African American

Listen to the latest audio content in African American culture, identity, politics and history. This playlist features African American individuals having great conversations on relevant topics through a cultural lens. Broadcast from premium podcasts.

Interview with Calvin Baker

Toure Show

06:17 min | 3 d ago

Interview with Calvin Baker

"Talk A lot about Colin. Kaepernick who of course has become far more than an athlete and more than any athlete of his generation has become super politicizing talk about how sports is a narrative of nationhood and definitely think that you could write eight the story of modern America on his last Assi What What do you? What do you? What are you? What are you thinking about? Colin Kaepernick. I think he's great. I think the truth almost didn't come to light. They. They suppress it for so long and so long and so long I think that it is. Emblematic of what's going on the country as a whole where you have this man and expressing is. Liberal belief. and. Becomes a lightly We tell ourselves we're in the twenty th century were everything is so diverse, and then you see what a lightning rod that becomes for. White. Anger. Someone expressing pride who is but also like. You can't kill black. That's radical athlete baboots how that's That's where we really are that. You can't say. Retaliates tally is wrong. Those are the hard enforces of racism, which I which I can chew colonialism in larger forces and patterns. How advanced how might and can the society be if you if it's if it's controversial as it was in that moment? Thankfully it's I think. As this moves forward. He's becoming raise established himself as one of a line of. Athletic spokespersons yet if you go back on tradition begins. Muhammad Ali's or the world and the Jim Brown's the world who's as like Oh as black versus one of the few people who is allowed any sort of visible Jackie Robinson in different. S. And that's end. And then he became corporate. Right. But the happiest people's right night. I talked about Jim Brown on the NFL who made the decision to leave NFL. After A manhood battle with art modell whose the owner Cleveland browns and direct line and one of the things on everything. We think we're saying there's historical precedent for it and the function and the horses ourselves. Insane. And so right. You look at that the and you look at what's happening feeling I'm not the first person. Say This I long chop wanted to contextualized story. And also like yeah. Camp is doing civil rights work. In the resistance that he faces shows you how much of this country is still against the most basic expression of civil rights what do you? What do you make of? The NFL along with the NBA? WNBA. Others. The institutions of sport have seemed to have come around to say you know we're going to embrace black lives matter. We're going to plastered all over the field or the court wear whatever you want. Neil. However, you want like you know we're fully supportive of the movement and yet gaps still doesn't have a job. So he still sacrificed his dream. Surely, it was his childhood dream that he achieved And then had that taken away chose to go after something bigger, and now that the the sports world, the NFL in particular has come around to his side of things. He is still left out which for so many of us for you to. ADDS a hypocritical sheen to all of it. I mean, I don't know I can't fully embrace what the NFL is doing until he is welcome back into the fold in a serious way. I mean, one of the. made the final cut I. Don't remember off the top of my head but wasn't Michael Vick can chilidog and still have A. Job in Colin Kaepernick, can't say. Shoot people. And not have a job. That's what I think. First of all the NFL. Lost me just I mean. There are a lot like their lot of sports. I. Love. I. Love Sports is you know and but there's always another sport and league baseball loss during steroids. Haven't been back. Haven't really looked back. I might watch catch on the corner of my eye, the barbershop every once in a while. The NFL. Because they are so far on what you say what you think the man like Avenue you know Muhammad, Ali's spent. Eighteen months in jail for Kosovo Vietnam War. I don't remember how much. Much of the baby actually did. Athletic careers. sports and they end when you're still a young individual with a lot of life ahead and as you read it as Jim Brown realize can't stop. By many miles at. And right the dream of NFL would it looks like it might be over I hope that it's eventually someone will give him a shot maybe but. And will air. We'll find the next stream. Nets like life purpose. That's always the challenge of being an athlete. It happened to him in a prematurely it's not fair but he's shown himself to be larger than that lead

NFL Jim Brown Colin Kaepernick Muhammad Ali Neil America Michael Vick Cleveland Browns Wnba Jackie Robinson Kosovo Baseball Camp NBA
The History Of Soul Train

Black History in Two Minutes

02:38 min | 3 d ago

The History Of Soul Train

"Billed as the hippest trip in America soul trained was an undeniable cultural phenomenon. Soul. Train was conceived of as a black American bandstand by a man named Don Cornelius a Chicago Radio reporter and the DJ. Hosted by Cornelius the show launched in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy. Initially airing. Only. In, CHICAGO. It was a low budget black and white TV show. But Seemingly Became a cultural phenomenon? And soon, it's what the nation. Hey they. Up to the mind. going. For. Those rain. Cornelius had this vision of bringing black popular culture music and dance to the Stream, and it's not just African Americans who were tuning in clearly you have young black folks who are on. TV being being into the homes of white. Americans across the country. This coming off the heels of the civil rights movement and is the first time that you're seeing. Young black teenagers really not mired in the way that they've been preceded national news. Soul train came appointment viewing. Show wasn't just about sings of their songs. It was as much about the dancers. Dance is that they were introducing two teenagers around the country. Veto regionalized. M made it national suddenly their dance became everyone's days. We're trying to emulate everything that we see. Soul train has the distinction of being one of the longest running programs in the history of American television. Showcasing, black music and culture to Americans of every race. You've always had in various ways, black popular culture being mainstream but for so long it was being mainstreamed with white voices and white vases. So to have then culture on display that way was. Revolutionary. Soul train brought. It's devoted audience love he's soul. The Mantra Don Cornelius. Passionately other. At the end of every episode an Don. Joining. Reason. We would love.

Don Cornelius Chicago America Reporter
Sex Positivity Throughout the Lifespan

Therapy for Black Girls

07:49 min | 5 d ago

Sex Positivity Throughout the Lifespan

"Thank you so much for joining us today on you. Thank you. I'm excited I'm glad to be here you. So you are affectionately known as the southern sexologists. Yes. That's like my brand name and I love it. It took me a few years to develop in design on it actually based on some of the ideas around the southerner and when that looks like and I'm originally from Brooklyn but my family's from. North Carolina's. So it was also like is this part of my identity and upset I think yes live here long enough. I'm definitely into that and so I started by were actually from a prevention Lynn's in sexuality looked doing work around HIV SEI information education, and then literally I remember the year in two thousand, three half finished my masters and I started working on a project for persons living with HIV and AIDS. To, talk about intimacy and sensuality, and disclosing realizing you just because you have a diagnosis of conditions, HIV or aid does it mean to stop being a sexual being and so like all my worlds collide it because here I was challenging aspects of my prevention side with aspects around holistic approach to sexuality and so fast forward just adopted the name southern sexologist when committed to doing work that was more sex. Positive and embracing sexually Walker Likes Fan So that's a really interesting point that you bring up. Just the idea of even talking about six as a southerner right and you know I think that the discussion around sex and sexuality can be difficult for lots of different people but it definitely feels like there's something about being in the south that makes it even more ZANU. Can you talk a little about that? Absolutely. You know. So my family is originally from eastern North Carolina that's where our family roots I, and so we have been challenged both in my immediate family and then cousins around talking about sex sexuality growing up in a Christian household like literally walked to church when I moved to North Carolina. That's how we've been treated with across the street from my house and while I appreciate some of the values and the. Impact that my church in my religion had on my life. It was also some of the ways our challenge in my own worldview around sex sexuality and I didn't have words for a young age some things that I would hear feel right in Audie in just made me feel sad and I didn't know why until later and so in my family again, we had person's family members cousins who passed away from HIV. And AIDS in the eighties and nineties and no one will talk about it. It was just so taboo and it's Kinda like much. You put two and two together. You realize what was happening and then when you try to talk to somebody about it, they wouldn't want to talk to you about even as professional. So to this day, there's two people who passed away in my family that subset of my family. Will Not talk about the cause of death Yeah. So it it definitely does feel like some of those kind of religious backgrounds intertwined with these conversations that even makes it more difficult to discuss and I think religion is a core element of the south thing. There's a lot historical aspects of life wise that even true within also think about when I say southern Kinda like that idea of Prim proper nece in. What you should be talking like, what are the words that are coming out of your mouth in public? So one of the topics that are appropriate to be talking about whether it's in school or Church, or even in your home in front of other people who aren't your immediate family very good point and that kind of reminds me of something you said earlier just the idea of a more holistic approach. So sex education, and so can you talk a little bit about that right? So the way I look at it and there's a model entitled those circles sexuality it was made most famous by Dennis daily, but he wasn't the originator of this model and some people don't like it but I think it's a good way to start I like to use it when I'm teaching for myself is that you know we are. Sexual beings across different aspects in this model has five areas which include sensuality, intimacy, sexual, and reproductive health sexualization, and than sexual identity and I think as we go through our lives in through development would probably get the most information on sexual health and reproduction, and even that has its limitations you know you might learn about body parts, breath control, and sti prevention, etc. You know kind of confined there but oftentimes. We don't talk about how our sense bring us pleasure. You know like when you taste something really good and I love when people say something better than sex 'cause obviously nightly for them. What something tastes so good brings you so much pleasure or hearing something that can resume and make you feel good. So ultimately, we had to look at sex from those different areas including our sense is another area I don't think. We talk about is intimacy. I often ask my class like how do you think somebody might get catfish like I can't believe that someone would fall for that but we don't really talk about the desire that people have for intimacy in not just physical intimacy like just connection with your friends with your family. The reason why so many people are like glued even social media now because they are not able to. Physically be with folks, but they can connect socially in have intimate conversations even on social media and then sexualization we probably talk about that next after sexual reproductive health because we do want to protect each other especially children from predators, etc always about sexualization to from that negative side of sexual assault sexual abuse. But there are some good sides to like flirting and you know just using power dynamics in your intimate. Partner relationship so I love that Model I. Know there probably are other models out there but I think it helps us look at it from the time we're born until the time we die we're sexual beings in that the whole is of us. Okay. So I, think you cover for the circles. was there a fifth one? All all the fifth one is important to sexual identity because that's that's the one that. Says who am I? How do I show up? How do I wanna be seen or perceived, and how things we can't control is how do people see an perceiver like art expression sexual identity so not to go on so much I think about you asking me about southern route. So when I think about sexual identity so I'm old school and when I was in college, it was like boys to men era in. Baggy Pants I. Literally went into the air quotations, men's department and purchase ties on sales in but in downs and our baseball caps and I remember going home on one of our college breaks and one of my classmates friends was like, why do you always wear those ball cats you better not come home again after being in college we are in a ball cap and asks thinking why don't you like what I have? On was she was really addressing my gender identity imagine expression because for her I was presenting in a masculine way a young lady shouldn't just like that. So she actually came from me during that time and it stuck with me about if we believe in the binary or subscribe to you that it's Kinda like melnace in female nece and how you show up in the world and you get to choose that you get. You get to express yourself the way you want to express

Aids North Carolina Sexologists Zanu Baseball Brooklyn Audie Lynn Dennis Daily Partner Assault
Antebellum's DirectorsWe Made A Slave Movie

Toure Show

04:25 min | 5 d ago

Antebellum's DirectorsWe Made A Slave Movie

"I watched the film twice because. It was compelling and I kind of had to like see it a second time after I've seen the twist and all that Sorta good stuff So a lot to talk about why this film now. Well, you know. We'd like to say that it was it was strategic but it but it wasn't about. SIX MONTHS DR moved to La for Miami I had this horrific nightmare that I think. was probably precipitated by the death of my father. Bit, less than a year prior that I was having some problems processing. And in this nightmare. This woman who was eating. was so desperate for help that it felt as though she was screaming across dimensions to reach anybody. And when I when I awoke from the nightmare. It didn't feel like anything that I had experienced before. It was within the the Brandon category of what would you call dream or nightmare, but it definitely felt like something other worldly like an ancestral visitation. And the next day Christian from I talked about it and ended up writing the short story because that's our process. And the natural writing the short story. We wrote the script that is now a antebellum. So you know for us as part of the work that we've done up to this moment, we've always felt like. All of the work that we were presenting or that we're trying to percent. Of that, there was an urgency of now and that that. The world in America has been. Careening. Toward disaster. And so yeah I mean we we never imagined in a million years that anything that we would create would be just for entertainment sake but that it is it is art. To, activate into catalyze a national dialogue around a host of issues. Not least of which is race in America. But without finger-wagging. you guys are co directors right and that's unusual to my experience and the last pair of CO directors. I remember the Hughes Brothers where there was a clear delineation of like I do this sort of stuff. I, this sort of stuff is there a division of labor or you guys kind of like one? Group. We pretty much. You know act as one onset were always together in the same space, which is super important because otherwise you know production designer or Qassams Zainur will come up to one of US nasty question we have to kind of be central in the same place but. What what helps us as a directing duo is that were also writing duo so that we kind of are able to have all of those knock down drag out. Battles on the creative in our own home. As writing the by the time we get onset we really have one vision at were were super. I mean within the duo is there a division? Is there I'm a little bit more this. I'm a little bit more that. I think. We've been together for twelve years and so we speak a telepathic shorthand. I don't know that we could be objective in saying that one is a little bit more this or that I think. I think. An outside observer would have to get you that answer as far as we're concerned we are we are. It's Qismat and we're we're we're certainly would have connected on on levels that feel we normal most writer director. duos were also a couple. So it's like everything is really on. Utilized.

America LA Hughes Brothers Qassams Zainur United States Miami Writer Director.
The Shade Room: Pros & Cons

The Nod

06:12 min | 6 d ago

The Shade Room: Pros & Cons

"In a world filled with Daesh ously bountiful boss of headlines and videos that screen world saw the shave room has taken instagram by storm in two thousand fourteen Joachim. Wanda start at the shade room after realizing she can use her love for celebrity gossip to practice her writing. But after hating ten thousand followers you want to realize she was on something. Today, the Shade Room has over twenty million followers on instagram and features regular commentary from celebrities like the descent Nicki. menaj and Ti that last part is what makes the Shade Room truly unique outside of twitter it's pretty rare for celebrities and everyday people to have so many interactions with those blurred lines are also what makes the Shade Room? So controversial whether it's making Ziya, Wade owner of harmful comments or the legal back and forth with Cardi B. When it comes to boundaries, things can get ugly. So today we brought on journalist and author George. M Johnson to help us figure out if the Shane Room is good or bad for the culture. Thank you me. I'm excited. You know the showroom has built an empire. Moving celebrity gossip here's what's your take on the importance of celebrity gossip. Gossip. It kind of is what keeps your career going on social media wise. As media has shifted from red carpets to kind of step of house, you can kind of create your own `Paparazzi. Kylie Jenner. Day. The. Whole Light Brown skinned girl only. Even though it was big, it kept her name out there viability for twenty hours on. Sale somewhere absolutely down, I think that celebrity gossip in general is fun I. Think it just gives me something to think about. Everyday life especially, these days I'm like recently has gotten dark I will say. The thing that? Has To be say. For the most part, it can be fun. I think that there is a difference between having good fun and that exposing like the more vulnerable aspects of somebody's life four laps, all that being said, what's actually start our. Conversation today with the pros. So you our guest you welcome to start off with the pros at Oh i. Froze are that the platform very very large and When they are used for good, can generate a lot of money especially to light nonprofit organizations are community based organizations and especially small businesses. I think a lot times sites will amplify. Small black businesses or business owners were creating things and it literally opens you up to people to support your products i. think in ways when you utilize your platform to uplift. And encourage and support resources in things that are out there for black folks I think that's something that more of. These types of sites can start to do. Now that's the point I do wonder what percentage like if you actually did, what percentage of share on posts are act I kind of lean towards the lifted Maybe one out of every fifteen. Twenty. That's something I. Think if I'm considering what my pro is I think the showroom actually does what I consider a pretty exceptional jobs documenting how black people use the Internet, black folks have. In DEX on social media, you know we are on twitter. So much is referred to as black twitter. This thing that all kind of white corporate executives are trying to figure out and the share room kind of will break down those pieces before black people like I think about the the not obeying video that came out recently. Day aware she. Fucking Bang. Not A. wakeup talking about not obeying and I'm like what is going on and I knew that I can go to the shave room and it will break down who made it why popular all the means they had developed all around it and I think that actually can be a big service like I don't know of too many other places that are talking about. The way. Black people use the Internet and social media like the share room us. Come along with a whole lot of other stuff. Absolute. Auto. I think that this shade room is a reliable platform for black celebrity. A celebrity period is is celebrity gossip every single celebrity whether they want to admit it or not they benefit from the celebrity height machine and that gossip like gossip mechanism the shade room does is provide back black celebrities who are frequently shut out of your us. Weekly's people magazine's it's a place. Where you know a black celebrity knows that somebody is GonNa care who they are what they're doing whether they are selling Tommy T or in the case of the simone dry like usually I like to keep some of the scams but I can be some old was I can go on the find out but also Michelle Obama gives a speech at the Democratic National Convention. Even if I missed it. Yeah NPR. Have NBC. SHAVER. Remarks on that to the thirty years from now we look back. The Oscars, the grammys, the emmys, the institutions that don't frequently reward black talent. We might look back did not see an accurate reflection of what was happening in the culture, our culture at the time American culture at the time. But this Shade Room Shave is GonNa Habit accurate count black people the culture and shaver actually documents a wide variety of black people and I think that's a good thing. Archive of like everything going on black. That's a good point. It's an interesting slice.

Shade Room Twitter Shane Room Instagram People Magazine Joachim Kylie Jenner Wanda Oscars Ziya George Nicki. Menaj NBC M Johnson Wade Shaver Michelle Obama NPR Tommy T
Queen Afua Discusses Coronavirus, Grief, & 21 Day Detox

On One with Angela Rye

05:53 min | Last week

Queen Afua Discusses Coronavirus, Grief, & 21 Day Detox

"Welcome everyone. This is another edition of on one with Angela Rye as a masterclass with the Queen Herself Queen. Food. Thank you so much for being with me and invited me to your lovely space in Q.. So Much I. Just Love You love your work. So honored to be with you today. Thank you. I'm honored to be with you and just for making this time given all this going on corona virus forest fires. Everything else and here I am sitting with you seven days into mind. Your details. So let's talk a little bit about your journey. How you kind of came into this space I have my heel I sell books, and here am my sacred woman book here. You aren't expert on all things holistic wellness and healing. Can you talk to me a little bit about how you started your own journey? Well, my journey is what keeps me inspired to help others when I was sixteen years of age. I had chronic asthma. And ECZEMA from head to toe at rightous had bedridden PMS. Headaches I was as fell. Sick and tired of being sick and tired know what to do you know how to change it. And the doctor told my mother. Lived in a glass house, he's alert to every. That's all he had me and I had my biweekly objections to just manage. So I know by the time out of East in my twenties walking with the respirator. You know that's helped boggling my lungs were. And there was no way to get out of less I, shifted a whole nother new life. Well, I was invited to healing mistreat that changed my entire everything where was it? It was upstate New York, right? The first time I've ever been on retreat I was a mediator, a junk food eater everything's toxic I was eating right out of ignorance and so when I go in this retreat. The bus open the cartilage. The grass, the trees there should be a friends, but it will my image toxin. So then the ASS kicked in and getting off the bus and I started exe- scratching and weasing and left my medication home and I wouldn't so the cafeteria to put down my bags and I ask the first spiritual question ever. Was Am I. Going to do I'm out here with strangers and I was in a panic but I got my first message from my invoice. Grapefruits Lemons and oranges. Okay that's formula later on I found out and I had. T and that day that's all I had water. In, the midst of the asthma me quietly in this state I heard this loud voices wonderful man who's talking about herbs and the healing the nation. A master heartless at that time about fifty years. and. He talked about healing testimonies in miracles happen for people who did the herbs and took a natural lifestyle. Well I. Sat down that Nice still wheezing scratching I didn't hear anyone I didn't remember the giving presentation anything I was caught up. But that night, there was a fireplace, the fires going. It's come into my lungs not knowing a fellow sitting up because as Mac down you love to collapse. Everybody else was in their big I. was front of the Fireplace on the Sofa like now. That next morning I had my first detox I didn't d tops. Bathroom for about an hour music is drained out of my nose. Some came out of my eyes some came from my chest on my throat out of my mouth. And then all of a sudden the asthma stopped. and. The red. White of my eyes it's. Stopped where and then the itching stopped, it was A. Tornado that hit me and then it was a calm day. After that happened I said, wait a minute what's going on there must be some relationship. To what I'm eating and if I'm going to get well, I'm going to be sick. And I realized that I had the power at that moment to change my life. Dazzling never came back. I'm in my sixties. came. Back. And I picked up a book Dick Gregory cooking with Mother Nature. He became my mentor to his book. Took on his family nine children they didn't know me but I knew them. Went home. With membrane the next day the next two days now of a sudden. People were talking about algae to herb. War. Using Medicine Meditation Yoga often that I live now and teach others it was all new to me. When I went home, I went cold Turkey I didn't go through transition I didn't go from one level. I just went all that's called the detailer not begin. And soul debt was the shift, and then shortly after I got home twenty, one day detox. And Twenty one day. For the last two years. And then became certified opened up a censored life continued and the asthma the allergies left the Eczema left the PM less was a shock that live took two months no more pain and I was in the President I. saw my mind shifted to my thinking. I was very introverted. I didn't talk a lot but I was an artist. I was dancing a dance off to sing and that's what I'm wanting to do. But this he'll got caught quote me and I got caught up in. Yeah and that's what I do now.

Asthma Dick Gregory Eczema Angela Rye Headaches New York Rightous Allergies MAC President Trump The Detailer
The Cost of Student Debt

The Nod

05:07 min | Last week

The Cost of Student Debt

"Michael, thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you for having me during a plague I appreciate it. We appreciate you and I gotta say it like when I saw the title of your book, I don't WanNa die poor. You know I thought to myself every point in my life I feel that. ADDS but but tell us why did you want to write this book right now? I didn't really put Tomlin per se but I think off the bed I'm really sick of away. College debt is talked about it's either like it's really really bad. People did like some ridiculous off their debt, which is really silly I, WanNa talk about debt in the way it's actually really impacting people black college graduates and Black College. Graduates of all five in general. Yeah. Getting into it like. Did your dream of going to college costs you can in numbers. And totals about like a little over six figures, the primary loan that paid for. Power for the most part sixty, thousand principle in about thirteen years i. Spend about ninety, five, thousand dollars on it already it's just the fact that for a lot of people don't have access to certain capital, we don't come from certain backgrounds. So they take advantage of us. I tried to put in the context of like I took the educational woman of a subprime mortgage loan. Conversation. Around student I think tend to focus typically on the number of how much how long? To pay back how much interest You accrued over time. But in the book you really get is like the emotional cost of procedure dreams or getting an education talk more about that part I wanted to talk about in terms of high really impacts every facet of life instead of just kind of even like how did it impact mostly in terms of your dating some cases? How does it magnified trauma that you kind of grew up with you know run into also recognized A question like there is an emotional way that we carry in addition to the physical dead. But I think if people really kind of you don't have to have student loan debt to lead into, you know where we are. Now all of us kind of see like people being screwed over even better not their fault or at least you should not solely be blaming yourself for a situation that you did in earnest with the best intentions. In this year is kind of a I think compounds a lot of a lot of people are feeling obviously with the pandemic. Of subsequent like economic. Fallout. Economic Stadi- things is affecting black people with substantial student debt. Whenever, there's a crisis in the country. We feel the worst of it we have more debt just by virtue of again started from behind and trying to crawl away open. You know black grabs was even if you didn't necessarily have a substantial amount of debt realities, your college degree doesn't allow the same ability to generate wealth away a wife high school graduates still. So it's just kind of highlighted. What was already there to that end statistic is like you know it takes the average person twenty years. To pay back their student debt while a lot of people are. Building their lives. Starting entry level work trying to start families are having to take care of parents and loved ones. It's a lot to all at once. Are there any policies or initiatives that you think our leaders our government could putting in place to make this easier on people live with Horn and Bernie in particular really brought debt cancellations like a national conversation. We all go to cancel all student that in this country. and Said Joe Biden Credit, you know was not my first second third fourth pig but auntie slapped down and we is what it is. It is what it is. But I do get. that. Piggybacking off of some Elizabeth Warren's influence that he does have initiative about some level of debt forgiveness. It's not high as Bernie with Liz but there's the caveat if you are a black college graduates specifically and you make under one hundred, twenty, five, thousand dollars I believe that is like total debt cancellation because I think that's really one important way to kind of help a lot of people who are going to default this you. And that's also gonNA stop them from being able to buy houses and rent apartment. So let's fix the problem by giving people a great is you mentioned like a lot of people are really going to be struggling this year and it probably in subsequent years to come what advice would you give to recent grads who are coming out who are trying to figure out how to how to make it an approach paying back their debt? Or even just living with that day. If you have federal loans, you probably have repre- just enjoy it in hate the interest. Later if you have private loans unfortunately, the situation going to be a lot more. Less than giving because they don't work with you as you have to also learn to forgive yourself for a situation as the young you're control Louis don't worry about your credit right now because a lot of people are in, it'll bounce back and just please vote. Just get over vote for Joe Biden might use the money

Michael Joe Biden Black College Bernie LIZ Tomlin Elizabeth Warren Louis Horn
Interview with  Glory Edim

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

04:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview with Glory Edim

"Her second in policy, which we look forward to hearing more about welcome glory are you having me? Oh thank you so much for joining us in your kicking off our season two of the podcast series. So what a way to start the fall? Oh, this is incredible. I'm glad to be a guest I am a fan of your work. In addition to just enjoying the book itself, I'm a fan of what you've been able to accomplish with well red black girl particularly in the way of used the platform of of a literary network to intentionally highlight narratives that are often ignored or ones that disappear from her collective consciousness as to African descended womanhood, the beauty and diversity of our voices experiences I enjoy speaking to people like yourself and I often wonder how is this person get here? What was their journey like? Why do they do what they do? So you ready to get into it? Yes, I am. Act One call to adventure. As a writer entrepreneur, of course, there are paths that we take and processes that we engage in to get us to where we are today, and sometimes we do that. Emotionally, we have spiritual processes, intellectual ones, and so on. How did you become interested in doing the work you do today? Well, it was a long and Berry unexpected journey and I think it really started for me at Howard University by alumni really supported me feel seen in loves and space where black women aren't always valued our university boosted lifted me up. So it was there that I countered Zora Neil hurston and Tony Morrison and my Angelo, all incredible authors that allowed me to see myself more clear in allowed needs to really start to think about who I wasn't the world in the work that I wanted to do, and originally I majored in journalism and I minored in geology and I was always surrounded by just incredible people that motivated me whether it's my professors my best friends I just always had a beautiful reflection to someone saving mealy you can do this and whether it was reading pursuing journalism, I, always find courage is supported and I think that's the main takeaway from my spirit's is becoming not. Yet or do serve the festival and so many other names. It's having a support system being passionate and being able to identify what your vision is. Jahns I've been able to say without a doubt that my purpose to really be of service to other black women and help uplift them in a leary space yawns I gained so much joy from that. I didn't know that was what I was going to be doing when I was a freshman in college, but it just organically happened as I started pursuing my career. Network in meeting other people it just services evolved this beautiful way. So years later, we well red black girl but I know that seed was planted on campus our university I, like fat because and maybe this is just my own personal perspective of going to a Pwi a predominantly white institution that it's not to say that you don't have professors that encourage and cultivate you your skills, your interest but I wonder if if it's something about going to an HP, see you that it's like Hashtag black excellence all around and then you. Just really entrenched in that moment of Oh, you dig Tony Morrison to, and it's not like we have one week where we covered Tony Morrison then that's it. No, it's extends like it's like the whole life cycle like I think back when I was a freshman I taught at a school that was called the Maya Angelou Public Charter school and I don't think I could have done that anywhere else but in DC as a student at Howard University and those moments gave me again the sense of purpose of helping. Other children and working in space with other black students and working with black professors just around we twenty four, seven that I didn't have I didn't have a chance to second-guessed took away. Any doubt I had when I was at a randomly whites all as a high school student and then when I graduated I, just have the sense of I mean in. Regards like entitled to myself were that I felt like I do anything united feels token is any way because I knew

Tony Morrison Howard University Angelo Maya Angelou Public Charter Sc Zora Neil Hurston Writer PWI Berry HP
Plant Parenthood Is More Than A Trend

Therapy for Black Girls

04:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Plant Parenthood Is More Than A Trend

"If you're instagram be looks anything like mine for months you've probably been seeing tons of beautiful assists in their homes surrounded by lots and lots of Lushes, green plants. It seems like many of us have found solace in plants and other connections to nature in the past couple of months. So we wanted to dig into which driving this for us. In this episode, we're sharing to perspective on growing field of psychology called nature therapy are ego therapy. First of is my conversation with death collier. Beth is in private practice as a nature allies psychotherapist and writes on nature health and race. She specializes in working with relational trauma in our connections with people and Nature Bethany discuss what ego therapy is why. So many of us have turned to plants the psychological benefits of being connected to nature. And steps, we can take a repair our relationships in nature. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thanks so much for inviting me, it's really great to be able to join you here from London I'm sat in a woodland fail I mean the city at the moment. Yeah. So of course, the listeners can't see you but you were you have a very picturesque as beg rows. So I'm at peace just looking at your background out there in the woodland. We all lucky. Old People See London is one of the world's major cities still still got a huge amount of green space where we're lucky to have lots of parks but also woodland's to very close and accessible. So I'm happy you're able to join us because I'm not sure how active you are on social media but definitely, since March you know since the pandemic really hit I've just been observing lots and lots of pictures of plants all across the social media feeds seems like lots of people have been getting into buying house plans for their homes planting gardens just really doing a lot with greenery, and so I like to hear from you your thoughts about why that's happening like why do you feel like people are turning things like plants and gardening right now? Nature has this wonderful capacity to sue the since the help us fill grounded I think a lot of us have turned to nature. Help US get through some very stressful anxious times during the coronavirus period and and lockdown in particular for many of us have had policies where we've had to stay indoors most of the time and we can't go out and accessible usual green spaces than bringing nature indoors as being the next best thing. So I think people have been turning to nature for release. It's been a wonderful focus having plans to tend to and care for, but also feel the benefits of being around plants which uplift us that. Make us feel calm. Yeah, and I know a lot of your work is in nature therapy. So can you tell me more about what that is and how you became so passionate about their practice? Yes. So I grew up in the countryside in UK which for a person of color is quite unusual. Any two percents of people of African. Descent live in the countryside. UK and so my childhood's spent roaming the fields playing outdoors learning about nature and how I could meaningfully interact with it. For example, the more knew about edible plants, the less I had to go home to to get something two weeks. So nature became a very meaningful relationship for me. and. When I moved into the city, I realized that not everybody saw nature as normal that had been a real disconnection. Where I opened my door and I was surrounded by nature for a lot of people they have to make an effort to go out and find the natural world. Not Everybody has the kind of connections which makes it possible whether it's they don't have parents that take them or they find that green spaces aren't accessible in the areas that they live. Semi journey into nature was through seeing how for many people there was a distance between them and the natural world and I'd be working with a young boy. who was at risk of falling into trouble with gangs and we were working traditionally indoors in a room and nothing seemed age appropriate for him the toys. Too. Young. He was someone that presented with a lot of provider even though here's about ten eleven, but it wasn't ready for face to face I contact and it made me think back to my days as a child and having natural spaces and being up to Rome and how that let south a lot of energy and how allows us to process things that we're feeling and I wondered what it would be like if I took our work outside, it didn't actually happen with that child but. It did with others in the similar situation and from there I started to all my adult clients, the opportunity at work outdoors to and the transformation was sort of self evident that when we change our environments and we're able to express ourselves differently and we realized that much of the things we're experiencing our to do with the extended violent, wherein not just our own internal

London UK Beth Rome Private Practice
The Power of La La Anthony

The Nod

05:35 min | 2 weeks ago

The Power of La La Anthony

"PLA Anthony Welcome to the show so. How are you guys doing? Don't? Talk to you. So, people. Know, you got your start in radio at the age of just sixteen t talked to us about your journey I like to go to eleventh grade and I was just so until with this radio station and then went to an event they were having enormous like saw some interns like hanging posters with something that the Wu Tang clan was doing and I was like this could be really cool. So I applied for the program NASA I got him but I didn't really have a plan I just knew I. Love Music and my love for music has taken me where to where I'm at now I got somebody who has dj big. Fan You want not held it down. But it's been incredible to see your acting career just flourish and you play the character of dom on most recent season of the shy conduit for the money I, do it for the culture talk to us about what it was like to play. And get into that character shirish doubt I love lean away. She's amazing for our culture and she was like I might have something for you on which to come in addition and I was like I can't mess this up like I wanna be on the shy and I got the role of dom which I love because she's so different from leaky show empowered dom as a chef that's an entrepreneur and trying to get their business off of. The ground and really focused into keeping 'em it on point so they can build this amazing business together. So I think it was a great transition into go from working with great creators like Courtney Kemp and fifty to now be on the Lena and her crew has been just an incredible transition and so there and you've been acting in so many different types of roles for over ten years I'm curious like what type of role do you hope comes next I'm always looking for relieve rooted and grounded stories just stories that matter to us. Our culture stories that we can relate to stories that people aren't telling I'm attracted to that kind of material, which is why I'm also producing house well, because the great thing about producing, find your own material and bring it to life you're working on a new project that gives a behind the scenes. Look at the NFL. Tell us a bit about this new series and why you wanted to be involved. So fifty were executive producing together the book that we read that we love and it's more about like what goes on behind The scenes with sports, but it's mostly about the women. So many women just give up their own lives just to be there for their partner, who's an athlete losing sports, and what happens when you like I have my own life and I want to do my own thing and what effect does that have, but it gets really grimy and gritty in real and obviously you know sports and athletics or something you know I know a lot about so I was able to really give some of my stories and really gives some real. Really exciting content to the show. So we're excited we're excited to hopefully be in production really soon and get that oven going you're also working on. Producing Story About Sin Toya Brown long you know young woman who killed a man in self defense sixteen was tried as an adult given a life sentence was then finally offered clemency last year. Why was it so important to you to make sure that this story was told that just such a powerful story and I had been tracking it for a while and watching toys interviews and just what happened to her from young growth? Donau. Moe's fascinated at like what? Was Your Life like that. took you down these paths and then her completely changing her life and finding God and becoming the spokesperson for young girls and sex trafficking. I thought it was amazing. So that's something we're so excited about and wanted to be so careful with because now we're telling someone's life story. You don't WanNa, take it lightly or take that for granted art. So power was truly one of my favorite shows I've talked to breathe way too much. I still found myself wondering what carers from the show would do if they existed in the real world. So We'd love it if you could just indulge us in a little bit of a game. Okay. We're GONNA throw out a scenario and you tell us which character from power best fits the situation. All right. Okay. So we all know that Joe Biden made good on his promise to choose a woman to be his running mate. On the democratic. Ticket but we want to know which female character on power would have made a better choice as a running mate. Okay. So You already know off the top of the dump quick witted she's smart. She knows the system how to get through the system I. think he'd be a great running Angelo for sure I mean she kinda got caught up by the system that numerous through it and she knows the law whether she was part of breaking the law or not. She knows the law. So I think she would have been great. All, right. Second Question. So none of the men on power were necessarily winning awards in the a good boyfriend healthy relationships department lynch two men from power. Do you think could go head to head in a horrible boyfriends verses? Who would you like to see? I think draze caring. There was a horrible boyfriend who said the daughter the always mentioned that he didn't care what happened. Durham mom probably ghost I don't love how he handled the situation between you know Tasha Angela and how he did that I wouldn't say Tommy 'cause. You did kill Holly. You're right. Maybe that's what I was gonNA. Relationship you've really love Kisha and things that he would have never heard. Anything to protector. So he might not have been the ideal boyfriend, but I think he was getting to a place where he was really trying to eat. Better. But he did last gopher. No

Wu Tang Nasa Joe Biden Courtney Kemp Toya Brown Angelo NFL Kisha MOE Partner Executive Lena Durham Tasha Angela Holly Tommy
Interview With Trey Haley

Black Girl Nerds

06:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Trey Haley

"Hey, guys welcome to the black GRONER's podcast. I'm your host lying and as you probably guessed. Unless? You've been hiding from it. We're still in the Kobe nineteen. We're still hanging out in the pandemic. Times out of ten, you're probably trying to figure out what you're going to watch on the streaming service. You know what movies are out right now and at the same time things are being canceled and push bag. But every once in a while, you can find like a little project, a little indie project this last through that, you can check out the me wouldn't have got the tension in the past and the past Hollywood because reinventing these days. It's all. Got Me thinking I'm like well Andy Andy Projects `Dinu thing now for Hollywood can be a new formula for how Hollywood Cannes film because they're used to the smaller budgets and used to make things work. But you have to take my word for it I. Do have an expert with me today. My guest today is Indie director Trey Haley and he's has had quite the influence on bt plus if you see where I'm going with that. He also has a series, the family business, always a bridesmaid which features the visa which you guys know by the way is going to be bad woman. So I, had the in my head to point that out straight and his his my favorite project of his at ease erected is called note to self. It's like a really cute romance movie like I don't know if you guys are check this out as Christian keyes Letroy. Lucky I just it's. So it's so I love I didn't know I didn't know you directed this trey and I decided to get shot because that's one of my favorites. Thank you. Thank you. You're welcome. Go ahead I'll. I'll let you take talking to know enough I just want to keep you up here. Appreciates you. Thank you for having me on and. Yet notice we shut that several years ago on actually Christian actually wrote that moving Christian keys actually real. Wow. Okay. So that was cool. When you know like you said, Eva was evil Pickford and I mean, that was a really fun movie to do that was Yeah. It looked like a lot of fun like I was always wanted like so you never know I guess and I'll get we'll. Get hopefully we can get a little secrets from you and and how you've got an industry but you never know when you're going to get another one of those projects but to me it was so cute I would have wanted a second one but you never know what's going on you know with that kind of stuff and you know that world and Hollywood and everything right? Right? No No, you know That wind just it was just that one note to self. Really what? Part to ever really created for it but right right Sometimes, we get the part to sometimes it's just like you know it's like even always a bridesmaid people keep asking. Is there going to be a part of this? You know no Yvette Nicole Brown wrote that movie and that. She's now. Made her thing we we should make our to we'll let you know what would Yeah Right. But yeah. So yeah, that's cool. But yeah. So you have a lot of a lot of products going, which is really dope because you kind of like I think it's really cool. your career by the way when I was researching because you, you're kind of you're kind of under the radar but not necessarily like your hat and stuff. It's just Hollywood had this weird way of like surveys out there as we know yeah, yeah. It's it's one of those things I think as we continue to go. Yeah we like let the work speak for itself. You know a lot right now what we do, they see what we do. We also consider ourselves in indy studio in meaning like we you know from locations to our resources out here in Los Angeles to the relationships we have with distributors in allowing ourselves to be positioned to where we still have ownership within our property that we create and collaborate with networks or distributors where we both owned The property together you know like. Fifty or or licensing deals where we bring in the capital two so that we have some crew you know more creative. Input into what we're making so that we'd contrite or read about the Dome of these projects is well. And do you feel guess going on what I was off the top? Do you feel because I feel in my opinion any projects could kind of give a rollback or or blueprint for how they could go about filming. 'cause I know everybody's been question is how are they going to finish a lot of these TV shows? You know how they're gonNA finish she's movies because you guys correct me if I wrong with you guys deal with on a daily basis. Okay. Budgets. How am I going to get this done with this little better? You know these amount of actors yeah. Yeah Yeah we look like we we always say we. We do our best to quality you know every new project, we just make sure we're growing and building and building level. We can make sure that are actors are excited about working but the big thing for us is given people rolls that they don't often get. As one of our things, you know when we cast, we look for opportunities to give people unique. Like we say, Hey, will you know what this person may be interested in his role because they've never done this before you know right earl instead of looking at somebody and say they will never do it. They may actually do it because they've never done it before it's kind of like the Halle Berry scenario with monster's ball right nobody. Yeah. That role because she was at the time is far will you know obviously, they didn't even consider her it first for this, but then our passion to play something. So different. Placed her into this situation. So it's a of actors here that are just always been putting by. So doing the same thing, you see them doing those same. Sometimes, they always win the same role. What's not good that they just want to do the same role that's what they're being presented to him. A lot of times will right take you flip it say, Hey, I know you do that. That's your bread and butter, but here's a scenario. May We pay half of what you get. But right right. But it now is going to show you the value. Is it for you something different so now you can walk away from this people can say, wow, I never see this person like that before which explain exactly. So it's about also giving people adding value that's what our world collaborative company we love like whether it's behind the scenes in front of scenes we're always in collaboration and making sure we have a win win scenario with everybody we work with but then when this covert scenario as you were saying. It's also about. You know we're we're about to go back into filming at the end of the month and.

Hollywood Kobe Andy Andy Yvette Nicole Brown Trey Haley Halle Berry Los Angeles Director Cannes BT EVA Earl Pickford
Brittany Packnett Cunningham talks about effective policing in America

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

06:42 min | 3 weeks ago

Brittany Packnett Cunningham talks about effective policing in America

"Thank you for being here. I just have so many questions for you. You're someone who I admire everything that you're doing especially during this time. So the first question I wanna get to is you served on the Ferguson Commission as well as President Obama's Task Force on twenty first century policing. We talk all the time about how it's important to have a seat at the table. My having a scene at those tables went insights did give you about policing in America. I think one of the most important insights is that a very people who are suffering most from the injustices have to be at the center of the conversation about what the correct equitable and just version of our communities actually looks like I think from a more detailed standpoint. One of the things I really learned or rather was confirmed just how much this is really systemic issue that there are people who enter that profession because they have altruistic motives and they. Want to help their community and what they find is that they've entered a system that frankly was not built to truly serve and protect all of us equitably, and that covers up and is permissive to so many violent acts in our communities. Lastly, I think F from a policy standpoint on of the things I really learned was just how dispersed policing policy is there are over thousand police departments in the entire country and so yes, there is work that has to. Be Done at the federal level and the Department of Justice needs to take great care to pay attention to those things were. There are also a number of things that have to happen at the level of the state legislature that governor, the state Senate, and there are many many things that have to happen locally that often it is near to are appointing and hiring police chiefs that often it is local police and fire boards who are approving police union contracts that. Can Be worded in ways that are not transparent to the public and can actually subvert justice. So these are the things that we have to pay attention to at every single level, federal local and state to remember that if we are honestly truly going get to a place where we dismantle systems that do not work for us and replace them with systems that work for all of us, we have to be diligent at every single level of the police say conversation. I love how you went through just. When we're looking at elected office public office. Criminal Justice Reform, police reform it runs through so many offices and this is why people really need to pay attention to who they elect because these people really do have a strong impact on policing in America. So thank you for walking us through that certainly. So I wanna get into something that a lot of people actually dean controversy. The words defend the police. This is scary to so many people at the beginning of the movement that we've seen over the past few weeks. There wasn't a lot of support for defend the police. But over the past few weeks, we've actually seen support increase in your own words. What does it mean to defend the police and why is it important? So. What people have to understand is that defunding the police is half of the equation. It is a necessary rallying cry to provoke people's imagination and belief that there could be more. But once you move the money and you divest from traditional structures policing that have continued to carry out violence in black brown indigenous communities. You'd have to move that money and reinvest into the things that truly keep our communities safe. So the journey that Minneapolis is going through right now is a great example. If this they said, we're going to dismantle our current police department. They were led to that by not only their city council, but by the organizers activists that made such a radically imaginative future possible by. The organizers like the first black student body president at the University of Minnesota who compelled her schoolmates to push the school to disconnect and end their contract with the Minneapolis apartment followed by the case, twelve will system that did the same. So what we're seeing as Minneapolis is on this journey of reimagining reconstructing public safety in their city is, yes that is managing a police department and then it will happen in phases. I think. So often when people hear defunding the police, they get scared because immediately here kind of the chaos of Gotham without the protection of Batman and that's what we're talking about. This will have been in pieces will happen thoughtfully and most importantly, it will happen with the. Leadership of the community because the second step there is to actually gather the community and the mental health experts, the community organizers, this safety experts, the public health experts, gathering those folks together say, what are we going to design in place? Where should the money that used to go to policing go instead? So when we see a school district like La Unified, school district, one of the largest invitation where we see them say that they're going to end the practice of having police in schools that's tens of millions of dollars that can then be reinvested into different aspects of education that our young people desperately need into creating systems of restorative justice into creating systems, support, and mental health care. And counseling for young people in ensuring that, there are no more schools that have lease officers, but no counselors and mental health supports. So these are the kinds of efforts that we are talking about. When we're talking about defunding the police were not talking about leaving people without protection. We're talking about building protections in in the system, baking it into the system from the ground up so that people are living happy healthy, whole thriving lives from the very beginning. So they don't have to be over policed when something has happened or when something is suspected to have happened we're talking about a broad community vision here of building safety from the ground up instead of over police people from the top down.

Minneapolis America Department Of Justice President Obama Ferguson Commission Senate La Unified Dean President Trump Gotham University Of Minnesota
Interview with Brittany Packnett Cunningham

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

06:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview with Brittany Packnett Cunningham

"Thank you for being here. I just have so many questions for you. You're someone who I admire everything that you're doing especially during this time. So the first question I wanna get to is you served on the Ferguson Commission as well as President Obama's Task Force on twenty first century policing. We talk all the time about how it's important to have a seat at the table. My having a scene at those tables went insights did give you about policing in America. I think one of the most important insights is that a very people who are suffering most from the injustices have to be at the center of the conversation about what the correct equitable and just version of our communities actually looks like I think from a more detailed standpoint. One of the things I really learned or rather was confirmed just how much this is really systemic issue that there are people who enter that profession because they have altruistic motives and they. Want to help their community and what they find is that they've entered a system that frankly was not built to truly serve and protect all of us equitably, and that covers up and is permissive to so many violent acts in our communities. Lastly, I think F from a policy standpoint on of the things I really learned was just how dispersed policing policy is there are over thousand police departments in the entire country and so yes, there is work that has to. Be Done at the federal level and the Department of Justice needs to take great care to pay attention to those things were. There are also a number of things that have to happen at the level of the state legislature that governor, the state Senate, and there are many many things that have to happen locally that often it is near to are appointing and hiring police chiefs that often it is local police and fire boards who are approving police union contracts that. Can Be worded in ways that are not transparent to the public and can actually subvert justice. So these are the things that we have to pay attention to at every single level, federal local and state to remember that if we are honestly truly going get to a place where we dismantle systems that do not work for us and replace them with systems that work for all of us, we have to be diligent at every single level of the police say conversation. I love how you went through just. When we're looking at elected office public office. Criminal Justice Reform, police reform it runs through so many offices and this is why people really need to pay attention to who they elect because these people really do have a strong impact on policing in America. So thank you for walking us through that certainly. So I wanna get into something that a lot of people actually dean controversy. The words defend the police. This is scary to so many people at the beginning of the movement that we've seen over the past few weeks. There wasn't a lot of support for defend the police. But over the past few weeks, we've actually seen support increase in your own words. What does it mean to defend the police and why is it important? So. What people have to understand is that defunding the police is half of the equation. It is a necessary rallying cry to provoke people's imagination and belief that there could be more. But once you move the money and you divest from traditional structures policing that have continued to carry out violence in black brown indigenous communities. You'd have to move that money and reinvest into the things that truly keep our communities safe. So the journey that Minneapolis is going through right now is a great example. If this they said, we're going to dismantle our current police department. They were led to that by not only their city council, but by the organizers activists that made such a radically imaginative future possible by. The organizers like the first black student body president at the University of Minnesota who compelled her schoolmates to push the school to disconnect and end their contract with the Minneapolis apartment followed by the case, twelve will system that did the same. So what we're seeing as Minneapolis is on this journey of reimagining reconstructing public safety in their city is, yes that is managing a police department and then it will happen in phases. I think. So often when people hear defunding the police, they get scared because immediately here kind of the chaos of Gotham without the protection of Batman and that's what we're talking about. This will have been in pieces will happen thoughtfully and most importantly, it will happen with the. Leadership of the community because the second step there is to actually gather the community and the mental health experts, the community organizers, this safety experts, the public health experts, gathering those folks together say, what are we going to design in place? Where should the money that used to go to policing go instead? So when we see a school district like La Unified, school district, one of the largest invitation where we see them say that they're going to end the practice of having police in schools that's tens of millions of dollars that can then be reinvested into different aspects of education that our young people desperately need into creating systems of restorative justice into creating systems, support, and mental health care. And counseling for young people in ensuring that, there are no more schools that have lease officers, but no counselors and mental health supports.

Minneapolis America Department Of Justice President Obama Ferguson Commission Senate La Unified Dean President Trump Gotham University Of Minnesota
Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

On One with Angela Rye

06:41 min | 3 weeks ago

Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

"Are you doing array is doing fantastic carrio. I can't complain I'm happy to be with you today. I know it's been a little difficult getting scheduled. You gotta go out here raise money and may cause and win the seat listen. Every day, we're working hard to get the drop down. We have a lot of work to do. Yeah. Yeah. Well, at know that it's you have your work out free but I also know you're willing for the job in addition to hearing about you just from being on the board of Clarkston CBC pack also Special Little Nudge from our shared in winter. Are you gonNA talk to desert I said my pleasure it'll be monthly. Enough. Still. Always happy to get to get an edge my real vaseline to case. My boss to. Answer yes, she is. So phenomenon spirit in always had. So the first thing I want to go to actually is There is a song that's out right now. That is urging people it really to me is like the modern doper cooler version of schoolhouse rock and it's. A song by a yellow pain who when guide Efron Cory who works with him? I was like Oh God. No, and then come to find out. That's your cousin. Yes. Yellow pain is your president as right. We gotta get him to do a song for you. Hear that. Song. That's just for you so I helped educating. About voter suppression by how the definite words I need one specific desert for Congress. I have to think of that. So this the whole song came about because I'm back home. After you know the Obama Administration ended worked on Capitol Hill and I was like okay I am going to take a break from public service because people think he'll staffers make a lot of money and we don't What's What's and I was on the higher end but girl what's Yeah One more time for people in the back. So, law school they night at Georgetown and I was like, okay. I'm going to work at a firm for a little bit pay my student loan debt down a good for a few weeks. Or years and Michael Copy shoes real now trip here in there. That was that was what I invasion high yellow pain is on. On your to. On. Your standard requires well, okay because we. INSTAGRAM's sophisticated yet you're right now in. One at a time but ultimately, death rate is told you how to make more money instagram this season. So exactly right I claim home I'm limited ground talking to people about what's happening. So when I moved back home the KKK March downtown. Dayton? That weekend and then we had tornadoes in a match shooting and I was like, okay we have to vote and we have to make sure people are in retention but everyone here on the ground in my family they know me from working in the Obama White House and so sometimes when I say things in Angela, you know this, we say things because they are you guys are politicals. It's sometimes doesn't reach them in the way it should and I thought well, my cousin, he conscious rapper talks about a lot of things and I was like I need you to talk about this song. I have a song about voting in my head it's going to be like schoolhouse rock but hip hop. Though and I think it can work. He was like I. Don't know and I was like, no you can do it in the months reidy fleshing out ideas how to save you call. I. Now we need a robbery in Congress. I can't rent. Over like yours, the concept you're, Ryan. Here's the lyrics. This is what we're going to say we have to talk about what happened in two thousand ten we have to talk about our have to talk about judges at the scene we have. That No. It worked out. It was great I'm so glad he. Goes raise lyrics this little bit you now hidden talent. Okay. So in addition to being a a Georgetown educated a lawyer, you also are the granddaughter of Ashir, crapper. Talk to me a little bit about what this means having that in your lineage also opted those are the things that ground us that people don't see and don't hear about since asked me a little bit about that. Yes. So my Popo is I called him now is from the deep South. So like beyond Daddy Alabama Louisiana, my maternal side is Alabama in my paternal side is Louisiana so. Shout to be onset I'm Louisiana both sides. Okay. So he migrated from Alabama, to Ohio, in the late nineteen forties part of the great migration like many black people go live in Chicago and Detroit and the path as to how we got. There was the our parents and grandparents came for opportunity and you know he dropped out of school when he was six years old because he had to work the fields, but he could never go back to school but. He still was able to reach the middle class work in a factory in real heatless taught me the importance of hard work and made me promise to go to school for as long as I could because he couldn't and that's why I continue. I went to the first family to get the undergraduate degree. Then I got the Masters Okay Papa be done. He was like Oh is that he can you go further. Pressure. He lived to see me graduate from law school, but it was a promise I made him. He'd he'd passed away from stage for a lung cancer but I will him through the White House so that was one of his last trips. Through the Obama White. House before Obama left in mayhem that promise that I will continue to keep going in idea but he taught me the importance of hard work and perseverance and that's what I'm doing. So I may not have the most money here is a congressional candidate I may not come from the wealthiest bag ground but I come from a background of hard workers in no one will be desert hymns

Barack Obama Georgetown Congress Obama White House Louisiana Alabama Obama Administration White House Instagram Efron Cory Daddy Alabama Louisiana Clarkston President Trump Robbery Michael Copy Dayton
Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

On One with Angela Rye

04:29 min | 3 weeks ago

Former Obama Intern, Desiree Tims, Runs For US Congress

"Are you doing array is doing fantastic carrio. I can't complain I'm happy to be with you today. I know it's been a little difficult getting scheduled. You gotta go out here raise money and may cause and win the seat listen. Every day, we're working hard to get the drop down. We have a lot of work to do. Yeah. Yeah. Well, at know that it's you have your work out free but I also know you're willing for the job in addition to hearing about you just from being on the board of Clarkston CBC pack also Special Little Nudge from our shared in winter. Are you gonNA talk to desert I said my pleasure it'll be monthly. Enough. Still. Always happy to get to get an edge my real vaseline to case. My boss to. Answer yes, she is. So phenomenon spirit in always had. So the first thing I want to go to actually is There is a song that's out right now. That is urging people it really to me is like the modern doper cooler version of schoolhouse rock and it's. A song by a yellow pain who when guide Efron Cory who works with him? I was like Oh God. No, and then come to find out. That's your cousin. Yes. Yellow pain is your president as right. We gotta get him to do a song for you. Hear that. Song. That's just for you so I helped educating. About voter suppression by how the definite words I need one specific desert for Congress. I have to think of that. So this the whole song came about because I'm back home. After you know the Obama Administration ended worked on Capitol Hill and I was like okay I am going to take a break from public service because people think he'll staffers make a lot of money and we don't What's What's and I was on the higher end but girl what's Yeah One more time for people in the back. So, law school they night at Georgetown and I was like, okay. I'm going to work at a firm for a little bit pay my student loan debt down a good for a few weeks. Or years and Michael Copy shoes real now trip here in there. That was that was what I invasion high yellow pain is on. On your to. On. Your standard requires well, okay because we. INSTAGRAM's sophisticated yet you're right now in. One at a time but ultimately, death rate is told you how to make more money instagram this season. So exactly right I claim home I'm limited ground talking to people about what's happening. So when I moved back home the KKK March downtown. Dayton? That weekend and then we had tornadoes in a match shooting and I was like, okay we have to vote and we have to make sure people are in retention but everyone here on the ground in my family they know me from working in the Obama White House and so sometimes when I say things in Angela, you know this, we say things because they are you guys are politicals. It's sometimes doesn't reach them in the way it should and I thought well, my cousin, he conscious rapper talks about a lot of things and I was like I need you to talk about this song. I have a song about voting in my head it's going to be like schoolhouse rock but hip hop. Though and I think it can work. He was like I. Don't know and I was like, no you can do it in the months reidy fleshing out ideas how to save you call. I. Now we need a robbery in Congress. I can't rent. Over like yours, the concept you're, Ryan. Here's the lyrics. This is what we're going to say we have to talk about what happened in two thousand ten we have to talk about our have to talk about judges at the scene we have. That No. It worked out. It was great I'm so glad he. Goes raise lyrics this little bit you now hidden talent.

President Trump Congress Ryan Efron Cory Instagram Obama White House Obama Administration Clarkston Michael Copy Robbery Dayton Georgetown Angela
Managing Suicidal Thoughts

Therapy for Black Girls

03:14 min | 3 weeks ago

Managing Suicidal Thoughts

"We started this conversation last week when I shared a few questions for you to check in with yourself about your mental health. And given that September is national suicide prevention moth. I. Thought it was important today to continue the conversation but discussing how you can cope and manage if you're experiencing suicidal thoughts, suicidal thoughts or suicidal ideation as it sometimes called often occurs when people are in unbelievable amounts of pain. Infield like there's nothing that will make them better. It's often a sign that people want to escape their lives for one reason or another. It's important to note that simply having thoughts of suicide does not necessarily mean you will hurt yourself. But it does mean as something's going on that needs some attention and support. The risk factors are things that might make it more likely that someone might think about suicide including several things. We discussed last week like unemployment isolation. Feelings of hopelessness and a history of trauma. Suicide risk also increases if someone in your family has died by suicide or if you've attempted suicide before. So if you've been experiencing suicidal thoughts, here are a few things I want to offer you that might help in those moments. Number one tell someone in get support. I know that this may be incredibly difficult. Especially, if this is a new feeling for you, our mental health is not something you typically share a lot about. A one of the things that can take some of the intensity out of these thoughts is to share it with a trusted person. Someone you know will listen and be there to support you. People with suicidal thoughts often few like there'll be a burden to loved ones by sharing their thoughts. But many loved ones are happy to show up for someone in their time of need. You can talk to a loved one, but also consider meeting with a therapist who might be able to help you sort through how you're feeling offer some support. And maybe offer some suggestions you might not have considered. Also remember in the US you can text the word tribe T R I B two, seven, four, one, seven, four, one in Tex- with a train listener twenty, four, seven at the crisis text line. Number to. Remove the means. Something else to consider if you've thought about suicide and have thought about how you might hurt yourself is to remove the means you use. This might mean allowing a trusted family member or friend to temporarily take possession of firearms, knives, medication or anything else you've considered using to hurt yourself. Number three. Utilize your coping kit. In session one, fifty, two of the podcast I discussed making a collection of pleasure well, activities calming Cents Puzzles and other things that can be useful to engage in when feeling starts to become overwhelming and you need to take the steam out of them.

Suicidal Ideation United States TEX
Acting Class with Will Smith

On One with Angela Rye

06:27 min | 3 weeks ago

Acting Class with Will Smith

"For. Is Nudity where field shooter this? This I'm one with Andrew arrived masterclass series. Where we only learn from the best the masters in today there is word, Smith. Might. Years. Really. Lama On sewer train he's like teach me how to act today. Yes and I am so excited that but I also thought that we could just engage in some harbour station earth. because I think it's important. So one of the things I really wanted to do with this is You know this this this moment in quarantine has given us space heard those of us were not workers for those investment not fallen ill to reset it allow ways your. Head. So I'm like you really WanNa make sure that I'm creating opportunity in space for people to do things that never done, but they've always wanted to do maybe you're. And so one thing that I can't say about acting. Is. I. I wasn't drama class. That's years drama. Okay. In my day are. August, Wilson's on. I wasn't quite honest Wilson. I'm not. Quite there. But I will tell you that what I learned over time will is. Acting from Rockefeller. Steps to seems to be like another layer of therapy for people that want to go to the advanced level and for me because I really enjoy conversing. From, host standpoint I feel like it would make me a better. To know. Acting connecting people in different ways. So where do you? What do you think they'll know absolutely so Let's first start with with a definition, right? So Acting. Essentially. You're. You're watching a person perform actions. So at the end of the day, that's that's all it is situations present themselves at a person takes actions. So acting is performing actions. So where do the actions come from the actions come from internal impulses that we had in our reaction to the circumstance bright. So what an actor learns, how to do is to simulate a good actor you learn how to simulate in an authentic way the reaction to the fantasy circumstances that have been presented. So in its simplest form in order to do that, you just study you watch you pay attention to human beings. That's a big part of acting you just watch what human beings do. And you, keep what we call a toolbox. And you just have a toolbox emotional. Perceptions that you can call on in any given circumstance. Right. So What what people? Bad Actors. Try to show the audience. What they're thinking and feeling and great actors internalize, and you just learn how to take yourself to the emotional space that the character is and learn how to relate you learn how to have compassion and understanding for some one who believes things that you don't believe. Right. So you you learn to understand what makes a human being do what they do So. That's really all it is. You look at the scene. and. You just want to understand and why acting would be good for you is you make an a make a living on your opinion. Right acting, you have to completely discard your opinion and totally open. Open yourself up to the emotional comprehension of someone else's plight no matter how despicable or foolish it may be to you. There's no such thing as a foolish points of view as an actor there are places you may not want to go there things like like for me it's like because I learned how to take my mind. So deeply into the thoughts and feelings of other people to play a character, I, don't WanNa play a pedophile. Right I don't want to understand that now. Right. Even like a film like Django. You know I was GonNa do Django you Y You Know Clinton, and I you know we met and I was really close on Django. And I hated that movie I hated, J. Push. The will sorry for this interim motors displayed on way with it again after you just. But listen. Django, I wrote A. Right, the about I was so mad at me, I WANNA know why do I have? No we we we can do. We can definitely talk about that for for me. First off it was it was it was willow. So I sat the family down because of the psychological space I was going to have to live in. To comprehend those atrocities willow was like you know. Daddy please don't. Daddy pleased on because she she knew what the time around the house would be if I was living in that in that psychological space and she was just She was like daddy pleased on I. Don't I don't WanNa live like that

Rockefeller Wilson Andrew Smith Lama J. Push Clinton
Sports Strike Against Racism

The Nod

05:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Sports Strike Against Racism

"This summer athletes have taken the lead by using their platforms to stand up against police brutality. The WNBA, has consistently protested throughout the year with numerous players even sitting the season out and on August twenty, six, twenty, twenty, four years after Colin Kaepernick began his anthem protests something historic happened athletes across the board streit and refuse to play today we're discussing reactions to this incredible moment in sports. This is the not. On August Twenty Third Jacob Blake was shot seven times in the back by police in Kenosha Wisconsin where we're calling this episode on. August twenty seven twenty twenty the day after the Milwaukee Bucks and players from the NBA WNBA NFL. Major League Baseball Major League soccer and tennis champion Naomi Osaka all refused to play or practice in an unprecedented strike in response to the shooting of Jacob Blake the NBA postponed the playoffs for two days. The first time that games have been postponed in this manner since Bill Russell led a strike in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, one after a day of deliberation players in the. NBA. Playoff Games pending further action. You're excited I. Know You're excited for sports to return obviously, this season has been one of a kind and unprecedented in. So many ways I want to know how do you feel now the players are using their platform in this way to be honest I feel this very strange sense of excitement. I need some really tragic kind of set of circumstances but I have been feeling conflicted after NBA Games kind. Came back I had been motivated by occurrences like kyrie irving standing in solidarity with Wnba players saying like Oh actually, I'll pay your salary. If you don't feel like you can play whether it's you know a reaction to corona virus or your desire to protest how support seeing. Lebron Kinda start almost every post game interview with a demand to arrest the cops that killed Brianna. Taylor. That made me really happy Siamese. Floor of the same energy that we have tours. Justice for Briana told, even seeing black lives matter on jerseys and in the court kind of made me feel a little better. I realized yesterday that this was the inspiration really been waiting for but now I'm wondering what comes next of course, how were you reacting to everything? You know I'm not like the world's biggest sports fan I do. I am a fan of black women and so seeing the WNBA protests. Throughout this year, but especially, the summer that felt released significant. Still I've always hesitant to look to athletes during these like highly political moments just because it's not the job that they set out to do. But you know as I started to see people sharing statements aerial Atkins from the Washington mystics we're going to say, well, we need to say and people need to hear that. They don't support us I'm fine with that. At the end of the day I'm GonNa make them good anywhere that I have to it basketball. It's not. Just what it is Chris Weber's telecast if not now when Not doing a pandemic. and. Countless lives being lost if not now when that is me in tears so lucid in that moment and so real and also just seeing how so many other sports leagues join them in protests were. Teased. Happen I mean it just shows. The hate people's heart. The thing is though is that as we were starting to develop this episode today so much has changed already in that the players in the NBA have agreed to return to playing the playoff season. Later, this week I don't think that all the progress is gone but I'm wondering what what happens. Now you know thought that same whiplash like I said, I felt like this was finally the type of inspiration leadership that I've been hoping to see from such a wide body players. Leaks, cross-border. It was truly abused beautiful, and I think now we need to do more I'm hoping that that since this is now on the table, players can put more pressure on owners to. Work with the people they are most connected to some of the richest and most powerful people in this nation are in the speed dial of most NBA owners even just the day if feels effective part of I, think resuming the season was the players putting pressure on the NBA to address the social unrest we've been dealing with all summer in some ways. So they started a foundation that's dedicated to investing in black causes. They're giving hundreds of millions of dollars they've given like you know the players, some approved protest phrases that they can use. They can put black lives matter on the courts and things like that and what I liked about this moment is at the NBA players were like that's what I usually do. And that's actually still not enough. So I'm hoping that we can see continued forward motion in that way something that I enjoy in this moment was seeing the NBA take the WNBA's league they have been holding it down all your curves pressing in. So many ways the thing is, is that WNBA, players, they don't make as much money as NBA players do they have really put their necks out there for social justice speaking up. Protecting black lives in many ways, it seems in some ways that they have more to lose by doing it. You know I am maybe two degrees below cautiously optimistic. That is a lot better than cynical, which is where I was before.

NBA Wnba Jacob Blake Milwaukee Bucks Colin Kaepernick Bill Russell Kyrie Irving Kenosha Wisconsin Streit Chris Weber Basketball NFL Briana Washington Lebron Naomi Osaka Taylor Tennis
Freedom Summer: Datra Dee Dee Jackson

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

05:37 min | Last month

Freedom Summer: Datra Dee Dee Jackson

"Many. Of the faces that we have seen over the past few weeks leading the black lives matter movement have been those of young black women theatric DVD. Jackson is one of those dynamic women speaking truth to power as a leader, a black youth project one hundred while attending Florida International University. She became active at the height of the murder of Trayvon. Martin was led to founding the local chapter, a dream defenders at her university. Today, we chat with Yatra, how young people are seizing and owning their political power at this moment. I'm really excited to talk to you today I've been such a big fan of B. y. p.. One hundred in really excited that you were able to join us. So thank you. So I I want to talk about the fact that at such a young age you have done so much for the black community and the Black Youth Community you've done organizing as a CO founder or of the Durham Chapter of the Black Youth Project hundred supporting black mamas bail out, which is one of the favourite causes that I donate to and just so much more especially during the racial pandemic that we've been in these past few weeks. What brought you to this work? What made you wake up one day and say, okay as a young person, I have to get involved as a black young person I have to get involved. So I am from Philly or and throughout my years I was in public schools I grew single mom. Single mom household of three girls and. So grew up in inundated southwest philly end of there's many things of my experience that really informs where end today but that's not quite where I was politicized. I was in Grad School. Down in Miami Around Twenty, twelve, twenty thirteen and so I, was living in Florida. At the same time as the murder of Trayvon Martin and all of the marches in the energy that was being built up in that time and I was pretty apolitical leading up to that point and was going to a black sitting union meeting because our school where I know black people. So the black student union because that's where we were and this organization out to folks from dream, defenders averages a state based organization down in Florida Cain ended presentation on the work that they were doing and police brutality and immigration. Reform. School to prison pipeline. We're talking about these different issues in was really activated started to pay attention. To. That as an opportunity to be partners to the apartment organizations actually doing the work that was really where I started really a moment that similar to where now I love your path that you just talked about and I feel it's so important because A lot of young people you know when I talk to them, they just feel that can I just show up? Can I do it in? That's really what you did, and that's what a lot of the people involved with the. One hundred have done and I would love for you to talk a little bit more about the work that you're doing. In particular I'm a fan of the safe. We save campaign, which is something that I also think is a very timely conversation that we need to have in this country. Yes. So she said we save is one hundred national campaign It's our transformative moving campaign to end gender-based violence against like women. Like girls in black gender, non conforming people especially comes. In there is more origin even how we got to deciding orange she sees as national as I national campaign we had this huge visibility of black boys and black men that were being murdered brutalized by the police It was carrying this very long history erasure, black women, black girls, an our stories in the way that we have been brutalized by the police, and so we wiping one hundred among many other organizations really uplifted. Hashtag say her name. As a demand to also remember the stories of black women and black girls be harmed on a regular basis by the police and really pushing a bit of an intervention into the visibility of who stories are being told. And so we help these different events honoring black women and black girls who stories were not being pushed to the front and also talked about the a specific nature of black women in the way that the system harms us that doesn't that doesn't necessarily apply to black men in black police in. So we've been pushing. On, lifting up story of Ricky Boyd Renisha McBride. Happens Melissa Alexander. In just a number of Ions Stanley Jones might hall that list goes on online. Envy making sure that that this was also part of this time. The stories of black women grows they're are always forgotten

Black Youth Community Black Youth Project Trayvon Martin Grad School Murder Florida Florida International Universi Ricky Boyd Renisha Mcbride Jackson Philly Melissa Alexander Stanley Jones Durham Co Founder Miami
Community Check In

Therapy for Black Girls

05:38 min | Last month

Community Check In

"I thought it was time for us to do another community check in given that there continue to be so many threats to our mental health. I want to start by letting you know that if you are not feeling. Okay right now it's totally understandable why you would not be. I know we sometimes hear glimpses about the ways our mental health is being impacted but I don't know that we're always aware are able to recognize the significance of what's happening when many of us are currently experiencing in terms of the pandemic racism unemployment police brutality it Cetera. Is a prolonged stress response. And our bodies are not designed to be able to withstand prolonged exposure to stress. When we experienced a stressful situation. Astra's hormones are firing up to help us to take care of ourselves in the event of an emergency. When the stress will leave in his past, are homeowners should go back to normal. But if that's stressful event never passes our hormones and our internal emergency system stay on alert. In session thirty, eight of the podcast you heard Dr Hodge Talk About Stress Response as the one you might have if you were being chased by a bear. In this instance of course, you want your system engage so that you can get away from the bear but if there is no bear, it's damaging an unsustainable for our systems to stay engaged in the same way. With, many of us have been experiencing for the past couple of months mentally and physically is reacting as if the bear has been there the This heightened state can lead to a host of concerns like headaches, difficulties, concentrating stomach aches increased heart rate an heightened blood pressure just to name a few. In our car in reality not only has the stress relief event not past we continue to get hit with new stressors. So it's really important that we be tapped into how our mental health is holding up and be able to recognize when we might not be doing so well. So I WANNA share a few questions for you to consider. So, that she can be more intentional about checking in with yourself. Number One. Are you feeling a little crispy around the edges? We know that when stress is heightened our ability to regulate our emotions diminished, which sometimes means that were more irritable. Additionally it's important to remember that depression doesn't always look like someone Sullen and staying to themselves sometimes, it looks like the person who snapping on others for no apparent reason. So if you've noticed that your patients has gotten a little thinner. You're yelling when you don't typically or it's a little harder for you to show grace to yourself or to others. Take moment to stop and tap into what might really be underneath the irritability. Number two. Are you managing your anxiety in ways that are actually helpful when we feel anxious and out of control, it's normal and helpful to try to control the things. We do have control over it. Many Times. This actually works, for example, controlling what you can relate it to cove in nineteen in terms of washing your hands, wearing a mask and keeping a distance are all things that are helpful and may actually help bring down your anxiety. But sometimes are attempts to control. Don't always stop with the ways that are helpful in managing anxiety. So pay attention to whether you've been doing things like getting into power struggles with your partner or your friends are micromanaging your employees. These things may seem relatively innocuous, but they could actually be unhelpful the chimps and managing your anxiety. Question Number Three Are you really allowing yourself to feel your feelings. Now. This is a tricky one because there are plenty of environmental cues that would lead us to believe that things are okay and somewhat returning to normal. But this rush towards normalcy is unfair. It's unkind and it's damaging. We're being expected to show up again in our offices. Send our kids back to school hop on zoom call after zoom, call as if everything is okay and it's not okay. And so even though the world may be signaling to US hey, it's okay. You're fine. I want you to take a step back in focus in on how you're really feeling when everything is quiet. You may notice that you're purposely not staying engaged with reality because it often feels like too much to bear and I get it. Are. You may notice that you're spending lots of time throwing yourself into tasks because the way to the situation feels like too much and again I get it. It is too much and how we choose to or need to cope in situations where resources are depleted are valid but I do want you to pay attention to it and be mindful twitter you're doing.

Dr Hodge Twitter Astra Partner
Interview With RZA Of The Wu-Tang Clan

Toure Show

03:42 min | Last month

Interview With RZA Of The Wu-Tang Clan

"Tell me about this movie. Why? Why? Why this movie now cutthroat city to War Katrina Shamikh it the trailer is amazing. Tell me about this movie long. Hamas. Start talking about the movie without sandbox La Brother a long time acknowledging your hairstyle. Acknowledging each other's beards. Dante Very Long. I haven't cut anything in a while you have accrediting theater while. If you want to acknowledge you the first two time guest on this show. So I appreciate that Bongbong Quantity without grades I got breaks down so That's how we doing anyway a man's treasure to. Talk to you again but this film right here. This is like our this is me really conti myself down as a filmmaker. Based in New Orleans after. Noted with aftermath, of Hurricane Katrina. You Watch. These four young men who have always asked rations in charge of desperation. And desperation. Lead. US down the rabbit hole. Was We all know? And hopefully, the goal of the for me as a filmmaker is spire. Out The desperation what could be desperation? Trauma Nation. And that's kind of you know. Kind of summarize the. Trying to do here. That's what the film is aiming to show. I know you're a student of film. So what are the films that are most inspiring your vision of this one like it did you make a mood board or at least in your mind you're like I wanna take a piece of this piece of this a piece of this and make it my own like what is what is what are the fathers of this? And it is definitely I'll. Be, honest with you small struggle with no in class struggle as young black men in our neighborhood. Movie You saw the Cina. Right I experienced things that he trauma neighborhood apart unanimity and also experienced myself in A. Good Adelaide. And a lot of not getting out and so when I got screenplay got invite the screenplay was led by my buddy all. Ready. ACCOST Hurricane Katrina was a tragic thing for. Country, you know we have to your anniversary of the right now and it thanks don't seem to change much in this country right? A sense of. How fasteners? Post the black community or the community more, it hurts other communities because see right now the fan denic, right but even if this story was set. In Flint, Michigan would water was bad or Saturday Chicago is south bothers is going through the struggles. Or set right on Staten Island Faulk, hill either either place. Is destroyers relevant but this one is set a Katrina and and these guys may turn to that desperation. It becomes. A high school, it will lead the films that kind of. Inspired like you know like feelings I'll turn to. I think John Singleton Boys Hood was a great example of somebody trying to get out. Get the situation, the neighborhood itself what the situation was under holding a man I thought John Degree Job John. Nash Story. You Go back to F Gary Gray or set it off. You know what I'm. Trying. To figure out, you know

Hurricane Katrina Katrina Hamas Trauma Nation New Orleans Dante John Singleton Gary Gray Hood Staten Island Nash A. Good Adelaide Chicago Michigan Flint
Life in Limbo

The Nod

03:04 min | Last month

Life in Limbo

"Amina welcome to the show man. So happy to have you. Thank you for having me congratulations on your most recent album limbaugh. How did you approach thinking about creating this album? Is the follow too good for you. I just started about the word legacy a lot more when meeting them both. So I wanted to make something that wasn't just super current to the times of a more. A. Ten years down on. About the title limbo. What does that mean? A lot of people thought it was speaking to the Times that we're in because I know that we're all currently in the. Title for a good year and a half for me I felt like I was stuck between two places from a young man to over. Kind of just figuring it out personally. But I definitely think people are connected with the project although I will say the day drive limbo twitter had a strong reaction to one track in particular becky. In attract, you talk about an interracial relationship with a white girl I kinda the challenges there was also within your family. There are a lot of folks who were kind of bothered by the song I'm curious like did you expect any of the response that you? I think me and my boys off knew that that was going to happen to immediately went into thinking was an ode to White One stories more. So about a black important Oregon stories is about me and middle school it completely woke me up to the Society of Portland what it's like growing up there and and how you look at truth. So I didn't really WANNA. Like shy away from that. You know there's a lot going on in Portland right now just between the uprisings and federal agents snatching protesters off the streets I visited Portland before I got a lot of stairs understand why? What are you making sense of what do you think of what's going on your city right now I'm a bit bitter sweet on it and I said that multiple times because as a black person going important organ, we never felt welcomed. We never felt like the city cater to us more than the scene is a liberal city but has so much racism behind the feds. And the police have so much work to do but the community of Portland, the people protesting and have a lot of work to do as well. People who are on the front lines are the same people kicking out black families out of their neighborhoods and gentrifying held out of these neighborhoods. So they're kicking the black family out but have a black lives matter sign on. Yeah I mean and it's not just Portland is mini CDs across the country that had to kind of do that working and wrecking live the fact that like this isn't something that just kind of crept up out of nowhere I wanNA. Come back to the album of bit. You share how the Becky was something you were thinking about in middle school you know that the subject matter there is there a track on the album that you kind of most cashes where you are right now the track burden? Really shows you where I'm at mentally I just kind of talk about my friends my life would I've been up to.

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Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

07:06 min | Last month

Freedom Summer: Barbara Lee

"In June nineteen sixty four freedom summer also known as the Mississippi Summer Project was a volunteer campaign across America to attempt to register as many black American voters as possible in Mississippi. News coverage of freedom summer shed a light on the white supremacy and police brutality that black Americans face. We. Don't Tuesday night the finding of three bodies in graves at the site of a damn near Philadelphia Mississippi where three civil rights workers disappeared six weeks ago. Over the past few weeks we have been experiencing another freedom summer. Minnesota are saying to people in New York two people in California to people in Memphis to people all across this nation enough is enough cell phone videos and social media are once again providing glaring spotlight on the inequities and injustice that are woven into the fabric of American society. In this special season of the browns to politics, we are diving into the past in how is impacting our present and future. For protests to political campaigns and youth involvement change is in the air and the fight for liberation continues. We'll be hearing from some of the Black Women at the forefront at today's movement who are fighting for change in making history to ensure that we have justice for all. Her name was even floated as a potential. VP. Pick for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's. It is no surprise that would ever congress is debating issues of equity and justice. Congress will lease voice is one of the strongest and most prominent today we talk about her work as a college student, a member of the Black Panther Party and what Congress is, do we to fight systems of oppression to reshape reimagined our political world? Congresswoman Barbara Lee thank you so much for joining us and happy belated birthday. Breaking very good happy with you. I'm really excited to talk to you today and for our listeners, the congresswoman is such a legend and all of her work that she has done in. Congress over the years especially for Black Brown and indigenous communities by I have to ask you this question because it's something that I just wanted to talk to you about for so long is. You were a part of the Black Panthers. What was it like being? Black Panther I actually was not a member of the Black Panther Party I was what they call the community worker community workers had a lot of responsibilities as the Black Panther. Party. Members and remember the Black Panther Party began as a result of police Gupta brutality and the African American community. I mean. They stood down the police because things, police, murders, police Retali- as we know now were occurring then and they were the first organization that really took the police on, and so it was out of that that the Black Panther party formed, there's the Bible programs because it was not only an organization that address police brutality, but it was an organization that addresses chemic-. Racism and poverty. and. So what I did, and which was really phenomenal work and I was a single mother on public assistance with two little boys. I helped sell newspapers like math a newspaper on street corners I actually participated in the breakfast program for children who didn't have whose parents didn't have enough money to buy food and that's actually the breakfast programs from the federal government. Actually. Started as a result of the of the models that the Black Panther party you. I also really worked with you. He knew then did the research on his book Revolutionary Suicide. It was really phenomenal project I got to know Huey Newton Bobby Seale, Elaine Brown, Erica Huggins Joan Kelly, who just passed away and many of the leadership of the black. Panther party because community worker and student I was very involved in a lot of the work with party members. I actually brought Shirley Chisholm got involved in politics through the first presidential the first. Time. A black woman ran for president and that was sure children who was the first African American woman elected to Congress and so the Black Student Union president I invited her to come to milk college where I was attending and I got involved in her campaign by herb insisting that I register the vote and I had a class go because I didn't WanNa work in any of those campaigns. Well, bottom line is working her campaign and got the Black Panther party really involved in voter registration efforts. I. Was the one that went and asked Huey Noonan Bobby Seale to consider becoming politically active around early Chisholm campaign and they did. So I worked on all phases of the black. Panther. Party and all the different divisions I actually bag groceries. You know the panthers had a whole ten point program which again, the Free Breakfast program for the kids They started the Community Health Center Movement by instituting the George Jackson free medical clinic they did sickle cell tests. In fact, there was the Black Panther party that raises awareness about sickle cell disease as a as a disproportionate impact African Americans Fast Board Twenty Twenty people in the African American community and Black and Brown news still struggling disproportionately as it related to food security food desert healthcare disparities, unequal education. I. Helped. Start. Actually I wrote the first proposals for the Black Panther Party community learning center. They establish a Black Panther party school and so I was very instrumental in working on that project. So I did a lot of work with the Black Panther Party and I can just speak to how phenomenal they were and how necessary they were and how we should as we move forward. You know there's this Symbol in a gun and Andy. In government in Ghana called and Copeland. If the bird beautiful bird looking back holding an egg in her mouth and like in order to move forward in order to blackboard and you have to look back, we have to know our history we know where we've been and we have to build upon that so that we can move forward it. Now a wonderful young people in the Movement for Black, flags, or dreamers all the movements that are taking place are a continuation of what I see as the civil rights movement of of today, as well as what Black Panther Party actually started as it relates to stand down and and thing that that policing in our community. chain stop disproportionate killing black, and Brown people

Black Panther Party Black Panther Party School Panther Party Congress Black Women African American Community Black Student Union Congresswoman Barbara Lee Mississippi Huey Noonan Bobby Seale Philadelphia Mississippi Joe Biden Minnesota Browns Shirley Chisholm Memphis Ghana Panthers New York
April Ryan Interview

Toure Show

05:04 min | Last month

April Ryan Interview

"Another tactic trump used to galvanize his core supporters came to me in an awkward moment in the summer of twenty seventeen I took my kids to New York City to see Broadway musical wicked for the third time yet more importantly to see actress Shirley Ralph, who played madame miracle the headmistress of the school. My friend made theater history by being the first black woman to play Madame miracle on Broadway, it was art imitating life. When one of the characters began to reveal the plot of the play making the green, which the enemy of Oz character said the best way to unify people is to create a common enemy. Mind you wicked. The book was published in Nineteen Ninety, five and the play was a broadway musical in two, thousand and three. This thought pattern was laid well before Donald Trump decided to create a common enemy, but he understood what to do. And you could say that about a lot of things calling cabinet is the common enemy. April Ryan is the common in Barack Obama is the common and the media in general common. Enemy of the people isn't that something you and that was I swim. Are you afraid for your life right now? 'CAUSE you've gotten death threats. Now you're traveling with security. Are. You didn't say I'll challenge with security okay. Okay. Are you are you are you are you seriously afraid for your life? I'm seriously afraid. I'm seriously the mount over their freight for myself. I'm afraid for my fellow reporters. There are some crazy people out here. Today there are people out here who listen to this president and believe that he's doing God's work and think they're doing God's bidding by calling us and threatening us. A reporter, call my boss recently. And said, well, you know we hear April's getting these death threats and then. Okay well, I thought he was just going to verify verbally that I was getting the death threats. So my boss and I talked on the phone. So yeah I got a call from so and so from Sullen. So I said Oh I said, did you tell them? He said not only did I tell them I gave him the emails I gave them the voicemails I gave him I gave him everything I said what so it's cringe-worthy but I am not going to cower to fear. I. Do what I have to do to survive, but I'm not gonNA couch fear. Ones at back what does a credible death threat look like what have you gotten that really made you say I without going into without going into a lot of it when someone calls or emails or texts my company or me and says death from above and you know how? Some of these things are just belligerent and they talk about you know falsehoods about the black community. I'm a race Baiter I'm this I'm that and then death from it I don't WanNa get into it, but I had one the one of the early one came into the company website saying that I was like what in the person happened to be someone a retired military person Yes. So I don't want to go any further into this, but it's real Torah, it's real and. It's real, but I'm not going to stop because. I take my precautions I'm on I'm fully aware of it, but guess what a lot of it to they want to make you afraid. They want to make you afraid and I refuse. Has It changed the way you do your job in any way noticed that changed the way I do my job? No not at all not at all not at all. And I refuse to let it have you seen. This climate of media as the enemy and we must be violent toward media has it affected the way others are doing their jobs. I can't tell you what others I mean. I. Don't talk to them that much because. I just I don't WanNa. Give it life. But there's also this understanding that it's real. I mean. WanNa talk to you but I can't and I just don't want to get into it because. They're people who may WANNA copy. There are people who may want to do and I'm not going to give them that foothold. and I and I hear you sign because it's a sad day. No, it's it is heavy to see what we've already seen of. The newspaper gets attacked. This one gets attacked that when the television you hear Kim Volvo what they called they said to Kim is like what what, what did they say? They said some crazy stuff about you know they were talking about I don't even want to give you talking about the AK seventy, you use a pin but what about I have an AK seventy something along that line I'm like what it's ridiculous. C. Span of C. Span caller said something crazy about Brian. So I'm like what and I'm like it's not a joke. You don't use this tongue in cheek these words this is real this allies people don't see. There's collateral damage. When you do something like this and I am we have seen what happened in? Annapolis

Donald Trump Kim Volvo Nineteen Ninety Wanna New York City OZ Barack Obama Shirley Ralph April Ryan C. Span Black Community Reporter President Trump Annapolis Brian
How to unlock your potential, Modeling manhood for teen boys

Core Confidence Life

04:37 min | Last month

How to unlock your potential, Modeling manhood for teen boys

"Going on it? was going on how's IT GOING DENNIS? Appreciate you have me on man I'm so excited. For this this discussion this conversation and just love what you do my man. I appreciate that. Appreciate that very much. So tell everybody a little bit more about you. Other than what I just said because you know you can tell you better than I can tell you. Absolutely my man. So I I guess I'll give somebody a little bit of background, but I was born and raised in Baltimore Maryland, and I grew up in a family that struggled with poverty for generations and You know basically saw my mom struggle from paycheck to paycheck us all the people around me just struggling to make ends meet and at from my perspective I decided that it wasn't going to stop or that was gonNA stop with me. I didn't want to be stuck in. That same Rut life So I just decided to start making some decisions, which basically leads me being the first male in my family to ever earn a college degree. Okay. which then you know basically the the mindset behind all of that is a I was able to get myself out of a bad situation because my dad left when I was only I think seven or eight years old wisdom allowed me to become you know a kid that grew up in a single family household. Where my mom basically was forced to take care of me and my brother on the thirteen thousand dollar a year disability in cup. So it was a different type of situation different type of environment I basically felt as though only had three options, which is I feel as though a lot of kids that grew up that grew up in that type of environment they feel the same way but my options was either Goto the league right become oppression athlete it was either the other option was to be a professional entertainer. So a singer rapper dancer or something like that or so drugs right and chose option. I chose option one. I decided I was going to go to the league or wanted to basically play football and be able to go to the NFL and because of that dream, and because of that that goal that I had I became the first student in high school to ever earn a scholarship in just because history. So now my mission my passion is basically helping kids shed though self limiting beliefs and live a life that they're passionate about living I. don't want them to have that same thought process that I had when I was growing up. All right. That's great. Great background that you have spoken about their we'll get into a lot of those different things. So what what issues do you mainly speak about when you're in front of today's you would. mainly. Primarily just shed and self limiting beliefs I think a lot of the times we don't believe in ourselves what we can actually accomplish in life and I personally believe that we all are born with the seeds of greatness inside of us. We're all men to do great things and sometimes when you're born into an environment environment where maybe you're stuck in poverty or you know your surrounding area just basically tells you that you can only be one thing which for me, it was basically go to jail or be dead before you're even eighteen years old right If I WANNA help kids break that belief that that is all that life has to offer. Because there's so many different opportunities and things out there that kids can take advantage of to really increase their lifestyle and increase the the life that they wanna live. Limiting beliefs so You know we talk about limiting beliefs all the time and changing your mind frame and just how you think about things. So talk to us a little bit more about limiting beliefs limiting beliefs, and what did they do chew us. Absolutely, so a limiting belief is something that you believe about yourself. That is just not true. It's a box that you place yourself in that. That doesn't allow you the CA like to break out right. Basically leaves you confined inside of one individual section. What it does to you is it prevents you from stepping into your own greatness. A lot of times we limit ourselves with these. These thoughts like for me growing up was like I only had those three options, right? That was all I had. If I wasn't picking one of those three that I was just going to be a failure in in general where obviously thankfully you know as I got. Out of that environment instead to associate with other people I started to realize that there are other options available, right. So they're self limiting beliefs are detrimental to your ability to succeed in life because if you only put yourself inside a one box, then you you basically close yourself off to all other opportunities and all other abilities that you have within you to create the success that you want.

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