Asian American

Listen to the latest audio content in Asian American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features Asian American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

Why You Should Fill Out Your 2020 Census Today

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Why You Should Fill Out Your 2020 Census Today

"Are Introducing this week is not me telling a story but it's actually A really important issue that we wanted to bring to your attention and to help me do that I have asian-american advancing justices. Demographic Research. Program director. That's a mouthful. June Lim, who's WHO's here to talk about the census. So thanks for being here to do this and for our listeners sake especially those who have yet to fill out the census, they have relatives who haven't filled it out. Why is this census of particular great concern for us. Right. Now, what we see is is a very unfortunate because what we have seen as the administration's attempt to politicize the census s suppress participation ultimately really to shift political representation away from places with large immigrant communities, such as the Asian, American and Native Hawaiian Civic Islander Communities and other communities of color, and Water considered hard to count communities. and what we really want people to know is that regardless of political affiliation or ethnicity everyone needs to be deeply troubled by these attempts to undermine and risk misrepresent data from the census. And the reason is, is that we have so much to lose if people do not participate in the census. Yeah. I mean some states can lose congressional seats I was also reading that there's over a billion dollars in federal funding to over one hundred programs for the next ten years, there's writing on census twenty twenty. It's actually one point five trillion dollars federal funding. Okay. Okay. Okay. I was little off on my decimal point. Wow So, this seems this seems June to fit right in line with our current president and his administration Zena phobic anti immigrant position on. So many policies. Yes. Unfortunately, there's been a lot of anti-immigrant sentiment and fear mongering. In Administration's policies and also like we're really seeing it. Affecting. People's participation in the census. And we understand that because of this for many immigrants both documented and undocumented, there are significant fears about participating in the census. But. We need everyone to know that the constitution mandates that every person living in the United States should be counted in the census regardless of Citizenship Status and that privacy is of utmost importance and that there are strict laws in place to make sure that information is kept confidential. So. That's really important to emphasize right that I think the trump administration is these seeds a fear that yeah. If you fill it out and you're undocumented in particular, like can come get you and that's completely not true. Exactly. There isn't even a question about citizenship status on the census or immigration on the senses. So there is no way using the census data that received from the twenty twenty cents is that that information could be received and regardless of that any information that is like that is received by the census. It doesn't actually leave the census it only can be. Used for statistical this tickle purposes and in like more of a like for statistical purposes in an aggregate form and never by an individual responses. And the Census Bureau They've done something to the due day to right I mean this this. This is one of the reasons why we're doing this special announcement here an encouragement for people to hurry up and fill it out. Can you talk a little bit about what's what's happened? Yeah sure and there's been some new happening since then as well it's it's that ultimately because of everything happening with the pandemic this Census Bureau had to pause some of its. So, the census deadline was actually Extended until October thirty first to make sure that there was enough time for for people to self respond. But also to make sure that the the non response follow up period, which is when enumerators go door to door to take the responses of people who have not yet completed the census can be done in a fair and thorough manner and also taking in mind safety However, that was shortened to be it was to be rushed than leader change to be moved up to. September. Thirtieth. however, right now, there actually was a I think it was A. Temporary. Almost like a restraining order against a restraining order. That's exactly. that. Judge actually did. Accept that. So it is right now there's there's they're actually having a hearing. To See. What the date is going to be, and for now, the Census Bureau has to continue with its operations as planned and that being not necessarily what the short deadline but we we see how that could cause some confusion in the in the community. So really what we want to do is to urge everyone to fill out the census to day job. Because I, it's like we're not sure what the deadline is now because of all the things that are happening because they're so much advocacy taking place for a community. To ensure that we can have an accurate dentists count and really pushing for the October thirty first line However, we don't we don't know if it's going to land there on September thirtieth. So really the messaging we want to put out to our communities is to complete the Senate today.

Census Bureau Native Hawaiian Civic Islander June Lim Program Director United States President Trump Senate Water
They Call Us Mulan

They Call Us Bruce

07:03 min | 2 weeks ago

They Call Us Mulan

"Low, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. It is one which we are going to used to. You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, and that is Disney's live. On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. And we have guests, schools, opinions in some of them our guests We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. Who have with us? Phil? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. Quite possibly a record. Record record. Our good friend formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. Welcome. Thank you. I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. On. Challenged. Bring honor to us all. We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not the last frankie. Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. Chinese about this. Conversation's. Break Welcome, to the show. Thank you for having me. So excited to chat with you about this. Well, the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. The movie itself debuted Friday, and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. The film. You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. The way they perceive this this new one right. Rebecca. What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? This one for you. Yeah. Well, for me, I you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, my whole life, and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. So I think I was sixteen when I came out Even, though I was no longer a small child I, what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. Just swallow emotion. Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. Who I was, you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. Listen. you know and reverence that was so moving. So that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time. And Frankie in you grew up until age nine in China, right? Yeah in Beijing was. Yes. But you but you did also see Milan and I'm atrophies theaters or at home or so I was already living in the US by the time Mulan came out. So I washed it in Missouri were I was in the fifth grade and I think. My first exposure to Mulan the figure was actually when my mother taught me the ballot of Milan and made me memorize recited back to her. So this character was already one of my favorites. You know this cross dressing heroine who bests all the boys that was basically my dream I wanted to. Show everyone how amazing I could be. So you know I wasn't super. I had very mixed feelings about it because even as a ten year old I was you know I had trepidation about whether or not Disney was going to do a good job representing my culture, my country. So but at the same time, of course, I was really proud to see that they chose a Chinese story to bring to the big screen. So when I saw it I think I continue to feel mixed because there were these moments like the one that Rebecca described was incredibly moving but there were also these little things that day I guess. I don't know if I would say they got wrong because you can tell a story a story Harry you want, but it's more like there were very clear league. American narrative elements that were meant to. Get, a reaction out of American audiences. It makes sense but as a Chinese viewer I just thought while if you're going to represent my culture, why don't you get it right? Why don't you think that the? Quote Unquote correct representation can't also get a reaction out of Americans I remember when she dressed up for the matchmaker in the face was all white I just thought well, this reminds me of Geishas much more so than Address up Cheney's lady and maybe geishas is much more recognizable symbol. But why can't you just make her look uncomfortable as? A Chinese woman rather than something that looks more, Japanese. Their stuff like that.

Rebecca Son Rebecca Disney Milan Bruce Frankie China Mulan Jeff Yang Phil Geishas Forbidden City Asia Missouri Beijing Hollywood United States ABC
A conversation about Mulan

They Call Us Bruce

04:35 min | 2 weeks ago

A conversation about Mulan

"Low, and welcome to another edition of they call us Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and I'm Jeff Yang and this will indeed be an unfiltered podcast. It is one which we are going to used to. You know spend talking about something that we've been wanting to talk about for a while waiting to see for awhile, and that is Disney's live. On which released this weekend right before Labor Day and immediately generated quite a lot of opinions some of which we have. And we have guests, schools, opinions in some of them our guests We've seen quite a lot of in somewhere new. Who have with us? Phil? We have making her third appearance on they call US Bruce. Quite possibly a record. Record record. Our good friend formerly journalists of the with the Hollywood reporter most recently, she did a profile of Tima in Vanity Fair. Are Powell Rebecca Son Rebecca. Welcome. Thank you. I'm here to reinforce and ensure that my title as most frequent they call us first guest. On. Challenged. Bring honor to us all. We also have a first timer on the show hopefully, not the last frankie. Hong who is a freelance writer and illustrator and Frankie also grew up until age nine in China and has a pretty solid grasp. I think of some of the larger context around the film both as somebody personally in in more immerse perhaps in Chinese culture than those who grew up here but also just from being able to read and understand the conversations that are going on in. Chinese about this. Conversation's. Break Welcome, to the show. Thank you for having me. So excited to chat with you about this. Well, the conversation has been proceeding Apace has a not I mean literally the show. The movie itself debuted Friday, and I think that's we don't have any metrics yet that feels like a lot of people in have been streaming it despite the way that it's being presented and I mean, maybe that's the first thing to talk about a little bit like. The film. You know how the film has changed over time how it was what was meant to be in where it is now today in this time of Of Covert in quarantine in theaters basically being shot I think I wanted to ask if maybe everybody could share their relationship with the original film because that's that will serve you know color a lot of people's. The way they perceive this this new one right. Rebecca. What was it like watching the original Milan and how did that impact actually shape? This one for you. Yeah. Well, for me, I you know sort of your classic ABC asian-american Crawl one in the bay area you know live here lived in America, my whole life, and so I was I'm looking this up now and I was actually not cured with anime tomatoes teenagers. So I think I was sixteen when I came out Even, though I was no longer a small child I, what I remember most palpably was bursting into tears at the end of the animated film when Milan she's at the Forbidden City and she turns around and it feels like the entire country is kneeling and bowing and Reverend before her and the swell like I remember for years after that, like you know even without we watching the film just thinking about that moment. Just swallow emotion. Kind of being unprepared to see that image of of somebody who representative you know about as exactly. Who I was, you know just a small Chinese girl could be treated with such respect and honor. Listen. you know and reverence that was so moving. So that's what I remember most about you know the animated law and I think the way that made me feel is is sort of what I treasured about that movie even though it was, you know I haven't seen it in such such a long time.

Rebecca Son Rebecca Bruce Milan Phil Disney Jeff Yang Forbidden City Asia China Frankie Representative Hollywood ABC Reporter Hong Writer America
The Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo Review

Books and Boba

04:52 min | 2 weeks ago

The Empress of Salt and Fortune by Nghi Vo Review

"With, the heart of an ad with tail and the visuals of a classic Asian period drama. The empress of salt and fortune is tightly and lushly written narrative about empire storytelling and the anger of women a young royal from the far north sent south for a political marriage alone in sometimes reviled, she has only her servants on her side. This evocative debut chronicles horr- is to power through the eyes of her handmaiden at once feminist high fantasy and a thrilling indictment of monarchy. That's I remember when this book got a buzz. The Library Journal said it was the day of the month buzzfeed said it was A. Pretty much like the fantasy novel of Spring Twenty Twenty. So I was really excited about it plus handmaidens tail and a political drama. Yeah. Sure. That's that sounds like something that I'm really interested in. Yeah. I mean my main thing is. I don't know if the handmaidens hill comparison is that are descriptive of what this story really is because to me, it definitely was a pro woman story, but I don't really know if I got handed until vibes besides the fact that there's like a handmaiden it you know I actually got more of. The handmaiden, the Korean movie. I got more of that five because that movie is It's told multiple multiple perspectives and us the story is not what seems like and you kind of have to like piece together everyone's motives and how their plans and motives like fit together. So it kind of reminded me more of that movie. Yeah, which is also based on a book. It's based on the fingersmith Sarah Waters, which I highly recommend. It's it's great. Yeah. It's also queer, which is you know this book is also very Queer Zaveri Queer friendly story. There is a lot of different characters on all sides of the LGBTQ spectrum I guess we can start with just how the story is set up. So the story is told through I guess, would you call the second person narrative? Is that what this is or now I? It's third person narrative right? Actually it's third person and then when it switches to flashbacks, swin rabbit is telling the story that's first person right so but basically the main character or the protect I mean tonight even protectionist right like the. I guess perspective character. Through the story. The main character is a monk or in this world, a cleric named chief who is coated as a non binary they go by them pronouns and their. Magical. Talking Bird companion who is actually like a supercomputer right? To go there like a bird that can remember an archive everything it sees and hears you know I had to Google what a what a hoopoe was his Like through context clues was like, okay, it's a bird but what this bird? Looks like Google Google. It was I mean right off the bat and we can talk about this later. Now we want but it's this book is Novella it's really short. It's one hundred and twenty eight pages I wanNA say or it's it's less than a hundred pages I'll wet. Okay. So I just checked how many pages it was on kindle. It's one hundred twelve pages. Okay. So even less yeah, and in those short on a pages, it does a ton of world building and I know this is something that you and I have thoughts about. But like to me, I feel like it did a lot of world building through giving really sparse details. Requiring the reader to kind of fill in the blanks. Right off the bat, you have a talking bird which took me a while to figure it was a bird. you have supernatural hungry ghosts. Yeah. And like implied magic in the world to there's allusions to Mejia's and whether magic like we mentioned. So like right off the bat it Kinda throws you into this world that the reader has to figure out what's going on through context lose. Totally independent of the actual narrative because I think even without the like fantastical. Does also stand alone on its own as like A. Story of political intrigue. In. Rebellion Yeah.

Spring Twenty Twenty Google Bird Library Journal Buzzfeed Sarah Waters Mejia Kindle
A Conversation About The Postal Service

They Call Us Bruce

07:04 min | 3 weeks ago

A Conversation About The Postal Service

"Low. Welcome. To another edition of call us, Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I'm Phil You and Jeff Yang and this week on the podcast we have been thinking and talking about doing something for a while and our wishes are finally coming true as if delivered to us. Our. I'm sorry we've come. A Dad jokes attention but we we've been talking a lot about the postal service, not just amongst ourselves but in society right I mean the relevance of the US mail to our society internal democracy has been more prominent now more than the headlines now than ever before, and one of the things that we recognized is that the postal service actually plays a really critical role even. Specifically in our communities and there are. There are a lot of Asian Americans who work at the Post Office The post office connects us are far-flung relatives and friends, and in general we just thought it was time to give a little shine to this institution that. Is taking a few bumps, these days, and so we actually found. A postal. Service employees who was. Happy to talk to us about this profession and about the stories and. The world behind the scenes at the post. Office. As, well, as other things going on his life as well. So we love to welcome to they call us Bruce Kevin Again UN. He is a musician and multimedia. A graphic designer, a fan of A. Pretty Amazing Music. I can tell social platforms and also a employee of the PS Kevin Welcome to the show. Hi. Welcome guys. Ola. So Kevin you're in Oakland right. Yeah. I wouldn't opened. And did you reborn in scripture? I was actually born in southern California and. Always, knew that I would end up in the bay area. So sometime around two thousand and two, thousand five moved up here. And I found myself. Here. To sort of blend in. Oh Yeah Oh. Yeah. And and you say you're from southern California originally like a like Los Angeles or or. Montebello okay. And now A. End, up actually working for the postal service. Honestly. I was laid off in rather time the pandemic. was. Gaining momentum. and. I was desperately looking for work and I I had heard this echoing my head, my mom's voice. You know like you should go work work at the post office like your uncles grandfather. Finally listen to the voice. And Sure Enough I. went onto the USPS site. And, saw their openings locally and swint for and they ask for references. Internal references and. Plugged in some family members names, and I was pretty much and within twenty four hours. In the family. It's a family business. It really is. Yeah. How many of your other family members worked for the postal service that are alive to? But. But it's it's been like kind of multigenerational thing or it has absolutely. Is there. Is there something about the post office or the Postal Service that has been? particularly. Peeling I'm guessing in some ways it's because it's eighth always there be. It. You know like they're always jobs in the postal. I. I just Kinda remember Hollywood shuffle under if you've seen that movie Robert Townsend movie. where? Kind of what you're saying is one of the themes in the movie that. His family's like A. Get A job. The Postal Service it's it's you know it's it's a secure job. You know it's comfortable. It's something which you can rely on and Robert Townsend characters like I wanna be a star in Hollywood but you know as a black actor in Hollywood. You gotta deal with a whole lot of bullshit and movies about the bullshit and. Kind of like you know no spoilers or yes boilers. Movement. You haven't seen it. You should see it but. In the end in the end, actually the post service ends up being a where he lands and and you know he's it's sort of like a celebration affected like you can still do when you dream of but other things can also be part of that dream and anyway I'm kind of curious if if that's kind of the story of how how like your uncles and other folks in working for the post office to. For my grandfather. I believe he went in right after he was discharged from the military e- so he. He had served in the Cold War came back They relocated to Daly City from Dallas. and. I think he that's it hired pretty much on the spot. And it's still the case to this day So he he was there until I moved up here. And two, hundred five. I remember him getting village. One Am and coming home. And afternoon. He. Yeah it's interesting my Uncle Sam deal with him in Minneapolis. He got out of the Air Force and became a carrier pretty much immediately. And my uncle Kennedy in. Hawaii. I think he started in Minneapolis, but then transferred to Hawaii, which is apparently. The most requested transfer. Why And he's been a mechanic for. Sixty years. He's he's been there for a long time I. Think he's been here the longest. Everyone fixing like postal trucks, postal trucks, the machinery he's he's really handy guy i. mean he used to build birdhouses? Similar skills I guess.

Postal Service Bruce Kevin Robert Townsend Phil You California United States Kennedy Minneapolis Asia America Jeff Yang Usps Hawaii A. End Oakland Hollywood Los Angeles Montebello Air Force Daly City
Lessons From A First Love

First of All

06:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Lessons From A First Love

"If you're new to the PODCAST, you should know very thoroughly that I am a promoter of where mass social distancing washing your hands sanitizing them. And in general watching out for your neighbor as well as yourself. Life is crazy. It's insane but we're getting through it. So now that that is out of the way and we're all getting settled in really happy to be here for this week's episode. This is a solo one and Hopefully worthwhile, I wanted to do something special in light of a really significant day for me. And in memory of one of my dearest friends and my I love. This is not the first episode about him as I was sharing Just my life in real time and what what what I was experiencing. This is definitely about my first love but I do WanNa, do a disclaimer before anybody goes any further that. It is about a friend of mine who passed away. via suicide. So it's GonNa get deep. And if you're if you've been listening first of all y'all know that that's just how I roll. But if you're new and I really WANNA look out for your mental health and your emotional health and your wellbeing. If you are in any state. To. Be Rocked by that in any way, me talking about my friends passing and the overall theme. As as lovely as parts of this was definitely going to be because it's reflections and story time there's definitely going to be some hard part. So I really recommend that you step off right now and come back and listen to it maybe at a later time when you're ready but yeah, I can't really talk about my I love without. Now I could but I'm choosing not to Is Feel right because I'm doing this On an anniversary of his passing. So just my way of commemorating him and honoring his memory hopefully sharing some. Some pearls of wisdom that I've learned along the way. We have a really want to look out for my listeners do not want you to go into any sort of dark place. So yeah, just. There's a lot of other stuff. There's so much other great content on his podcast. Go listen to that come back later. So. The way I wanted to. Structure. This podcast I'm like giving is my show notes at the top. This is really quickly wanted to share the story of. What my first love was like. 'CAUSE I. think that's cute and I love hearing about other people's love stories whether that's their I love or their twentieth I. Don't Care I love love stories, I love understanding how people met how they fell for each other even the hardships that they endured can't get enough of it. So thought just share that and just reflections on what I've learned. From that experience and from that relationship because it was a doozy. In memoriam. Is that the right word in memory of of my of my friend at my first love. So here goes. my I love his name was J. And we met when we are ten years old. And forever and ever, and ever for tardy of my life, I'll always be really grateful that I was. Able to have such a Cute I. Love. Forever. It just means a lot to me. We met when we were ten years old and we met at Church. We went to church in San. Jose California. And we're bay area kids and we I don't even remember. I. Don't have a distinct memory of like the day that we met. I just know that. Upon meeting I just thought he was the cutest and it was pretty fast crush on my end and I don't know how. It came to be that he liked me back. You'd think that that memory would be like seared into my brain but I don't remember the day that we recognize that there was something going on. But as a fortune and fate would have it. He likes me back. We were actually in different grades. I was in fifth grade and he was in fourth grade. I think because we are technically only six months apart but you know I'm a summer baby. He's a winter baby in he was in the next grade. So yeah, I had a thing for the younger man guys. And We just had like a very. Beautiful Care for each other and what started at church. I just recall these really beautiful memories of looking forward to church. In every single way every single Sunday life was just rainbows and UNICORNS. And Sunshine every time I would go to church and I would. I knew his his family car. And there are all these really unique synchronicity about us. That I still remember and I still really treasure For example that we had the same family car like we both had suburbans we both came from. Families that like I have my brothers immediate family of five, he came for family of six. So you know natural fashion instead of like the Minivan we had my dad and his dad had. suburbans like giant SUV's. And his was blue. and. Mine was green and I remembered There are multiple suburbans at our church and I remember even memorizing the the license plate. So I knew if it was his dad's car parked in the I knew if it was him and that that meant upon entering the parking lot that he was a church, it was like that

California SAN
Author Chat With Suzanne Park

Books and Boba

05:35 min | Last month

Author Chat With Suzanne Park

"So we're here, which is the park, the author of the perfect escape and low that first sight. Thank you Suzanne for joining us today. Thanks for having me. This is gonNA. Be Really Fun. I hope. Okay. Ask You all your deepest darkest secrets on this past summer. Little nervous. Person To make fun. So. A little bit about where you're from. Well. I was born and raised in. Tennessee. So in a town right outside of Nashville. At the time. Of the town didn't have that many non. Mostly, just white people at this in this town and I think slowly Shirley over the years they've increased it to about three percent. A pretty. Pretty. Big Waves are making their but Yeah. So I was born and raised in this town, but we did most of my schooling in Nashville. So. Yeah, eighteen years of my life spent. In the south. Are you also living in Tennessee right now or have you relocated. Yes. So after After high school I moved to New York for school, and then after that moved to Los Angeles for Grad School so I've moved. To those two cities in then found a position in Seattle and lived there for a number of years in the move to La. About. Eight years ago so I consider L. A. my home now but definitely have I still have a lot of friends. In Nashville and I do like to go visit. We kind of had the same trajectory because I'm from Georgia. And then I went to school in New York and then I moved to La and now I'm here. I totally understand when when people ask where are you from? I'm like I don't know I'm from like four different places so. And I've lived in a at least all of those places for a number of years. So New York, I was there for seven years for in La collectively I was there. Twice that I've moved here over ten if you combine everything and then Seattle also along time so up. So I consider all the my home to some degree but yet Nashville I do consider like my hometown. You had the opposite I was born in Toronto and then moved to L., A., and I've been here since. An immaterial house one psalm barely Canadian. About delay wondered about like like what does that feel that? Place. I. Mean. One is for your entire life living cities. I've lived in DC lived in San. Diego. But. I've spent at least twenty five years of my life in La specifically in San Gabriel. Surrounded by Asians all the sites. In Georgia and Tennessee. Is there anything about Tennessee that YOU MISS I'm this the food. Something I. It's true and even when in La, you really can't find good southern food I. Mean you fine food that is like southern adjacent, but it's not the meeting threes in it's not. Just. The just the type of food they have there's just hardier and it tastes how main I guess I just really appreciate that either foods and when I go back home we you know I love just eating southern food like shrimp and grits in. Whatever? Put it all on my plate biscuits gravy. If you can let you get a lot of fancy shops making southern food. Yes. That's right. I mean Collard Greens are not too fancy and yet somehow they add all these ingredients that make it almost too fancy and I'm like it's Turnip Greens like. It shouldn't have all these. It shouldn't have eighteen ingredients in it but but somehow the the the La way of doing it in it's also. Very, organic in. Raw when you eat it. So both of your books are set in Seattle. And you said that you're now in La do plan to write a book set in. La Anytime soon. One of my books, the one I'm riding for release next year the Young Adult Book Coming Out Ju I'm twenty, twenty one that one is partly in La. In. That book is about A. Social Media DICTA teenager who shipped off by your parents to go to digital detox camp in Iowa. So the beginning part is placed is end La, and you have a little bit of La. some some discussions about just the environment there when she shipped off, you can see the contrast of it though of so partly I guess the La based and that that's been a lot of fun to write because it really had the opportunity to write about both what I know about l.. A. In love about La but then also go with the stark contrast her being on this in this detox camp that's on a farm and Harketting through a fine. Yeah. the smaller town feels. So I've enjoyed that one a lot

Los Angeles Nashville Tennessee Seattle New York Suzanne Georgia Grad School Collard Greens A. Social Media Dicta SAN Shirley Toronto Diego San Gabriel Harketting Iowa L. LA.
Author Chat With Supriya Kelkar

Books and Boba

05:44 min | Last month

Author Chat With Supriya Kelkar

"Everyone here. Cal Tar. The author of American Premiere Pie, as well as a him Sir. Thank you. For joining us today. Thank you so much for having me. So how has it been with? With the pandemic like are you getting any writing done or has it just in chaos for you? It's yeah. It's pretty much been chaos I I I have three small kids at home. So as soon as virtual learning started, I pretty much had to stop writing for a bit. I used to write at like ten o'clock after they would sleep before the pandemic but it was my new year's resolution to not do that and to sleep better. But I'm back to staying up till one am except I'm just like staring at tiktok videos and I'm not doing anything productive because I don't know that's my stress relief right now though everyone's gotTa Cope Right. Totally get to staying up watching just whatever yeah. Today I guess before we get into our questions can you let listeners know? What the book is about. Yeah. So American as Veneer Pie is the story of Laker who is the only Indian American in her small town in Michigan and Lak- feels like she has two versions of herself. There's home Laker who loves watching Bollywood Movies and eating Indian. Food. And School AK- pins her hair over her birthmark and avoids confrontation at all costs especially when someone tease her for her culture. When a racist incident rocks lead co small town she realizes she must make a choice whether to continue to remain silent or find her voice before it's too late. So the book takes place in the Midwest and as I understand it, you also grew up in the Midwest What was your upbringing like? Yes. So it was very similar to lay Kaz I grew up in a small town in Michigan and. The only indian-american or the kid in in town but there are just a handful of us. It wasn't a very diverse town You know we had a rock thrown through our window Someone wrote put a comb in that rat's nest and permanent marker on my locker and high school. There were plenty of incidents of micro aggressions and other ing and you know very obvious racism when I was growing up. So I put a lot of that into Lak- story as well. And how did you get into writing was writing something that you've always done as a kid or was that something that? Came later in your life yeah. It was when I was in third grade, our teacher had us all right these little stories and he bound them as hardcover books and I thought it was so cool to see my name on the cover I decided right then and there that I was going to grow up and be an author somewhere around middle school that dream changed to wanting to become a bollywood screenwriter. So after college I started working as a Bollywood screenwriter would travel back and forth between Mumbai and look. And Michigan and I did that for well over a decade before before my first book, him so was published. So as a screenwriter, did you use a beat sheet for writing by chance? I do so I definitely right all my novels out with a beat cheat first, and then I outlined them I, I write my novels. right my screenplays when I'm prepping them out. So there's a lot of planning a lot of outlining use a three act structure and then I start writing the book. Do you actually follow your cheat. I do. I. So I learned screenwriting at the University of Michigan from Jim Bernstein and he is a screenwriter as well as they. Instructor there, and he sort of you know drilled into us that its structure structure structure. So I spent a long time working on the structure before I actually go to the book and so then that structure pretty much stays the same. Yeah. I was really curious about that because I studied screenwriting in college and Again, it's all about structure. It's all about having your beats there yet but a lot but a lot of the times it depended on the assignment for me I will have their there were cases where I had every single scene like outlined, and then there were scripts where I was like I have the beats but I'm probably not GonNa follow it at all. Writing is unpredictable it yeah. But that's really cool that you actually follow your beats than you have such tight structure for your books because novel writing it's it's a massive project you don't have like. 'cause like scripts are like ninety, two, hundred, ten pages, and you know there are very strict rules to to adhere to write a novel writing. It's just. It's free game. Yeah and much longer like when I first started writing books my editor on a him. So as like you know, you have to pause and take a second to describe what people are wearing and what the scenery looks like. You know because from a screenwriting background, you don't do that because there is a costume designer and there's a set decorator and there are other people to take care of all those details. So it took a bit of retraining to get get. into novel writing but I I do definitely depend heavily on the screen writing background

Michigan Jim Bernstein LAK Midwest American Premiere Bollywood University Of Michigan Laker KAZ Mumbai Editor Instructor
Author Chat With Supriya Kelkar

Books and Boba

05:44 min | Last month

Author Chat With Supriya Kelkar

"Everyone here. Cal Tar. The author of American Premiere Pie, as well as a him Sir. Thank you. For joining us today. Thank you so much for having me. So how has it been with? With the pandemic like are you getting any writing done or has it just in chaos for you? It's yeah. It's pretty much been chaos I I I have three small kids at home. So as soon as virtual learning started, I pretty much had to stop writing for a bit. I used to write at like ten o'clock after they would sleep before the pandemic but it was my new year's resolution to not do that and to sleep better. But I'm back to staying up till one am except I'm just like staring at tiktok videos and I'm not doing anything productive because I don't know that's my stress relief right now though everyone's gotTa Cope Right. Totally get to staying up watching just whatever yeah. Today I guess before we get into our questions can you let listeners know? What the book is about. Yeah. So American as Veneer Pie is the story of Laker who is the only Indian American in her small town in Michigan and Lak- feels like she has two versions of herself. There's home Laker who loves watching Bollywood Movies and eating Indian. Food. And School AK- pins her hair over her birthmark and avoids confrontation at all costs especially when someone tease her for her culture. When a racist incident rocks lead co small town she realizes she must make a choice whether to continue to remain silent or find her voice before it's too late. So the book takes place in the Midwest and as I understand it, you also grew up in the Midwest What was your upbringing like? Yes. So it was very similar to lay Kaz I grew up in a small town in Michigan and. The only indian-american or the kid in in town but there are just a handful of us. It wasn't a very diverse town You know we had a rock thrown through our window Someone wrote put a comb in that rat's nest and permanent marker on my locker and high school. There were plenty of incidents of micro aggressions and other ing and you know very obvious racism when I was growing up. So I put a lot of that into Lak- story as well. And how did you get into writing was writing something that you've always done as a kid or was that something that? Came later in your life yeah. It was when I was in third grade, our teacher had us all right these little stories and he bound them as hardcover books and I thought it was so cool to see my name on the cover I decided right then and there that I was going to grow up and be an author somewhere around middle school that dream changed to wanting to become a bollywood screenwriter. So after college I started working as a Bollywood screenwriter would travel back and forth between Mumbai and look. And Michigan and I did that for well over a decade before before my first book, him so was published. So as a screenwriter, did you use a beat sheet for writing by chance? I do so I definitely right all my novels out with a beat cheat first, and then I outlined them I, I write my novels. right my screenplays when I'm prepping them out. So there's a lot of planning a lot of outlining use a three act structure and then I start writing the book. Do you actually follow your cheat. I do. I. So I learned screenwriting at the University of Michigan from Jim Bernstein and he is a screenwriter as well as they. Instructor there, and he sort of you know drilled into us that its structure structure structure. So I spent a long time working on the structure before I actually go to the book and so then that structure pretty much stays the same. Yeah. I was really curious about that because I studied screenwriting in college and Again, it's all about structure. It's all about having your beats there yet but a lot but a lot of the times it depended on the assignment for me I will have their there were cases where I had every single scene like outlined, and then there were scripts where I was like I have the beats but I'm probably not GonNa follow it at all. Writing is unpredictable it yeah. But that's really cool that you actually follow your beats than you have such tight structure for your books because novel writing it's it's a massive project you don't have like. 'cause like scripts are like ninety, two, hundred, ten pages, and you know there are very strict rules to to adhere to write a novel writing. It's just. It's free game. Yeah and much longer like when I first started writing books my editor on a him. So as like you know, you have to pause and take a second to describe what people are wearing and what the scenery looks like. You know because from a screenwriting background, you don't do that because there is a costume designer and there's a set decorator and there are other people to take care of all those details. So it took a bit of retraining to get get. into novel writing but I I do definitely depend heavily on the screen writing background

Michigan Jim Bernstein LAK Midwest American Premiere Bollywood University Of Michigan Laker KAZ Mumbai Editor Instructor
Book News For August

Books and Boba

05:07 min | Last month

Book News For August

"So let's start work as always we open up our episode with the latest Book Publishing News Rewrite What's our first story? As always, we get our book deal news from Publishers Weekly and our first piece of news is in an eight house auction carper Collins teagan books one north. American rights to Michelle quashes debut novel not here to be liked. This why a ROM COM follows Chinese Vietnamese. American, girl allies, kwan who snubbed as the next editor in chief of the school paper for less qualified but more likable male peer as she leads a feminist reckoning at her school she begins falling for the boy she she's asking to step down publication is scheduled for fall twenty twenty one what are your thoughts on this premise? Sexism exists everywhere and yeah. Yeah. But what if she falls in love with him and let them have job I'll take him down regardless. He doesn't deserve the position. So yeah, take him now date him after you get the job you know if he really loves her he'll step Tom. because. He wants her to do her best right isn't that what partner supposed to? Yeah and also you want a boyfriend who likes supports feminism. Sorry. This is this is a way for him to prove his worth. Yeah. But you know given the recent state of the publishing industry and like the news industry, it's a pretty timely story. You know it's weird how a lot of these books are coming up at just the right time. We'll also just you know books are a reflection of what's happening in the world and. Sexism. Racism. Capitalism none of that is going away anytime soon. So it's always going to be timely. Yeah. OUR OUR NEXT STORY HARPER TEEN bought axios exile EXO Bya Rom. com fall is a Korean American cello prodigy who spent part of her junior year at an elite Music Academy in Seoul where she falls into a whirlwind secret romance with the Lead Singer of K pop's biggest boy band. Publication is scheduled for summer twenty twenty one reread. This sounds like your jam. Kind of. Here's the thing I. I love Korean music I love Korean indie hip hop and some and some pop here and there. But I'm very skeptical when it comes to books that. Are Romances with pop stars. I don't I don't know like for some reason it just kind of. Makes me feel. Like, will they it right? Will they get the culture? Right obviously AXIOS is Korean American and she Malo Kate pop for a very long time. So I'm sure she'll get it correct. I mean wasn't her last book on rebel soul about like K. pop and robots. I don't think. K pop poison there. Oh. Yeah it was like Mecca. Feel checks, all the boxes though you know you have not just the the K pop part but also. School. Drama set in Korea at a music academy. Those check a lot of box. I will I will read it because, Acsi Oh, I've read rebel soul and it was a fun book and I I have trust in MC owns all of these elements right. So I am excited for her twenty twenty one it is pre diabolical that she named the book after herself because it's it's excellent. So's axial twice isn't it like kisses and hugs is Trying to make a joke never mind. All right. So our next book deal is McMillan top? Bought World English rights to Karen chows Middle Grade debut miracle, which is about an Asian American girls struggling to find herself through friendship and music in the wake of her father's death publication is planned for twenty twenty two. This one's not as. not, as upbeat as the last one and not as feel-good. But that's pretty deep subject for a great novel. Yeah. I mean, it does have music in it music. Yeah. Next up William Morrow. Science Sequoia Nagamatsu debut novel how high we go in the dark according to the publishers the novel Explores Humanity's struggle to rebuild itself in the aftermath of a climate plague and is akin to stationed eleven and cloud atlas very timely. Yeah. I don't see a release date. I'm going to assume probably twenty, one, twenty, twenty, two. I really loved station eleven. So I am very interested in seeing what the book is about or I guess we already know what it's about, but again, get more familiar with. And the characters

Kwan Publishers Weekly K. Pop Michelle Quashes Carper Collins Chinese Vietnamese Music Academy Editor In Chief Korea Malo Kate Karen Chows Middle Grade William Morrow Seoul Tom. Mecca Partner Acsi Mcmillan MC
Becoming Who You Are with Lilan Bowden

First of All

05:00 min | Last month

Becoming Who You Are with Lilan Bowden

"Menje Lon, how are you doing? Oh, I'm relatively good. I mean like the you know the world's on fire. You know, and especially in the states, we're entering a new phase of wt of. As far as madness goes like, yeah I just feel really lucky that I'm like I have a roof over my head. I'M GONNA save place I'm in a loving relationship I've got friends and there's a lot of thankful for for me and I'm I'm thankful for it own my. I, I'm actually I don't know if it's a survival mechanism or it's just general maturity glow up but I'm definitely doing more of the journaling and the gratitude practice. Because I think it's one thing to have the attitude which I I definitely feel really grateful. But it's the doing of like writing it down. Acknowledging it makes a big difference. I think You know it's the same thing of like. I feel like working out at home versus like working out in class or like doing a defined class you know. Where it's like Oh yeah. I've got a good intentions or whatever But when you when you take, you take it to the next step and that really like increases your practice right and if you're just writing down things than that, like gives like that increases your gratitude more than just like thinking about it. I think funny thing that I heard today I'm just GonNa. Fill you in on my my life. Practices that I've been super into accelerated by Covid but I do watch a lot of youtube and I watch a lot of spiritual teachers or philosophers and things like that because it honestly, it's become really fascinating for me. I do think at one point it was really survival because I was going to break up and stuff but one of the ones I listen to today actually was I'm big on law of attraction and they were talking about the difference between gratitude and appreciation. Does very nuanced there. That they're saying that gratitude is wonderful and it's not anything to take away from. But gratitude kind of implies you're grateful for something that you overcame. So that's something that was like difficult in that is no longer there. But in the gratitude, there's like a there's a little bit of that energy of like that that hardship or that or whatever it was like I'm grateful and appreciation is just kind of. A little bit more pure love like, wow, this is just a beautiful flower. It's not like you're like, oh this lower overcame so many things or like or you overcame something to to appreciate that flower right? It's just it's just appreciation. It's just like this lowers beautiful the sign, the water that made it are amazing and salt like, wow that's kind of like next level but also learned today I love that. Yeah I I would say that in my mind gratitude and appreciation are synonymous. But I. I like that idea where you have. Like gratitude has the idea of like you can't always expect this is having always had it. Yes. You have a very good. Okay. This is why I was like. So excited to talk to you. First of all, we all need acknowledge already said this I'm like the hype woman in all my inches a year one of the funniest people I've ever met. So I got I got to know you through the Asian af world and the world. So I've already. Touched upon. But you're just yeah you're one of the funniest people have met and like that I think is an innate. Blessing. From the heavens that huge. So kind. Of you but it's also a skill. So can give me just like baskin in that for a second I was curious like what the origin story of. This this journey. Talk on Collab- cast once upon a time. But if You. Call Station I. I. Think you also kicked us off in a good way because I would say that I have gratitude for. My ability to to comedy. Now because I was not a funny child. I was I was humorless. Hard to believe knowing you now. Yeah believe it right I mean I think it was a quirky kid for sure I have Super Quirky parents who are likes very quirky in different ways. But like I would say, I was really insecure as a kid. I was shy a lot a lot of people who have listened to podcasts and stuff like, no, I I like to talk about this because. I have gratitude for like where, where, what felt. Natural to me in where I've come. But but yeah I i. think it was I think you talked to anybody from elementary school or junior high I think that they would have guests last that I would pursue a career in comedy.

Menje Lon Baskin
Becoming Who You Are with Lilan Bowden

First of All

05:00 min | Last month

Becoming Who You Are with Lilan Bowden

"Menje Lon, how are you doing? Oh, I'm relatively good. I mean like the you know the world's on fire. You know, and especially in the states, we're entering a new phase of wt of. As far as madness goes like, yeah I just feel really lucky that I'm like I have a roof over my head. I'M GONNA save place I'm in a loving relationship I've got friends and there's a lot of thankful for for me and I'm I'm thankful for it own my. I, I'm actually I don't know if it's a survival mechanism or it's just general maturity glow up but I'm definitely doing more of the journaling and the gratitude practice. Because I think it's one thing to have the attitude which I I definitely feel really grateful. But it's the doing of like writing it down. Acknowledging it makes a big difference. I think You know it's the same thing of like. I feel like working out at home versus like working out in class or like doing a defined class you know. Where it's like Oh yeah. I've got a good intentions or whatever But when you when you take, you take it to the next step and that really like increases your practice right and if you're just writing down things than that, like gives like that increases your gratitude more than just like thinking about it. I think funny thing that I heard today I'm just GonNa. Fill you in on my my life. Practices that I've been super into accelerated by Covid but I do watch a lot of youtube and I watch a lot of spiritual teachers or philosophers and things like that because it honestly, it's become really fascinating for me. I do think at one point it was really survival because I was going to break up and stuff but one of the ones I listen to today actually was I'm big on law of attraction and they were talking about the difference between gratitude and appreciation. Does very nuanced there. That they're saying that gratitude is wonderful and it's not anything to take away from. But gratitude kind of implies you're grateful for something that you overcame. So that's something that was like difficult in that is no longer there. But in the gratitude, there's like a there's a little bit of that energy of like that that hardship or that or whatever it was like I'm grateful and appreciation is just kind of. A little bit more pure love like, wow, this is just a beautiful flower. It's not like you're like, oh this lower overcame so many things or like or you overcame something to to appreciate that flower right? It's just it's just appreciation. It's just like this lowers beautiful the sign, the water that made it are amazing and salt like, wow that's kind of like next level but also learned today I love that. Yeah I I would say that in my mind gratitude and appreciation are synonymous. But I. I like that idea where you have. Like gratitude has the idea of like you can't always expect this is having always had it. Yes. You have a very good. Okay. This is why I was like. So excited to talk to you. First of all, we all need acknowledge already said this I'm like the hype woman in all my inches a year one of the funniest people I've ever met. So I got I got to know you through the Asian af world and the world. So I've already. Touched upon. But you're just yeah you're one of the funniest people have met and like that I think is an innate. Blessing. From the heavens that huge. So kind. Of you but it's also a skill. So can give me just like baskin in that for a second I was curious like what the origin story of. This this journey. Talk on Collab- cast once upon a time. But if You. Call Station I. I. Think you also kicked us off in a good way because I would say that I have gratitude for. My ability to to comedy. Now because I was not a funny child. I was I was humorless. Hard to believe knowing you now. Yeah believe it right I mean I think it was a quirky kid for sure I have Super Quirky parents who are likes very quirky in different ways. But like I would say, I was really insecure as a kid. I was shy a lot a lot of people who have listened to podcasts and stuff like, no, I I like to talk about this because. I have gratitude for like where, where, what felt. Natural to me in where I've come. But but yeah I i. think it was I think you talked to anybody from elementary school or junior high I think that they would have guests last that I would pursue a career in comedy.

Menje Lon Baskin
That's Just The Way The Ball Bounces

Asian Americana

04:39 min | Last month

That's Just The Way The Ball Bounces

"Bobby, how are you? Ever. Since I was a kid my grandma I've called each other a few times a week. Cross doing the crossword. So she used to call me every Thursday to remind me to serie chickens at Safeway. We're going on sale the next day. Or Two tell me when Walmart started selling Mentos for five cents cheaper than rose ours. I'm just as quick to call her with good news courtesy. She's always been my most enthusiastic cheerleader. She's eager to shower me with pride in praise for getting a good grade. You're finding a good discount on a pair of shoes. To call because I heard you made us tonight I, did make asparagus night 'cause. Really impressive. Lately, we don't have as much to talk about. It's the spring of two, thousand and twenty and in the midst of waiting out the coronavirus. Parents moved my grandma into their house. When the virus I broke out in nursing homes. In Seattle in hopes, it would lower her risk of exposure. And I'm finishing school remotely. So, our lives have gotten pretty quiet. These days when we call, we usually start by talking about the weather. Beautiful. Weather we've been. Lucky really. Man, and then again update on where she's out with their latest jigsaw puzzle. One. Smaller, and all the lights. Only entertaining thing I have to offer her now are updates about my quarantine inspired virtual dating experiences. So I, really leaning into it. Okay. What's going on with your own dates? We upgraded? We're not just doing folks. We're doing a facetime. For my top house bottom half is You've gotta be kidding. But inevitably, the conversation always turns back to the coronavirus. Everyone. You know everywhere, it just seems strange Oh. This world is. At a standstill, even a small portion isn't that crazy I mean everything's great. You know you know can go how long is because last I've never seen anything like this. I think we all through. And then without fail, the conversation ends with. Well. That's just the way. The boxers. This is my grandma's go saying whenever something bad happens. She. Says it all the time. When I was growing up, she said, if my team lost a soccer game or if I called her to get some sympathy when I was home sick from school. Oh you poor thing. She'd say. Then she take a long inhale initially released her breath, she'd say. Wow. That's just the way. The ball. Shelby shrugs when she says it. Even, on the phone, I know she's sharking the thing itself is kind of like one big shrug. I always pictured football when she said it. Basketball or tennis ball is. Reliable. They bounce from Palmdale pavement. But if you slam a football onto the ground. You never really know what direction it's going to bounce. It might land on its stitches in bounced back into. Your Shins. Or might just tumble down the street cartwheeling over itself. Changing directions goes. It's at the base of her reaction to most things especially anything negative. Whether losing a fourth grade soccer game or global pandemic. Just above. You can't help it. That's just the way things go. But. This phrase is kind of the antithesis to my response to the pandemic. I move through the day trying to focus on work, but ultimately falling down endless internet rabbit holes. Watching videos and New York City hospitals, reading articles looking at modeling. Charts. Grasp, for any form of control I can. Sewing facemasks, scrubbing grocery packages with bleach, outlining contingency plans for every possible combination of who might get sick and my family. I stay up at night often too anxious to sleep imagining the worst case scenarios in vivid and dramatic detail. So the idea of shrugging off seems kind of impossible. But every time we talk. My grandma keeps saying this phrase. Function. She updates me about her puzzle. She tells me how many hummingbirds she counted in the are that day. She asks about my phone dates. And cheer pizzas words. Every time we talk.

Shins Soccer Football Walmart Safeway Bobby Seattle Palmdale New York City Shelby Basketball Tennis
That's Just The Way The Ball Bounces

Asian Americana

03:39 min | Last month

That's Just The Way The Ball Bounces

"Julianne. Bobby, how are you? Ever. Since I was a kid my grandma I've called each other a few times a week. Cross doing the crossword. So she used to call me every Thursday to remind me to serie chickens at Safeway. We're going on sale the next day. Or Two tell me when Walmart started selling Mentos for five cents cheaper than rose ours. I'm just as quick to call her with good news courtesy. She's always been my most enthusiastic cheerleader. She's eager to shower me with pride in praise for getting a good grade. You're finding a good discount on a pair of shoes. To call because I heard you made us tonight I, did make asparagus night 'cause. Really impressive. Lately, we don't have as much to talk about. It's the spring of two, thousand and twenty and in the midst of waiting out the coronavirus. Parents moved my grandma into their house. When the virus I broke out in nursing homes. In Seattle in hopes, it would lower her risk of exposure. And I'm finishing school remotely. So, our lives have gotten pretty quiet. These days when we call, we usually start by talking about the weather. Beautiful. Weather we've been. Lucky really. Man, and then again update on where she's out with their latest jigsaw puzzle. One. Smaller, and all the lights. Only entertaining thing I have to offer her now are updates about my quarantine inspired virtual dating experiences. So I, really leaning into it. Okay. What's going on with your own dates? We upgraded? We're not just doing folks. We're doing a facetime. For my top house bottom half is You've gotta be kidding. But inevitably, the conversation always turns back to the coronavirus. Everyone. You know everywhere, it just seems strange Oh. This world is. At a standstill, even a small portion isn't that crazy I mean everything's great. You know you know can go how long is because last I've never seen anything like this. I think we all through. And then without fail, the conversation ends with. Well. That's just the way. The boxers. This is my grandma's go saying whenever something bad happens. She. Says it all the time. When I was growing up, she said, if my team lost a soccer game or if I called her to get some sympathy when I was home sick from school. Oh you poor thing. She'd say. Then she take a long inhale initially released her breath, she'd say. Wow. That's just the way. The ball. Shelby shrugs when she says it. Even, on the phone, I know she's sharking the thing itself is kind of like one big shrug. I always pictured football when she said it. Basketball or tennis ball is. Reliable. They bounce from Palmdale pavement. But if you slam a football onto the ground. You never really know what direction it's going to bounce. It might land on its stitches in bounced back into. Your Shins. Or might just tumble down the street cartwheeling over itself. Changing directions goes. It's at the base of her reaction to most things especially anything negative. Whether losing a fourth grade soccer game or global pandemic. Just above. You can't help it. That's just the way things

Soccer Football Walmart Safeway Julianne. Bobby Shins Seattle Palmdale Shelby Basketball Tennis
That's Just The Way The Ball Bounces

Asian Americana

04:43 min | Last month

That's Just The Way The Ball Bounces

"The way we speak in the words we use are shaped by so many things, and that includes the family friends culture and language we grow up around for me growing up bilingual in. Thai. In English meant I was pretty used to code switching between the two for others. There may have been phrases in other languages that have stuck with you. Maybe A. To encourage someone or disapproving deny when you're being wasteful or even an exclamation of when you drop something or. To get someone's attention and these phrases include ones in English to sings like longtime. No see and no-can-do Asian American or rooted in the language of Nineteenth Century Chinese American immigrants. These words can serve lifeline to the boys of our cultural and linguistic heritage. But for some others, they're away to cope to find comfort and solace familiar mindset. They think when this pandemic began, I, was like really spinning out about it and I think my grandma really tapped into that and. She got from repeating this phrase to me thought she used to always say to me when I was a kid, but it wasn't just in this kind of like funny way that she's to always say this when we were growing up, felt a lot more like meaningful and intentional than that. That's Julianne. Parker minutes Chilean. Parker. I'm a documentary film producer in now in pursuing my MFA in creative nonfiction writing at the University of Pittsburgh. Fourth Generation, Japanese American woman. As she was saying her grandmother's particular turn of phrase had a change in tone, and it also felt really practiced like she was kind of returning to a mind state that she ben in before, and so I kind of wanted to understand that I started to draw parallels. My mind between be sparing says that my grandma has now lived through were she was out this like. Like real loss of control over her own life, and so I, kind of just wanted to understand her mentality a little bit better and see what I could learn from it. Today, we hear from contributor, Julianne Parker as she explores the depth and meaning of her grandmother signature saying in, that's just the way. The Ball Bounces I'm Quincy Sarah Smith and this is Asian Americana. Julianne. Bobby, how are you? Ever. Since I was a kid my grandma I've called each other a few times a week. Cross doing the crossword. So she used to call me every Thursday to remind me to serie chickens at Safeway. We're going on sale the next day. Or Two tell me when Walmart started selling Mentos for five cents cheaper than rose ours. I'm just as quick to call her with good news courtesy. She's always been my most enthusiastic cheerleader. She's eager to shower me with pride in praise for getting a good grade. You're finding a good discount on a pair of shoes. To call because I heard you made us tonight I, did make asparagus night 'cause. Really impressive. Lately, we don't have as much to talk about. It's the spring of two, thousand and twenty and in the midst of waiting out the coronavirus. Parents moved my grandma into their house. When the virus I broke out in nursing homes. In Seattle in hopes, it would lower her risk of exposure. And I'm finishing school remotely. So, our lives have gotten pretty quiet. These days when we call, we usually start by talking about the weather. Beautiful. Weather we've been. Lucky really. Man, and then again update on where she's out with their latest jigsaw puzzle. One. Smaller, and all the lights. Only entertaining thing I have to offer her now are updates about my quarantine inspired virtual dating experiences. So I, really leaning into it. Okay. What's going on with your own dates? We upgraded? We're not just doing folks. We're doing a facetime. For my top house bottom half is You've gotta be kidding. But inevitably, the conversation always turns back to the coronavirus. Everyone. You know everywhere, it just seems strange Oh. This world is. At a standstill, even a small portion isn't that crazy I mean everything's great. You know you know can go how long is because last I've never seen anything like this. I think we all through. And then without fail, the conversation ends with. Well. That's just the way. The boxers.

Julianne Parker Quincy Sarah Smith Seattle Producer Walmart Safeway Bobby University Of Pittsburgh
Interview With Susan Park

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

05:57 min | Last month

Interview With Susan Park

"Or those of you who are foodies and I know if you don't consider yourself a food, do you like food? Some of our most popular episodes are when we bring on people who own restaurants or who are chefs and my guest today. Is kind of a combination. She's not a chef. She's married to a chef. This is Susan g young park, and she and her husband are the owners of a very unusual Taco place near the campus is called. I think I'm saying this right Revolucionario? Is that correct? Yes, it's a revolutionary on North African Tacos on. At one, four, three, six, West Jefferson, boulevard currently were only open on weekends, Saturdays, and Sundays for pick up orders only from noon till three, and actually I am a chef to learn more. Oh okay. Okay. Yeah. Well, you know, I definitely want to do a deep dive. Into, your establishment. But you know since we're recording this in early May and is still during the whole shutdown, and this is a restaurant I gotta ask you because we'll put this out relatively soon. This episode I have to ask you like, how has it been for you guys with the shutdown with the limited time that you're open. How's that going? It's been very, very asymmetric call. Because I also have. Started a nonprofit at the end of February and a lot of people keep asking me how I knew to start early with the Asian. American. Specific food. Bank. It's because I am an Asian American person. Who? WHO also owns also Asian American owner. And I. My restaurant is near USC SO I. Get to talk to a lot of. Asian, American, and Asian international students. So my restaurant very community driven. So. As an Asian American person business owner and somebody who speaks to Asian American students in Asian international students on a regular basis. You know I could feel the of sacks of you know, the the Wuhan Virus China virus. Right one international news broke in in December, and I can feel it affecting my business to I can feel it affecting my business, my in store business just tanked. I made it by with a lot of lot of catering more because they kept asking my customers helped me out catering orders than. And then a lot of a Chinese American students in particular in Chinese. International. Students who come to my restaurant. Started telling me. They just felt really anxious and they had a feeling of like just more isolated, and also I also do a lot of tenants advocacy work I've been in touch with CCD in. Chinatown. MOM since last year I helped him out occasionally with things at the request as I could see for myself, I mean. Koreatown didn't get hit that bad. Early, a chinatown business in Chinatown just tanked. You know at in December and January some restaurants. It was like ninety nine percent down the streets were empty. There's nobody. And then my friends from the San Gabriel Valley started reporting. The business was down in the San Gabriel Valley. And then it rolled into Korea town. So Koreatown was hit a little bit later. By declining sales and then in my restaurant to. So January usually means like a huge surge in business. And a lot of my customers are international students, not as Asian international students, but international students because my husband is also he's a French born Algerian Berber and Berbers indigent people to North Africa. So we also have a lot of European customers in African customers, and because we're North African Taco restaurant, we also have a lot of Mexican Latin next customers so very international. We hear a lot of news from everybody to because we're, I'm a owner operators on that restaurant every day that it's open. So I'm in touch with just. So many different communities. And just business was just was not picking up and beginning in January I started. Reducing, my restaurant hours drastically because it just wasn't worth it. It just wasn't worth it to old. You know just to get all that going and it was like this is not what any you know So then I started my food bank initiative I started I started my bag initiative before a stylish on nonprofit. Net Song early I. Think I met her Nebi. Rarity. A month after I had started my brown bags for all skid row initiative. Because wins, virus news broke of a mysterious virus mysterious You know that's a scare scare tactic. In China and it's highly infectious in know we live in a global village? and. Experts have been warning about pandemics for a long time and America wouldn't be prepared for one. So my first thought in January was to start my Brown Dad's for everyone initiative for skid row because in an era of pandemic, who do you want to help the most? I, I mean, who should you be healthy? It's the most vulnerable people were most exposed. Then it's going to be homeless in the House to people. And who are the poorest of the poor, the an housed I mean, it's the black residents. Elderly residents are skip Vo. So I, the Brown. Doctrines, round that for everyone initiative really took off fast because the idea was catchy. People could wrap their mind around like Paquito, Brown bag lunch. You know. So I, had neighborhood associations like four hundred members hanging. Why? Why can't all of us do like ten Brown bags? That's four thousand bomb. Gad's already

San Gabriel Valley Koreatown Business Owner USC Susan Wuhan Paquito GAD North Africa Korea Nebi America China
Author Chat With Julie Abe

Books and Boba

05:29 min | Last month

Author Chat With Julie Abe

"Hello everyone I'm so excited to have Julie obey the. Eva Evergreen semi magical which here with us today. Thank you Julie so much for a be here with us. Thank. You I've been a huge fan of Simba. But a long time. So it's exciting me here. Yeah. We're old friends I remember when when you first started following I, think it was like two years ago or two and a half years ago. So we're we're so excited to have you. I still can't believe people listen to our podcast to be honest I know. Especially all too. Real ask people listen to our pockets. It's a great resource just as an Asian American. It's nice to know that there's a community of authors dogs that are actually owned voices in legitimate though I love podcast. Awesome. So your book is coming out in two days we're recording this on. August second. So so by the time, you hear this is already out. So we're going to hype up the books our listeners can go and just grab it rapidly listen to his podcast. Thank you. Do you have. I. Guess like jitters like are you nervous about your launch it? Yes. Yes and no yes. Because it's finally here in no because I feel like it's been happening for a long time already. So it's a it's exciting just to kneel to finally have the book out in the world and having everyone. Read it. Done very excited. You had. This is your debut, right? Yes, it's my first and only look in the world as of yet. Yeah. We'd love to know more about your background. I mean we're always a writer and what was the process like getting this book maiden put out into the world I never really thought I would ever become a writer I've always absolutely loved reading when I was little I would read all the time. It was my favorite thing like if I could get some Mike Birthday money are doing that always like go towards books like without a doubt. But I never considered. Writing as something that I could do personally. Won I think is is when I was young. There weren't many authors that were. Not White. And Seeing that I was like, okay that's that's not me like I. Love these books. Obviously, I love these authors but I don't think that's that that is me can I can do? So I kind of actually followed in the fall footsteps in my father like what did Biz Adnan or major fight that All all along I did like I love books nevertheless like I loved. Just, the world of books in how it could take away bean escape. I, looking back I didn't do realize that. I did right when I was anchor I never thought much of it but I did right. just refine. Journal or diary land in Middle School. My teacher had speed. The Martian chronicles by Ray, Bradbury. I really liked the book It's budget short stories sort of like said on Mars in then. So her prompt was your own little Martian chronicles on chapter. And having super excited as. Oh. My Gosh is this homework like this can't be homework? This is actually fun. Did that and I didn't think much of it entered it. I was like a penis assignment. That another instance to that like I think this in fifth grade where we did the committee evil medieval course. I also had to write for that class to end up writing like. Twenty K. word count on. The Story? And super excited about that. But then I never thought about it like elevated could be career. Because all I saw Romney was like business medical health care. Fields so might say loss. Eastern. American conduct. Exactly. which you know I still have my day job. Of course in my day job was actually working out really well right now but I I graduated college. I started started day job and. I've been working before you know like I am. Worked Rosen Yogurt shop in high school in like I did internships and stuff like that I worked in the job through college. But my first day job I sat down as her working has. GotTa be more to life than this. Has To. Be. So. Like go back and forth nine to five day job GonNa Commute. Drive home. There's something missing. That job was the right job for me for one company was on the right bit but. I realized I didn't do something more like a Passion Hobby And so I was like, well, obviously like I love books. So maybe I can write like this for fun.

Writer Julie Eva Evergreen Biz Adnan Rosen Yogurt Middle School Romney RAY Bradbury
Letting Go Of Control & Checking Reality with Josh Han

First of All

04:48 min | Last month

Letting Go Of Control & Checking Reality with Josh Han

"We're off to a good start Josh I appreciate this. To thanks for having me on. Yeah, being here. How are you living in this? Very, very hot day in this very, very hot lays during this global pandemic. Man. I'm I'm doing all right I'm doing all right for the most part. How's it over there for you? It's Not that hot over here girl I'm in the valley. Sorry I call everyone girl. Five in the valley and you're on the west side like it's probably eight to twelve degrees hotter here Roy right. Great it's always always. Yeah I'm doing I'm doing all right I mean I'm still seeing. My therapist, which is great. Yeah I. Got a good Quarantine Group of friends. And Bought some new workout stuff? I'm dislike you know. Trying to. Keep it real basic good. Ball right. Simple. Right. Who is it? Well, you have roommates you live with Andrew Yeah our friend. Andrew. And then what do you mean by quarantine friends? Is that people that you're like meeting up with two social distance walk or like? That what that involves yeah. These are the people that I see on a regular basis and. We keep it. Safe What am I a homeys Jarman I go over to his place a lot. 'cause one they don't have a car and then. Yeah I've just been there ever since quarantine started th I would like frequent their place. A lot and unlike merely just the only person that comes over there. So. Yeah I got tested once and I have another testing kit here that I'm going to do. Tomorrow. Because I, mail it out. So it's like put in A. Yeah, I have not heard of these. Well, I've heard that they exist I. Don't know anybody personally until this moment of anyone that's been using those like Mayland huskies. Revelation Andrew Andrew's one I. got this from my friend. A can send you the link Mingy, but it's free. It's from labcorp basically. Okay and it's they partnered with this company called Pixel and yet they they send you this kit you do a nose swab, and then you put the specimen in a bag and then you sent to Fedex and everything is already taken care of. Yeah, it's just it's a very. What time to be alive I mean this is the ongoing thing. We're at one four. I've been doing weekly podcast sometimes twice a week. So it get to me I'm just like. To what extent does that that saying I'm already sick of it. I've been sick of like week three but you know it's it's just a knowledge the accumulation of what's going on like you and I had a check in before we even started recording like are you okay to record and that's like a new development at least in my world that I noticed people like very graciously doing because we're all on different. Energy sources like our levels are fuel tanks are all. Are All very sensitive right now and so I really appreciated that because there was there was one moment is like consent and permission and just self self awareness right and checking in were like somebody that I had a a meeting like a phone call with asked me that and legit thought about saying you know what? Like maybe it'd be better to talk a different day and. I had never asked. You know you just go just Gogo as a really appreciated that philosophically like the asked me that I checked in and I ended up saying you know what I think if we just keep it pretty of UK for maybe like a half hour instead of like doing a full hour conversation. So stuff like that is is changing on my end. Now know about what's going on in your in your world of like how people are gauging those things warmer. I think we are being a little bit more sensitive to each other, which is great I haven't done like my podcasts in a long time, but I have had a couple. You know just phone calls with friends while I'm doing like these walks and stuff and. A lot of it is. Hey Dude checking in opening up about like any feelings or. Anything like that because again, this is a really weird time.

Andrew Andrew Quarantine Group Josh UK Fedex ROY
Has China Won? With Prof. Kishore Mahbubani

Model Majority Podcast

05:30 min | Last month

Has China Won? With Prof. Kishore Mahbubani

"Professor Shore Mahbubani welcome to the Model Majority podcast today my pleasure rejoin you. All right. So to get a conversation started, you know the focus of our interview today is your New Book Has China one, and there are a lot of things over to dive deep into with you on this book. The first thing I wanNA chat about is this notion of the Chinese civilization party as you know, very well, the as an acronym is sort around quite. Casually, in the media in foreign policy circle to describe China as a whole right the Chinese Communist Party and you believe that this is actually quite an inadequate framing to understand China as a country as a people and you believe that by thinking of the CCP as the Chinese civilization party is perhaps a better way to think about it. Why do you think this kind of change in terminology is helpful in helping the United States in particular understand China. I think it would make a huge difference. If the American people came to realize the truth. which is the main mission of the Chinese Communist Party. Is Not export communism to the rest of the world. which was the mission of the Soviet Union's Communist Party. But to try and reform I've and strengthen China's civilization. I what I told you is is a basic of. But most Americans, do not know this basic truth. Because, when they hear the what Chinese Communist, party. The what communists in the American imagination. is by definition somebody WHO's evil and doing bad things. That good a good communist continent, an oxymoron. In America, in American linguistic discourse. So when you when you tell them that they're dealing with the Chinese Communist, party the by definition, they believe they dealing with an evil party that is out to undermine America out to oppose the American values out to diminish. America's standing in the world without realizing. That the core mission of the Chinese Communist, party is is to make China's strong and what's interesting. And to understand how deeply rooted this mission is remember remember the send the words that Chairman Mao us. When the People's Republic of China was established in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, nine, he did not say, Hey, today we celebrate the victory of communism over capitalism and said that he said that she that the keyboards used that China has stood up he said it twice. China has to. So, even chairman mouse goal and he was much more of a communist clearly than the current leaders are in many ways was still China's strong. Too. That's why I think that the communist is. Creates a form of intellectual. Laziness in American minds because they cannot look behind that what the see what is really the purpose and mission. Of the Chinese Communist Party that's why I think that thinking of it as a Chinese civilization party, then they'll begin to realize the most important thing that America in China and live in peace because Chinese civilization is not opposed to American civilization American civilization and not oppose the Chinese civilization and both can live together in peace. Right right. What do you think the US not just a public but really even the foreign policy circle. Right. The folks in DC. The people who are supposed to understand the stuff for living because it's their job. To kind of display, this laziness intellectually speaking, is it just because the Cold War was still such a recent memory I guess for the United States generally positive memory. 'cause we won that we just kind of put the Communist label back to where it was just because it was something that we think we understand. You ask them very difficult question because this is the great. Paradox. About the United States in the United States spent more money. On strategic, think-tanks than any other country in the world I think he spends hundreds of millions of dollars. You not billions of dollars on tragic thing. And yet America the America is the best digit think-tank were. America has the worst thinking in the. And and is shocking for example, though any comes to understanding China? More strategic think tanks very Lisi and using all the conception tariff Nelia the Cold War in the Soviet Union. And then applying it to China, when is clearly not relevant? China. So. The inability. Of the strategic think tanks in in the United States to understand the real nature. Of China. Is actually quite a frightening. Thing to watch today,

Chinese Communist Party China United States America Chairman Soviet Union Professor Shore Mahbubani DC Lisi
The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey

Books and Boba

05:02 min | 2 months ago

The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey

"So, re-re yes. What do you want to start with this one? I think we should start with the author's background. and. Just like the inspiration behind Irvine. So. John Massey was born in England and she was raised in the US right now, she lives in Baltimore and her parents are from India and Germany. So she did a lot of traveling. She actually wrote another mystery series back in the nineties which was set in Tokyo while she was living in Japan and it's the Ray Chamara mystery series. But this book was more in the of own voices She did an incredible amount of research for the book I don't know if the people are goods forums read the acknowledgments at the very back but I tend to read all of the acknowledgments because I. I'm usually really curious as to who the author thank and it gives me like a sense of. Their journey when it came to writing the book and she. Massey doesn't have a background in law. She reached out to people reached out to legal historians at universities in. The US who specialize in South Asian law and also in Bombay she contacted magazine editors who are familiar with Parsi customs she went she actually went to Mumbai and she visited all of the historical institutions she reached out to like even railway experts. So she could figure out like how people were able to travel from one place to another and even with the food she I think she interviewed a bunch of like food writers as well. So like the food descriptions in this book are fantastic and our main character per wien is actually inspired by two. Women, attorneys. One of them was Cornelius One of them was Cornelius She was the first woman to read law at Oxford, and the first woman to take the British law exam in eighteen ninety to eighteen, ninety two that's a lot earlier than I would expect the first. First Indian woman to to study law, and the other women that appropriate is based on is Mathon Totta lung who also studied law in Oxford and whisk first woman admitted to the Bombay bar a back in one thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, three. So. Yeah like per Venus. This this book is set in the nineteen twenties. So yeah. It's actually it's really interesting that it's actually based on women who did practice law so Yeah. I mean it's I? Don't think reunite can claim to be experts in the cultures of India but this book real you can tell that the author did a lot of research especially to portray like Mumbai such Mambi during this time period, which was a pre partition it was it depicts a Mumbai that's very multicultural multifaith like a lot of different. People Customs Cultures Religions, and even value sets that kind of coexisting with each other which made for really interesting setting especially in the context of per wien enter father Jamshedi as lawyers who had to. Navigate these. Waters right because every single community has their own set of loss at they have to understand and know how to argue and just also takes place on the backdrop of this was when India was still in imperial colony, right is still part of the British empire and so you have the added. wrinkle of a colonizing power in the form of white people in the mix as well. Yeah Like you said, I'm I'm not an expert with a one thousand, nine, hundred twenty s India But in terms of like England nineteen twenties. So that was during George, the fifth Who was the grandson of Queen Victoria? It's so it's to rains after the Victorian era. So very the the the dad of the King's speech King Yes yes. So this was during time where there was a rise in socialism. And just. I. Think it was like at the height of the British empire and then it crumbled.

Bombay John Massey India United States People Customs Cultures Religi England Mathon Totta Lung Irvine Oxford King Ray Chamara Tokyo Japan Baltimore Jamshedi George Queen Victoria Germany Mambi
They Call Us Lucky Grandma

They Call Us Bruce

04:25 min | 2 months ago

They Call Us Lucky Grandma

"Fill. Today. Okay. So we have here representatives from a new feature film. That's. Coming soon, it is called Lucky Grandma. In Studio, we have a call writer, Angela Chang Hello, we have writer director Stacy, Sealy High, and we have the star, the legendary, the iconic iconic, the amazing side. Jim. Boy, what else can we say this having you guys here isn't just feeding because you're one of the showcase films in the La. Phil. Vessel Right but also because. We thought it was a real great opportunity to talk both about come to the past and the present in some ways of Asian Americans and film with someone who seen all of that. And that'll beats I, of course. And also talk about this film because it's kind of a unique showcase. In many ways, the role that really puts in the center of the screen that we've all been waiting for a lot of ways I. mean you know? The Joy luck club, you know as Auntie, Lynda, OB, incomparable until. You've always had a particularly unique presence and I feel. We want to see more of it and this show. This movie really does give us everything that we're looking for so. Tells more about the film So lucky Gramma is the story of. A little bit grumpy superstitious. chain-smoking ordinary Chinese grandma plagued by side Chen. She. Gets, her fortune told and. Takes a chance at the casino ends up on the wrong side of luck. I. Would say a little bit of trouble. So it's a dark comedy and we hope it's a lot of fun So I've been actually following the. Production of this little while I know that you won a the screenplay won an award at Tribeca that right? Yeah. We got this grant from. Home Institute in at and T. as called untold stories, and it was really a godsend because I'm sure you guys can imagine. that. Making a movie with an eight year old grandma in mostly in Chinese was a little bit of. In Hollywood, so It was really a little bit of a minor miracle. This movie I mean talk. About, untold. Stories I think This is sort of this is taking the the camera and the Lens focusing on something we never seen before. You know we'd never usually. Our hero in this is somebody who never gets shine but you know you go to Chinatown grandmas are everywhere and. This is very cool. Unique Story. I I'm wondering what? What was the seed of the like? What inspired you to focus this on this story? You know? Yeah. Well, I mean, I had taken these buses. They have these buses that we from Chinatown. In New York to all the nearby casinos and tristate area near they advertise in the Chinese newspaper. There's like billboards in Chinatown, all the casinos. To Gamble to. And so I had taken a few these buses and seen the full of old Chinese people and so. One day I sort of had this image of the bus scene. That's the beginning the movie with one of the GRANDMAS having this bag of money following in her lap. And those sort of really the seat of the idea and I called Angela and recruited her. Yeah, and then say see pitched the premise to me and we immediately started talking about will whose main character say she had this idea that it was the main character was one hundred percent of an elderly Chinese woman. And as we started building the character, it just reminded me so much of my own grandmother and. I think for reminded her so much of her own mom. Kind of ornery free spirit or like independently. Spirited woman who is. Just very fierce and unapologetic. And we just built it from there I

Angela Chang Writer Joy Luck Club Sealy High LA Stacy Phil JIM Chen Lynda Hollywood Home Institute Director New York
Friendship During COVID

Model Majority Podcast

05:51 min | 2 months ago

Friendship During COVID

"Am your Co Host Tony Naga Tony and I am your co hosts Kevin Shoe and I'm your Co, Host Bang reappropriate build a little bit. okay. That is about as energetic as we're. GonNa get. Along. With. We're dying. We're done. Very draining times as well. There's tons of stressful stuff going on in addition to all the stressful things that go on in our daily lives normally so. But, it's been a little bit I. think a little too long since we've all gotten a chance to speak, so it's good to talk to you on this Saturday Sunday Sunday orgies today Sunday. Yeah, what is day? I don't know about you, but I have completely lost track of days earlier this week. I was trying to schedule a phone call for Thursday. I want to say and I was like the person was trying to talk about. There's like isn't this Saturday and they're like? No, it's Tuesday and I was like. Wow, this isn't just like you've lost like a single day. This is completely track of any day of the week weekdays versus. Morning versus I have no idea what's going on. I'm just taking it a day at a time. You got you got the keys region and is Tuesday or Thursday they do. Talk. I sorta there too as well Jen. I thought it was on Tuesday. I thought it was Wednesday now single time I. Think I know what day it is I. Think Myself Wait. I was wrong last time so now. I'm not really worried that I'm wrong. Be Wrong again. Yeah, yeah! I'm now at the point where I have to check the calendar every morning. Figure out what day it is. What dates it? Is I have one one or two standing weekly meetings, and that's the only way that I'm able to sort of anchor. My Week is just like. Is Today Zoo Meeting Day or not? Just keep going with this. Skip the INTRO. You know speed that we do that. Just keep talking because. You, know we. We talk about serious stuff wonky stuff on this pot all the time and they really important. You know we still have an election coming up. Hopefully hopefully, hopefully, hopefully, donald trump is president, and all sorts of things but I. don't know if there's one thing that I've been doing a lot of reflection on my own since the days. Obviously no matter either here is how much of this whole thing has. Impacted us as human beings in ways, as never really impacted us before and I'm actually just kind of curious out a very. Level! What has this thing major realized something about yourself that you didn't know before? And I'M GONNA. Put you on a spot Tony, just so I can think of a good answer myself. No, you're funny Kevin. Something that I didn't know before you know what. So to know something. In my business that I make money off of which is video editing, it has always sort of been the this given that. You kind of have to work in Los Angeles and and do those sorts of things and one thing that covid nineteen has I think really proven. Is that regardless of where you live? If you work in the entertainment industry, there are a lot more options than just. Being tied to one particular place. Just, because we're being forced to work remotely now and I don't see people necessarily going back to the office setting. In what March or April of next year after we have a widely distributed vaccine or whatever the the timetable is for Covid, nineteen and so. You know people were always sort of pooh-poohing me whenever I would be. The harbinger of automation is coming, and and also we really think about well. We could probably work from anywhere if we really really wanted to so i. know now for a fact that it is possible to work in many industries now that we couldn't before remotely and I think that that's going to have a lot of good impacts going forward on many different industries, because I think diversification and decentralisation is a good thing, philosophically speaking Kevin's wow, that's a good one. That's really big. One that we talk a lot about here in Silicon Valley because people have been. Pushing for that in various ways in profiting off of it to right lots of products coming out of it on that side I think Jason. That's GonNa come full swing from that. Push that we had a few years ago where it was all open open office design lots of collaboration, and like you know what I'm talking about right especially Kevin insists he can value whereas like the push was to get away from like closed offices, and even in the lab. Setting that I'm in There was this huge push to do sort of. Big Open lab spaces where the desks were in with the labs, and the idea was to foster a lot of collaboration, and I think to some extent. Those labs can really work, but I know that I way before. Kovic struggled with having a lack of boundary between different spaces, and especially for someone like myself. WHO WHEN? I'm really focused on something I just. Just, want to shut the entire world out and so I had a really hard time like that there there was seem to be this complete stigma towards finding, closed spaces, and closing a door like I didn't have doors I could close the world out and focus for like four or five hours, so isn't that kind of interesting now that we're now realizing that? To some degree, the social interaction the collaboration is really valuable. And we need to be able to I think once this all is said and done create spaces where we can go back to having those kinds of interactions, but we don't have to like anchor everything that we do so that that's the only thing that we foster. And maybe also swing back towards like yes, people also need private spaces and spaces to sort of be alone and focused, and maybe swing away from like everything has to be right on top of each

Kevin Shoe Tony Naga Tony Donald Trump Los Angeles JEN Kovic Silicon Valley President Trump Jason
Crash Landing On You + Fate with Joe Gunawan

First of All

05:23 min | 2 months ago

Crash Landing On You + Fate with Joe Gunawan

"Thank you so much for tuning in for this week's episode. y'All better be still doing the mass and the washing your hands and social distancing especially. If you're in America, because we are the worst, we're actually not technically the worse I think we're like the third worst depending on what data you're looking at, but considering how much we front about how great we are. In America where the worst and it's a humbling moment, it's a lesson learned right very important time to take responsibility for all of the nonsense and grow up and move on. We're going to be better yeah. If guys. Thank you so much for tuning in for last week's episode, it really means a lot to me as a third anniversary episode of first of all and a pretty intense one on inner child, trauma, and healing, and letting go of the past and I just really appreciate anybody who tuned in and. Listened politically with compassion and shared space, because that was a doozy a lot for me to let out but I'm very grateful that I was able to do that. Share that with you, all and I'm really really moved by the response. I got some messages of of gratitude and very vulnerable. Sharing and I just want to say know I'm not. I first of all. I didn't think I was GONNA, be here. I didn't think it was gonna do this many episodes. I was just giving it a shot. See where it goes and I didn't think that I'd be sharing so much of myself in terms of like my. Past in my what was happening in my life real time and it's been really really liberating really. Just eye opening for me and I just didn't know that I'd be here. And I didn't ever aspire to have millions of listeners. That idea actually scares me. Slash scared the crap out of me to think that that many people would listen to what I had to say. So, yeah anyway. That actually. That's next week's episode on. Stop playing small, but. Suffice it to say I just I didn't know really what I was aiming for when I started this, I didn't know what kind of reach I would have I. don't have a gazillion followers. Our listeners and I don't even know if that's what I I once per se, but what I care about is making an impact and what I care about is having something valuable to share with somebody else because I have. Learned so much from other things that other people have shared. That's all I wanted to do so when I get these messages of gratitude it genuinely. Like I'm shook. You know I didn't I didn't? I didn't like would have that kind of impact and to know that it is doing that. It's somebody else's life and making somebody feel less alone and like they're not crazy and that you know that their wounds in their traumas are not. that. They're not Something to isolate themselves with that. It's usually means the entire universe than some to me. It really motivates me to share more and not give up on this thing you know not used all these issues factors as measuring sticks of whether something is successful or not. Genuinely makes me feel like. I have succeeded. I've done something really valuable and worthwhile, so thank you, thank you to everybody who took the time to listen and thank you to those who took time and energy and effort and vulnerability to share their story with me. It's really touching I truly appreciate it. And now we're going to talk about K. Dramas. I think it's so funny that I've just done this energetic shift from like a huge one eighty going from inner child trauma, which is very real. I hope that you tune in for that when you're ready. To Talk About K dramas because. I'm just laughing. Guys You'll hear about in this episode it's it's quite a lengthy one, but I'm all about crash landing on you. It is a reintroduction for me after fifteen years of not watching any K dramas of having a lot of prejudices and issues with my identity, my culture that I'll share with. My guest and yeah I just want to dive right into it. This week's guest is my friend Joe. GonNa one who is a longtime first of all listener. He's a patriotic supporter. He's a dear friend of mine in the industry in La, and he's just a bright soul like he and I. Talk about so many different things, different movies and The industry itself, and about our personal lives and as we've grown in our friendship I've just come to value his voice because he's so insightful. Right Not right you'll, you'll get to hear. So a little bit about Joe, he is I first assistant camera and a camera operator, so he's the guy carrying all the big year in handling camera equipment on set and his journey as as a camera operator has just been really fascinating for me to learn terms of the life as production crew, and the person kind of behind the scenes watching making everything happen. And he's done incredible work over the years. He's worked on projects with OPRAH WITH BTS future dial Lauren Conrad Dumbfounded Disney Jaguar Gucci like Victoria Secret Heat. All from very humble beginnings like Joe is such a wonderful person.

JOE America K. Dramas Lauren Conrad LA Oprah
July 2020 Book News

Books and Boba

05:03 min | 2 months ago

July 2020 Book News

"We're here to let everyone know upheld holly books that you're about to add to your TB are list because. Even though the world seems to have slowed down, due the Cova, the publishing industry has not. and there's there's a there's a ton of book deals in never stops. So. Let's get started. A rewrite wants you tell us about the first book deal all right in a six figure deal. Salaam breeds acquired Hana coughs. Why a novel Queen of the Tiles! When cryptic messages begin appearing on a dead girl, social media account during an international scrabble championship in Malaysia. A girl must investigate the mysterious circumstances of her best friend's death, and uncovered the truth before a would be killer strikes again. Publication is scheduled for Spring Twenty twenty two. This feels like a like a thriller. Yeah. This definitely sounds. Like. It's going to be my jam because it has. Well why? Apple. Grapple murder because of the scrabble, yes. We so well Marvin. Like it sounds really really cool. It reminds me of called God there is this one really bad horror slash thriller movie I watched like a a long time ago. It was about like. This one girl who befriends like this antisocial girl, and then the antisocial girl. she kills herself at, but her social media account is still going, and she's like I. Guess like the Ghost of her is attacking like the girls, other friends and stuff. It was really bad breed, but it kind of reminds me of that. Is that the one where it all takes on the computer screen? Yes. I think unfunded. Right Oh my God. Yeah, you're right. Yeah, what's bad movie? I had a great time. Next up in another six figure deal Thomas and Mercer acquired world. English rights to choose me a standalone novel by bestselling authors, Test Garretson and Gary Braver. The Thriller Follows Boston Detective Francis Frankie Loomis as she unravels the cost of the death of a student intern. More Lewis's investigation uncovers a dark sight of relationships including obsessive. Affair with her professor and mentor. Gets in is the author of twenty nine suspense novels including the Resilient House series, which was adapted for TV BY A T and T. Another murder buck yeah yeah. Also. I don't know Hana's book is about a college student, so I don't know if it's both. Murder Mysteries about college students at Yeah Yeah. I mean this is definitely like if anyone has followed our booklet podcast for any period of time, you should know that we are definitely down for the detective story I think a good half of our book picks out been detected. Fiction earlier feels like it so definitely right up our alley. It's been like maybe a quarter I. Try my best to diversify hard Chandra's at the very least. NEXT UP ABRAHAMS SPOT world rights to Little Red Riding Hood and the Dragon by Ying Chang. Compass Stein illustrated by joy. Hang the picture book. retelling relocates. Fairy Tale in China where it was really the WHO ate little red, not the wolf and read his Account Foo fighter, who doesn't need rescuing publication slated for Spring Twenty twenty three. What do you feel about these like retailing's of? Fairy Tales. I mean, is there. Is there a fairy tale that similar to little red, riding Hood and Chinese culture, there is actually It's a lot darker. which I guess. Fairytales are in general. The versions that we are used to in. I guess. American culture are via highs, version of a lot of these fairy tales right? I remember there is a version of the story Chinese fable. Where there's I think two kids. Who Go visit their grandmothers in the grammar has been replaced by. A wolf or some SORTA creature. And they actually end up eating one of the kids, and I remember because they made the younger brother or sister into like little critters or something. I remember being really really. creeped out what I listen to the story Oh back when I was a kid 'cause he came on the Book fables that came with a a cassette tape, and it would be in Chinese I listen stories, and like this one was extra gruesome, and I remember I. Don't remember the details, but I remember. Like one of the kids got literally chopped up in eight so Yeah, that's not something that's not something. A child should see and yet and yet and yet.

Murder Spring Twenty Marvin Spring Twenty Twenty Cova Thomas Apple Garretson Hana Resilient House Ying Chang Compass Stein Boston Gary Braver China Malaysia Lewis Chandra Professor
July 2020 Book News

Books and Boba

05:56 min | 2 months ago

July 2020 Book News

"Back to books and Boba Club in pocket, which impose Asian and Asian American Authors Marinas Marina. And I'm re-re. You and we are here today our mid month episode toward the month of. July July. Twenty twenty. How're you doing? Good I can't believe that we're ready like halfway into July. Honestly if each like just started no right. Also, I realized that because Marvin and I used to record in studio. I used to see Marvin by twice a month in person, but we haven't. We haven't seen each other in like. Ever since March I don't think we've seen each other. It's been. It's been a while I think the last time we saw each other was when we were recording. What was our? Was? Our February book even. Was! It not south no map assault stars. was after I. Think it was May. who was such a long time, we? Can just look it up right now. I'm looking at right now. Because the Internet exists, I don't WanNa be one of those people who don't know how Gorka. Let's see now that there's like this website where you put in a Google Inc and then you send you send it to someone who asks you a question right like they could totally yes. Let let me Google there for you. Yeah, yeah, I back. When I was in Grad School, I was send to. My classmates would ask me dumb questions. They can just google themselves. sat quite a lot. In College as well our February Book Club pick was the kiss quotient. God so the one recorded with your friend Kaitlyn. That was our last the last time we saw each other. That's wow. Yeah. I feel like These past few months has reinforced idea that. I'm. Pretty Okay with staying at home all the time, which is something I didn't really know about myself or didn't remember about myself. What's your? What's your Myer Briggs by the way? I know it's I. I know it's complete bullshit, but. It does give me a good handle on whether someone is a really extroverted or introverted, and so my with the Myers Briggs is like so if I take the test I usually test at an NF, which is like the Uber. But because of the people I work with I'm often forced to take the set characteristics. So people are often surprised that I am at NFP because I was surprised, too. Because you know like your co host used to be Mindy. The. She does now she now does first of all which is. which is one of the PODCASTS Einar podcast collective and Like she's she's definitely like more extroverted. She's an actress, so yeah I was pretty surprised once I started co hosting with you. I thought it was just going to be to interest talking about books. That totally was not the case. The thing with like introvert extrovert is it's not really. Outgoing. This isn't the it's a trait of extroverts, but it's not. It's more of a symptom than like a core thing, right extroverts just means I. IF I'm out with people are like I can stay up all night. socializing gives me energy instead of expending energy I. Mean I think that's the core difference so? but but what I found is I do gain energy from socializing even online with people so I don't need face to face to be energized and the complete opposite for for. I mean like my Myers Briggs is on twitter, so a lot of people probably know already, but I am I've tested as I N T J. and. socializing is definitely not my strong point. Every time I do go out to Asian American like shindigs. People are always surprised that I'm there. 'cause tonight, because I, really I. Really don't go out. I'm pretty much a unicorn if you see me out in about. So I definitely adapted to the whole self isolation thing. Better than others I mean it helps. There's a lot of media to enjoy at home so I've been seeing a lot Final fantasy like the past. The past three weeks. Grace I recently I talked about this on some of the other pockets that I'm on I binged content this past week, so I washed the old guard, and that I watched all three seasons of dark, I watched the first season of umbrella academy I watched both current seasons of food wars, the the horny food anime, and then I went online and read the rest of the Manga series, so it's been Dan Marvin. I have unhealthy binge habits, which is why I try not to binge as much as possible because. Once I start something I will finish it. It's like it's not even it's not even a of a question. And then I'll spend the next ten hours reading pieces and analysis, so which is why like when you were watching killing eve as it was airing. It definitely curbed that addiction. I know but I've phone behind killing eve so now I have a whole season to binge later, so it's so good Marin about that So good. Yeah, I mean. It's the same with books to write I typically read books in like s few sittings as possible because. A because I have zero self-control, and if you give me the chance to just stay up all night and read something and free or something. I will take that chance

Dan Marvin Kaitlyn Google Inc Twenty Twenty Mindy Myers Briggs Myer Briggs Boba Club Authors Marinas Marina Grad School Assault Gorka Marin Twitter