Biotechnology

Where modern medicine meets technology and innovation. Listen for the latest biotech news on technological innovation, genetic engineering and pharmacology, broadcast on leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Speeding the Delivery of CAR-T Therapies While Cutting the Cost

The Bio Report

04:25 min | 4 d ago

Speeding the Delivery of CAR-T Therapies While Cutting the Cost

"Greg. Thanks for joining US getting so much standing. My pleasure. We're GONNA talk about Cartesian therapies, exuma biotech, and your efforts to develop rapid point of care delivery of these therapies. Let's start with Cartesian therapies themselves out of these therapies work today. Well you know if we were to look at this technology today. And put it in the context of what we do in science and medicine even fifteen years ago. The the thought that we could truly have living medicine with genetically modified. LYMPHOCYTES in the body would have been unheard of it. And really I think the basic process of taking one cells from the body. In reprogramming genetically lymphocytes in returning them back into a patient to retrain those cells to see cancer antigens much in the same way we've done with monoclonal antibodies in the past, but wiring all that into itself is what is made Carta. Medicine which has been both exciting in is of course had. Equally that the number of challenges in in many different areas. Well. How are these therapies typically prepared and administered? Well it's a complicated process that has. A tremendous amount of technical skill required as well as logistics so typically. When a subject is entering into a trial or on therapy for approved medicines, their blood is drawn and separated into white blood cells and then shipped usually on a plane to a central manufacturing facility where those cells then are taken into a cleanroom, they are activated their genetically modified they're grown for about. Fifteen days, and then they are prepared just like you would with drug. And then ship back to the site. So there's a tremendous amount of time that can be lost for patients during this period and then once those cells. Are received. Back The patient receives Olympic depleting chemotherapy regimen to kind of make space. And then the cells are infused and at that point they take off and they're on their own. These cell therapies have been more successful in hematological answers than in solid tumors. What why is that? Well I. Think if you look at the history of the Field Dang, what you will find is that. One of the principal challenges in building cellular therapies has been it. They can be incredibly potent. So in the case of something, we know very well like CD nineteen, this isn't a liquid tumor setting those cells with CD nineteen will eliminate. All targets in the body that express CD nineteen, and this is found in many lymphomas. leukaemias. But the problem is in the case of CD nineteen, you're eliminating all of the normal cells make CD nineteen, which are called E. Cells, and this is tolerable in the case of liquid tumors. But when you think about the antigens targets that we go after in solid tumors, those are often expressed in tissues that. Not Be safe if the immune system were to attack it. So we've been forced to really take steps back on how well we can make a car for solid tumors to try and make them smarter to help recognize friend from foe. So the great efficacy I think that you've seen in relapse refractory ael l.. As well as in diffuse large B. Cell Lymphoma, and now also I think exciting we in places like multiple myeloma getting that stain level of efficacy in solid tumors has required that people really think about the precision inside of the problem to make sure can get a potent car but also one that is safe.

Solid Tumors United States Carta B. Cell Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma Field Dang Olympic Principal
The Secret to Better Sleep

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:04 min | Last week

The Secret to Better Sleep

"Is so let's talk about nighttime breathing during sleep and what the differences of breathing through your nose versus breathing your mouth. And what that has to do with our our oral health. Right. Yeah it ends. The same of this talk we've been having his. Teacher important will take taught me something very important about what we need, how fade our bodies and that the crucial nutrients your body will tell you when you're missing the critical factors. Bottom and nutrient needs the thirst in the mail and the first nutrient that your body needs. You can only go minute without it is oxygen and so. In mouth, we can see when not breeding with delivering enough oxygen to our our body and how this translate to add dental health is that as we mentioned before when agile is done developed promptly when we have been narrow up gloomy have risen, tasted done fit that's the back of the magazine and mandible the upper low joel the done developed that is by definition airway space, and so what that does is it pushes us into. What I like to call survival braiding, and what happens is that we are designed to break through the nose and there's some very deep. Raisins for that. In that in the nose, we released nitric oxide which mixes with the air goes into our lung and increases blood flow and pushes auction right throughout the body. Now, when we have crooked up-to-date and the hi pal, we have nasal sinuses that have a low of volume and we don't breath around knows as well as we would when we have nice and central wide jaws. Lovely Watch faces. So what happens is that we learned to break through Mao and this is delivering coal unfiltered there. That's alert air immune system gives us things, Swanson's and Adenoids but what happens is we don't deliver so oxygen and the most crucial part of this is that the mice hungry that the patio body requires auction is the brain and so when you're a breathing correctly, you're starving your brain of oxygen. And so this can happen through the day. You'll bring me through the mail seventy, five percent of the time. Your brain isn't getting enough oxygen. But when you go to sleep, there's one thing you have to do, and that's brief and deliver your brain oxygen and the reason for this is that when you go into deep levels of sweep, your brain is depending on your breathing pattern to take your nervous system into his. Level sleep that then allows himself to clean now and so oxygen and braving patents or what control that. So if you have the small crowded mouth with and you not comfortable with Nicer braiding, you'll then pushing your brain into survival mode during during slate and so as you mentioned, sleep apnea sleep apnea is the most the most severe form of this condition of airway and oxygen deprivation, and that's when we posed. During slave to ten to twenty seconds, the You Count Ten to twenty seconds in you on your hand. That's what people are doing up to thirty or forty times the not, and that's your brain in deep distress, and so this is how we increase the risk of Alzheimer's Disease Dementia and mental decline because we're not giving us a brain opportunity to regenerate and to replenish itself with the the crucial nutrient on. And where I was sharing earlier in the interview is that we typically think of like the you know if anybody has a family member or know somebody diagnosed with sleep apnea we typically think of somebody as. Being usually quite overweight. The one of the things you started noticing and hearing about from some of your colleagues is that there's a whole group of younger. Men But especially women that were coming in. With sort of these symptoms of anxiety like waking up in the morning with anxiety and Tell us how that also relates to this breathing through the nose versus breathing through the mouth. Absolutely. So when we started to talk about the spectrum sleep disorders, now we see obstructive sleep apnea is at the very very severe and but what they found in the nineties at Stanford, a Research Co. Christian. Gilmer found that there was a group who've is patients that's showed positive results for a mandibular advancement splint, which is a dental sleep device. That didn't that were diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea and what he did was he called it. New. Syndrome called Airway Resistance Syndrome and it's not a recognized medical term yet. But there are many many studies and lots of research out there showing that people with upper airway resistance, syndrome, which is exactly what it sounds like. It's an airway that has more resistance. So Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome is characterized by an increased pressure in the airways and. How this happens in the body is that when we sleep your muscles relax and that increased pressure is detected by the Brian is receptive at the back you threatening the Airways the tell the brain what the pressure is. Now we have a small bone structure and the muscles relax. What happens is the brain is constantly being sick these precious signals and it relates to a choking response. So the brain has been sent into fight of what? Response, and so this is a survivor when these wackle survivals sleep, and so what happens is that your brain will respond by pushing the Joel Ford and so the most common sign of Airway resistance in Jeremy Teeth grinding and we say this in the Dental practice busy look. But what happens is that people may not even notice that they have the syndrome. You know they slave they wake that I feel that rested. It's because your body doesn't get to reach date levels

Upper Airway Resistance Syndro Airway Resistance Syndrome Joel Ford Alzheimer Gilmer Swanson Stanford Research Co Brian Mental Decline Disease Dementia
Transforming Infused Biologics into Injectables

The Bio Report

04:09 min | Last week

Transforming Infused Biologics into Injectables

"Rene, thanks for joining us. Thank. You Danny a pleasure to be here. We're GONNA talk about how It's enhanced drug delivery technology and how the company has rebuilt its business strategy around this, let's start with enhanced though what is enhance? That's a great question. Enhance is based on the proprietary enzyme recumbent Human Highly Rana Days Ph twenty. There is a human enzyme on human, highly Rhonda's enzyme and on accommodate version of that. I'd be happy to go into a little bit more about how it works if you'd like. What's the normal function of the enzyme in the body? Okay. So a little bit of biology then. So if you think about the Subcu-, if you think about the skin, there are three layers, the epidermis, the Germans, and then subcutaneous stays. The subcutaneous space is primarily composed. Of fact, some structural components like Alaskan in college, and then a sugar call highly Ronin. Hiring Ronan Forms Gel like substance in the subcutaneous as and this is what's important when it comes to enhance that that GEL like substance creates a resistance to injecting omnium into this up you space the typical volumes you can inject are usually wanted to amounts of subcutaneous. And so. What the enzyme does is it is it breaks down the highly Raanan as as you're jetting drug and the Enzyme Co formulated together. If rates out highly on, she can actually deliver large volumes of injections subcutaneous slow. And that's how drug. Works. So, when we think of That are infused into a patient is volume the issue of why those drugs get infused as opposed to inject it exactly most of the biologics are large lions and they can be sixty, nine, hundred miles. It depends on the concentration if a partner if a company wants to coach with smaller injection buying that could be administered subcutaneous -ly they we co formulated with our enzyme and that formulated product is injected. subcutaneous league are typical products. are in the range of five to twenty EML's. which is allow a lot more than the standard one to two that you can deliver without the enzyme. And what is it actually doing wants it's formulated with a biologic. So, it doesn't do anything to the biologic. But when you inject the CO formulated product into the subcutaneous face, the enzyme breaks down the highly are mentioned that the skin it's a sugar that's naturally in the skin. It breaks it down and opens the state think about like opening the secure space that larger volume have be dispersed, and some of the drug can then be absorbed into the. Circulation. So it facilitates fat sub Q. Injection Large on fluids. What does it take to actually formulate a biologic with enhanced? Does it actually? Does it require doing something to bind it to it or is it just a matter of exciting it into the liquid? It's more than mixing. So typically what we do when we work with a partner on their therapeutic, is we I WANNA, make sure that the enzyme is compatible with their drug at there's no effect of the drug on the vice versa. So we test for compatibility. Then we would test for stability making sure that the two men combine the enzyme on the drug are. Stable a long period of time so that the drug can be manufactured I'm sitting on the shelf for a period of time. One says diamond than simply mixing the two together and the amount of enzyme relative to the amount of drug is extremely small the environment in the order of micrograms of material verses, the drugs which are usually in milligrams. So thousand fold differences.

Enzyme Co Partner Rene Danny Rhonda Ronin Ronan
World isn't meeting biodiversity goals, UN report finds

UN News

07:08 min | Last week

World isn't meeting biodiversity goals, UN report finds

"The number of plants and animals on the planet that are at risk today would be far higher without globally agreed safeguards in action to protect him but it still far from good enough UN by diversity exports sat on Tuesday in call for far greater commitment from only Chicago to safeguard human wellbeing in the planet's the body that oversees these work. The Convention on biodiversity urged those gathering for UN summit at the end of the. Month to broaden their ambition from the convention. Here's Executive Secretary Elizabeth Marina Deputy Executive Secretary David Cooper talking to UN uses Daniel Johnson just if you wouldn't mind Elizabeth Merima give me the classification of diversity and in particular why is it important in simple words by devastate is everything around us and when I say everything around us, it means everything we do as human activities affected by busy. Each could be what we do on the land what we're doing. What we do in the forest, what we do on species, animals, plants, I mean, what we do is we produce our food as we consume all by diversities. So our human actions in the nature of virus around us and what we're finding is that if fact but diversity is in massive trouble and your report from the conventional biological diversity, the UN Conventional Biological Diversity tells us that only six out of the world's twenty goals on biodiversity have. been achieved only partially achieved by the deadline, which is actually this year. So to be honest I wasn't aware that the governments of the world had agreed in Japan twenty ten to a series of biodiversity targets and you're saying that only six of twenty goals of being partially achieved by the two thousand twenty deadline. So what is the concern? Which of these? Obviously a very bad report card where have we gone wrong and please don't say everywhere. No because they some progress. But indeed unfortunately by diversity's declining it unprecedented level rate and precious deriving they decline unfortunately. So increasing just as underlying. So indeed this scorecard, his only identify six of the twenties so not even half in the seats. In the areas of deforestation, where at least deforestation is gone down by Fed or two percent fisheries. Management fisheries catches also improved clearly indicating where appropriate policies on fisheries management have been put in place. Then the fishery cage hazing and abundance is increased and improved education of alien species. Particularly from the islands Z. Qualley improved protected areas has increased from ten percent to fifteen percent in terrestrial in three to seven percents on marine areas we also learned my says extinction fishes extension at really threatened in the history of mankind still where conservation measures they've been put in place every improved and reduce extinction of species without which. We and be waste than what we are talking today I think joining us now we are very fortunate have Mr David Cooper. Deputy Executive Secretary of the UN. Conventional. Biological, diversity. Welcome to you Mr Cooper. Thank you very much. Daniel. Thank you ever so much for joining us. We were just talking there with Elizabeth, my executive secretary on the really mixed report card. I. Think that's the charitable worth putting it off. The biodiversity targets that was back in two, thousand ten. So a decade on. We've got six of twenty goals partially achieved although Elizabeth was saying that the has been some good work on eliminating foreign species from islands and in the fisheries to and other national programs that perhaps you could tell me a bit more about to give us maybe a little bit of positive news. What is a pretty Hesse mystic outlook for humankind and also forbade diversity moving forward? Yes. Thank you very much indeed even in those targets that haven't been pasta passages talks that haven't been achieved. Is. Some signs the progress as as in his methods as as mentioned in which Houston deforestation rates in fooding fisheries management in dealing with invasive alien species and in reducing. Rate. So numbers of bird mammal extinctions that occurred over the past ten years or indeed over the life of the Convention would bean at least to perhaps up to four times higher without the actions of being taken. So one clear message despite the disappointing results one clear message is policies do work if they are put in place and implemented, and so we need to learn from that we. Need to be encouraged by that, we need to step up those policies more widely in order to reduce the greater biodiversity loss. The report also shows that if he wants to actually not only we do survey to biodiversity loss that Ben that curve and put me on a path to recovery than more fundamental actions also needed looking at the way we produce and consume food in particular that. Sustainable production and consumption captains more broadly as well. I'm just going to dive in that because the report is pretty alarming and I'm very glad to hear about some of these national projects that have been successful in. Boosting bio-diversity, but the report says that the rate of biodiversity loss is unprecedented in human history I guess we did know that really and precious intensifying and living as a whole being compromised, and of course, we can't have this discussion without talking about covert and how the degradation of our natural environment has I suppose, but closer into contact with viruses in the natural world, is that the kind of thing that's really going to galvanize support for greater support for native greater protection for nature if we don't do so we're going to be huge trouble ourselves forms. Suddenly I I. Hope. So there's Very clear evidence as you say that the degradation of of ecosystems encroachment into international areas, unregulated wildlife trade, these things. Increase the risk of emergence of future. Disease increase the risk of future pandemics, and conversely, if we can invest in conservation an investigation regulating control wildlife trade, we will reduce those risks. So these are suddenly Lead important reasons on top of wanting to prevent six-man south extinction. These really positive reasons also for investing in IDA versity.

UN Un Conventional Biological Div Deputy Executive Secretary Executive Secretary Mr David Cooper Daniel Johnson Elizabeth Elizabeth Merima Elizabeth Marina David Cooper Chicago Ida Versity Japan FED Houston BEN
UnifyID: Biometric Authentication with John Whaley

Software Engineering Daily

04:22 min | 2 weeks ago

UnifyID: Biometric Authentication with John Whaley

"John Welcome to show. Hey, great to be here. You work at unify ID a company CO founded and you do biometric authentication is that mean? So, there's all these things that are very unique about each Each of us the most common type of biometric authentication. You know about these things like like fingerprints you know everybody essentially everyone's fingerprint is unique and then record that and then know that that is that whether Jew or not I mean. So what we do something called behavioral biometric, which basically incentive looking at something static like your fingerprint will look at your behavior like this dynamic behavior, you do things like. The way that you walk or the way that you hold your phone or you know there's this millions of other little Ideo little habits and idiosyncrasies that you have, and then use that for authentication and by doing that, we are able to get something that's very seamless that just doesn't require you to require any conscious user action. You can just be yourself and there's enough that's unique about you. We can actually indicate you based on that and it's continuous so you don't need to. Get up. Walk away from a computer you put your phone down. You know somebody else picks it up things like that. We're able to detect that that change and then know whether it's you in a very seamless way. I feel like biometric authentication has been a thing for a while there have been a lot of companies that have tried to do this. Why is unify different? Yes. So the biggest differences is the type of factors of us. We've focused entirely on passive factors. So things that that don't require any conscious user action to do I. think that's always been the challenge with any form of authentication is the users as the the the human beings just human nature I mean people are naturally lazy and they like they don't want to go through these additional authentication steps because it adds friction to the user experience I mean if you look at the way that people choose passwords, I, mean there's been plenty of information about. You know with Patrick Breaches and how to choose a good password, etc. You know if you look at every year, the list of reach passwords, it's always the same traditional, one, two, three, four, five, six, or the word password these those type of things, and so you know get changing human behavior is really hard. Now I, mean if you look at just historically across technology like there's always been a shift where initially human beings have to adapt to the limitations of technology and eventually technology reaches a point where humans where it can adapt to humans and the way that they are and so authentication is not a new problem in it. I mean it goes back to. Prehistoric Times in any social creature needs the ability to then identify and authenticate like are you who you say you are is this. Are you part of group or not? You know that's the this goes back a longtime y'all before technology existed and the way the people had always did in the past was you know you'll get their face you hear their voice you see that you know the context under which you see them maybe possessions things like that. But it was always very natural thing and then passwords came along around four hundred and fifty years ago now, and so this was very much of adapting to the limitations of technology. Let me enter these know these sequence of of symbols and numbers and letters, and that's how you know whether it's going to be it. It'll be me right but that's not the way that that people had traditionally identified themselves in the past. and. I think it's about time that no. Now Technology has now reached the point where individuals can be themselves, and then there's enough sensors and people's lives as well as technology reached the point that you can identify people just for better natural behavior rather than having them do something explicit. So you know the difference is because we're doing this completely passively it opens up a lot more different use cases where you don't really have to change the user experience. You have a much more seamless user experience like opening a door, for example. You, know with our technology like you, we make Sdk you can link into any IOS or android APP. We also have components are Web Java script as well but you know you walk up to a door and you have the APP installed, and then the door already knows that it's you and then the you know the the the doors unlock-, you don't need to take out your phone and do something extra and so for use cases where you have security concerns but you also care about these or experience that's that's where. Our technology really comes to play.

Now Technology John CO Patrick Breaches Prehistoric Times
On the trail of COVID-19 misinformation

Science Friction

06:03 min | 2 weeks ago

On the trail of COVID-19 misinformation

"Hi. An tesha Mitchell welcome to science fiction. You are about to mate to people who have really felt the fault lines of covid nineteen in their families. But in the way you might imagine. A mother, he told me I've been on the Victorian government website and the coronavirus testing is boosted a son. That's when my father said Australian scientists have now found out that sunlight is quite effective in preventing nineteen fiction confronting two pieces of medical misinformation. When it comes to medical misinformation, that term is actually really knew what we're used to as snake oil quackery, the waves of misinformation misleading content conspiracy content. It's really everywhere in a way that's really shocking. ABC's technology reporter investigative journalist Ariel Bogle joins us. Now she's been tracking the spread of health information since this pandemic began some of its mono-, some of it easy flat out dangerous and aerial imagine the spink kind of like wrestling with the arms of an octopus. It's really out there. I've seen dodgy posts and videos about carbon nineteen everywhere, and when we put a call out on ABC News website for examples. We received hundreds of tips and that's we're investigating here in click sick this a three part series on where health misinformation comes from, and it's impacting our lives. We're going to start with a single social media post then aerial and the team going digging and found what's out. There is really confusing papal testing their relationships including this woman. We'll call her lucy she lives a life on the move. Yeah Gypsy had. For more than two years Lucy's been travelling around Australia with a small dog picks the angel in a Pink Caravan. I couldn't afford to rent a house at any of the places places near where my children live, which ones album winds up in Byron Bay. So then I was like our will all to stick to being in the caravan and and that way I can float between my children but early in the pandemic in Queensland and interstate travel bans kept her apart from the son and daughter. So when restrictions as FA- caravan parks in Victoria I really wanted to just come and see my son that was that was migraine lot and I just bugged out acquaintance. When she arrived in Melbourne, she heads straight for his sons share house. There's been a dramatic escalation in the efforts to control a spiking corona virus cases in. Victoria in Melbourne. Getting grim as the number of covid nineteen cases, Russula, large parts of Melbourne now in danger of being put into lockdown. So I, only really got to see my son. A COUPLE OF TIMES BECAUSE? I want it to be careful because I didn't know you know how well they were self-isolating and protecting themselves. Busey was more worried than most about being infected with the coronavirus as you're going to hear Ya when Melbourne look like it was heading for a second wave of covid nineteen she bio just before the city went into second lockdown she was staying in a caravan park in country Victoria when she got some bad news on he got really sick really really sick about a week after I left Melbourne a son was on the fine couldn't get out of bed aching alive. You know coughing and I was really nervous I was like honey I really think you should get tested. It wasn't clear what it was, but his son saying it's probably not covid earned. It's probably just a bad flu and I was like, yeah. But for my sake, just to reassure your Mama I'd really appreciate it. If you go get tested because if you get tested and it's negative than I, know at least I'm okay and then he said something that really took her by surprise his words on the phone were I've been on the Victorian government website and the coronavirus testing is boosted. Lucy was really worried about him, but she was also especially worried for Oregon Health I've got to autoimmune diseases and the worst being rheumatoid arthritis, which affects all the joints causes stiffness and sometimes I can't walk. So Lucy takes powerful medication, which also suppresses her immune system's ability to protect itself from infections. My immune system does not function well. Well doesn't really function at all. But I do tend to pick out coughs and colds and sniffles sore throats if I just around people. I live as a total recluse on my iron but that's what I have to do to to stay healthy. And this means contain is a big threat to. Lucy. So at this point, lucy son was feeling really sick and they was a risk he might have covid nineteen though it seems he wasn't eager to take testify doubt. It's important to say that Lucy son didn't want to be part of the story. Sorry. These impressions only. But this was a time when Victorian health authorities wanted everyone even with modest symptoms to get tested to help contain the pandemic Lucy didn't know what to do so I said well. What makes you think that it's crap and he said, well, I've been reading on the government website and it says the tests that they give you. Is just the test corona viruses in general, not specific to. Sarah's To the one that causes covid nineteen then her sunset Lucy a screen shot of a website he'd seen on facebook and it was from CDC Dot Gov Had the link at the top and pretty said what he'd said. But it had like highlights across the words and a big Red Maka pen round

Lucy Melbourne Victoria Abc News Mitchell Pink Caravan Byron Bay FLU ABC Australia Ariel Bogle Migraine Reporter Facebook CDC Queensland
Plants Engineered to Remove Indoor Air Toxins

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Plants Engineered to Remove Indoor Air Toxins

"Welcome to the talking biotech podcast. It's Wiki podcast about agriculture and medicine with him emphasis on biotechnology and the good things we can do for people and the planet. My Name's Kevin fulltime professor and. Science. Communicator. Worries about your understanding about science and about some of the major issues which new technologies can play an important role and today we're going to revisit a episode. We did last year, we're speaking with Dr Stewart, Strand from the University of Washington civil and Environmental Engineering Program, and we're going to re-explore his air purifying plants. So there's been some developments over the last year or so that are really important. So welcome back to the PODCAST. Dr Strand. Thank you. Yeah. It's really nice that you're back because this was an intriguing topic to me. And maybe we need to start fresh for listeners. But back in twenty nineteen, you talked about plants that could remove impurities from indoor air. and. Why do you think that this is necessary and is it really a problem? Yes, it really is a problem Our homes are contaminated with gashes. Chemicals such as Benzine and Formaldehyde. ACURA. Lead chloroform is president are indoor air, and these are all either proven or probable human carcinogens. So these are important even at very low levels that they occur in the hall mainly because our most vulnerable populations, children, and older people as well. spend all their time in the home and are exposed to these chemicals continuously. Okay where do they come from? Well busy comes from fuel storage in attached garages. Lawn more fuel gasoline contains a lot of busy and can get out of the tank even with voters car Benzine also comes from outdoors. It also comes from cigarette smoking or any kind of smoking and the home. Sometimes, Campbell's can emit. And It's approved human carcinogen chloroform an interesting one with chlorinated municipal water performance farm from the chlorination process and reactions with trace organic compounds, maybe water and that chloroform which is a probable human carcinogen. Is a mid into the air when you use hot water in the hold like showering or or washing of. Procedures Machines admit chloroform into the air FORMALDEHYDE. A lot of people are familiar with that. It comes out of the glues we used in pressboard carpets and so I'm but it also comes from things like smoking and cooking. In the home too so that at that's hard to avoid. And do you think that our big push to have more energy efficient homes? You know we're we're getting double pane windows and really good insulation around our doors and thresholds that don't leak is this just exacerbated the problem? A yes. It has as well recognized to be a part of the problem of that. Don't have as much Eric's change in a lot of the homes. That we that have been retrofitted with installation. That we should have there should be frequent air exchanges in the home and. Even. Those though will Lee some of these residual gaseous compounds. Okay. So we have this problem of at least some level of. Volatile compounds that are present inside of our indoor air that may be there exceedingly small amounts, but still represent some finite risk and. Now, you have a solution to help clean those out a just with plants that have been specifically engineered to deal with those chemistries. So remind me again about the first invention which was both those eighty what what is that in? How does it work? Well Pathos Ivy. The last name is the criminal Maurya around the trunk as tropical plant. Many people have it in their homes. It's also called Devil's Ivy in some places And it is very common house plant very easy to grow It doesn't flour in the home So it's a less of a bio safety risk in the ecology and. It is a house plant that is rare in the fact that it has been genetically modified.

Dr Strand LEE President Trump University Of Washington Acura Kevin Professor Benzine Dr Stewart Campbell Pressboard Environmental Engineering Prog Eric
How to Biohack Your Sexual Pleasure

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:19 min | 3 weeks ago

How to Biohack Your Sexual Pleasure

"Did you know that being sexually active associated with closer relationships, better immune function, lower blood pressure improved sleep, reduce stress, and even lower mortality. In this mini episode I speak with Dr Amy Killin Elicit City, and Dr. Stephanie. Steam about the importance of sexual pleasure to our well being how sex drive in orgasmic response changes a woman cycle Y orgasms should be part of our Self Care Regimen Spicy topics. Let's listen in starting with interview with Doctor Amy Killin an anti ageing and regenerative fission specializing in sexual optimization aesthetics and longevity medicine. How important is sexual pleasure and sexual health for our overall health what we get from it So we get so many things It's basically important for all aspects of health when I talk about health I look at. Of Six main components of health. So you have physical health and I will talk about kind of some specific things with that and there's spiritual health there's emotional health mental health there's. Environmental Health and their social health. So those are kind of the six main types of health or parts of health that are important and sexual health and sexual function having a happy successful. Pleasurable sex life actually impacts all six areas of health It's also impacted by all six areas of health. So it's Kinda goes both ways So for instance, for comment of Health, we know that people who have active healthy sex lives and usually is defined as something in the realm of maybe once a week having sex or certainly a couple of times a month it depends on the studies, but it's not like every day. It's just you know it's something that's generally a part of their lives. Those people tend to have less cognitive decline as they get older. They said he's with with women and men, but basically looked at women who had were having sex versus women who had not been having. You know regular active sex in the wants you were sexually active. had better. Cognition had less cognitive decline as I got older, which is interesting. They've done look looked at the hippocampus and basically people who are more sexually active attend to have. Larger Healthier hupa campuses which tie memory and things like that. So it's tied very much cognitive health. Sex's definitely tied to mental sort of emotional health. In that, we know that people who again has been active healthy sex lives tend to have less anxiety tend to have the they feel better about themselves have better. Sort of self they their self. Self esteem. They'd have higher self esteem is. A sleep better a which, of course, we know sleep has its own whole other. The the benefits of sleeper could talk for half a day about that. So it helps sleep helps. It helps self image. And other lots of other things like look less depression people are who are having a lot of sex have less depression. So all of that's important from physical standpoint we know that people who are sexually active tend to have lower blood pressure. They tend to against sleep, which is really important. They tend to have less cardiovascular disease There was one study in man again who looked at men over a ten year period of time men who were having sex at least once a week I believe, and at the end of it, they showed that there was actually a fifty percent reduction in overall mortality in the men who were having regular sex. Versus the men who were not now there's things probably tied to that. I mean you can't just say it's just accent maybe they're just more active in general or they have a better relationship with their partner etcetera. So but but these are pretty big things to you know to talk about and think about and it's besides sex is fun but it also does all this really good stuff for US A. Woman's hormonal landscape changes dramatically throughout her life because of this unique biology understanding her menstrual cycle and it's rhythm can be incredibly useful for optimizing productivity weights, sexual drive, energy mood, and so much more Elissa vide- a pioneering female bio hacker and women's hormone and functional nutrition expert, and by the way bestselling author of Women Code and in the flow talks to us about how for women the best pat to. An orgasm changes depending on which phase of her cycle she happens to be in and what's happening with her hormones. She also shares great tips for couples who have children or who are new parents and the importance of communication and regularly scheduling time for physical intimacy. Let's listen in one of the ones that you had mentioned in is sex and intimacy. Yes. So let's talk about how that plays into the rhythm. So, as I mentioned before sixty percent of women are sexually unsatisfied, which is a ridiculous amount of women. This is not good. You know we're talking about when women are happy to other people are happy I mean I think this is a great place for women to just get some agency because it's a very simple fix. The reason why women are are I think unnecessarily unsatisfied is because they are not aware of the fact that they have real physical physiological changes across their libido and orgasmic response across the infrequent cycle. Right? So that means you'll. have times when you're naturally less look self lubricating, you'll have times where you need more clitoral stimulation to achieve not only the orgasmic flato but also climax, right you'll have times in the cycle where you'll need more emotional connection before the physical connection. This is not just like shots in the dark of Oh I wonder why last week was fireworks with my partner and this week was like a Ho hum right and this and women because we've been deprived of all this information right it's the same continuing the conversation when the Diet doesn't work we think. That inner critical steps in and it's like Oh it's my fault I failed something's wrong with me I lack discipline I lack willpower when the fitness plan doesn't work we don't question the plan we questioned ourselves we criticize ourselves when our sex life isn't going the way that we would like it to sixty percent of us to to be exact are not fulfiled sexually. We think there's something wrong with our libido, and

Environmental Health Partner Dr Amy Killin Amy Killin Dr. Stephanie United States
The rise of vaccine nationalism  should we be worried?

Science Friction

05:13 min | 3 weeks ago

The rise of vaccine nationalism should we be worried?

"So hell, we end this pandemic by making sure everyone in the world gets access to treatments or vaccines could determine how we respond to the next one. The world's wealthiest countries, Astrid your amongst them have already BRCA deals with pharmaceutical companies to preorder more than two billion doses of corona virus vaccines that's according to the Journal. Nature those deals, of course are contingent on with the vaccines, a proven safe and effective, and that's big eve. Streaming, problematic calypso chocolate do is director of global health policy with the Santa Fe Global Development and professor in the Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at imperial. College London obviously governments of wealthy countries heads to. Ten had to be seen to be acting and I totally appreciate the urgency over at all and I had the opportunity to talk to officials here from the UK government also from a European Commission. Now that set aside I think there's a number of issues with the current approach which ignores effectively the effectiveness questioned. The performance questions we're buying things were assuming we'll work. and. That means that goes are now shouldering the bulk of the risk. And they're shouldering the bulk of the is the commercial risk as well without being able to negotiate really on the price these things do come out scrambling is inevitable in my view economists professor I'd Hollas as President of incentives for Global, health, which aims to build a health impact fund to finance new treatments especially for neglected diseases but on the rise of Covid nineteen vaccine. Nationalism. He says one country that started off the United States has been explicit America first policy. In other countries the citizens were unlikely to be happy with their governments. If those governments came back to them with deal that said, we're just going to allow off the Americans to be vaccinated first, and then we'll take our turn along with all the citizens of the rest of the world. It's just became politically unfeasible. To do the right thing. So I think we're having the worst of every world. Really. So were engaging in a sort of an arms race where everybody's trying to out beat everybody else in buying things that we don't really know they will ever materialize or even if they do whether, they will work with the right product. So shouldering the risk as taxpayers effectively, we're doing it in a very bilateral fragmented fashion. So this undermines countries that are not as wealthy, and certainly the middle income countries have been left out of this conversation which I think is extremely problematic. So goelz plan says a global health community to support the low income countries through Garvey and effectively philanthropic subsidizing any successful vaccine doses. But then there's the vast majority of the world's. Forest people are living in very crowded conditions leaving middle income nations live in Nigeria Favila in in Brazil Brazilian cities, they live in Mumbai this country's middling concern necessarily going to qualify for this subsidy, but also not wealthy enough to engage in bilateral deals and behave the way the United Kingdom or the US are behaving been scandalous. I. Think that we haven't talked about these countries if the missing Middle Mrs add on a vaccine. What's the picture for the pandemic and getting on top of it? They will be disastrous for sure it will be disastrous. What will it be looking at situation where income countries close the borders a game where people are not admitted were basically sees. Stop people from moving around. We stop goods from moving around it. It's going to be absolutely disastrous situation is is certainly not desirable by what we want to have is as sensible efficient allocation of vaccines around the world. So. That the people who need to get back stated first everywhere get vaccinated first, and then we gradually progress in each country. Not instead vaccinating people who were very low risk in rich countries while people are at high risk in middle income and lower income countries are left unvaccinated that doesn't make any sense for the world is aside from the moral calculus here of yes. H Nation has an obligation to their own citizens. They also potentially have an obligation to the rest of the world because his biological imperative here isn't they this is a global pandemic. Yes. I'm mean one of the risks of course as if the viruses left to spread among people in lower income countries. At some point, it may mutate into a new form which existing vaccines don't offer protection against. So there is there is a reason for people in high income countries even people who don't care about poor people to say, let's just make sure that everyone gets vaccinated on a timely basis.

Professor United Kingdom United States Santa Fe Global Development Department Of Infectious Disea London Journal Director Garvey European Commission America President Trump Nigeria Mumbai
The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

WSJ The Future of Everything

05:35 min | 3 weeks ago

The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

"Okay I'm assuming people just didn't start thinking about making lab producer artificial blood during this pandemic. How long has research in this field been going on scientists have been experimenting with lab, Produce Blood for decades but due to issues of funding or skill ability or just now seeing the start of clinical trials. and. Even though we're all really thinking about corona virus right now, what really accelerated our work blood substitutes was actually another virus. That was the HIV AIDS epidemic in the Nineteen Eighty S. The evidence was that the cause was not only something new. But something transmitted by blood Thousands of people were infected with HIV, through blood transfusions. This was before the blood supply could be tested for HIV in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five. So it made people really scared there was panic going on I remember my grandparents being fearful about the blood supply people before they had surgery would have their own blood extracted so they could use during surgery. There were all these fears about whether the blood supply was safe yeah, and that's when A. Lot of my sources told me we started shifting our national attention to looking at the blood supply. We realized it had to be tested. It had to be controlled, and we had to dump a lot of blood during that time because it was contaminated I spoke to one of the researchers who's been studying blood since the late nineteen eighties, his name is Dr George Daily. He's now the Dean of Harvard Medical School and he runs a lab there that studies this. Ultimately through various public health measures and very aggressive testing, very sensitive and specific testing. For HIV, the blood supply was made extremely safe. But as we've seen in recent years with the emergence of new pathogens whether it's Zeka war Ebola or. Recently coverted. There's always a worry about new infections that can contaminate the blood again, raising the value and importance of being able to more carefully controlled manufacturer and presentation of blood through a different system. That different system, he's alluding to is one where blood could be made in a lab. Okay and we're going to break down those new developments in just a bit but first Nora can you explain what do you need to make blood? Well just a refresher from probably what we learned in high school biology blood is made up of different parts. You've got the red blood cells, they carry oxygen. You've got white blood cells, they fight infection. Then there's plasma that carries nutrients, salts, proteins, and then there are platelets they make your blood clot when you get a cut. All of these parts are important because they all serve different functions so far no one has come up with a complete replacement, one total package for all of these functions. Instead different research groups are focusing on trying to produce the individual parts of blood. There's been some early testing of red blood cell substitutes including. Jehovah's Witnesses because most don't accept blood transfusions as part of their religion. But. Most of the momentum that I saw in my reporting was with labs trying to grow their own platelets. One of the top researchers doing this is Dr. Cedric of art and he's a consultant hematologist who leads a research group in transfusion medicine at Cambridge University? Rather important seven will be the small cell in the body, but equally if you don't have enough lateness. The bleeding symptom saw a really horrendous. Can I just stop right here and say I am shocked the platelets or the smallest cell in the body there's a lot of small cells in the body I know I know I was shocked when he said that too I had to go back and double check but it's true they are and even though platelets are so small they're really powerful. They're really important for patients undergoing chemotherapy or people who sustain traumatic injuries because they often receive platelet transfusions, but they're also quite finicky. They can only be stored for about five days and they have to be sort of stirred around to keep them from going bad. Leaving Jam Joel, Rubin on New Kitchen surface for five days zero. Gross stuff. So part of the reason he's trying to figure out how to manufacture them in the lab in vitro is because platelets are usually in the shortest supply because they have that shorter shelf life and when you say in vitro, you mean basically in a petri dish. Yep, that's right. That's in vitro. Got It. All right. So this makes sense I mean it's kind of like how you have to buy milk every week while if you drink milk which I don't. But flower can last a month or so yup. Yeah. Exactly. Right. So I get why platelets need a bit more backup but I'm still trying to figure out my head how they actually make more of them in a lab. You know what I mean. Now platelets don't just reproduce own you need stem cells to make them.

HIV Dr George Daily Nineteen Eighty Dr. Cedric Producer Rubin Aids Harvard Medical School Nora Cambridge University Joel
The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

WSJ The Future of Everything

05:04 min | 3 weeks ago

The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

"I'm assuming people just didn't start thinking about making lab producer artificial blood during this pandemic. How long has research in this field been going on scientists have been experimenting with lab, Produce Blood for decades but due to issues of funding or skill ability or just now seeing the start of clinical trials. and. Even though we're all really thinking about corona virus right now, what really accelerated our work blood substitutes was actually another virus. That was the HIV AIDS epidemic in the Nineteen Eighty S. The evidence was that the cause was not only something new. But something transmitted by blood Thousands of people were infected with HIV, through blood transfusions. This was before the blood supply could be tested for HIV in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five. So it made people really scared there was panic going on I remember my grandparents being fearful about the blood supply people before they had surgery would have their own blood extracted so they could use during surgery. There were all these fears about whether the blood supply was safe yeah, and that's when A. Lot of my sources told me we started shifting our national attention to looking at the blood supply. We realized it had to be tested. It had to be controlled, and we had to dump a lot of blood during that time because it was contaminated I spoke to one of the researchers who's been studying blood since the late nineteen eighties, his name is Dr George Daily. He's now the Dean of Harvard Medical School and he runs a lab there that studies this. Ultimately through various public health measures and very aggressive testing, very sensitive and specific testing. For HIV, the blood supply was made extremely safe. But as we've seen in recent years with the emergence of new pathogens whether it's Zeka war Ebola or. Recently coverted. There's always a worry about new infections that can contaminate the blood again, raising the value and importance of being able to more carefully controlled manufacturer and presentation of blood through a different system. That different system, he's alluding to is one where blood could be made in a lab. Okay and we're going to break down those new developments in just a bit but first Nora can you explain what do you need to make blood? Well just a refresher from probably what we learned in high school biology blood is made up of different parts. You've got the red blood cells, they carry oxygen. You've got white blood cells, they fight infection. Then there's plasma that carries nutrients, salts, proteins, and then there are platelets they make your blood clot when you get a cut. All of these parts are important because they all serve different functions so far no one has come up with a complete replacement, one total package for all of these functions. Instead different research groups are focusing on trying to produce the individual parts of blood. There's been some early testing of red blood cell substitutes including. Jehovah's Witnesses because most don't accept blood transfusions as part of their religion. But. Most of the momentum that I saw in my reporting was with labs trying to grow their own platelets. One of the top researchers doing this is Dr. Cedric of art and he's a consultant hematologist who leads a research group in transfusion medicine at Cambridge University? Rather important seven will be the small cell in the body, but equally if you don't have enough lateness. The bleeding symptom saw a really horrendous. Can I just stop right here and say I am shocked the platelets or the smallest cell in the body there's a lot of small cells in the body I know I know I was shocked when he said that too I had to go back and double check but it's true they are and even though platelets are so small they're really powerful. They're really important for patients undergoing chemotherapy or people who sustain traumatic injuries because they often receive platelet transfusions, but they're also quite finicky. They can only be stored for about five days and they have to be sort of stirred around to keep them from going bad. Leaving Jam Joel, Rubin on New Kitchen surface for five days zero. Gross stuff. So part of the reason he's trying to figure out how to manufacture them in the lab in vitro is because platelets are usually in the shortest supply because they have that shorter shelf life and when you say in vitro, you mean basically in a petri dish. Yep, that's right. That's in vitro. Got It.

HIV Dr George Daily Nineteen Eighty Producer Dr. Cedric Aids Harvard Medical School Nora Rubin Cambridge University Joel
Evofem To Launch On-Demand Contraceptive

Breaking Biotech

05:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Evofem To Launch On-Demand Contraceptive

"Today we're GonNa talk about a company that is trying to commercialize a female contraceptive and the company's called Yvo FEM and their product is called sexy and it's going to be launched actually in the next few days. So I wanNA talk about them as the main story, and then we're going to start with some updates from Gilead O'Donnell as well as bio Merrin and actually we got some news from Amarin today that I'm GonNa touch on just very very briefly because I haven't. Totally incorporated it into my portfolio yet, but we did see some dramatic news from them. So with that, let's get going and the first thing I want to talk about is the Gilead, news that we heard and what we found out is that they were issued a complete response letter for the approval of Phil God's Nib, which was their treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. So, this is a bit of a surprise I would say and Phil God was going to be something that replaces revenue streams that are slowly starting to fall off a patent for Gilliat and they're gonNA start to feel that in the form of loss of revenue and forgotten it was kind of shoe into get approved by the FDA issued them this complete response letter saying that they will not approve the drug unless certain conditions are met and usually when companies receive Sierra L. either it's unconditional in the sense that they don't have any recourse or it has conditions on it and hear what we. Found out that the FDA wanted more data from their face, three Manta and Manta Ray studies before completing its reviewed, the NBA and they're specifically concerned about issues in male sex organs. So Gilead is going to have to provide this data, the FDA before they will approve it, and it looks like from what I looked very briefly on the clinical trials dot Gov site is that the primary completion date isn't until early twenty, twenty one where they final completion date of twenty, twenty four. Now Juliette is pre savvy. So I feel like they'll be able to eventually overcome these hurdles once they provide some data. So I. don't see it being long long-term hindrance of the company, but we've seen the stock get hammered pretty hard since the glory days of remedy severe and in general has been kind of slow to adopt new therapies to their pipeline in order to maintain that growth that people expect. So hopefully, with the approval of Fil gone, they'll be able to replace those drugs that are falling off of patent and be able to maintain their value that way. But personally no position for me from Gilead but I thought it was interesting to point this APP. Nasr Company. I WanNa talk about is by Merrin, and they are trading at a fourteen billion dollar market cap now, and they were also issued a complete response letter for Rock Avian and this was their hemophilia, a gene therapy and I've touched on Hemophilia A and. A number of different videos but I haven't touched the topic in a while. I did notice the CRO though and it's interesting because the conditions that the FDA wanted in order to approve the drug was evidence from two years of data for its ongoing phase three trial to support the durability of the gene therapy. So this is obviously kind of rough for the company because the bar is rarely set this high for other companies that two year window of therapy is going to be maintained. This has me questioning the gene therapy space as a whole that you know other companies that have invested in say route Jenex bio if they're going to have to show two years of data to show that it is a Gerbil effect, this obviously plays into the models and delays the time at which it's GonNa take for them to get revenue. So kind of. makes. Me Nervous about the gene therapy space but you know different diseases seem to have different thresholds for what the FDA wants and it's tough to predict. So thought it was worth bringing up and just for those who are actually following by man, their last phase three patient will complete two years of follow up in November twenty, twenty, one, serve you're expecting revenue from this drug. Now you're GonNa have to wait until twenty, twenty two proudly see any revenue. So that's a disappointment even though the drug does help us significant number of patients. All right. Moving on I WANNA touch on otani therapeutics ticker symbol od T, and they're trading now at around five hundred, seventy, four, million dollar market cap for those that don't remember I, touched on this a while ago they were short candidate that I had once I seemed like they had a run up in the stock for no obvious reason, and then I sold it off in anticipation of run up to this event that we just saw news to, and they're commercializing a tax seen that is given orally. So right now has to be given IV in a lot of complications surrounding that a lot of hurdles that patients he'd go through to get this. Treatment and it's Kinda tedious. So if he can come up with an oral version, it would be much better for patients and that's what Oh Donald Trump do here. So what we heard is that their face three contessa trial achieved primary endpoint and what they were looking at is test attacks will their drug plus bean compared to just capital being alone, and the results showed that the progression free survival was significantly better in the tax will plus Kapustin group rather than just cap aside to being alone nine point eight months versus six point nine months with a hazard ratio of zero point seven to just pretty good and value point zero, zero three.

FDA Nasr Company Phil God Gilead O'donnell Merrin Donald Trump Amarin Manta Ray NBA Juliette FIL Kapustin Group Gilliat
A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

Sounds of Science

04:43 min | 3 weeks ago

A Look At The Building Blocks Of Stem Cells

"From mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Charles River Saffron Walden Mariangela Founder Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
Building the Building Blocks of Life

Sounds of Science

04:48 min | 3 weeks ago

Building the Building Blocks of Life

"I'm Mary Parker and welcome to this episode of Eureka Sounds of science from mouse models in one, thousand, nine, hundred, one to cloning Dolly the sheep to a couple of Nobel prizes. Stem cells have had an exciting half-century. But rearranging the building blocks of life is not easy and more importantly for patients not fast. However, newcomers on the market are ready to change the stem cell programming for the quicker. Joining me today are Mariangela, I o Vino Group leader integrated biology at Charles River Saffron Walden site and Mark Qatar. The founder of the cellular reprogramming startup bit bio. The are here to discuss the innovative technology created by mark and his associates and how it can be exploited by end users like Mariangela welcome Mariangela. Thank you welcome to Beautiful Safran. World. Nice, weather? Yeah. Not Bad. So can we start at the beginning? What are stem cells briefly? So stemmed has really the origin of any complex organism. Their form pretty much after an expert. And role is ready to reproduce all the cells. In the body of a human or or an animal. And the cool thing though is that Yamanaka in two thousand seven showed that one doesn't have to fertilized egg to produce stem cells. You can also produce them synthetically using salary programming, and that really has opened up the use of stem cells for drug discovery and can locations. Cool. All right. What practical uses do stem cells have for drug developers? I think that the DAW to using human cells in drug development this is really important because there's a huge translation gap at the moment between. The animal models and cell lines that are traditionally used right and. The high failure rates that you see in clinical trials. Yeah. Totally the boiled on to two things I drugs because they're toxic to human or because they don't work the human setting and so at the center of all this differences between the species used for drug development at us as the end uses. So you're saying is that the stem cells can be made from human cells and that way they're tested on human cells instead of a different species. That's exactly right. Okay. That makes sense. So how were stem cells traditionally used to create sells like brain cells? So the traditional paradigm was to try and repeat what happens during development when embryo grows in Utah and so researchers for the last twenty years or so tried to. Create protocols that expose cells to extra Selah cues, molecules that exist in the growing embryo and instruct them direct them towards particular cell fates. One of the problems that you have if you repeat this paradigm, of course, you're bought into the timelines of of Embryo Genesis, which basically means it often takes sixteen hundred days plus to generate human sale. and. The other problem that you have when you adopt this, this method is that you have to overcome the diversity that nature requires to create cells. So the worst thing that can happen during development is if a lineage, an organ or a cell type isn't produced raced. And Soak Nature seems to. Prevent. This using. CASSIE principles. So these cells make cell fate choices all along the way. If you think about a protocol that takes sixty one, hundred days with multiple steps were cells make these choices than you end up with inconsistencies. So inconsistency and longtime nine's really the biggest bottleneck introduced new Simpson about. So it's basically I, mean if we're trying to imitate nature nature is trying to make all of the organs we may be only want brain. So using nature's methods is a little bit tricky. So I would say if you wanted to produce a particular cell type, it's very tricky. In terms of producing elements of an organ. It's probably slightly less tricky although you still have the inconsistency question right and then this new paradigm called cell reprogramming. Which is essentially. An expansion or reverse engineering of Yamanaka reprogramming. Provides an alternative route so you can now very efficiently in very quickly. Produce. Human cells using. Synthetic biology paradigm

Mark Qatar Mary Parker Charles River Saffron Walden Founder Mariangela Beautiful Safran Yamanaka Vino Group Utah Selah Simpson
After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

The Bio Report

04:55 min | Last month

After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

"Joining US pleasure beer. We're GONNA talk about far next. It's unique approach to drug discovery and its efforts to develop a therapy for the rare degenerative nerve condition shark Marie Tooth Syndrome. A let's start with the company's platform technology though and its efforts to discover what it terms, his cleo therapies what's meant by the term cleo therapy. Therapy. Comes from the idea of field tropic meaning that that there are often multiple pathways for any drug to follow. In fact that most drugs don't act on a single target but rather act on multiple targets. So for example, we all know that you know aspirin can treat a headache, but it also can. You know prevent clotting by. Platelets from forming clusters that. Eight including so. Many many approved medicine have multiple pathways, and the concept here for us is that diseases are not. Just single genetic kits that that that does exist. But often I'm diseases are the result of an imbalance between multiple pathways and insofar as multiple drugs acting on multiple pathways can correct that that's been the goal of far next our work we call it also polly pharmacology. This is a data intense platform uses a I. How exactly does it work and what's the range of data that draws upon? Well it starts with essential genetic data or G wash data. and. What we aim to do is look at a specific disease and look at the genetic lesions if you will within that disease and then all the pathways that are affected. When there is a genetic lesion liken charcoal, Mary Tooth, and then by looking at all those pathways, we can figure out which drugs or which molecules might interact with those pathways in start to put them together in combinations insofar as the combinations provide. A novel and non obvious exciting results that are true synergies. Synergies meaning that the result is greater than the sum of of each response and we do that with a lot of data. It's a lot of data inputs in a lot of a inputs and a lot of experience in pharmacology by our experts. Working at for next on our teams in. So with a multitude of approaches knowing that the output are combination medicines as opposed to single medicines, we've been able to achieve I think some some remarkable results. The company is focused on using this platform as a way of repurposing combinations of existing therapies. What's the case for doing this from a time cost speed on view? We in the past have I'm combined existing medicines although I would say going forward in the future we'll probably. Use a novel molecules are new chemical entities, so-called ease as the combinations of new medicines. It does afford when you're using existing medicines and much more efficient process however, simply because these medicines are already safe and well tolerated in so you can put them into clinical trials right away in advanced trials and get towards the FDA, an approval usually much faster than starting with a lot of the toxicology work that you have to do. With new new molecule. So it has been for us an inefficient process generally should be inefficient process, but most importantly, it should bring new medicines to patients and caregivers that they haven't seen before. You're focused on neurological conditions. This is an area where there's been great frustration. diseases have been somewhat intractable I. Think of what's happened in the area of cancer in terms of the use of combination therapies is that part of the rationale here that combination therapies are what's going to be needed to address diseases like Alzheimer's on Ls? Right in in diseases like Alzheimer's for example, you know there may be one or two or three. Causative factors but ultimately, it causes a significant imbalance in the brain and rather than addressing the first domino, which is still a huge debate in many companies in among many scientists, we often think maybe by making combination medicines, you can address a lot of the more downstream. Activities. That have resulted in the balancing that could be readjusted. So so as we can make a better new equilibrium with that new equilibrium, hopefully modified disease as we've done. Well. Let's talk about.

Alzheimer Marie Tooth United States Mary Tooth Aspirin FDA Headache
After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

The Bio Report

04:50 min | Last month

After FDA Set Back, AI Driven Drug Company Advances with New CEO

"GONNA talk about far next. It's unique approach to drug discovery and its efforts to develop a therapy for the rare degenerative nerve condition shark Marie Tooth Syndrome. A let's start with the company's platform technology though and its efforts to discover what it terms, his cleo therapies what's meant by the term cleo therapy. Therapy. Comes from the idea of field tropic meaning that that there are often multiple pathways for any drug to follow. In fact that most drugs don't act on a single target but rather act on multiple targets. So for example, we all know that you know aspirin can treat a headache, but it also can. You know prevent clotting by. Platelets from forming clusters that. Eight including so. Many many approved medicine have multiple pathways, and the concept here for us is that diseases are not. Just single genetic kits that that that does exist. But often I'm diseases are the result of an imbalance between multiple pathways and insofar as multiple drugs acting on multiple pathways can correct that that's been the goal of far next our work we call it also polly pharmacology. This is a data intense platform uses a I. How exactly does it work and what's the range of data that draws upon? Well it starts with essential genetic data or G wash data. and. What we aim to do is look at a specific disease and look at the genetic lesions if you will within that disease and then all the pathways that are affected. When there is a genetic lesion liken charcoal, Mary Tooth, and then by looking at all those pathways, we can figure out which drugs or which molecules might interact with those pathways in start to put them together in combinations insofar as the combinations provide. A novel and non obvious exciting results that are true synergies. Synergies meaning that the result is greater than the sum of of each response and we do that with a lot of data. It's a lot of data inputs in a lot of a inputs and a lot of experience in pharmacology by our experts. Working at for next on our teams in. So with a multitude of approaches knowing that the output are combination medicines as opposed to single medicines, we've been able to achieve I think some some remarkable results. The company is focused on using this platform as a way of repurposing combinations of existing therapies. What's the case for doing this from a time cost speed on view? We in the past have I'm combined existing medicines although I would say going forward in the future we'll probably. Use a novel molecules are new chemical entities, so-called ease as the combinations of new medicines. It does afford when you're using existing medicines and much more efficient process however, simply because these medicines are already safe and well tolerated in so you can put them into clinical trials right away in advanced trials and get towards the FDA, an approval usually much faster than starting with a lot of the toxicology work that you have to do. With new new molecule. So it has been for us an inefficient process generally should be inefficient process, but most importantly, it should bring new medicines to patients and caregivers that they haven't seen before. You're focused on neurological conditions. This is an area where there's been great frustration. diseases have been somewhat intractable I. Think of what's happened in the area of cancer in terms of the use of combination therapies is that part of the rationale here that combination therapies are what's going to be needed to address diseases like Alzheimer's on Ls? Right in in diseases like Alzheimer's for example, you know there may be one or two or three. Causative factors but ultimately, it causes a significant imbalance in the brain and rather than addressing the first domino, which is still a huge debate in many companies in among many scientists, we often think maybe by making combination medicines, you can address a lot of the more downstream. Activities. That have resulted in the balancing that could be readjusted. So so as we can make a better new equilibrium with that new equilibrium, hopefully modified disease as we've done.

Alzheimer Marie Tooth Mary Tooth Aspirin FDA Headache
The Injustices of AI

Science Friction

04:55 min | Last month

The Injustices of AI

"You are about to meet to Gutsy. multi-award-winning film directors with stories that connecting contrast to incredible confronting crucial films where artificial intelligence is being used in the service of good bad and possibly plein rotten. Lucia terrorism. Sleeve those. WHO ITS MUSCLE IS INSERTED GAVE David France director of the documentary. Welcome to Chechnya went underground to document the current persecution imprisonment, torture murder of lgbt people in Chechnya and the. Going rescue mission to get them out to safety. Kid Dot as facial recognition mis identification, and then you start. To search, this is an innocent child. System is becoming mechanized shall nation Thanh Director of coded bias documents the rise of this called Algorithm, ick Justice League. There are fledgling movement with this mission to rescue us from the insidious crepe of biased computer algorithms into pretty much every aspect of our lives. Now, they films both feature at this year's Melbourne International Film Festival and they join me from a Balmy summer in New York. City thank you for having us. Absolutely thanks for having us the injustices in these films. Real and raw and happening in the world right now, and there's this. Shopping, and shocking sense of urgency in both of these films for both of us. Why are these films that you were compelled to make? Now what drove you to these stories David? This is a story about an ongoing genocidal program in the southern Russian republic of Chechnya a conflict which we were all informed about in a series of articles published in a newspaper. In Russia back in two thousand, seventeen, it produce headlines around the globe. It was a horrifying revelation of a campaign to round up and eliminate all lgbtq people living in the. Chechen republic it generated our government leaders around the world were outraged by it and demanded justice. But the story immediately fell from headlines and what I discovered some months later was that it the the crimes themselves had not stopped. And in fact that ordinary Russians were responding to this in really heroic ways I spent eighteen months embedded in his underground network this underground railroad of people who were actually physically rescuing individuals from. Hiding them. Tending to their physical wounds in their psychological ones and trying to get them out of Chechnya if and to relative safety and other parts of the world the access you got. WAS INCREDIBLE THE TRUST In Janet easing credible Shalini what about you boss is this absolutely riveting vital interrogation of the wine which machine learning algorithms are effectively shaping lives in the most potent and yet most secret ways. Why will you compelled to make this film? Well, I think all of my work deals with how disruptive technology makes the world lesser more fair. And when I stumbled upon the work of joy Leney and Cathy O'Neil the author weapons of mass destruction I sort of stumbled down the rabbit hole of the dark side of big tack and came to realize quite shockingly. that. You know these computer systems that we give our implicit trust to and entrust with such decisions like who gets hired, who gets health care how long a prison sentence on someone may serve. have. Not Been often vetted for accuracy or for racial or gender bias, and that comes across in the making of this still where. Joy Leney is just trying to make something like a snap chat filter were right? And put a mask on her face and stumbles upon the fact that commercially available facial recognition doesn't see dark faces are women accurately she's

Chechnya Joy Leney David France Thanh Director Melbourne International Film F Ick Justice League Director Russia Chechen Murder New York Cathy O'neil Janet Shalini
Space Crops

Innovation Now

01:02 min | Last month

Space Crops

"The space crop production lab at NASA Kennedy Space Center is a web of research labs equipped with plant growth chambers of all sizes designed to simulate conditions on the International Space Station in these labs teams of researchers apply chemistry, biology, microbiology, and engineering to find the best ways to make plants grow in space. The passive poorest plant nutrient system is one of the latest food production technologies developed in the NASA lab this system. Uses a ceramic poorest tube and water nutrient bags connected in a loop to feed plants. Nutrients are pumped in through a combination of capillary force and the same evapotranspiration process that moves water in plants on earth with no moving parts and requiring no electricity. The apparatus is simple to assemble and fully autonomous minimizing the amount of time astronaut farmers would need to spend tending their

Nasa Kennedy Space Center International Space Station Nasa
A Gamified Therapy System Helps People with Brain Injury Recover

The Bio Report

08:05 min | Last month

A Gamified Therapy System Helps People with Brain Injury Recover

"John, thanks for joining us. It's a pleasure to be here. We're going to talk about mine motion, Go Neuro Rehabilitation and gamification complain improving outcomes for patients. Let's start with my motion. Go itself Oh. What exactly is it? Right. So Go is is one of the platforms produced by mine maze and it was specifically designed to be asked of technological advances in assist to physical therapists. That's the way to think about it. and it is as you say, a game of five platform. Which? allows. Patients to interrupt with therapists virus set of games on a screen. which are than the movements picked up by a camera has been used mostly is in the connect camera you know that probably from. Microsoft and so essentially, you should see it as. A camera picking up the movement to the patient while they play games projected onto the screen. With the computer present as well. So the therapists can program the game's changed at levels watch the patient play and record their movements for subsequent analysis for follow up. How how does it work? What's what is the patient due to use this? So the the patient will stand. In front or sit in front of a screen that movements we picked up by a camera. And then there's twenty seven games that they can pick from usually picked by the therapist and those games will Consists of games for the upper body lower body. And basically the standard. Movements and strategies therapist of used for time immemorial have now been turned into a quantifiable game old form. That the patient COMPLA- so for example, the patient and be a little octopus which is on the screen in a water channel, and then they can crouch up and down and up and down crouching movement they make will lead to a thrust of illegal octopus as it goes up the water channel, for example. So it's essentially bringing gamification quantification and standardization. Onto the repertoire of treatments at therapists have always had. And from a neurological point of view what's happening to someone who's using it? Well, I think it's very important. To sort of take a step back and you should ask that question what's happening to a patient when they're getting regular therapy right and you know we feel like what is happening during regular therapy is a patience on learning. To use what they have left after the damage to optimize their movements and retrain and what this game is doing is upping the efficiency. Of that approach. So I think the way to think about. Is. For example, you know you lose your right arm, you learn how to write with your left arm that's called compensation. Now. Think about doing that within the arm, just getting better with what you have left and so it's kind of motor learning. That, this platform encouraging. In patients and they also probably do a little bit more than motor aligning depending on when they get this treatment, you get it very early off a stroke you can actually probably get reversal of your deficit. And this allows you to practice in that setting as well. But see it as a kind of training device. For Motor learning off brain injury what are the range of conditions it's intended to treat? I think to the degree that therapists around the world are fairly generalized and who they look after, and there's a considerable lap in the set of movements and techniques that they use that this platform although has been specifically designed as a neurological platform and with originally devised for patients after stroke that means Article Jane, it be used in spinal cord injury brain injury And probably extend into other conditions, Multiple Sclerosis Parkinson's disease and at Hopkins it's being used. For Orthopedics and may be used, the cardiac patients sets quite general in so much that therapists are used to treating many different kinds of patients to surgery after injury. So I think quite general.

Microsoft John Jane Parkinson Hopkins
Genentech Drug Offers Oral, at-Home Option for SMA Patients

The Bio Report

04:35 min | Last month

Genentech Drug Offers Oral, at-Home Option for SMA Patients

"Levi thanks for joining us. Danny. Thank you for having me. We're GONNA talk about spinal muscular atrophy, the recent approval of Genentech's every, and which is the first oral at home therapy and what this means for patients with the condition. Let's start with spinal muscular atrophy few though what is it? Absolutely, and Danny really appreciate the opportunity to talk to you about this spinal muscular atrophy. The use S. M. A. for Short it's a neuro muscular disease is actually quite severe and progressive. In fact, it's the leading genetic causes of infant mortality and so ESA affects approximately one in ten thousand babies. So this disease is caused by a mutation in a gene called S. M. in one, it means survival motor neuron one. So it's a mouthful, but that mutation causes a deficiency of the protein the. Protein, and this is a problem because that protein is required for the proper function of nerves that control our muscles there for our movement. So without proper s him in protein function, those nerve cells, they don't they don't work well, and eventually they can become lost over time and that leads to progressive muscle weakness and as you might imagine in the fall, time. That that weakness will affect someone's ability to move their limbs to eat the breathe on the round and depending on the severity. Some people may eventually require constant caregiver support for daily activities even simple as getting dressed, brushing their teeth going to the bathroom, etc. So overall people with FEMA, they lose their ability to perform critical muscle movements and that that can often impact their ability to participate independently. And Activities of daily living and may become debilitating. We've seen new treatments. Merge for patients with us. What's the prognosis for Well. So certainly as I mentioned earlier. May remains a severe progressive disease. It can be fatal in fact, and yes, there have been recent advances but despite those advancements, the majority of people in the US with FEMA. So let's say sixty percent or so still aren't treated at all and so therefore they're they're has remained a need for continued innovation for new therapies. And and so. As I mentioned throughout their lives, you still have this progressive ability potentially to lose. Critical movements and So that's why we're excited about Israel as wristy, which we think it's first of a kind mechanism. It's at home delivery is oral dosing. All those things represented important advancements, an treatment options. For patients with? And how does wristy work? So as I mentioned everybody, it's the first at home treatment for Esa May to be FDA approved. It's actually approved for for adults as well as children who are two months of age or older, and the way that it works. The technical term is it's called a splicing modifier. So I'd describe the the SEM in protein. and. I mentioned that the primary problem for patients with SA is a mutation in gene called SM IN ONE It turns out that so they've lost. The a function, but there's a there's a second gene called sm into that can make a related former the protein but but most of that pro team, it's not it doesn't come together properly. So it can't it can't rescue a can't serve the purpose of estimating one. But what frizzy does is it causes a specific form of the SIM in to function to be expressed with actually can rescue can substitute for estimate. So you now have what we what we call a functional rescue. You have a different variation of estimate protein that can do the job that the men one protein was opposed to do, and so if you do that, if you can increase the level of that of version of in two in nerve cells and other cells in the body,

Spinal Muscular Atrophy Muscle Weakness Fema Danny S. M. Levi Genentech ESA United States S. M. A. FDA Israel SA
Companies test antibody drugs to treat, prevent COVID-19

WBZ Afternoon News

00:35 sec | Last month

Companies test antibody drugs to treat, prevent COVID-19

"Vaccine could still be months away. Now there's word, a drug companies a Russian to test what could be the next best thing. Antibody drugs that fight the virus immediately, the last maybe a month or so, but they could give some quick temporary immunity to those in high risk groups, such as nursing home workers in front line employees. University of North Carolina virologist Dr Myron Cohen says he thinks antibody drugs could be ready in the near term. We can generate them in large concentration in big vets. In a anybody factory. We could give the antibodies directly. There's

Dr Myron Cohen University Of North Carolina
Prions And Infectious Proteins

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:11 min | Last month

Prions And Infectious Proteins

"So today's topic is one I've wanted to address for a long time. It's the topic of Priante, a fascinating area of infectious particles that aren't. Alive, it's not it's not viruses or bacteria or or fungus, and in the days of cove it if you really wanted something else to have to worry about him. Here we go. Here's Priante and fascinating topic that has some very interesting routes and potentially some application to a number of important neurological diseases. So we'll say we're speaking with Dr Cassandra Teri. She's a reader in protein pathology at the London Metropolitan University in London so welcome to the podcast Dr Terry. Thank. You Kevin thanks for having me on. Yeah. This is really really good. I really appreciate you. Taking the time to meet with us because this is a topic that I think has. Just, so captivating. And we really need to start with the basics and there's a disease called Kuru. What is Kuru? and. Why is it important for us to understand pre-owned related disease? Okay. Yes. So curry is a really really interesting disease and. is. A disease that was found the tribes of people in. New Guinea. Um. What you what they used to do as part of that culture is when members family members of their tribe. Would die What they would do is they would actually. Senator. Eat parts of the of the of the person that had dead deceased. And And you know many years later when scientists looking into this, what happened was a lot of people down with this strange Strange symptoms the couldn't really work out why so many people within these tribes were getting these symptoms. So. When scientists eventually looked into it to try work out what was going on and they bend discovered the doing this practice this rich listrik cannibalism I'm what happened was essentially. A parts of the body such as. The central nervous system in the brain were eaten. By members of the tribe and those people who you know these parts of the brain. A parts of their body that were essentially infected with prions they got passed on to people who eat within the tribe. So essentially, what's happening is People within this community came down with the same disease Kuru. So it was it's been directly linked to the fact that. Members of this tribe were essentially add contracting this disease by ingesting m other m humans who had this these prions essentially I mean it's a fascinating disease unluckily this. The which list cannibalism has now been banned, it's not been stopped and there's been no more cases of crew and but it from a scientific point of view. It's very interesting to to see the actually this was one of the first reported cases of a transmission of a disease from humans to other humans. So this is why it's really Important to understand Karoo and from a scientific point of view because it shows prions can be transmitted. From humans to other humans. Now, you say, you say prey on and I've always said Priante and I've taken classes where said preempt is this like a tomato tomato thing like a UK okay. I try on other people, call them Priante if complete. Other. Correct pronunciations. Prions you can call them preowneds his. Just wanted to make sure I. got it right because you don't want to talk to a world expert and get it wrong. So that's a by. Could you tell us more about what is a PRI- on? So. They are essentially transmissible at infectious proteins. So they all proteins which are found within your body. And what they do is they can convert into a abnormally folded form of of the protein. And they can actually be transmitted. To species on cools disease essentially an infectious protein possible. It's really interesting stuff. So so you say they're naturally found in the body what is their role in the central nervous system? This is this is really important questions so. Obviously, lots of people, lots of scientists have tried to look at what it actually meant to be doing when they're not on the disease state, and actually if you look at mouse models, if you knock this protein out this off pc prion protein, if you knock your towels in mouse models. Mice. Absolutely. Fine. So exactly what it's doing in the body is not entirely clear. So there's lots of different theories are what it could be doing, but to this day was still not entirely sure what the prion protein does when it's not causing disease.

Dr Cassandra Teri Priante Dr Terry London Metropolitan University London Senator Curry Karoo New Guinea Kevin UK
Enabling Precision Medicine through Proteomics

The Bio Report

06:19 min | Last month

Enabling Precision Medicine through Proteomics

"Lodge again and the ability to run a test of five thousand proteins in the blood to gain new insights into health and disease. I WanNa talk about two specific areas that you're working in. But before we do that perhaps we can begin with why someone would wanNA sample five, thousand proteins once we think of looking for a specific protein that's a biomarker for z's but what's the benefit of looking at this whole realm of proteins? Sure well, and that's that's really the. The crux of of what's different about what we do here at some logic. On on this developing diagnostic side and that is that We've known for a long time that. Proteins would be the best information source for. Human biology in potentially to predict things about conditions and disease but. The problem has been measuring enough proteins at any one time to get what I would call. A full-body. Signal. If you think about the comparator here is believed that since we can measure all genes in the human body that. The doing genyk risk assessment looking at expression of all these genes may give us an information. That someone's risk for things we can come back to that later turns out that approach is not as good as we would hoped, it would be. And the reason it's not as good as we'd hoped, it would be is because jeans aren't dynamic they don't change over time that will change with age and changed with. Your your genome is the same at age twenty five is it is at age forty, five and sixty five. John doesn't change when you're sick or changing you take drugs but all of those things. Change with your were there proteome But the problem has been, you know measuring enough proteins at any one time to get sort of a full body signal. Rather than measuring one protein at a time and then trying to correlate that some disease process the second problem is been. Gosh even if we could measure thousands of proteins at a time. How would we be able to make any sense out of it? In so The thing that's just happened to occur and that some logic happens to be the. You know at the at the leading edge of is we figured out a way to measure thousands of proteins at a time rather than hundreds of what almost everybody else in the world does. In sort of clinical commercial context and then we. have been able to to use machine learning. To look at those patterns of protein expression of those thousands of proteins correlate them to. Thinks that you really WanNa know about. What exactly does your some scan platform do and and how does it work? Yeah. So To sort of back up into the technology itself what? What are found discover thirty thirty years ago is that You can actually take little pieces of nucleic acid a DNA. In, in in solution. So when they're in you know the body's liquid format. These little pieces of DNA will fold into three. D. confirmational shapes. And he knew in his research group thirty years ago that. Are, which is very similar to DNA in sales actually does this it folds into confirmational shapes and moves proteins around in cells in has important roles. So this question was, why can't we just make a library of millions of different? Little pieces of DNA and select the ones out by dentist their shape would bind to the shape of a protein people thought it was crazy and so. In in in these little pieces, of DNA, Short, they're not jeans or slow random sequences of nucleic acid. Are called OPTIMA. and. So he was the CO founder of the. Science thirty years ago. In what we do is we've developed a library of thousands of these little pieces of DNA. We've modified them to make them buying the pre-teens even more. Specifically, reliably in because of that, if you will, we sort of engineered. Of Synthetic. Antibodies that can recognize proteins, but they're not antibodies pieces denying. In the asset that we do. We expose the body fluid to these thousands of of afterwards we call ourselves immersed because they've been modified to work even better. And so we just happen to have currently five thousand different of these different uniform these by the end of the sheer will have seventy, five hundred. You're pretty own has about twenty thousand canonical when I say canonical basic protein structures. But again, until we came along, you can only measure a few hundred time. So we expose a body fluid to you know a solution full of these. Summers that they bind proteins the we throw the unbound protein away. In the unbound optimus away or the summers away. We then or left with these little pieces in click acid bound to proteins. We then throw the proteins away. And we measure the. DNA. They're. Using we use an array. where an array were, you know you've got a complementary sequence printed on the slide and If you can identify whether or not that sequence was there in your specimen that gets when it. Binds to the slide at lights up. You can also do this Sunday called next generation sequencing but what we do we turn. Protein measurement into DNA measurement, and that's sort of the magic. As far as the tests themselves that are derived from this. The magic, there is actually a what's best described as is pattern recognition. And so the way to think about the way the test works. So give me your blood sample, we run it a we we expose it to our some immerse. We should out what proteins in that sample in how much we can do both relative to one another, and they'll. So now we have this pattern of protein expression in your blood for thousands of proteins. We've run this acid several hundred thousand

Z Summers Co Founder Optima. Short
Enabling Precision Medicine through Proteomics

The Bio Report

06:01 min | Last month

Enabling Precision Medicine through Proteomics

"Some lodge again and the ability to run a test of five thousand proteins in the blood to gain new insights into health and disease. I WanNa talk about two specific areas that you're working in. But before we do that perhaps we can begin with why someone would wanNA sample five, thousand proteins once we think of looking for a specific protein that's a biomarker for z's but what's the benefit of looking at this whole realm of proteins? Sure well, and that's that's really the. The crux of of what's different about what we do here at some logic. On on this developing diagnostic side and that is that We've known for a long time that. Proteins would be the best information source for. Human biology in potentially to predict things about conditions and disease but. The problem has been measuring enough proteins at any one time to get what I would call. A full-body. Signal. If you think about the comparator here is believed that since we can measure all genes in the human body that. The doing genyk risk assessment looking at expression of all these genes may give us an information. That someone's risk for things we can come back to that later turns out that approach is not as good as we would hoped, it would be. And the reason it's not as good as we'd hoped, it would be is because jeans aren't dynamic they don't change over time that will change with age and changed with. Your your genome is the same at age twenty five is it is at age forty, five and sixty five. John doesn't change when you're sick or changing you take drugs but all of those things. Change with your were there proteome But the problem has been, you know measuring enough proteins at any one time to get sort of a full body signal. Rather than measuring one protein at a time and then trying to correlate that some disease process the second problem is been. Gosh even if we could measure thousands of proteins at a time. How would we be able to make any sense out of it? In so The thing that's just happened to occur and that some logic happens to be the. You know at the at the leading edge of is we figured out a way to measure thousands of proteins at a time rather than hundreds of what almost everybody else in the world does. In sort of clinical commercial context and then we. have been able to to use machine learning. To look at those patterns of protein expression of those thousands of proteins correlate them to. Thinks that you really WanNa know about. What exactly does your some scan platform do and and how does it work? Yeah. So To sort of back up into the technology itself what? What are found discover thirty thirty years ago is that You can actually take little pieces of nucleic acid a DNA. In, in in solution. So when they're in you know the body's liquid format. These little pieces of DNA will fold into three. D. confirmational shapes. And he knew in his research group thirty years ago that. Are, which is very similar to DNA in sales actually does this it folds into confirmational shapes and moves proteins around in cells in has important roles. So this question was, why can't we just make a library of millions of different? Little pieces of DNA and select the ones out by dentist their shape would bind to the shape of a protein people thought it was crazy and so. In in in these little pieces, of DNA, Short, they're not jeans or slow random sequences of nucleic acid. Are called OPTIMA. and. So he was the CO founder of the. Science thirty years ago. In what we do is we've developed a library of thousands of these little pieces of DNA. We've modified them to make them buying the pre-teens even more. Specifically, reliably in because of that, if you will, we sort of engineered. Of Synthetic. Antibodies that can recognize proteins, but they're not antibodies pieces denying. In the asset that we do. We expose the body fluid to these thousands of of afterwards we call ourselves immersed because they've been modified to work even better. And so we just happen to have currently five thousand different of these different uniform these by the end of the sheer will have seventy, five hundred. You're pretty own has about twenty thousand canonical when I say canonical basic protein structures. But again, until we came along, you can only measure a few hundred time. So we expose a body fluid to you know a solution full of these. Summers that they bind proteins the we throw the unbound protein away. In the unbound optimus away or the summers away. We then or left with these little pieces in click acid bound to proteins. We then throw the proteins away. And we measure the. DNA. They're. Using we use an array. where an array were, you know you've got a complementary sequence printed on the slide and If you can identify whether or not that sequence was there in your specimen that gets when it. Binds to the slide at lights up. You can also do this Sunday called next generation sequencing but what we do we turn. Protein measurement into DNA measurement, and that's sort of the magic. As far as the tests themselves that are derived from this. The magic, there is actually a what's best described as is pattern recognition. And so the way to think about the way the test works. So give me your blood sample, we run it a

Z Summers Co Founder Optima. Short
A Pediatricians Guide to COVID-19 and Cellular Resilience with Dr. Elisa Song

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:21 min | Last month

A Pediatricians Guide to COVID-19 and Cellular Resilience with Dr. Elisa Song

"Welcome to the broken marine podcast where we dive deep into the topics of neuro plasticity epigenetics, mindfulness, functional medicine mindset, and more. I'm your host droid and each week my team, and I bring on a new guest who we think can help you improve your brain health feel better and most importantly live more. This week's guest is Dr at Lisa Song Dr. Song is an integrative pediatrician pediatric. Functional Medicine expert and most importantly Amama in integrative pediatric practice whole family wellness she's helped thousands of kids get to the root causes of their health concerns and help their parents understand how to help their children drive both in mind body and spirit Dr Song as taught around the world on integrative pediatrics topics for multiple podcasts in summits including functional medicine Australia Bio Circles, Australia integrative medicine, and mental. Health Institute for Functional Medicine A for 'em and a lot of other really incredible institutions, organizations that the song created healthy kids happy kids in online holistic pediatric resource to help practitioners in bridge the gap between conventional in integrative pediatrics within evidence-based pediatrician backed approach Dr Song Thank you for being here on the broken brain podcast. Thank you for having me. It's an honor to be here with. You and your audience, and I wanNA give you just like a massive dose of gratitude because for so many of my friends I don't have kids, but I want to get educated on his many of these topics as possible not just as a podcast hosts in a community leader because I wanNA learn for myself in the future. This is probably not the last pandemic that will ever go through. Talk about help for Awhile Joe royle knock on wood. But I do want to say that for so many in the community right now you are the voice. Of Reason, you are the voice of really helping people understand what's real what we don't know because there's a lot of what we don't now and you've run so much peace to so many families. So thank you for your incredible work and I know it's a team effort. You know your husband, your kids the whole team over there that's helping out but really utilize. Knowledge you for that. Thank you that means so much to me. Yeah, absolutely, also I want to check in because in addition to use servicing your online community and your patience. Your family you've been very vocal about this has had first-hand experiences with Cova nineteen and we're gonNA talk about that. But I just WANNA check it on a human human level. How're you doing during these times? You know I mean it's crazy times everybody. My son and daughter for those of you who follow me they actually contracted co bid on. I mean really it was about a week after we wanted to quarantine. So we all went to quarantine from school Friday, the thirteenth, and then maybe seven to ten days later my daughter got sick cough fever search you have a little trouble breathing. Thought well, this can't be Kovic she's been in quarantine right? We haven't been in contact anybody in as far as I knew there was nobody at school who had had covid Right, around that time when quarantine was happening, I had a little bit of a sore throat and a headache nothing major but I did my usual kind of functional. Medicine Integrative Medicine dosing that I do and I get sick and I teach families. My husband had something similar but we we were fine then a week after Kenzi got sick she recovered ten days fever cough you know not feeling well little bit alot ish tonight a similar. She got maybe about ninety four, ninety, five percents but that's literally on Day ten. It was like the switch flipped she she bounced back and she was completely like nothing ever happened. A few days later, my son starts to get a fever and I'm like, oh no, it's going on here. Right at the time. Remember early in the days of the pandemic testing was really not available I mean that available. Right so but then even more. So I managed to get a swab and do swab my child, which is not fun experience and the Senate to quest four days later it came back negative. Okay. Maybe she caught something. Weird, right Then when Bodey start to get, he had a fever and stomach ache his tummy was hurting him so much that was his symptom and that in the fever little bit a sore throat and so I thought and even back then the early days remember we we know so much more about covid nineteen than we did back in. February march and remember this is March back in the early days we still have so much word learn right but abdominal pain was kind of maybe a symptom maybe not subdue might. So I'm thinking maybe he's got a stomach flu but in the back of my mind, I, think, okay this has to be Govan. So he he then so developing abdominal pain fever really bad headache a little bit of a cough. He started seeing things and hearing things, which is really frightening He sought a wall. Yeah. He had auditory visual hallucinations. He heard voices in his room. He would see the wall moving in and out and kind of scary people in front of him. Here's H-. You really mean people saying I mean he he said he was embarrassed to tell but really bad words right? Like you know words you wouldn't use in polite conversation and so and then he got a rash on his face and pink guys, right Thank goodness back. Then the really weren't reports of this Kawasaki Like Disease Right. Multi-system. Inflammatory Syndrome associate with children. Because if I had known about this phenomena I think I would even more freaked out than I already was right but his oxygen levels dropping he did go to about eighty eight percent at which time I did bring him to the ER. Now I was low dam up with all the supplements that I had researched. You know for Kobe nineteen both preventatively am for support. Active Illness and I fully one hundred percents. We're GONNA talk about some of the things that I did but that the interventions that I was able to do for him through the through the research really helped him to bounce back very quickly.

Fever Medicine Integrative Medicine Health Institute For Functiona Abdominal Pain Functional Medicine Dr. Song Joe Royle Community Leader Cough Visual Hallucinations Govan Cova Headache Inflammatory Syndrome Kenzi Kobe Illness Senate Bodey