half century. Fantasyland was about how this chronic condition in America of the weakness for the irrational and magical thinking in entertaining lies. Turned into this acute illness after having been a centuries long chronic illness, the last fifty years, and thus the President United States as the poster boy for that. This is a different story. This is not a spontaneous organic. Problem that I'm talking about here. About the Paradigm. Shift and hijacking of our political economy that happened starting fifty years ago by who what the people I call. Evil Jesus, it's this very rational, very specific, very strategic, long war that had the effect in a hundred different ways of making the majority of Americans worse off. So if fantasy land talked about America has propensity to believe in nonsensical illogical things. It sounds like evil genius is this kind of why the efforts that were made on the part of institutions and individuals that have led to that kind of thinking. No actually not that led to that kind of thinking that. It's a wholly different thing. What would i. have having a Neo Liberal Clinton Centrist Democrat all of my adult life partners may culpa for simply being. Oblivious to what the economic right was doing. So these. Are People of the economic rights. The coax are the most obvious buzzword way of saying that and how they manipulated and used and changed through all of these different means the way we thought society. The economy should be since the new deal they used the fantasies and delusions and. All that of their political allies on the right to enable their real project, which is to make Americans think the government has no role in anything involving the free market when you are working on fantasy land, did you know that you were going to be writing the second kind of companion book? I really didn't know that it was late in the game working were. I realized wait I am kind of telling half the story here. There is this other story that isn't about look at Wacky America. We've always been wacky for four hundred years and believed all kinds of nonsense but I realized that there was this other story about how the economy changed in how politics changed and what technology is doing. That is the other half and it. Really came when I was out talking about fantasy land with people readers, whatever I remember early on a woman rating stood up and said, well, what about climate change? Yes. It's a matter of nonsensical disregarding science in the facts, but it's it's all about people like the Koch Brothers shifting the way people thought in denying science and I said yeah but it wouldn't have happened. To the extent has the United States without this underlying iffy grip on empirical reality. But I realized that it was both of those things you know people all over the world had if he grips on honeybear curiosity but they don't have this massive politicized denial of climate change. For instance, it's the to in concert in so many ways that has led us where we are. Okay I have to time related questions the first about the writing of the book and the second about the time that you cover in the book, and I'm getting very specific about the timing of the writing the book because as you know, things are moving so fast that the second you think that something is the big story. Something else becomes the big story and these are both kind of Sixteen Post Twenty Sixteen Bucks where did you do pick up in writing this book and also when did you stop because you know it probably I'm assuming this was a pre black lives matter but maybe post covid book or am I getting that First of all fantasyland I wrote and finished before Donald Trump was even nominated. So it wasn't like Oh look Donald Trump I'll reverse engineer how that happened over several Hundred Years This I delivered it early February, but then bless random house had the next several months to incorporate, which is a significant INC because it reflects. So much of what I'm talking about the pandemic and the. Horrific. US government trump administration response to the pandemic, which illustrates most of my major themes in this book. So I the whole last chapter is about that and indeed the the black lives matter protest also is in here as well to the degree that relates to what I'm talking about this. This is a book less about race than it is about economics and technology, but it certainly all of the peace and I dress both the pandemic thoroughly,

America United States Fantasyland Kurt Anderson Donald Trump Kurt President United States Koch Brothers Clinton Engineer
Author Chat With Supriya Kelkar

Books and Boba

05:44 min | Last month

Author Chat With Supriya Kelkar

"Everyone here. Cal Tar. The author of American Premiere Pie, as well as a him Sir. Thank you. For joining us today. Thank you so much for having me. So how has it been with? With the pandemic like are you getting any writing done or has it just in chaos for you? It's yeah. It's pretty much been chaos I I I have three small kids at home. So as soon as virtual learning started, I pretty much had to stop writing for a bit. I used to write at like ten o'clock after they would sleep before the pandemic but it was my new year's resolution to not do that and to sleep better. But I'm back to staying up till one am except I'm just like staring at tiktok videos and I'm not doing anything productive because I don't know that's my stress relief right now though everyone's gotTa Cope Right. Totally get to staying up watching just whatever yeah. Today I guess before we get into our questions can you let listeners know? What the book is about. Yeah. So American as Veneer Pie is the story of Laker who is the only Indian American in her small town in Michigan and Lak- feels like she has two versions of herself. There's home Laker who loves watching Bollywood Movies and eating Indian. Food. And School AK- pins her hair over her birthmark and avoids confrontation at all costs especially when someone tease her for her culture. When a racist incident rocks lead co small town she realizes she must make a choice whether to continue to remain silent or find her voice before it's too late. So the book takes place in the Midwest and as I understand it, you also grew up in the Midwest What was your upbringing like? Yes. So it was very similar to lay Kaz I grew up in a small town in Michigan and. The only indian-american or the kid in in town but there are just a handful of us. It wasn't a very diverse town You know we had a rock thrown through our window Someone wrote put a comb in that rat's nest and permanent marker on my locker and high school. There were plenty of incidents of micro aggressions and other ing and you know very obvious racism when I was growing up. So I put a lot of that into Lak- story as well. And how did you get into writing was writing something that you've always done as a kid or was that something that? Came later in your life yeah. It was when I was in third grade, our teacher had us all right these little stories and he bound them as hardcover books and I thought it was so cool to see my name on the cover I decided right then and there that I was going to grow up and be an author somewhere around middle school that dream changed to wanting to become a bollywood screenwriter. So after college I started working as a Bollywood screenwriter would travel back and forth between Mumbai and look. And Michigan and I did that for well over a decade before before my first book, him so was published. So as a screenwriter, did you use a beat sheet for writing by chance? I do so I definitely right all my novels out with a beat cheat first, and then I outlined them I, I write my novels. right my screenplays when I'm prepping them out. So there's a lot of planning a lot of outlining use a three act structure and then I start writing the book. Do you actually follow your cheat. I do. I. So I learned screenwriting at the University of Michigan from Jim Bernstein and he is a screenwriter as well as they. Instructor there, and he sort of you know drilled into us that its structure structure structure. So I spent a long time working on the structure before I actually go to the book and so then that structure pretty much stays the same. Yeah. I was really curious about that because I studied screenwriting in college and Again, it's all about structure. It's all about having your beats there yet but a lot but a lot of the times it depended on the assignment for me I will have their there were cases where I had every single scene like outlined, and then there were scripts where I was like I have the beats but I'm probably not GonNa follow it at all. Writing is unpredictable it yeah. But that's really cool that you actually follow your beats than you have such tight structure for your books because novel writing it's it's a massive project you don't have like. 'cause like scripts are like ninety, two, hundred, ten pages, and you know there are very strict rules to to adhere to write a novel writing. It's just. It's free game. Yeah and much longer like when I first started writing books my editor on a him. So as like you know, you have to pause and take a second to describe what people are wearing and what the scenery looks like. You know because from a screenwriting background, you don't do that because there is a costume designer and there's a set decorator and there are other people to take care of all those details. So it took a bit of retraining to get get. into novel writing but I I do definitely depend heavily on the screen writing background

Michigan Jim Bernstein LAK Midwest American Premiere Bollywood University Of Michigan Laker KAZ Mumbai Editor Instructor
Author Chat With Supriya Kelkar

Books and Boba

05:44 min | Last month

Author Chat With Supriya Kelkar

"Everyone here. Cal Tar. The author of American Premiere Pie, as well as a him Sir. Thank you. For joining us today. Thank you so much for having me. So how has it been with? With the pandemic like are you getting any writing done or has it just in chaos for you? It's yeah. It's pretty much been chaos I I I have three small kids at home. So as soon as virtual learning started, I pretty much had to stop writing for a bit. I used to write at like ten o'clock after they would sleep before the pandemic but it was my new year's resolution to not do that and to sleep better. But I'm back to staying up till one am except I'm just like staring at tiktok videos and I'm not doing anything productive because I don't know that's my stress relief right now though everyone's gotTa Cope Right. Totally get to staying up watching just whatever yeah. Today I guess before we get into our questions can you let listeners know? What the book is about. Yeah. So American as Veneer Pie is the story of Laker who is the only Indian American in her small town in Michigan and Lak- feels like she has two versions of herself. There's home Laker who loves watching Bollywood Movies and eating Indian. Food. And School AK- pins her hair over her birthmark and avoids confrontation at all costs especially when someone tease her for her culture. When a racist incident rocks lead co small town she realizes she must make a choice whether to continue to remain silent or find her voice before it's too late. So the book takes place in the Midwest and as I understand it, you also grew up in the Midwest What was your upbringing like? Yes. So it was very similar to lay Kaz I grew up in a small town in Michigan and. The only indian-american or the kid in in town but there are just a handful of us. It wasn't a very diverse town You know we had a rock thrown through our window Someone wrote put a comb in that rat's nest and permanent marker on my locker and high school. There were plenty of incidents of micro aggressions and other ing and you know very obvious racism when I was growing up. So I put a lot of that into Lak- story as well. And how did you get into writing was writing something that you've always done as a kid or was that something that? Came later in your life yeah. It was when I was in third grade, our teacher had us all right these little stories and he bound them as hardcover books and I thought it was so cool to see my name on the cover I decided right then and there that I was going to grow up and be an author somewhere around middle school that dream changed to wanting to become a bollywood screenwriter. So after college I started working as a Bollywood screenwriter would travel back and forth between Mumbai and look. And Michigan and I did that for well over a decade before before my first book, him so was published. So as a screenwriter, did you use a beat sheet for writing by chance? I do so I definitely right all my novels out with a beat cheat first, and then I outlined them I, I write my novels. right my screenplays when I'm prepping them out. So there's a lot of planning a lot of outlining use a three act structure and then I start writing the book. Do you actually follow your cheat. I do. I. So I learned screenwriting at the University of Michigan from Jim Bernstein and he is a screenwriter as well as they. Instructor there, and he sort of you know drilled into us that its structure structure structure. So I spent a long time working on the structure before I actually go to the book and so then that structure pretty much stays the same. Yeah. I was really curious about that because I studied screenwriting in college and Again, it's all about structure. It's all about having your beats there yet but a lot but a lot of the times it depended on the assignment for me I will have their there were cases where I had every single scene like outlined, and then there were scripts where I was like I have the beats but I'm probably not GonNa follow it at all. Writing is unpredictable it yeah. But that's really cool that you actually follow your beats than you have such tight structure for your books because novel writing it's it's a massive project you don't have like. 'cause like scripts are like ninety, two, hundred, ten pages, and you know there are very strict rules to to adhere to write a novel writing. It's just. It's free game. Yeah and much longer like when I first started writing books my editor on a him. So as like you know, you have to pause and take a second to describe what people are wearing and what the scenery looks like. You know because from a screenwriting background, you don't do that because there is a costume designer and there's a set decorator and there are other people to take care of all those details. So it took a bit of retraining to get get. into novel writing but I I do definitely depend heavily on the screen writing background

Michigan Jim Bernstein LAK Midwest American Premiere Bollywood University Of Michigan Laker KAZ Mumbai Editor Instructor
Stress Relief: How to Stop Losing Your Sh*t with Your Kids

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

03:49 min | Last month

Stress Relief: How to Stop Losing Your Sh*t with Your Kids

"How do you relieve stress these days Well ahead of these answers, but your intro also reminded me that I feel like I should give a shoutout to a book just read how her which was Carla number. How not to lose your we never curse on this podcast so L. it out. Castro. s-h-i-t with your kids. So we'll keep we'll keep this family friendly by the way. Did you all new real-life curse a lot, but we'll never do it on this podcast. Okay. So that surprise people and then anyway I am really digressing it is such a good book and it is actually based on a lot of meditation. Techniques including very powerful technique like noticing while you're doing something kind of noticing your own reaction, noticing your own feelings, noticing what's going on around you and it's fairly simplistic premise but I actually found it incredibly powerful. So I am not saying that I'm someone who loses it with my kids all the time. I. Feel like I'd probably do an average amount but I still feel like her book really helped me to. Calm down in those situations where I might have chosen to yell or give out kind of a harsh ultimatum or something like that. So. Yeah, good recommendation than which probably all check that out. There's a lot of. Whatever the word is with our kids these days. Yeah. You had mentioned though Josh giving you a night right like. That was amazing I had to ask for it. You know my husband is wonderful but we have kids and it's not always the easiest to put all three of them to bed. So neither of US typically wants to volunteer, but one night I just said. I cannot do this I do not want to do. Can you please just do it I want to go in there I want to go in our bedroom like locked the door and finish binge eating big summer, which was great by the way and I did and it was great. I will admit you've cried for me and I had to put her to bed but it was it was actually Up until that point and Exactly. It was. It was actually really nice and I will do it again I don't know that I need like a specific like night every week I know some people do that but I do think that asking for it when I need it. Fine with it, and then he asked it actually over the weekend he had a headache just like I can't and I was like you know what I feel like really good because you did this for me and I'm happy to do this for you, and so I think we may do that a little bit more. Yeah. That's great. Now, I took a sort of evening not not so much indict off. Having a really rough day than I You know we still had our sitter in after dinner for a little bit. Michael was with Ruth at her softball game and I said, I, really need to go for a run I hadn't got one in and I was feeling rather clustered about a lot of stuff and it was still ninety degrees but I went on a trail run and it felt much better in the shade at than it would have out on the. Street and it was just what I needed. I came back and so much of a better mood than if I had spent that time trying to answer random emails which I was going to do during an email triage time as we discussed in the last episode, just recognizing that you're kind of going off the rails and having some sort of treat or coping mechanism that you have to get yourself back to a normal place instead of wallowing in it, which is you know sometimes. Satisfying and its own twisted way. But probably, not the healthiest thing long-term if I'm GonNa Wallow in something that I, it's probably best for me to journal about it or like right out some words about it or even like draw a diagram or something because then I kind of get to enjoy the actual wallowing but then I feel like the active using my hands to do something prevents me from multitasking and also just kind of. Better know feels a little bit therapeutic. So that can be a way to acknowledge your crappy feelings, but then also relieved them at the same

Carla Number Castro. Josh Michael Ruth
Book News For August

Books and Boba

05:07 min | Last month

Book News For August

"So let's start work as always we open up our episode with the latest Book Publishing News Rewrite What's our first story? As always, we get our book deal news from Publishers Weekly and our first piece of news is in an eight house auction carper Collins teagan books one north. American rights to Michelle quashes debut novel not here to be liked. This why a ROM COM follows Chinese Vietnamese. American, girl allies, kwan who snubbed as the next editor in chief of the school paper for less qualified but more likable male peer as she leads a feminist reckoning at her school she begins falling for the boy she she's asking to step down publication is scheduled for fall twenty twenty one what are your thoughts on this premise? Sexism exists everywhere and yeah. Yeah. But what if she falls in love with him and let them have job I'll take him down regardless. He doesn't deserve the position. So yeah, take him now date him after you get the job you know if he really loves her he'll step Tom. because. He wants her to do her best right isn't that what partner supposed to? Yeah and also you want a boyfriend who likes supports feminism. Sorry. This is this is a way for him to prove his worth. Yeah. But you know given the recent state of the publishing industry and like the news industry, it's a pretty timely story. You know it's weird how a lot of these books are coming up at just the right time. We'll also just you know books are a reflection of what's happening in the world and. Sexism. Racism. Capitalism none of that is going away anytime soon. So it's always going to be timely. Yeah. OUR OUR NEXT STORY HARPER TEEN bought axios exile EXO Bya Rom. com fall is a Korean American cello prodigy who spent part of her junior year at an elite Music Academy in Seoul where she falls into a whirlwind secret romance with the Lead Singer of K pop's biggest boy band. Publication is scheduled for summer twenty twenty one reread. This sounds like your jam. Kind of. Here's the thing I. I love Korean music I love Korean indie hip hop and some and some pop here and there. But I'm very skeptical when it comes to books that. Are Romances with pop stars. I don't I don't know like for some reason it just kind of. Makes me feel. Like, will they it right? Will they get the culture? Right obviously AXIOS is Korean American and she Malo Kate pop for a very long time. So I'm sure she'll get it correct. I mean wasn't her last book on rebel soul about like K. pop and robots. I don't think. K pop poison there. Oh. Yeah it was like Mecca. Feel checks, all the boxes though you know you have not just the the K pop part but also. School. Drama set in Korea at a music academy. Those check a lot of box. I will I will read it because, Acsi Oh, I've read rebel soul and it was a fun book and I I have trust in MC owns all of these elements right. So I am excited for her twenty twenty one it is pre diabolical that she named the book after herself because it's it's excellent. So's axial twice isn't it like kisses and hugs is Trying to make a joke never mind. All right. So our next book deal is McMillan top? Bought World English rights to Karen chows Middle Grade debut miracle, which is about an Asian American girls struggling to find herself through friendship and music in the wake of her father's death publication is planned for twenty twenty two. This one's not as. not, as upbeat as the last one and not as feel-good. But that's pretty deep subject for a great novel. Yeah. I mean, it does have music in it music. Yeah. Next up William Morrow. Science Sequoia Nagamatsu debut novel how high we go in the dark according to the publishers the novel Explores Humanity's struggle to rebuild itself in the aftermath of a climate plague and is akin to stationed eleven and cloud atlas very timely. Yeah. I don't see a release date. I'm going to assume probably twenty, one, twenty, twenty, two. I really loved station eleven. So I am very interested in seeing what the book is about or I guess we already know what it's about, but again, get more familiar with. And the characters

Kwan Publishers Weekly K. Pop Michelle Quashes Carper Collins Chinese Vietnamese Music Academy Editor In Chief Korea Malo Kate Karen Chows Middle Grade William Morrow Seoul Tom. Mecca Partner Acsi Mcmillan MC
Elizabeth Wetmore Interview

Bookworm

06:38 min | Last month

Elizabeth Wetmore Interview

"Today. I'm rejoining Elizabeth what more Beth what more to talk about how? At Age fifty two, she published her first novel Valentine. A novel that not only is superb. It made its debut at number two on the New York Times bestseller list. The book is wonderful an impressive demonstration of the power of women's voices to carry a novel. Now, I'm very interested Elizabeth. How is it? That this. Is Your first novel at Age Fifty Two when did you start writing? Well I don't think I wrote my first short story until I was in my late twenties and I was a reader and I loved books and I read voraciously and impulsively as a little girl if somewhat in a somewhat unfocused manner and and really I don't come from a background where one becomes a writer at least not as a profession. So I think that this sort of combination of of a a kind of holding writers in such esteem I as a little girl in even as a young woman, I thought authors were. Other worldly they were sages and priests and rabbis and holy people live all sorts but I didn't think of writers as being particularly human or occupying the same world as the rest of us So I even write my first short story until I was in my late twenties but I read a lot and I love to read and I thought it must be a pretty holy profession to spend your time telling stories. I fell in love with reading and I had a hard time imagining who a writer might be. I, confused my teachers with riders. I thought that they and the books they taught me came from some specially magical and creative source and I felt song lucky. that. There were special classes when I was in elementary school, it had the ugly Title I. G C Intellectually Gifted Children. By the time I was in high school it was called AP advanced placement but whatever it was called we got to read the best books. One of my teachers took us not to the school library but to a public library where the head librarian was a friend of hers and we were able to take out adult books in this book, your new novel your first. Novel. Valentine one of the characters is reading the scarlet letter. There's a beautiful quote it's not identified, but I recognized it from Charlotte's Web. She here's the beauty of language, the children who are readers here that beauty and they find it on the local bookmobile. The comes to a nearby parking lot a parking lot that's near the strip. Strip joint. It's kind of amazing on the one hand you have. lost. Romantic children getting books and on the other hand you have the men watching the women taking their clothes off and that defied is the divide that defines this novel. But at a certain point Beth, you are at Iowa the Iowa Riders Program How did that happen? When I was waiting tables in Phoenix I started taking community fiction workshop It was being taught by to Grad students at Arizona State, and at that particular time, I don't know if they still do this. But at that time they the MFA students had to do some kind of community service project. So these two guys were teaching this community fiction writing workshop and. I sort of made my way into that and that was where I started and then at some point I was able to to sort of I wouldn't say sneak-in but I was able to get permission to sit on an MFA level workshop at Asu and just sort of as a guest It was really lucky and I'm not sure it would happen today. But but the long and the short of it is I was able to sit in on a class being taught by Ron Carlson who really encouraged me than to apply to Grad School, and I'm the first generation of my family to go to college I. Grew up in a really really working class background. So Honestly It wasn't until I was in my late twenties that I even really knew that there were such things as MFA programs when I signed up for that community fiction workshop was when I learned that there were MFA programs out there So So I was encouraged by a by a mentor to to apply and I did and You know initially he had said to me go do some research and come back in. So I, I went and did a little reading and came back with a sort of list of places to fly in University of Texas Syracuse Iowa was not even on my radar until he said, why is in Iowa on? What year is this one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, I went to I. I was at Iowa from two, thousand, two two. Then I think it's easy to forget that there are whole swats of the you know the population for whom these kinds of things just are not on the radar at all. I mean for me the biggest one of the biggest things that happened in my life ever and and I would hold it in the top ten to this day was the day that book mobile parked on that lot because for me men I could check out books at at my pleasure ride I could just ride my bike up and get them. I didn't have to wait for someone to take downtown to the to the one library you know. So these things were not on my radar. That one could devote one's life to to telling stories into thinking about beauty.

Iowa Writer Beth Head Librarian Elizabeth New York Times Arizona State Ron Carlson Valentine Grad School Charlotte Syracuse University Of Texas
Elizabeth Wetmore: 'Valentine'

Bookworm

05:48 min | Last month

Elizabeth Wetmore: 'Valentine'

"Today. I'm rejoining Elizabeth what more Beth what more to talk about how? At Age fifty two, she published her first novel Valentine. A novel that not only is superb. It made its debut at number two on the New York Times bestseller list. The book is wonderful an impressive demonstration of the power of women's voices to carry a novel. Now, I'm very interested Elizabeth. How is it? That this. Is Your first novel at Age Fifty Two when did you start writing? Well I don't think I wrote my first short story until I was in my late twenties and I was a reader and I loved books and I read voraciously and impulsively as a little girl if somewhat in a somewhat unfocused manner and and really I don't come from a background where one becomes a writer at least not as a profession. So I think that this sort of combination of of a a kind of holding writers in such esteem I as a little girl in even as a young woman, I thought authors were. Other worldly they were sages and priests and rabbis and holy people live all sorts but I didn't think of writers as being particularly human or occupying the same world as the rest of us So I even write my first short story until I was in my late twenties but I read a lot and I love to read and I thought it must be a pretty holy profession to spend your time telling stories. I fell in love with reading and I had a hard time imagining who a writer might be. I, confused my teachers with riders. I thought that they and the books they taught me came from some specially magical and creative source and I felt song lucky. that. There were special classes when I was in elementary school, it had the ugly Title I. G C Intellectually Gifted Children. By the time I was in high school it was called AP advanced placement but whatever it was called we got to read the best books. One of my teachers took us not to the school library but to a public library where the head librarian was a friend of hers and we were able to take out adult books in this book, your new novel your first. Novel. Valentine one of the characters is reading the scarlet letter. There's a beautiful quote it's not identified, but I recognized it from Charlotte's Web. She here's the beauty of language, the children who are readers here that beauty and they find it on the local bookmobile. The comes to a nearby parking lot a parking lot that's near the strip. Strip joint. It's kind of amazing on the one hand you have. lost. Romantic children getting books and on the other hand you have the men watching the women taking their clothes off and that defied is the divide that defines this novel. But at a certain point Beth, you are at Iowa the Iowa Riders Program How did that happen? When I was waiting tables in Phoenix I started taking community fiction workshop It was being taught by to Grad students at Arizona State, and at that particular time, I don't know if they still do this. But at that time they the MFA students had to do some kind of community service project. So these two guys were teaching this community fiction writing workshop and. I sort of made my way into that and that was where I started and then at some point I was able to to sort of I wouldn't say sneak-in but I was able to get permission to sit on an MFA level workshop at Asu and just sort of as a guest It was really lucky and I'm not sure it would happen today. But but the long and the short of it is I was able to sit in on a class being taught by Ron Carlson who really encouraged me than to apply to Grad School, and I'm the first generation of my family to go to college I. Grew up in a really really working class background. So Honestly It wasn't until I was in my late twenties that I even really knew that there were such things as MFA programs when I signed up for that community fiction workshop was when I learned that there were MFA programs out there So So I was encouraged by a by a mentor to to apply and I did and You know initially he had said to me go do some research and come back in. So I, I went and did a little reading and came back with a sort of list of places to fly in University of Texas Syracuse Iowa was not even on my radar until he said, why is in Iowa on?

Iowa Writer Beth Head Librarian Elizabeth New York Times Arizona State Ron Carlson Grad School Valentine Syracuse Charlotte University Of Texas
Brandon Taylor: Would Rather Be Alone, Thank You Very Much

LGBTQ&A

05:19 min | Last month

Brandon Taylor: Would Rather Be Alone, Thank You Very Much

"This is not the typical queer character that we're used to reading about. Yes he's black. He's a scientist but on top of that, he doesn't fit into the gay male stereotype usually presented of gay men being sex obsessed is that something that you want to push back on you know I mean I wouldn't say push back on because I think that that is like gay men sort of feeling free to express their sexuality or people in general being able to express their sexuality is really an important part of like. And feeling like you can. You can do that without being persecuted by the law. So it wouldn't say something that I wanted to push back on because I think it is an important part of your life but I was interested in sort of telling a story that feels closer to my own and trust in my own way of being in the world and I know many Queer people who? Are Not sort of sex centered and were Sachs's sort of a thing that exists but it's not sort of something that we're interested in pursuing necessarily, and so it felt important to me to sort of tell different kind of story. But I I don't really see it as being in opposition to those other kinds of stories i. think it's you know we're all part of the same party it's great. Knowing Gotcha. You've written before to about like your view on relationships and sex and I just think again comparing that like the history of literature and Hollywood like were sold this myth that if you're not in a relationship, then your life is not fulfilled. was that something big that you would get over absolutely ages ten to twenty, eight or something I was. Really relationship obsessed and I really really wanted relationship. But I thought that if I didn't have a relationship that I wasn't worthy of love and I wasn't a worthy person and I had all these myths many of the internalized from culture I. I will say and so it was really only like when I turned twenty twenty nine or is kind of like. Oh I really like myself like I like the human I. Am I am an interesting person i. don't need someone to desire me to feel worthy or fulfilled in coming to that place in my own life. Allowed me to sort of imagine you know characters who existed beyond the realm of like. They won't they will get involved in relationships, won't they? It became a much more interesting set of questions to me to sort of understand how a person exists in the world if I kind of set that relationship question aside. But it was really only after like working on my myself that I was even able to kind of see how you know becoming relationship obsessed. It's not that it's an unworthy thing, but it was just kind of like, oh, it's not the only thing that I can do my wife. And then just to clarify, are you not interested in a relationship ever or is nothing that you're like spending time pursuing? I, it's nothing that I didn't spending time pursuing. You know I had a boyfriend for the first time ever in two thousand eighteen and we were together for about a year and it was a really wonderful relationship and and you know it was a great. Like of my life and it was really wonderful. But I I sort of had this sort of growing awareness that I kind of just as good as that was, I think I craved solitude more and rather than letting that relationship get to a place where I was feeling resentful or where I was feeling like negative towards this person that I cared so much for like why not just call it good and be like you know this relationship was really beautiful and really wonderful. But I think I I would rather be by myself I like that more and so I don't feel the need to stay in this relationship if it's only going to become resentment you like it's only going to turn. Turn this great beautiful love into resentment I kind of left that relationship to sort of be alone to sort of thing, and and to be by myself and you know maybe I'll change my mind you know down the road, but I'm just trying to follow. What makes me happy because for a long time in my life I felt as though choosing my own happiness was not only not an option but was also a deeply selfish and really offline. So I'm just trying to unlearn a lot of this toxic west. From the culture and loud you open and talking about it just because I've been single for a long time like in terms of long-term relationships and I get the look of sometimes like what is wrong with you Yes I and I thought that for a long time you know like I felt that. But when I told some friends that I had broken up with my boyfriend to sort of be alone all my some of my friends were like, okay. But like why wasn't it good I was like It was wonderful but I like being by myself more and they're like I don't understand you boyfriend like I could tell that you know I had kind of stepped down in the world by choosing to be alone and I could tell because people started treating me differently you know what? I got a boyfriend people sort of like, ooh Oh, look at him. He's so globally and they treated me better when I had a boyfriend and when I. Chose to leave that relationship people's treat started treating me worse it. So I do think there is something very real to that idea that society likes people paired off and a single person disturbs.

Scientist Sachs Hollywood
Isabel Wilkerson Talks About 'Caste'

The Book Review

04:34 min | Last month

Isabel Wilkerson Talks About 'Caste'

"Isabel Wilkerson joins us. Now she is a Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of the warmth of other suns which she came on the podcast to talk about a little bit when she reviewed Michelle Obama's becoming. She is back now to talk about her new book cast the origins of our discontent Isabel. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks for having me. So as I alluded in my intro, the last time you came on this podcast, you did come extensively to talk about one book in particular, which was Michelle Obama's becoming which I used as an excuse to talk about book of Your Own the other sons, and I don't have to have that excuse to talk about a book of your this time because you have a new book, let's talk about how you got from the warmth of other suns to this new book cast because you wrote in your book something sort. Sort of intriguing, which is that you didn't seek to write this book, but you felt like you had to write it and I'm curious what you meant by that. Well, with the warmth of other suns, had spent fifteen years looking into trying to understand the great migration and and why that happened, and so that meant that I spent a lot of time looking at and having to investigate and understand wife as it was during that era from the end of reconstruction until the nineteen seventies essentially and what I discovered was that the word. Racism, which is the word that often is applied to descriptions of the warmth. Sons did not actually apply. It was not sufficient. It was not the precise or comprehensive word to describe the structure of repression that was in place from the end of reconstruction. Until till essentially the civil rights legislation of the nineteen sixties, and so I found that I was using the word cast. Cast was the word that anthropologists until geologists and others of the era who had gone into the South during the time of the depth of Jim Crow. They had emerged from that era and that region and that time using the term cast in. It intrigued me when I came across it in the research for the one of the sons and decided that that was really the only way to describe it, and so the word racism does. Does, not, appear in the warmth of other suns and in the intervening years especially with events such as Charlottesville, I have been in a forced to have to think about the language and think about how we remember our history, and so it's as a result of that that I felt I sort of felt, I had no choice, but to dig deeper into what I had begun with the warmth of other signs and it led to this. So in those intervening years. Did you start to think about another book, but you kept coming back to this idea of cast and sort of switched gears or was this the project you went into immediately as a natural outgrowth of the warmth of other suns was the former. You're exactly right I actually had other things that I was working on and was very excited about and very deeply wanting to get into and this this phenomenon helped rearing itself in the news kept prodding me and poking me to look further at what I had already begun. Would not let me go essentially. And an I, at every turn, I was seeing things that were manifestations of what I had written about. But no one was using the language. We we actually need new language to better understand the era in which we live. The old language may not be as efficient as it might have been. Say You know during the Early Twentieth Century? Such words, it's racism, which is a very fraught word means many different things to many different people and is often conflated with personal animus hostility, hate What we're dealing with now goes beyond that because actually it's the underlying infrastructure that we've all inherited that, and that has been here all along since the since the founding of the country actually since before the founding of the country and so this, the the recent events kept drawing me back to what I was not wanting to do, I was not wanting to write this. I really hasn't. And yet, it kept pulling at me

Suns Michelle Obama Sons Isabel Wilkerson Jim Crow Cast Charlottesville
Elizabeth Wetmore: Valentine

Bookworm

04:36 min | Last month

Elizabeth Wetmore: Valentine

"Today. I'm very pleased and excited. My favorite thing on bookworm is when I'm talking to a first novelist. And it someone whose work I have not previously known my guest on the show today is a booth wet more Beth wet more. Her book is called Valentine. It's published by Harper and it's novel. Beth. Wet more is fifty three years old and this is her first. Book, she's published many short stories in many of the best literary journals, the Kenyon, Review Colorado Review but this is her first time in hardcover. Tell me Beth what feel nights is finally see the book in hardcover. Well. It's all been a little unreal honestly. I worked on the book for a long time and I was ready to have the editor sort of wrestle out of my hands. Honestly I think if if she hadn't wrestled it out of my hands, I'd probably still be tinkering with it to tell you the truth and even now I occasionally spot a sentence or a paragraph that I think, Oh, I'd like to have a do over on that. But on the whole, it's been wonderful and surprising to me I think I. Expected The book to come out very quietly and and so it's been. Marvelous to see how many people have reacted to it in such a positive way and how meaningful it's been to some people. Yes the book has made its debut as number two when it came out on the New York Times bestseller list and it's set where Beth was born in West Texas in Odessa. Now, if you're me, you think Odessa that's near where my family come from in Russia this is Odessa in. West Texas how does it get its name? Well it depends on who you ask You know the they're part of Texas was settled pretty late in the early eighteen eighty s and depending on on what piece of local you believe it was it was named Odessa in part because of the sort of grasslands that that people said resembled the Odessa in Ukraine. And and and that's really been the most sort of certain story I've heard. No was Texas. is known for its. Economy. I'm sure most of my listeners will know this but what is an oil patch? Well. Odessa is in the Permian Basin which is about eighty, six, thousand square miles inside. So and and of course, West Texas and. is is even more vast right than the Permian basin and it's an oil and natural gas rich region of the country I read recently actually that actually until the until the pandemic, it was on pace to outpace Saudi Arabia for the biggest production in world in the next five years That's slow down and been derailed a little bit by the pandemic of course but it's so an oil patches you know a a part of the world where that is the single economy oil and natural gas. It's not a particularly pretty place in the world at least not by most people's standards I think it's beautiful. There's no other way to make a living out there other than working oil and natural gas and Odessa where I grew up on differs slightly from it sort of sister city, of Midland, which is about twenty three miles away in the sense that Odessa's a very working class town most of the people who live and work in Odessa do the. Blue collar work of the oil patch. So they work is the roughnecks and pipe lawler's and fitters and water haulers and That's still even today a pretty male dominated industry women in that part of the world tend to work in support roles as bartenders and waitresses preschool teachers, teachers, that sort of thing So that's where I grew up.

Odessa Beth West Texas Harper Ukraine Permian Basin Colorado Review Editor Valentine Lawler New York Times Midland Saudi Arabia Texas.
Tommy Orange Reads Louise Erdrich

The New Yorker: Fiction

04:58 min | 2 months ago

Tommy Orange Reads Louise Erdrich

"This month we're going to hear the years of my birth by Louisa Drake, which was published in the New Yorker in January of two thousand eleven growing up in the midst of a large family I had never registered visitations from my presence. At those rare moments when I was alone as something strange. The first time I was aware of it was when I was taken from Betty and putting the White Room. After that occasionally had the sensation that there was someone walking beside me or sitting behind you. Always, just beyond my peripheral vision. The story was chosen by Tommy Orange whose first novel there there was published in two thousand eighteen and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. Hi Tony. Hey Deborah. So what made you choose a story by Louis urging for the podcast so you had published, I think last year. Short story of hers called The stone is a pretty short short story and is it was a strange story and it just struck me So when you asked me to choose a story I went looking for another one of hers. She's actually published a lot in the New Yorker because I haven't known her for Short Sir she only as one collection of short stories you don't with pretty massive career, most of her stories started stories and end up in her novels. Yes. That's what I've heard her say and this one just struck me I think it's such a perfect story. In what way is perfect for you. You know what I love that fiction can do is the way it can get inside a consciousness and the way it can push mystery. There's something. So mysterious in this story and I don't necessarily always like magical realism but what Lewis does so well, in a lot of her work is sort of pushing boundaries of reality where it still believable still realism you never are asked to believe too much sort of realism's magic. There's something so strange and mysterious about it and really powerful the sort of cultural touchdowns that she does. So subtly though a native culture plays into it in the way, white culture comes up. Yeah. It's interesting because there is a supernatural component, but it can also be read as almost completely realistic. You can kind of how much you WANNA. Think of this as a kind of allegorical story and how much you want to think of it as real. Yeah. This is exactly what what I love about this story and what Louise doesn't work like I said. And if you've been reading, Lewis worked for most of her writing career at least. I mean, she's definitely one of my favorite writers of all time but I came to her a little bit later in my reading path. It wasn't until I was going to the Institute of American Indian Arts Getting my MFA a lot of native literature I didn't come to until getting into the program I. Sort of came in through a back door reading. Wise. I read a lot of work in translation, but I read love medicine I and just completely fell in love with her work. And do you feel the connection for you is that you have shared native American heritage? Definitely when I first started reading actually was a little bit turned off to some native fiction because it was. So reservation based and I, I have this urban experience but that was just sort of at the beginning of me thinking about native representation what it would look like in my own work the way that she handles bringing in native culture I think is so perfect. There's a clumsy way to do it and she never does it that way. always comes across really organically. and. Do you think that this story the the years of my birthday this characteristic if that main character as we'll discover is actually not native. Yeah I. Think the way that that works for the reader to something. Really Cool. Sort of putting you into a native family as a white character does a lot of work for the story I think. We'll talk more after the story and now here's Tommy Orange reading the years of my birth by Louise urge. The years of my birth. The nurse had wrapped my brother and a blue flannel blanket and was just about to hand him to his mother when she whispered. Oh God there's another one and out I slid half dead. I then proceeded to diner ernest going from slightly pink to a dull grey blue at which point the nurse tried to scoop me into a bed warm by lights. She was stopped by the doctor who pointed out my head and legs. Stepping between and the mother, the doctor addressed her. Mrs Lascher I've something important to say your other child had a congenital deformity and may die. Shall we use extraordinary means to salvage it? She looked at the doctor with utter incomprehension at first then cried. No.

Louise Deborah Tommy Orange Lewis Louis Louisa Drake White Room Pulitzer Prize Institute Of American Indian A Betty Mrs Lascher Tony
The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey

Books and Boba

05:02 min | 2 months ago

The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey

"So, re-re yes. What do you want to start with this one? I think we should start with the author's background. and. Just like the inspiration behind Irvine. So. John Massey was born in England and she was raised in the US right now, she lives in Baltimore and her parents are from India and Germany. So she did a lot of traveling. She actually wrote another mystery series back in the nineties which was set in Tokyo while she was living in Japan and it's the Ray Chamara mystery series. But this book was more in the of own voices She did an incredible amount of research for the book I don't know if the people are goods forums read the acknowledgments at the very back but I tend to read all of the acknowledgments because I. I'm usually really curious as to who the author thank and it gives me like a sense of. Their journey when it came to writing the book and she. Massey doesn't have a background in law. She reached out to people reached out to legal historians at universities in. The US who specialize in South Asian law and also in Bombay she contacted magazine editors who are familiar with Parsi customs she went she actually went to Mumbai and she visited all of the historical institutions she reached out to like even railway experts. So she could figure out like how people were able to travel from one place to another and even with the food she I think she interviewed a bunch of like food writers as well. So like the food descriptions in this book are fantastic and our main character per wien is actually inspired by two. Women, attorneys. One of them was Cornelius One of them was Cornelius She was the first woman to read law at Oxford, and the first woman to take the British law exam in eighteen ninety to eighteen, ninety two that's a lot earlier than I would expect the first. First Indian woman to to study law, and the other women that appropriate is based on is Mathon Totta lung who also studied law in Oxford and whisk first woman admitted to the Bombay bar a back in one thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, three. So. Yeah like per Venus. This this book is set in the nineteen twenties. So yeah. It's actually it's really interesting that it's actually based on women who did practice law so Yeah. I mean it's I? Don't think reunite can claim to be experts in the cultures of India but this book real you can tell that the author did a lot of research especially to portray like Mumbai such Mambi during this time period, which was a pre partition it was it depicts a Mumbai that's very multicultural multifaith like a lot of different. People Customs Cultures Religions, and even value sets that kind of coexisting with each other which made for really interesting setting especially in the context of per wien enter father Jamshedi as lawyers who had to. Navigate these. Waters right because every single community has their own set of loss at they have to understand and know how to argue and just also takes place on the backdrop of this was when India was still in imperial colony, right is still part of the British empire and so you have the added. wrinkle of a colonizing power in the form of white people in the mix as well. Yeah Like you said, I'm I'm not an expert with a one thousand, nine, hundred twenty s India But in terms of like England nineteen twenties. So that was during George, the fifth Who was the grandson of Queen Victoria? It's so it's to rains after the Victorian era. So very the the the dad of the King's speech King Yes yes. So this was during time where there was a rise in socialism. And just. I. Think it was like at the height of the British empire and then it crumbled.

Bombay John Massey India United States People Customs Cultures Religi England Mathon Totta Lung Irvine Oxford King Ray Chamara Tokyo Japan Baltimore Jamshedi George Queen Victoria Germany Mambi
The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism

The Book Review

06:35 min | 2 months ago

The 'Seductive Lure' of Authoritarianism

"And Applebaum joins us. Now from London, she is the author of the Pulitzer Prize Winning Gulag History and her new book is called twilight of democracy, the seductive lure of authoritarianism and thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having me, I want to start with a very basic language question because people are throwing around a lot of terms, these days, authoritarianism, dictatorship, demagoguery, autocracy, fascism, and sort of get to an understanding of what we exactly mean and what you need. Europe by authoritarianism. Book is about democracies really and it's about people and political movements in democracies who become dissatisfied with their own political systems and seek to change radically. And I. Agree with you that it's hard to sometimes describe what it is that they want to go towards whether it's a one party state or a liberal democracy or A. Not necessarily dictatorship. In which there's less openness and less competition, and so you know my book is about that. It's about the disappointment that some people feel with democracy and the draw towards more authoritarianism more centralized, less competitive, less open political systems. You're not so much concerned in this book with the specifics of the autocrats of our time, the Erdo ones and Putin's, and Orban's so much as you are with the people who vote for them side with them enable them. Why did you decide to look at it from that angle, but actually it's explicitly. None of book about voters I mean I think the reason why people vote for populist or authoritarian parties are various and I you know that sort of separate subject but you're right. It is a book about journalists spin doctors, intellectuals, and the people who sometimes help create these movements who create the ideas behind them, and then sometimes sell those ideas to the general public. Poorly I read about the because those are people I know not all of them are my close friends, but some of them are people have run into. The World I know and I thought it would be useful therefore for me to try and explain them in an an understand what happened to them over the last twenty years I wanted aired Juan because. About journalists and intellectuals he someone who and I think we could say this. About Putin von and others as well. These are people who have suppressed. The Press Ltd journalists closed down newspapers imprisoned writers who are the people on the other side who are the two of these other journalists and intellectuals who are supporting someone like Oregon. For example, in Turkey, will some of them are people who have become convinced. There's only one form of Turkish patriotism and that it's a nationalist form of patriotism and that anybody who has a different vision of Turkey vision of Turkey this integrated with Europe or a Turkey that secular those people are traders to. The country and their voices don't deserve to be heard. Some of the will have other motives. Some of them will be opportunists. Some of them will see the chance of if you get on the Government's bandwagon and you get on state media than its way to make a career, some of the will like the proximity to power. There's a range of reasons actually that's one of the themes of the book is, is the various different kinds of attractions that these kinds of movements have for people like that. So I'm probably betraying a little bit of my prejudice. As journalists and someone in the book world that the pamphleteer is the bloggers, the spin-doctors, the producer of TV programs in creators of memes. These are people that I can easily see supporting some of these autocrats I. Guess I'm interested in what circumstances in which countries it's writers intellectuals and and what's behind that I mean look they've always been nationalist intellectuals and intellectuals WHO and writers who supported dictatorships. well, into the twentieth century one of the themes of the book one of the kind of threads that I run through it is an analysis that was written in the first half of the twentieth century by French writer Julien Benda called it was called the clerks, the treason of the intellectuals, and it's a book about intellectuals who align themselves politically and who abandoned their search for truth or their object Tivi in order to be part of political movement. So this urge to do that and to be to play a political role or to be the voice sir to provide the ideas for movement is I mean I think it's as old as writing, public speaking itself. Talk about how you've seen that in Poland where you normally spend most of your time. So the book actually the idea for the book came from my reflections about the history of Poland. Over the last thirty years in especially some of the people who I felt aligned with in the nine hundred ninety s there was a kind of center right anticommunist movement that was I mean it wasn't ever cohesive, but it was the people within it certainly spoke to one another in the nineties who all had a similar vision of Poland and who all hoped for Poland it would be part of Europe and part of NATO and would be. Some kind of democracy. And connected world. Some of those people now have acquired a very different vision of Poland and they. Hope to pull, it becomes kind of Catholic nationalist one party state. They've been part of or supporters of a government that has cracked down on independent media and may be doing. So further that uses openly homophobic and anti Semitic slogans in its election campaigns and that I think worse of all really has sought to pack the courts in order to remove the independence of judges and the transformation of those people is one of the subjects of the. First part of the book, and again I think their motives are various I mean some of them are personal. They personally didn't like the political system that emerged in the nineties and two thousands and they they are. They didn't fight until they had a personal role in it. Some people felt police losing something they. They developed a stellar sometimes mythical nostalgia for some other version of the country that they preferred may have existed sometime in the past. Poland's cases to pre-communist past you know some of them felt that Poland was losing its identity as emergency urban there multiple reasons but the the overall impulse is one that I think Americans should be aware of too because the you know the attraction of authoritarianism, the attraction of the one party state or the attraction of liberalism I think can be felt in lots of countries including our own

Poland Europe Turkey Government Putin Pulitzer Prize Applebaum London Oregon Julien Benda Press Ltd Orban Juan Producer Writer Nato
Margot Livesey: The Boy in the Field

Bookworm

05:52 min | 2 months ago

Margot Livesey: The Boy in the Field

"Today, I'm happy to report that my guest is Margot Lipsey her newest book is the boy in the field it's published by Harper. And it's said correctly that it's a cross between a mystery thriller and the coming of age novel but you mentioned the particular kind of thrower of locked room mystery. Tell us what locked room mystery as. Well I'm someone who doesn't reach many thrillers but my understanding of through mystery is that There is no possible solution at yet solution exists and certainly in my novels I think of people's brains locked rooms locked rooms were trying to get into or trying to get alcohol job. Yes snow when I've read that in the book I thought, yes, the brain is the ultimate locked room. But what about the heart? The Heart? Yes. Perhaps even more the heart because the heart has its reasons that reasons does not comprehend. So yeah, they're all know syllogisms for the heart. It's a beautiful book because what happens essentially Is. The three children. Find the Boy Wyoming. For. Own intensive purposes asleep or dead in a field. They're afraid because they see that his legs are bloody. and. The youngest of them Dunkin, a boy who's been adopted is sent out to the road to flag down someone to Cohen Ambulance. As it. Turns out. The boring is not dead although his consciousness is on the wane. And he says at least according to these three children one of three things coward or Cowry or CAL slip. And the way this book works is that each of the three children has an interpretation not just of what the boy says but of how the boy got there of what life in the family is like. The father is perhaps having an affair. The youngest adopted child is looking for his lost I mother who was Turkish. Essentially. You say. That the book. Is like a compass and ultimately, there are thirty two points on the compass and the character can be proceeding toward any of those thirty two points now isn't a novel and this isn't a long novel. This is approximately two hundred and fifty. Some pages isn't it hard to make an potter novel that takes you in so many directions. It was hard to plot the novel absolutely and. Kept to mine something cats were meant field roach one of her lectures about how Every. Member of the family is is struggling to get free is struggling to step into their own life as it were I'm same time still wants to be part of this peculiar organism, the family. Three children you know cup so must like cubism. That's very different points of view about what was happening around the volume, the field. And in their own lives and in their family. Experiencing the family differently. Well, it's kind of amazing because each. Option. HAS A counter option? So the daughter Zoe is in love with a man that man is in love with a woman who was living in Paris, that woman living in Paris is married and feels that her husband comes first. So the constant shifting of point of view and possibility is dazzling you can't as a reader. Put Down what is going to be presented to you next. King for that very complimentary remark. Well, I do think it's one of my I'm Mike core beliefs if you will that. Everybody has a secret has a secret sorrow if you will and. AM. Real takes quite a long time before that emerges even even in the closest friend and of course. We're also refined new Soros. We find new secrets and we surrender other Zimmer's ongoing flux of life.

Margot Lipsey Paris Harper Cohen Ambulance Wyoming Cowry Dunkin Zimmer CAL ZOE