Addiction and Sobriety

Listen to the latest on recovery, addiction, rehabilitation and substance abuse. Compiled to inspire and strengthen your sobriety. Aired from leading talk radio shows and premium podcasts.

Calming the Chaos with Tracy Kenela

The Addicted Mind Podcast

04:27 min | 4 d ago

Calming the Chaos with Tracy Kenela

"Right everyone. Welcome to the addicted mind podcast. My guest today is Tracy Cannella and she is going to talk about. Chaos Tracy please introduce yourself. Hi Duane. It was good to meet you just a little bit ago and I love talking about chaos. In fact, my podcast is all about chaos and I have chaos in my life, and so here I am to talk about the possibility that we could actually be addicted to chaos aware chaos meets your specialty area, which is addiction. I know. I was so excited that you wanted to come onto the podcast because I had listened to your podcast and I really love it calming the chaos. Because I think anybody in addiction can relate to having chaos in their life. Oh Yeah. Yes I believe. So I think the the definition that I like to give away. Do you want me to introduce myself I? Yeah. Tell me a little bit about you and how you got into this work and why this particular topic chaos is meaningful to you. Yeah. So I am a licensed mental health counselor with a variety of certifications in eating disorders, rehabilitation counseling and hypnotherapy, and I have a private practice in Washington state. And so how I got interested in this? Topic of chaos is because I found that most of my clients who came in for therapy were really struggling with overwhelm and then I was in my practice at the time I developed the podcast I was very overwhelmed with people wanting therapy with me, and I just didn't have enough room in my practice to support them and always wanted to do a podcast and I thought well. You know let I'm just going to do one, and then I'll have a place to refer these people to in addition to other mental health counselors in the area. But then they could hear my voice and they can hear some of the things about overwhelmed because I really thought. This is that universal theme that most everybody brings in the therapy session why not do a podcast about? It and directs and people to a free resource that they can get help. It's a self help podcast and I really love doing it. It's it's great and it helps me come my own chaos because I have to hold my own self accountable for practicing the skills that I I suggest on the podcast. Absolutely. That's so true when you're talking and doing the work and talking to. People about how comic as he got to do it in your own life but I think you're absolutely right. This is such a universal topic I know that in my own life there have been times when I'm just overwhelmed you know it's it's so hard to get organized sometimes it's almost concealed paralyzing when you you've got all this chaos going on. So let's just start by defining chaos. Yes. So what is chaos anyway and there are several definitions I talk about in my very first episode of my podcast but in a nutshell, it is complete disorder. Unpredictable behaviour random or intense situations. So this could be actual real situations or imagine situations in your mind. It's also small changes that happen in bundles or are sensitive in nature and any sort of disorganization, and finally my favorite definition of chaos is a confused mass or mixture which I like to use to describe when I'm in the kitchen because it is pretty much chaos. When I'm cooking, I can definitely relate to that definition at times especially with all, that's going on in the world and everything changing and with a pandemic, and their feels like there's a lot of chaos right there are there's just a lot of sensory input. There's things you see on TV there's things that you hear from your next door neighbor there. Are Things you hear on the radio and all of these conclusions you come to in your mind just add up to a lot of wellm because of what's happening in our world today and we just in our minds, make it into something that it may or may not be. So I'm very fascinated by it but that's the definition of it. It's just a lot and overwhelm

Tracy Cannella Private Practice Duane Washington
Interview with Amy Dresner

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

05:13 min | 5 d ago

Interview with Amy Dresner

"I'm your host Angela Pugh we are recording in my home away from home. Sunny. Hollywood California although it's not very sunny yet it looks like. It's getting there our guest today I'm so excited about this. I just met amy she's fantastic. She's so much fun Amy Dresner. She's a former professional stand up comic and she has this fabulous book. I can't wait to read called my fair junkie a memoir of getting dirty and staying clean and that is available on audiobook to which I just found out, which is my favorite. So I will definitely be getting it as soon as we are done with this podcast. So Amy, welcome to the show. Thank you so much for being here I. Thanks for having me. I'm really awesome to meet you in person. I'm glad. Yeah Right. God. You're not glad you're here and I'm not doing this podcast by myself. So I was thinking with your personality, you should have a podcast of God. And everyone has a podcast. I'm time for a podcast You know I'm doing a lot of book promotion and a lot of podcast like yours people people other writers are like teasing me. They're like, are you on a podcast? Thirty it's embarrassing. So I actually made a meam of Colonel Puff Puff my cat going up you're on another podcast for your book please tell me more. So, what other stuff have you been doing promoting the book? Not Just Interviews readings I did a couple book fairs Best places for people to find your book. I'd say Amazon, it's Barnes and noble online. It's on target online nice but Barnes and noble in stores online everyone seems to be buying on Amazon. It's on india-bound. It's on fit? Amazon. Is probably going to own the world pretty soon. If they keep doing same day delivery like I will never leave my house to shop again. Yeah. That was the problem I think with the book. was them trying to push for a pre sales like addicts don't want deferred gratification? You know what I mean. So there I am like pushing. preorder book is like three months away and everyone's like No like they want. Order Yeah you know addicts one instant gratification me with audiobook. There you go. That's says they've never has never seen something like that. With my book, they've seen a one to one ratio of the paper of the of the hardcover audiobook. Me On a podcast and they downloaded immediately. Yes. The. Other part of it is audio. We were talking about this a little bit before we started recording audio is so easy because I can hit play on my phone and I can walk out of my house in it'll play I walk in the House it POPs up on my Bluetooth. Speaker. When I get in my car pops up on my car you're very electronically organized not I I'm I'm Ju Yeah I'm not tech people in general. Speaking for myself not other Jews. We're not that great at that's up except when I was a tweaker I had a little I had some good stuff it'll. Yeah and I was good at taking apart electric's. Fixing them just taking them apart in. Do you really need to fix them once? and. Now I'M GONNA go for a series deal based on the book, which is Super Super Exciting. Okay. What will that look like eyebrow? Oh come on as a little something. Okay. It's based on the book correct. So So based on a true story. Yeah. It's based on the book and I really want the opportunity to be involved in in the writing and I really want the opportunity to do a TV show that shows. Addiction. How it really is Not just these destructive monsters that were sensitive and needy and that we you know it's not celebrity rehab wherever was puking in garbage cans and fighting, and you know that's a part of it but it's like you I don't think there's been I've been I've been watching Patrick Melrose. I can't watch like I'm trying to watch at one of my good girlfriends. Told me about it she is hooked and I. Watch it but here it's so hard for me because of the needles like there's go to in the beginning. Yeah. When I when I started it and the first thing was a Syringe, my heart was like. Were you an IV drug user I? Well, I, was in such a chick was and I still have like of lick a visceral reaction needles and we spend maybe fifteen years since I've shot drugs right But my I have a weird sort of like it's like excitement and kind of repulsion nausea at the same time. But my body remembers I. See it my body goes crew. Is Wife's up wanting watching intervention because that's why I stopped it stopped it was to actually what triggering me freaking me out to show. She told me about that show and I started watching those are the that goes away that's beginning Kelly I can't watch this why I stopped watching out beginning it goes later it becomes more about is abusive childcare becomes. Because this is part. Don't tell me one TV show. That that really shows addiction the way it

Amy Dresner Amazon Patrick Melrose Angela Pugh Hollywood California Barnes Kelly
Drug Addiction In America

Mentally Yours

04:32 min | Last week

Drug Addiction In America

"Woken to Mentally Yours Metro could ikaes weekly podcast about all things mental health. Today we're talking to Dave. Marlon, he was the CEO of crossroads of Southern Nevada, which was the largest addiction and Rehab Center in the area, the psychotherapist drug and alcohol counselor, and he basically knows everything about addiction and mental health issues in the US and beyond. Making me talking tim today about how the pandemic has been affected addiction issues to get help if you're struggling and how to recognize if you might have a problem with drugs or alcohol. Bruce Dave. Thanks so much for joining us on mental yours and welcome from across the pond. My first question was basically because obviously as I mentioned, we're in London. You're in the US, it such different situation in terms of addiction, mental health, and obviously the pandemic to get started. Could you give kind of a brief overview of the reality of addiction in the US? How serious the problem is that how widespread is a? The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation calls addiction the number one health problem in the US. If we look at the the number of prescription opiates that are consumed in the entire world The United States consumes more than eighty percent of them. We. have. You know we've always had an alcohol problem for a percentage of our population. we we developed enough and phetamine mean and a cocaine problem over the last. Twenty years, and in the last five, six years Oh actually even a little longer. An opiate problem has has become. Our most serious addiction challenge. Kind of the most common addiction issue that you see people coming into your center with. It it's interesting. I've run Iran the largest treatment center in Las. Vegas of. Gene. Years. And now as a private center and they're absolutely opiates or over my last three, four years, they're opiates was the number one drug of choice that clients had presented to solutions recovery without the opiate use disorder their primary. Primary substance. Now I work at an indigent facility in in downtown. Las Vegas where. More than half of our clients are homeless. And what's interesting is with this demographic, there's a much higher methamphetamine use. Would say my number one. Substance of for clients is nothin vitamin with opiates and alcohol running for a close second place. That's really interesting I. Think What was interesting that you said kind of opiates have been coming up over the lost six years because for me, it's felt like the coverage has been really recent like only in the last couple of years, we taught it to the opioid crisis this being a sudden kind of unexpected issue but you're saying it's been building for a long time. It has. Interestingly, fourteen years ago I was running the largest health insurance company in the state. And I remember in my last. My last year or two I remember looking at pharmacy reports and we were all scratching our heads saying what is this Oxycontin and why did it not show up two years ago and now I remember when across the ten million dollar mark at the Insurance Company for monthly use so it really begins began spiking. Thirteen fourteen years ago. It became. Newsworthy in fashionable. Six seven years ago, and now we're a were still squarely in an opiate epidemic.

United States Las Vegas Bruce Dave Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rehab Center Marlon TIM CEO Southern Nevada LAS Cocaine London Methamphetamine Iran
Are You a People Pleaser? Here's a few tips for Saying No.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

04:37 min | Last week

Are You a People Pleaser? Here's a few tips for Saying No.

"This one's for all of US people pleasers out there who find it difficult or? Finding ourselves regretting saying, yes to things we are putting our needs before other people and we're also looking for affirmation insane. Yes. Two things you might remember I talk about. Different types of communication there really only three when you're looking at. The big scope of how we get our message across to people were either passive were assertive or were aggressive and sometimes aggressive impassive meet in the woods and have a little thing. But for the most part, you can see along that spectrum of passive assertive and aggressive where you fall. If we're on the aggressive side, we tend to let things percolate until we attack. We often do this with those. We love the most the ones we take for granted. We stay no aggressively stepping strongly into this false sense of power about with no regard or attention to the connection with the other person in passive communication we accommodate we say, yes. When we really really want to say, no, this brings us a temporary false sense of peace. But leader, we have apprehension we have rumination and then resentment we defer to the relationship with no regard to our power and ironically end up undermining the very relationship that we want. To sustain or not cause trouble in, we also avoid in this where. Passive and aggressive meet in the woods. We don't prioritize our personal sense of power or the relationship in other words everybody loses. We dishonor ourselves and amp up our own discomfort by leaving something unresolved and disrespect the other person by not providing them with an answer but instead provoking them silently through manipulation and articulating our needs in a very passive aggressive way sarcasm the no is one of the first steps toward healthy boundaries and often times. It's freaky scary and this is because people have been accustomed to coming to us for things for answers for doing. And we let them. So when they come to us and want to ask something we get flummoxed we get. Locked and loaded into our own discomfort because we really want to say no but they need us and we therefore are pushed in to the ritual of Sania. Like any other type of problem solving in recovery, we need some kind strategy, some kind of practice to help us get to know easier. To give us time, for instance, give yourself a pause before you answer. If you're having difficulty doing that. Structure some time before. In your off time to predict and play through how you're GONNA say, no a helpful strategy that can enable you to say, no with greater ease is gaining this clarity around things you want to say, yes to make a list of your top three priorities an understand that the change. Post these priorities around your house or you're going to see them, you're going to reinforce what's important to you. When someone then asks you to do something that takes your time and energy away from those things that you want to say, yes to fill free to answer the inquiry you know with. Now. I have things I need and what to do and want to prioritize those.

Sania
The Vicious Cycle

Big Book Podcast

06:11 min | Last week

The Vicious Cycle

"How it finally broke southerners obstinacy and destined the salesman to start a at Philadelphia. January eighth nineteen, thirty, eight. That was my day. The place. Washington DC. This last real merry go round had started the day before Christmas and I had really accomplished a lot in those fourteen days. I my new wife had walked out baggage and furniture. Then the apartment landlord had thrown me out of the empty apartment and the finish was the loss of another job. After a couple of days, dollar hotels and one night in the Pokey I. Finally landed on my mother's doorstep shaking apart with several days beard and of course, broke as usual. Many of these same things had happened to me many times before. But this time they had all descended together for me this was it here I was thirty nine years old and a complete washout nothing had worked. Mother would take me in only if I would say locked in a small store room and give her my clothes and shoes, we had played this game before. This is the way Jackie found me lying on a cot in my skivvies with hot and cold sweats pounding heart and that awful itchy scratchiness all over. Somehow, I had always managed to avoid DT's. I had not asked for help and seriously doubt that I would have but fits an old school friend of mine had persuaded. Jackie to call on me. Had, he come two or three days later I think I would have thrown him out but he hit when I was open for anything. Jackie arrived about seven in the evening and talked until three. A M. I don't remember much of what he said but I did realize that here was another guy exactly like me he had been in the same laughing academies in the same jails known the same loss of jobs, same frustration, same boredom, and the same loneliness. If anything he had known all of them even better and more often than I. Yet, he was happy relaxed, competent and laughing. That night for the first time in my life I really let down my hair and admitted my general loneliness. Jackie told me about a group of fellows in New York of who my old friend fits was one who had the same problem I had and who by working together to help each other where not now drinking and we're happy like himself. He said something about God or a higher power. But I brushed that off that was for the birds not for me little more of our talk stayed in my memory but I do know I. Slept the rest of that night while before I had never known what a real night's sleep was. This is my introduction to this understanding fellowship although is to be more than a year later before our society was to bear the name alcoholics anonymous. All of us in Ainhoa the tremendous happiness that is sobriety, but there are also tragedies. My sponsor Jackie was one of these. He brought in many of our original members yet. He himself could not make it and died about Gaullism. The lesson of his death still remains with me yet I often wonder what would have happened if somebody else had made that I call on me. So I always say that as long as I remember January eighth that is how long I will remain sober. The Age old question in a is which came first the neurosis or the alcoholism. I like to think I was fairly normal before alcohol took over. My early life was spent in Baltimore where my father was a physician and a grain merchant, my family lived in very prosper circumstances, and while both my parents drank sometimes too much neither was an alcoholic. Father was very well integrated person and while mother was high strung and a bit selfish and demanding our home life was reasonably harmonious. There were four of US children and although both of my brothers later became alcoholic one died of alcoholism. My sister has never taken a drink in her life. Until I was thirteen I attended public schools with regular promotions and average grades. I have never shown any particular talents nor have I had any real frustrating ambitions? At Thirteen, I was packed off to a very fine Protestant boarding school in Virginia where I stayed for years graduating without any special achievements in sports I made the track and tennis teams I got along well with the other boys and had a fairly large circle of acquaintances but no intimate friends. I. Was Never Homesick and was always pretty self-sufficient. However here I probably took my first step towards my coming alcoholism by developing a terrific version to all churches and established religions at this school. We had Bible readings before each meal and Church Services, four times on Sunday, and I became so rebellious at this that I swore I would never join or go to any church except for weddings or funerals. At Seventeen, I entered the university really to satisfy my father who wanted me to study medicine there as he had. That is where I had my first drink and I still remember it for every I drink afterwards did exactly the same trick. I could feel it go right through every bit of my body and down to my very toes. But. Each drink after the first seemed to become less effective and after three or four, they all seemed like water. I was never a hilarious drunk the more I drank the quieter I got and the drunk I got the harder I fought to stay sober. So it is clear that I never had any fun out of drinking. I would be the sober seeming one in the crowd and all of a sudden. Drunk Est.. Even that first night I blacked out, which leads me to believe that I was an alcoholic from my very first drink. The first year in college I just got by with my studies and that year I majored in Poker and drinking I refuse to join any fraternity as I wanted to be a freelance and that year my drinking was confined to one night stands once or twice a week.

Jackie Salesman Washington Ainhoa Philadelphia United States Virginia Gaullism Church Services Baltimore New York Tennis
Are You Being Private About Your Recovery or Keeping It A Secret?

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

05:14 min | Last week

Are You Being Private About Your Recovery or Keeping It A Secret?

"Hello my friends. Welcome to Episode Number One Hundred Twenty eight of the Addiction Unlimited podcast I'm your coach Angela Pew here to help you solve the sobriety puzzle to alcohol alcohol-free and feel great about it. I can't wait to catch up with everybody and see what's happening in your world and I need to come clean with you about some things going on with me in my world. This actually ties in perfectly with today's topic. Are you being private about your recovery or are you keeping it a secret? And this doesn't only apply to recovery and we'll definitely dig into all those details here in a minute. There's a huge difference though between keeping something private in keeping it a secret. Last week I had my own little a hough moment when an one of our listeners who I adore he is an incredible member of our facebook group and he's such a breath of fresh air always uplifting other people. Have something positive to say. And he sent me a message asking me if I was okay, he noticed I hadn't been posting on social media for Awhile facebook or instagram or anywhere else for that matter and he was worried about me. Now let me tell you for me. Getting this message was really amazing because I am not a person that people worry about you know what I mean I'm super independent and self sufficient and I have a strong personality and I'm just not someone who requires worrying about. At the same time. It was so nice to get a message like that. Just checking in on me. It was so thoughtful and kind, and the fact that he actually took time to send a message instead of just thinking about it like all of it was really good I. so appreciate it. So let me tell you what's been going on and why I haven't been posting on social media because I'm sure if he noticed it some of you have noticed it to. The simple truth is I was pushing myself way too hard to do way too many things and it just isn't sustainable long-term. When Corona virus happened, it impacted my business in a big way much like it impacted everyone in a big way and instead of restructuring things I put myself in a position where was doing everything myself. Planning the podcast recording an editing, the podcast getting guests for the podcast creating social media posts for ten pages. Writing all the captions, keywords, hashtags, blogs posting in being engaged in the facebook group doing videos twice a week doing webinars and trainings. And writing and researching content for the membership site on top of my actual clients than I do sessions with every week, my six week program that we just started a new group a couple of weeks ago, paperwork emails, returning phone calls, and I have a whole other business also with to sober living houses with guys who are managing on a daily basis making sure they're safe in happy and answering all those calls in doing those interviews, managing those households and moving New People in. I mean it's a lot. And it's certainly a lot for a person to do by myself. Right? I. Have a little bit of help. You know I have my assistant who is fantastic but with corona virus shaven went down to part time so. That level of performance in energy can only last. So long and I hit a wall I was exhausted and overwhelmed and I knew I had to take a step back from something because I couldn't continue at that pace like I literally could not keep up anymore. And at first I thought. I would just take a couple of days off and get some sleep right focus on exercising and eating really good food to fuel my body and rebuild my energy reserves and that was the plan like a couple of days. What happened was when I let myself sleep in a little bit like each day. At Six am instead of four thirty. And I was realizing that I was even more tired than I thought even sleeping in and taking time to spend with my family and not being so hard on myself I was so tired. And that's when I decided I had to get a new game plan in order I needed to give some attention to my recovery, my brain and my body I needed to connect with people again, and I just had to take some

Facebook Angela Pew Hough Instagram
Making Treatment a Virtual Reality for More People

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:39 min | Last week

Making Treatment a Virtual Reality for More People

"It's a real treat to have Bob Poznanovic with me today because a long time ago before he went to work at Hazel and before he became the vice president of Business Development for this organization, Bob and I met in the Community of recovery in Saint Paul Bobby. It was in about nineteen, eighty, nine, ninety five when you and I would get in the car together and drive to center city I'll certainly a lot has happened in our lives personally and professionally just share with our audience today your personal connection to the Organization Hi William. It was February thirteenth of nineteen ninety five when I had reached my bottom. When I was using cocaine. A really high. Amount. In. CHICAGO. I had just lost my job at the senior executive in a technology company in camp lost my relationships and. Like everybody else and reach that point that I ran out of options and Fortunately found the Hazel and foundation and went to treatment said February and stayed in center city until March and then I went to fellow club where I met you and other members of the community some point in at the end of the march we started volunteering and every Saturday a group of would go to center city and share our strength experience and hope with patients that became a big secret to you know to my recovery is at volunteering and giving back and having some fun. You'll filling that void that drugs and alcohol had that was now being filled. With recovering I think that's one of the one of the promises and one of the gifts is to have really to friendships like yourself and others. Throughout the year. So it's nice to see you and it's nice to be here in the same capacity with you being able to carry, put a face on recovery and carry the message of hope who have ever imagined it right when. You talk about how much you lost but. We're so glad that you've gained so much and we're so glad that you continue to hold onto the expertise that has put you into the role now as vice president of Business Development for this organization at really a critical time, not only in our growth but as we. Address the pandemic of. Corona virus. And you're in charge of a lot of that effort. Can you take us through the process of developing and law launching? He's willing. Betty. Ford's telehealth strategy. Sure so because. My background has always been in technology. I was looking ahead and trying to predict kind of where the industry was going to go is you're looking at technology and healthcare in general I. Think it was pretty clear that technology utilization in behavioral health was really lagging in particularly even more. So in substance use a lot of organizations didn't even have electronic medical records. And you looked at the look at the industry, look at the industry problems, patient problems and care delivery problems back in twenty eighteen. When I HAPPEN TO HAVE A. Demo of some software that one of our pair partners was developing. And it clicked on me that. This technology could be. Used to deliver care differently. So was in two thousand, eighteen we started to talk about how could we use video? In live video between patients, not just in one in one environment which was being done. For telehealth for for years. But how could it be done in a group environment because the problem we are looking to solve Was Access. We're working with a lot of our partners around the country and communities. Academic health centers and other state organizations in healthcare to rural organs. Rural patients is a real challenge. So you know, could it help provide care improve access to roll Marcus would the convenience? Of being able to get care wherever you're at improve engagement. If you live in downtown La Chicago New York you know the catchment area is really small and some big cities because people don't want to fight the traffic after work to get the care. So convenience improve engagement. And the other was would. Stigma. Could we help through overcome some of the stigma. By. Not Making people physically have to show up at a building Kinda put a label on themselves Kenneth come out much more in a sense in Kuwait engaged them earlier by having them. Feel it's safer. As, well as convenient. To start that way. So we it started in two thousand eighteen down the past, and could we accomplished all the goals of of healthcare which is approve access improve outcomes improve. Patient satisfaction and lower costs.

Vice President Of Business Dev Bob Poznanovic Cocaine Hazel Chicago Saint Paul Bobby Ford Senior Executive Kuwait Betty Kenneth Marcus La Chicago New York
The Game Changing Power of Acceptance.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

05:15 min | 2 weeks ago

The Game Changing Power of Acceptance.

"Pay their sober people and sober solar 's and other people who are just interested in fine tuning near. Mental Health. Yeah it's me Linh and I'm in Georgia peachtree city to be exact for those of you who don't know I. Would like to just kind of reintroduce myself if you're. A recent joyner to the podcast I am a licensed professional clinical counselor with a private practice in Peachtree City, Georgia, and I also practice online with my clients back where I was originally licensed in Minnesota. So if you're in either of those two states that can work with you as a counselor, however I also have sober. So recovery where I coach people because that's what do you do when your therapist and want to reach more people in the world you practice your coaching skills which we also use in therapy. So I've developed this coaching program that I use with people, which is very similar to what I do in my counseling practice extraordinarily similar. And I offer that through private coaching packages where you can work with me individually for a series of months and you can find out more at Lynn. Mattie DOT, com or sober. So Recovery Net, they take you to the same place and you can just check me out there. I started this podcast in two thousand eighteen really as a project to get my voice out there. And share what I know to be good mental health with other people along with issues that surround us when we are in recovery or trying to be sober and all of those good things and today I am surprised. But happily so to know that there are about twenty five thousand of you listening every month and I'm ever so grateful for you picking up what I'm. Putting down. So today's subject I loved digging in two things that interest me but also seemingly come up a lot in my week to week working with people who are suffering in the same way that I dead wanting to make their lives better and finding ways to do that. That are very empowering. So today I wanNA talk about one of the most powerful tools in what? I call the buffer zone, which is essentially your toolkit it just i. like the analogy of a buffer zone because you can grow it really big. I am putting my two hands out very close together at first and then stretching to become a big buffer zone of things that you can do to help you cope and one of the most powerful tools as I said is acceptance. Let's figure out why people often will say I can't. Do this anymore I can't stand it. It's not fair. This possibly could ruin me. This can't be true and it shouldn't be this way. It's almost as if we refuse to accept truths that are right in front of us, and we work really hard to keep it from becoming true. Or that we balk re refused to accept that if we do this thing called accepting. It means a green with this thing that is. Seemingly. Unacceptable standing right in front of us but accepting doesn't mean a green I like to think about accepting as refocusing your energy. Because it's exhausting to keep fighting what is happening right in front of us the reality of what's happening in front of us, and moreover, it doesn't work refusing to accept for instance that you've been fired or that someone's broken up with you that your friend cheated you somehow or did something wholly unexpected and something that goes against your very values you weren't you know accepted into a program that you like. This becomes pain and pain is uncomfortable and it's not what we want to experience. Accepting reality is difficult. Exactly because it's painful, no one wants to experience disappointment sadness or loss but those are experiences that are part of life when we attempt to avoid and resist these emotions. We add suffering to our pain. We build the emotion bigger her with our thoughts and our rumination creating more misery by attempting to. And or suppress these painful emotions

Mattie Dot Peachtree City Mental Health Private Practice Linh Georgia Minnesota
Looking Back On The First Year Sober

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:23 min | 2 weeks ago

Looking Back On The First Year Sober

"Let's get to it. Here's heather. We're going to talk about that first year of sobriety today with Miss Heather who is joining US heather is about sixteen sober. So she just triumphed this one year mark that can be elusive for some people. Really. Hard to achieve. This is going to be fantastic conversation just talking about the difference in that first year when you get over that. Hump, and what it's like going into your second year and how did things change and now that you've had some distance and looking back on that first year, what is that feel like and how do you see things differently, those are all the things we're gonNA talk about. But to start, let's welcome heather to the show and heather. Why don't you take a few minutes and just tell everybody a little bit about you and your story. Takes her having me. I'm excited to be here with you definitely a big fan and obviously part of the the group that you have on facebook. So a lot of good information out there to women about my story. I, say it started to get pretty bad. Out Seven years ago so you know growing up drinking at my house it was normal everybody drank every party we got everything was surrounded around drinking and I I. Probably had my first drink at fourteen and that just because everyone else was it wasn't like I felt the urge to drink. But back then I would drink and I wouldn't crave it went on like that all the way through college up until about my first child and then exchanged that point. Something happened where The way that I consumed alcohol was different I thought that I had to have it to calm me down. And it really changed outlook on how I drank, and then I had my second son or my second child. And was I had him it got worse and worse. This whole time may still jobs still have the same family still haven't lost everything, but things did start going bad by took my husband police were to my house things that as a professional women I would never think would happen in my lifetime because I was always quote the good one and didn't have these issues and so it got to a point though where I would wake up have to figure out what am I gonNA drink today how am I gonNa get it in and that would be my constant thought. Lou Up at one point where I finally got sick of myself in my husband was asking me to go to Rehab my family would say to me this is ridiculous your drinking. and. Finally, I had an incident on a business trip where I just. In, the mirror and I said I cannot look at myself anymore and and do this, and so I flew from place I was to Rehab for thirty days and really embraced program. Never Mind I'm not get out of this show home. Someone said. To me, they said, I want you to try. All you have to do is try if you really want to go home, you can try it and see how or extreme. So from that moment, would someone say not to be changed my outlook and I thought well, I, did fly all the way here to try to get sober based on really hitting my rock bottom impact impacted to my job A. Little Bit. That was my last Straw. So I stay stuck it out key back to my hometown and the first thing I did when I got back, which we have suggested was a meeting and so fortunately I did have some contacts air I contacted them and I was home at midnight on Saturday night from Rehab, and then the next morning I was at a women's meeting and so I just really. From, that point I try to get sober for the past four years of four years prior to the sixteen months that I have and nothing would ever work. It just I didn't I wasn't ready but once I decided I was ready and came back and just I just took direction really instead of listening to myself because my thoughts don't leave me to the right places. Or the right thoughts, and then also make excuses when I finally just listen to what other people are saying, and then still continued that. Let's just try to keep to keep trying and I kept saying that to myself an Harry. M.. Now six months.

Miss Heather United States Facebook Lou Up Harry
How procrastination is About Managing Emotions, Not Time.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

05:34 min | 3 weeks ago

How procrastination is About Managing Emotions, Not Time.

"I want to expand on something I. talked about in last week's Podcast, and that's procrastination because many of us are really getting stuck in this in the time of Cove Ed, and now back to school is happening and parents specifically, mothers are sitting back and procrastinating their own needs in lieu of, of course, taking care of their kids. So I wanted to touch on a couple of deeper things when it comes to procrastination I'm going to be quote mostly from an author, a professor of psychology rather from University Tim Pikal and he writes for psychology today. So I've been playing as I normally do lots of different information. Blogs. so that I can share them with you. One thing I want you to hear today is that. Most People Associate Procrastination with laziness it is not laziness. It's not failure. It's not an motivation it's not distraction. It's something deeper. It's mostly an unease, an unwillingness process emotions. It's not about time management. It's about emotional management which makes sense. If you really think about how you go about procrastinating, you start to learn you become more aware of the fact that you're trying to not feel a certain way, which is why procrastination and perfectionists them are Yin and Yang to each other Pikal goes on to explain in his book solving the procrastination puzzle. That procrastination is a voluntary delay of an intended act despite the knowledge that this delay may harm us. That is procrastination is by definition in irrational behavior because it runs counter to our own idea of what's going to make us happy. Specifically, he goes on to say procrastination isn't emotionally focused coping strategy to do with negative emotions. It goes something like this. We sit down to do a task. We project into the future about what the tax will feel like we predict that the task will not feel good meaning that we're going to stress out. We're GONNA feel bad and our emotional coping strategy kicks in to keep us away from that bad feeling. Therefore, we avoid the task this emotional void in technique that our brain takes on. Often subconsciously employees in such a way that is similar to what underlies many types of anxiety people with anxiety often do everything we can to avoid the perceived external threat and then we shut off access to both. Good and bad feeling which of course, leads us toward depression but also peaks anxiety when we're confronted with getting things done in our internal world in this brain that's been produced for us. What happens is that we procrastinate and when we procrastinate were avoiding the task with the assumption that the task isn't going to feel good and that means we're missing out on feeling something good an accomplishment or a success. Another Study Co authored by Dr Michael Fallon links between procrastination and negative emotions like frustration and resentment. Hello resentments. And that makes it even more difficult to cope with potential negative emotions. We predict our task will create. So instead of feeling even worse we opt for something that makes us feel good like our phone or petting the dog or multitude of other things giving into feel good. Is the term given to this phenomenon win? We seek short-term good feelings at the cost of long term satisfaction something that most of us learn in those early years of being a toddler, what we're doing is were giving in to. This hijacking of our brain by the inner critic we're leading this voice takeover us that says, oh no, no, no, no. No you don't want to do something Mike Start the project, get the ball rolling. You need to run far away from that because you are anticipating that you're going to feel bad. So your fight flight or freeze kicks said your inner toddler Hickson the inner critic takes over. Here's what's really interesting about what this fella found out. He noted that the relationship between self compassion and procrastination. Because it's both counter intuitive and Oso revealing is. Foundational to how we cope with

Tim Pikal Professor Of Psychology Cove Ed Dr Michael Fallon OSO Yang Depression
Why Procrastination Is About Managing Emotions, Not Time

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

05:13 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Procrastination Is About Managing Emotions, Not Time

"I want to expand on something I. talked about in last week's Podcast, and that's procrastination because many of us are really getting stuck in this in the time of Cove Ed, and now back to school is happening and parents specifically, mothers are sitting back and procrastinating their own needs in lieu of, of course, taking care of their kids. So I wanted to touch on a couple of deeper things when it comes to procrastination I'm going to be quote mostly from an author, a professor of psychology rather from University Tim Pikal and he writes for psychology today. So I've been playing as I normally do lots of different information. Blogs. so that I can share them with you. One thing I want you to hear today is that. Most People Associate Procrastination with laziness it is not laziness. It's not failure. It's not an motivation it's not distraction. It's something deeper. It's mostly an unease, an unwillingness process emotions. It's not about time management. It's about emotional management which makes sense. If you really think about how you go about procrastinating, you start to learn you become more aware of the fact that you're trying to not feel a certain way, which is why procrastination and perfectionists them are Yin and Yang to each other Pikal goes on to explain in his book solving the procrastination puzzle. That procrastination is a voluntary delay of an intended act despite the knowledge that this delay may harm us. That is procrastination is by definition in irrational behavior because it runs counter to our own idea of what's going to make us happy. Specifically, he goes on to say procrastination isn't emotionally focused coping strategy to do with negative emotions. It goes something like this. We sit down to do a task. We project into the future about what the tax will feel like we predict that the task will not feel good meaning that we're going to stress out. We're GONNA feel bad and our emotional coping strategy kicks in to keep us away from that bad feeling. Therefore, we avoid the task this emotional void in technique that our brain takes on. Often subconsciously employees in such a way that is similar to what underlies many types of anxiety people with anxiety often do everything we can to avoid the perceived external threat and then we shut off access to both. Good and bad feeling which of course, leads us toward depression but also peaks anxiety when we're confronted with getting things done in our internal world in this brain that's been produced for us. What happens is that we procrastinate and when we procrastinate were avoiding the task with the assumption that the task isn't going to feel good and that means we're missing out on feeling something good an accomplishment or a success. Another Study Co authored by Dr Michael Fallon links between procrastination and negative emotions like frustration and resentment. Hello resentments. And that makes it even more difficult to cope with potential negative emotions. We predict our task will create. So instead of feeling even worse we opt for something that makes us feel good like our phone or petting the dog or multitude of other things giving into feel good. Is the term given to this phenomenon win? We seek short-term good feelings at the cost of long term satisfaction something that most of us learn in those early years of being a toddler, what we're doing is were giving in to. This hijacking of our brain by the inner critic we're leading this voice takeover us that says, oh no, no, no, no. No you don't want to do something Mike Start the project, get the ball rolling. You need to run far away from that because you are anticipating that you're going to feel bad. So your fight flight or freeze kicks said your inner toddler Hickson the inner

Tim Pikal Professor Of Psychology Cove Ed Dr Michael Fallon Yang Depression
WOMEN SUFFER TOO

Big Book Podcast

04:15 min | 3 weeks ago

WOMEN SUFFER TOO

"What was I saying? From far away as in a delirium. I heard my own voice calling someone Dorothy. Talking of dress shops sub jobs. The words came clearer. The sound of my own voice frightened me as it came closer and suddenly there I was talking of not what to someone I'd never seen before this very moment. Abruptly, stop speaking. Where was I? I'd wake up in strange rooms before fully dressed on a bed or couch I'd wake up in my own room in or on my own bed not knowing what are our day was afraid to ask. But this was different. This time I seem to be already awake sitting upright in a big easy chair in the middle of an animated conversation with a perfectly strange young woman who didn't appear to think it strange. She was chatting on pleasantly uncomfortably. Terrified I looked around I was in a large dark, rather poorly furnished room the living room of a basement flat. Cold chills started chasing up and down my spine. My teeth were chattering my hands were shaking. So I took them under me to keep them from flying away. My fright was real enough but it didn't account for these violent reactions. I knew what they were. Right a drink would fix them. It must have been a long time since I had my last drink. But I didn't dare ask the stranger for one I must get out of here. In any case in any case I must get out of here before I let slip my abysmal ignorance of how I came to be here and she realized that I was stark staring mad I was mad I must be. The shakes grew worse and I looked at my watch six o'clock. It had been one o'clock when I last remembered looking. I'd been sitting comfortably in a restaurant with Rita drinking my sixth Martinian hoping the waiter would forget about the lunch order at least long enough for me to have a couple more, I'd only had two with her but I, managed four in the fifteen minutes I'd waited for her, and of course, I'd had the usual unaccounted swigs from the bottle as I painfully got up and did my slow spasmodic dressing. In fact, I have been in very good shape at one o'clock feeling no pain what could have happened. That had been in the center of New York on noisy forty second street. This was obviously a quiet residential section. Why had dorothy brought me here who was she? How I had? I met her I had no answers and I dared not ask she gave no sign of recognizing anything wrong. But what had I been doing for those lost five hours my brain world I might have done terrible things and I wouldn't even know it. Somehow I got out of there and walked five blocks pass brownstone houses. There wasn't a bar in sight, but I found the subway station, the name on it was unfamiliar and I had to ask the way grand central. It took three quarters of an hour and two changes to get their backed my starting point. I had been in the remote reaches of Brooklyn. That night I got very drunk which was usual but I remembered everything which was very unusual. I remembered going through what my sister assured. Me was my nightly procedure of trying to find. Willie, Seabrook's name in the telephone book. I remembered my allow resolution to find him and ask him to help me get into that asylum he had written about. I remembered asserting that I was going to do something about this that I couldn't go on. Remembered looking longingly at the window as an easier solution and shuddering at the memory of that other window three years before and the six agonizing months in a London. Hospital. Ward. I remember filling the peroxide bottle in my medicine chest with Jin. In case my sister found the bottle I hid under the mattress.

Dorothy Seabrook Delirium Rita New York JIN Ward Willie London Brooklyn
Dont Mess Up Your Recovery

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

05:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Dont Mess Up Your Recovery

"Hello Mike Brands Welcome to episode Number One, Hundred Twenty six of the addiction unlimited podcast. I'm your coach, Angela Pugh. Thank you for hanging out with me today listening to the pod today. We're GONNA talk about some of the most common ways I see people when they are trying to stop drinking and just can't get it to stick right. Some of the most common ways we screw up or sobriety, and one thing I want to be clear on with this many of these are not struggles specific to addiction, right? These are struggles specific to being human. But we focus on recovery. So I'm going to make it fit with that but this is not a thing that we have and nobody else has it right? These are all things that everybody struggles with in every area of life. Some of our greatest obstacles in this journey are just human nature. We're all super committed to the big change we want to make in the beginning it's easy to be committed in the beginning you feel good your motivation is high on top of your game. The hard part is staying committed for the long game. In this is something that ninety eight percent of the population struggles with. I. Just made up that number by the way I don't know. I would say might be more than that. But so does it yourself up about it like there's something wrong with you there's nothing wrong with you. It takes practice to learn how to do things differently than you've done them for your whole life or for many years. These habits and mistakes will also pop up in different parts of Your Life at different times for me. I've made huge strides in being committed when I want to achieve something and that doesn't mean that I'm easily committed in every area of my life. Okay. I'm fantastic with commitment and dedication to my sobriety, and I'm pretty good at it with entrepreneurship because I'm a workaholic and my work is so much fun. So that's kind of easy for me. But I really struggle when it comes to other things. Time management isolation food sugar. I still fall into the trap of binge-watching, a new TV show when I should be recording a podcast or creating social media graphics or returning phone calls, and then I get way behind on things and I don't feel good about it and start beating myself up about it and Yada Yada Yada. We're not perfect creatures that will do things perfectly and make the right decision one hundred percent of the time and never make mistakes and never hurt each other's feelings and always do the right thing. Forget that thought. It's not about trying to do everything right all the time. It's about consistently learning from the decisions and actions that don't work and consistently making an effort to do the things that are good for you and make you a happier person. And you have to do it like a million times to get good at it. I get the feeling sometimes that we have this misconception that if we do things a few times, we should be finished like I went to a five or six times so I should be cured. or I worked out for two weeks. So I should totally be in shape. I ate healthy four meals. So I should have lost that ten pounds. I put in five job application so I should have a job by now. We are hard wired for instant gratification in that definitely makes things a bit more challenging, but it won't you to start thinking about it as a long game instead of a short game think about it like the actions you take today may not give you instant results. But you know by doing the right things over and over again, you're building your future in creating long-term relief in results. So, let's dig in to this list I. Put together. Number One. You've heard me say two million times. Being noncommittal meaning, you are not making an actual commitment to stop drinking. Many of us want to stop drinking for a little while. We make deals with ourselves that will stop for thirty days or sixty days or ninety days, and then you're shocked when you start drinking again and it goes terribly The truth is you wouldn't be stopping drinking if you were able to drink in moderation, right? None of us would do that if we could control it, we would. and. The unfortunate part of this lack of commitment is that it puts you in a position of having to constantly. All Day long every single day of your life you're having to decide over and over again whether or not you're going to drink. and honestly it's exhausting. Nothing will wear you down faster than being in a nonstop argument with the committee about drinking or not drinking.

Angela Pugh
Providing Addiction Treatment Amid COVID-19

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Providing Addiction Treatment Amid COVID-19

"Here, we are another interview and art. Let's talk podcast series. Thanks for joining US I'm your host William seat. MOYER's these podcasts feature experts on the gamut of issues that matter to his Betty Ford. The same issues that matter to you, our audience from substance use prevention to cutting edge research treatment of addiction and recovery from it. These conversations have become quite popular the past two years, and if you're a regular viewer or listener to the podcast particularly if you're viewing them, you'll note that for today things around the set look a little bit different. Of course, they do were in the recording this in the midst of the pandemic has affected all of us. He's four, take seriously the need to do everything possible to prevent the spread of coronavirus among our patients and our employees. Even here in the studio, we are following public health guidelines. As a result I can take off my mask for this interview because the production crew, the executive producer, and yes even my guest Dr Victor Vines are elsewhere in the building good social distancing one. Doctor. Vines was hired as our regional medical director from Minnesota and join our. In January of this year twenty, twenty talk about a baptism of fire in the middle of Minnesota winter. But Dr Vines, you've got to Hazel Betty Ford. Expecting to plunge full bore into addiction and addiction medicine and being part of the vital team in all of a sudden you found yourself part of the Kobe response team with a pandemic on your hands. Yes that was completely unexpected and. Quad surprise. I was I was delighted to be invited to be a part of the Code Command team you know I've. At the time of this recording and we're we're doing this in June of two thousand twenty. I am still not completed. I have still not completed my on boarding process that was going to be about a three month or three and a half month process. With learning. That would be scheduled and continued for for a long period of time but. Less than two months into into the process cova came along and turned everything on its ear, and that has that's it's actually been a real benefit for me because I've gotten to know and work with directly many of the people in leadership positions throughout the Hazelton Betty Ford. Organization. On. Both coasts and in between and ways that I never would have as if I was simply functioning as a medical director. So the CO Vid Task Force the the instant command team that we have has been a real plus for me in terms of getting connected into the organization and what has that response team had to do the last couple of months so To. Give you some time timeframe. We. First met our very first call organization of our command team. We stood that up on Thursday, March the eleventh, and it's important. You know we did that even before the president announced that that this was a national emergency, he did that on on the next day on Friday the thirteenth and we had we had already put our organization on notice that we were going to do something different today before. You know the first thing that we did was to to acknowledge that there were risk factors out in the community and the possibility that the virus could be brought onto one of our sites specifically one of our residential sites, but it also affected our intensive outpatients. Was the recognition that if if the virus got foothold in any of our sites and spread that we would look at the possibility of having to close down one or more of our sites and. We took extremely aggressive measures to make sure that did not happen. How do you balance Dr Vines the the the attention, the energy, the goals. Up treating potentially two fatal illnesses within a system of care, you've got addiction, of course, substance use disorder, and then you've got the pandemic corona virus it's how do you do it? Absolutely in our medical director Dr Mark was the one who I put that out for us to all see and that was that when we are looking at to potentially fatal illnesses, we have to make a risk determination. Do, we close down because we don't want covid or say we will find a way to treat and try to keep covert out for our patients that come into treatment when people's lives have gone so far off the rails that they need residential treatment. The likelihood that they're addiction will be lethal to them is higher than the chance of developing a Ovid illness that would lead to a death. We we recognize that However, we can't completely discount the risk of Kobe because we have employees and we have other staff and we have the the patients who if they were to get an infection with code it could it could potentially be a devastating illness, and so we had from the very outset We put into place steps and measures to try to identify what was who would be at risk try to separate those folks from others who might who might be at. Risk of becoming very ill, and and then tried to keep the doors open and keep everything rolling as best we could

Betty Ford Dr Victor Vines Medical Director Cova Minnesota Kobe Dr Vines William Seat Moyer Dr Mark Executive Producer President Trump
Providing Addiction Treatment Amid COVID-19

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

04:41 min | 3 weeks ago

Providing Addiction Treatment Amid COVID-19

"Doctor. Vines was hired as our regional medical director from Minnesota and join our. In January of this year twenty, twenty talk about a baptism of fire in the middle of Minnesota winter. But Dr Vines, you've got to Hazel Betty Ford. Expecting to plunge full bore into addiction and addiction medicine and being part of the vital team in all of a sudden you found yourself part of the Kobe response team with a pandemic on your hands. Yes that was completely unexpected and. Quad surprise. I was I was delighted to be invited to be a part of the Code Command team you know I've. At the time of this recording and we're we're doing this in June of two thousand twenty. I am still not completed. I have still not completed my on boarding process that was going to be about a three month or three and a half month process. With learning. That would be scheduled and continued for for a long period of time but. Less than two months into into the process cova came along and turned everything on its ear, and that has that's it's actually been a real benefit for me because I've gotten to know and work with directly many of the people in leadership positions throughout the Hazelton Betty Ford. Organization. On. Both coasts and in between and ways that I never would have as if I was simply functioning as a medical director. So the CO Vid Task Force the the instant command team that we have has been a real plus for me in terms of getting connected into the organization and what has that response team had to do the last couple of months so To. Give you some time timeframe. We. First met our very first call organization of our command team. We stood that up on Thursday, March the eleventh, and it's important. You know we did that even before the president announced that that this was a national emergency, he did that on on the next day on Friday the thirteenth and we had we had already put our organization on notice that we were going to do something different today before. You know the first thing that we did was to to acknowledge that there were risk factors out in the community and the possibility that the virus could be brought onto one of our sites specifically one of our residential sites, but it also affected our intensive outpatients. Was the recognition that if if the virus got foothold in any of our sites and spread that we would look at the possibility of having to close down one or more of our sites and. We took extremely aggressive measures to make sure that did not happen. How do you balance Dr Vines the the the attention, the energy, the goals. Up treating potentially two fatal illnesses within a system of care, you've got addiction, of course, substance use disorder, and then you've got the pandemic corona virus it's how do you do it? Absolutely in our medical director Dr Mark was the one who I put that out for us to all see and that was that when we are looking at to potentially fatal illnesses, we have to make a risk determination. Do, we close down because we don't want covid or say we will find a way to treat and try to keep covert out for our patients that come into treatment when people's lives have gone so far off the rails that they need residential treatment. The likelihood that they're addiction will be lethal to them is higher than the chance of developing a Ovid illness that would lead to a death. We we recognize that However, we can't completely discount the risk of Kobe because we have employees and we have other staff and we have the the patients who if they were to get an infection with code it could it could potentially be a devastating illness, and so we had from the very outset We put into place steps and measures to try to identify what was who would be at risk try to separate those folks from others who might who might be at. Risk of becoming very ill, and and then tried to keep the doors open and keep everything rolling as best we

Medical Director Hazel Betty Ford Doctor. Vines Kobe Cova Minnesota Dr Vines Dr Mark President Trump
How to Stop Sabotaging Yourself

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

05:08 min | Last month

How to Stop Sabotaging Yourself

"Hey Sober peeps and non sober peeps out there in the ether world. How are you all doing today? I have a small dog I don't know if you can hear that. But in any case Oh no, he's coughing. Yeah. That's my life today. How are you doing? I'm GonNa do a relatively short episode I. Think Today One never knows on self sabotage only because you know this has been coming up a lot in my world lately, some on my own behalf and as usual some times with my clients in. My friends as well. So what is self sabotage? Behavior that is said to be self sabotage scene is when it creates problems in our day to day life in an if interferes with what we want, we desire what our goals are in life. The most common self sabotaging behaviors include when into no self medication with drugs and alcohol. Eating Comfort eating specifically and forms of self injury such as cutting or picking and procrastination. People aren't always aware that we're self sabotaging, and then we don't really know why we end up in the same situations over and over unfortunately ending up in the same situation over and over again is no indication or guarantee that we're going to end this behavior it is possible to overcome almost any form of self sabotage. Yep, you heard me right. We can do these things. We can do these really hard things. The best way? No. How to help people with this and the way that I use to help not sabotage myself so much anymore is to change my behavior behavioral changes and therapies can aid us in interrupting in greened, repeated patterns of thought and action while strengthening deliberately on purpose strengthening our self regulation, our emotional regulation, and there's this really impactful type. Of therapy called motivational interviewing, which can help you helps me helps me with my clients to reconnect to our desires to our goals and to our values. The big question might be in your mind right now, how do I know if I'm self sabotaging myself? This can be tricky identifying the self sabotaging behavior especially because the consequences might not be immediately felt. After, you do the behavior. So making that connection can be really difficult and sometimes impossible. The reason for this is because the forces that lead us to self sabotage are usually subtle and they're things that accumulate over time their dysfunctional, their distorted beliefs, behaviors, attitudes, values that we've adopted in. Don't really truly believe in that lead us to underestimate our capabilities and suppress our feelings lash out at people around us in while I gave you the shortlist a little bit ago. The longer list of forms of sabotage are in a nutshell. Those common things we do like. Perfectionism I've mentioned procrastination you know work. And home impersonal relationships, finances time in change. All of these things become issues for us that we find insurmountable an overwhelming, and then we apply these things like procrastination and judging ourselves and rumination all those things that I talk about especially in conjunction with the inner critic that keep us from doing even the simplest work sometimes. So today I'm GonNa give you just one thing to think about, and that is your seemingly irrelevant decisions known as said these. Things that we make decisions around seemingly irrelevant to the day to day aspects of our lives. Often sustain often contribute to the very ways that we block

How the Sober Spring Challenge changed my life

Goodbye to Alcohol

05:13 min | Last month

How the Sober Spring Challenge changed my life

"Twelve whole podcasts. My name is John Garang I'm the foundry weld without wine and I'm your host for this podcast. Thank you so much for union. A series. Two of the podcast is all about taking a break from all coal just how beneficially this to take a break how important it is to test salt dependent regularly this ties in nicely with also spring challenge which starts on the first of September. We're going to be interviewing people who done also spring challenging in the past last week we interviewed Kawhi, who did sobers spring two years ago he hasn't added drink since. He didn't do it because he wanted to stop drinking. So we also interviewed Lebeau who used it to moderate for awhile, and finally she decided that she felt so much better when she wasn't drinking that she was going to ditch moderation technique and give up drinking completely. Today's interview is with a lovely lady called KRYSTAL. Nine christel sober spring in two thousand and nineteen. She had me on the radio tasting alcohol-free wines. And when she had the conversation, she had a bit of a light bulb. Moment. Because she reflected on her own drinking habits and she decided that for her, it was more about the ritual. than the old coal. So perhaps, all coal free wines would work for. Assaulted our conversation by asking Christo to tell us about himself. On, crystal I'm forty five years old I live in Pretoria. and. Got One son, he turned to any one the other day a couple of weeks ago, and I'm married to my best friend for twenty five years in November now been married congratulations. When did you first start thinking that you'd like sued maybe change your relationship with all did you first start thinking? The might be a problem have. As you all know that drinking wine we need. It's the first loss that is the bugger because. When it's the first laws, it triggers, you have another glass and then I must finish the bottle. So and that started bothering me and I think I've signed up for wilt without wine the city day challenge in January and I think I lost it about sixty minutes. You know what you get those days way you wake up two o'clock in the morning. Your heart stopping and it's jumping out of your chased and you get this feeling. Then you think what have I done lost not did I feed Musonda my husband? Did I MAKE Can't remember and then you start negotiating with yourself said, this is this is Scott to stop you know. This is not happening again until six o'clock when you start making food and. Outcomes the bottle of wine and. You have to stay in the. Pit was terrible. So you did this. As all Robin ugity minutes of the thirty. That's. What I wasn't greedy. I've got a fitbit. What really triggered. Me was my resting. Offbeat at some stage August. Last year it was eighty four they win I started with the spring. It actually came down to the low sixties now. So it's it's really it was that was the main mission was for health reasons I what you said about you've got to be ready because some you obviously weren't ready when you signed up for the he is but nevertheless you you reflected a lot before you signed up, you pay full challenge Saturday you can't in the water in year than you ran away from the freezing water again but then said, you saw the Cyprus spring challenge. So what made you think Oh let's give these guys another try. You know what? What's fantastic just before that I heard you over the radio. On radio to and actually drinking the last one and having a taste on the radio and saying how it tastes like my husband was in the patroness me that much and I told him I said listen to this. I can actually do this for me. It's about the habit I love having mom gloss and my bottle WANNA open it, pull the drink, and then that's for me. That's that's my kick that I get out of IT I. told him I said, I'm sure I can do it because I know that it's not the Elko that I'm often it's the Heb it with the Al Khalid steerable because I can't stick to one drink because they ll kicks in any poisons, your audie entities with the colossal one I was so

Kawhi John Garang Christo Lebeau Robin Ugity Elko Al Khalid Musonda PIT Pretoria. Scott Cyprus
We All Play A Role with Daniel Snyder

The Addicted Mind Podcast

04:30 min | Last month

We All Play A Role with Daniel Snyder

"Daniel you introduce yourself morning do I in. Yeah I'm Daniel Snyder storm coming out of just outside Vancouver British Columbia Canada, a project in pure coordinator with our action table here in Langley, that is responding to the ongoing overdose crisis. So in British Columbia redeclared a public health emergency just over four years ago in response to the rising and alarming number of fatal overdoses in the province really dramatic spike in my own journey through opioid addiction I was basically addicted to heroin. For fifteen years and realizing learning about this crisis that was ongoing. I realized I really had an opportunity to play some role in sharing my story in how I was impacted by addiction and and how perhaps our current approaches kearns social attitudes towards drug use is not helping a lot of people. So let's jump in and just talk about that. Well, let's start with your story and then how that manifests itself and then how. You want to change that view. It sounds like, yeah. So I don't fit into a typical narrative and when his narrative I I mainly framing addiction around the way it's presented at large to to us in society. So for a Lotta people who aren't directly impacted, their perception is formed they what they see in the media and. The media has a strong tendency of focusing on the most. Damaging and obvious of cases. So we're talking about. While the downtown Vancouver is the perfect example. It's it's essentially world famous for all the wrong reasons in terms of drug use open drug use homelessness, and in it was inevitable that if you look at a newspaper or watch a leading story on on this overdose crisis, you're gonNA see back alleys and injection drug use in the perception might be that that's precisely what addiction looks like and I I was never homeless. I was never out of work hours maintain to maintain employment, and if you'd walk asked me. During the years I was inactive addiction, you wouldn't have had one of those stereotypical thoughts about me that perhaps many of us are guilty of insensitive. Look there goes drug addict and I spent. Most of my years in working really really hard at trying to hide it, right keep it a secret not allow people to find out what was really going on with me and what was underneath that or what the reasons were for. That are props complex and nuanced and heart of my own story but also part of the larger story of our our society and our attitudes towards people who use substances. Right. I, think a lot of people their addiction is hidden. It's not seeing they need help they need. Support. But because of the stigma around addiction, they can't reach out I mean they don't WanNa reach out or it's it's more difficult to reach out because of the consequences of reaching out hundred percent addiction is one of those things that we reduce people to these one word labels. Constantly, we put Phil Addict Label on people maybe it's friends and family I mean we're not doing this with the intention of hurting them by has a bizarre side effect of reducing them to just a set of behaviors without really considering. What's going on underneath the surface? What's the reason that this person is struggling with addiction? We just want to focus in on the outward behaviors and The world we've been that I grew up in and that's been ongoing since even before I was born is this one in which we have for the most part said drugs are bad and we got an Iraqi drugs we gotta radical them completely free society and the DA in the drug war and we gotta stop people from using them and I think we've clearly missed the point year. It's pretty evident that that drug war has failed and what we really need to be looking to do is mitigate the harms caused by by substances nursery we're not going to get rid of them will always. Be Choosing use substances and so our our efforts should be focused on reducing the harm both to the user and to to the society around them.

Daniel Snyder Vancouver British Columbia Can Vancouver Heroin Langley Coordinator DA
Sex & Love Addiction with Brianne Davis

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:51 min | Last month

Sex & Love Addiction with Brianne Davis

"Okay I bran I have to say I'm so excited to have you on the show I'm so excited to meet you and I have to tell this little story that you and I, were just talking about where we started recording. So for those of you out there I think you're all pretty familiar that I am a binge TV watcher and Especially as an entrepreneur and so much of my work you know when you have a digital company, everything is on the computer, right? So I'm just at home glued to my computer all the time and they always have TV going I. always have shows on or documentaries or news in I had come across this show. There was fantastic and binged the whole thing to seasons and got it I I thought the show was new because I had murdered it before. So I was like, oh my gosh, when is the next season show spin tastic and only find out the show is actually your years old and there were no more seasons and I was heartbroken. Next thing I know maybe five days later I get this email from this beautiful person about collaborating doing a podcast. Going on her podcast in a google her of course, and you are from the show but yes. Like you so crazy the show is called six it is it was so much fun. I mean, it's exactly my kind of show like high action, all of that. I love. So it was really great for me but how excited was I that five days later you were coming out at the television and entering my real life. So from there I'm GonNa let you introduce yourself tell everybody a little bit about you and what you do of God that is the best story ever feel like there's we're connected all by energy and I'm Brian Davis by the way but it's such a God shot such a like. How does that happen out of all the people in the world get an email five days later that to me is as. Easy but yeah. My Name's Bryanne. I've been around in the Hollywood world for probably twenty years I'm one of those actors you've seen, but you don't know her name I. We say that like You I those people that look at me and like I've seen you before I don't know what it's from I'm yeah. I've been pretty much on every show you can imagine and movie you just wouldn't know me. Still working actor but Yeah. I, just started this new podcast called secret life podcast because. In March right in for the quarantine hit. I released this article in Huff post is called. I am a sex and love addict, and this is how I knew. And I decided to put myself out there at my years of sobriety and I thought the world was going to stop and everyone was going to applaud me or nothing happens. So it really reminded me how small we are in this world and it and I woke up the next morning and I thought secret life podcasts other people's secrets I connect to other people during this. Tumultuous time that we're going through and it's been such a blessing in that what is what made me reach out to you to another female podcast? You're talking about recovery talking about themselves better as a person. So yeah, that's a little bit about me I. Love that. So I have to tell you too. I was super excited. When I googled, you were excited to see you are about sex and love addiction because especially the love addiction part because I feel like certainly in the last several years, sex addiction is getting more attention. It's definitely becoming more prominent in conversation, which is so. freaking necessary fell necessary and at the same time I think that for women a lot of women, it does tend to feel more on the love addiction side in just those negative habits but you don't know that certainly when you're in the midst of it when you're just having bad relationship after bad relationship, you know what I mean you don't understand that it really is a negative and damaging pattern that you're repeating over and over again and I didn't realize it until many many years into my sobriety. I was probably seven eight, nine years maybe before it dawned on me like, okay well. This is what I've been doing. I'm picking why do I keep picking this kind of person or this unavailable person? Yeah. It's Jirama gene. I think it's challenging to understand in the beginning to that because I am

Google Brian Davis Hollywood Huff
A Conversation with "Blackout Girl"

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

08:00 min | Last month

A Conversation with "Blackout Girl"

"Jennifer store is the author of blackout girl. It is a memoir published by Hazel in twenty eleven and it's about to have its second printing. Read the book and You won't doubt the power of addiction in the day to day life of a young woman, the subtle persuasion of alcohol, the pervasive violent consequences, one drink too many and the sheer luck some my call at grace to survive at all Jennifer Storm. Welcome to let's talk. Thank you so much for having me. You know one of the dynamics of our mission at Hazelton Betty Ford is that we published books and we publish your book in twenty eleven it's done. Very very well in fact, it's about to have its second printing. What does that mean to have a second printing of a book? It's such an honor truly to not have the story come out once and reach an audience but for it to have a whole new audience to touch I, it's it's a wonderful experience. It feels more relevant today than actually when I did publish it unfortunately just because of what we're seeing with sexual violence and addiction, it's still dominating headlines. The headlines more than it ever has. So it feels really timely and on the heels of the metoo movement I know there are a lot of people that are suffering in silence and so my goal is to get to those people and we'll come back to that in a couple of minutes. Cisco back into your own. Life. For people who haven't read your book or no the story Tell us a little bit about your introduction to alcohol and what happened as a result. So. I came from a mother and a father who both came from very abusive alcoholic homes and they of found themselves in high school and really vowed to to get away from that and so they married young my father went off to Vietnam my mother he returned my mother started having US Children's I'm one of three I'm the youngest and they did their best to keep us away from all of those family members that were heavily. Addicted at the time, they had their own demons, and of course, their own traumas that they never dealt with and for the most part though they did a really great job trying to raise us I really was only exposed to alcohol when my parents would have it at family gatherings, and then a friend introduced me to alcohol when I was twelve years old and I had my first beer which literally led to ten beers and I drank. The first time I picked up a drink and I write in the book that I it never felt that thirsty before my life and I blacked out that night and subsequently a came to well being raped, and so I had this horrific introduction to alcohol this very addictive introduction alcohol and yet it was the first thing I turned to to deal with the trauma of that incident. When you were sexually assaulted a home. was that your bottom as it related to alcohol it was the start actually. So it's what really propelled me into continuing to drink because. I had all this shame and this guilt in this anger and rage that I didn't know what to do with it and I was young and my parents coming from their own alcoholic abusive homes didn't have the coping mechanisms to deal with their own stuff. Let alone now watching their daughter go through this horrific trauma. So I started drinking you know and this was in the eighties. So alcohol was in everyone's homes. We all had the you know the liquor cabinet, and so it was really easy for me to access What happened to me led to the breakdown really up my. Parents marriage, and so the supervision and our home started to deteriorate my parents divorced by the time I was fifteen and so I was kind of left to my own devices as where my older brothers and drank alcoholic and that gave way to starting to use pills I would do anything to numb the pain I was having and so if it meant alcohol, it meant pills it meant marijuana that led me to LSD, which then quickly led me to cocaine but everything every single time I drank the result was always the same I drank I drank to excess I blacked out. and. So the introduction of cocaine when I was around fifteen sixteen helped kind of. Sober me up. If you will I always say that parentheses it would keep me from blacking out. It would allow me to retain control because when I was putting myself in situations where I was blocking out of course, then I was vulnerable to more violence and more abuse and I didn't want that. So the cocaine and the alcohol then became this really damaging codependent relationship and. And how long did that codependent relationship work before? You had your bottom. So eventually I turned to crack cocaine at age seventeen and I had my bottom at age twenty two and I it was brutal and I attempted to take my life. I didn't have any hope I was completely destitute. I didn't see a way out of my addiction I couldn't go a day without being high and being. Completely out of my mind and that got to a point where it felt so. That I wanted out and I didn't like I said, I didn't have any hope. So tried to kill myself and By. Some measure of grace I am here today and I woke up in hospital bed the next day and I. I had sliced my wrists pretty severely to the extent that of one was bandaged to to hold it together done so much damage and it was a miracle and the doctor looked at me and said, it's a miracle that you're live and I was in a psych ward because that's that's where they. Put you was nine, hundred, Ninety, seven and an intake officer came in and kind of started going through the questions and she looked at me and said you, you're not. You're a drug addict do you want treatment for that? Because you you shouldn't be here? Do you want to go to Rehab and I said, yes, it was the first time I had made the admission that my solution was actually my problem. And then you got treatment, did I went to a traditional twenty eight day treatment facility in Allenwood Pennsylvania by all accounts a great facility I they didn't they weren't trauma informed which that's the term that I would come later to understand and really appreciate but they didn't take into consideration the underlining trauma that I had dealt with. It was solely twelve steps addiction recovery. We're not going to deal with these outside issues right now you're here to get clean and sober and that worked for me my first night and Rehab came to share her experience strength. And hope much like I do now and she had said something that profoundly impacted me and she said that her secrets kept her sick and that has been my mantra since that day in that Rehab and it told me that all this stuff that I was running from all these bad things that had happened to me and these pains and these traumas these were the causation. These were the reasons and I needed to deal with these if I really wanted to be clean and sober for the rest of my life, and so I did that work on my own. The trauma work did yes. which point you decide that you're story. was worth telling. In a memoir. I started writing that night in Rehab writing has always been a source of of empowerment and healing for me. Even after the rape I have a book of poems that that I wrote I would stay up all night i. now know that that's post traumatic stress disorder I couldn't sleep. I had insomnia had irrational fears so I would right and that would calm me and so because I couldn't talk about my trauma in traditional treatment facility I wrote about it. And I kept writing and then I did my fourth step and I kept writing and kept writing and you know I was an avid reader at the time and that's really when memoir was starting to come into play and I wasn't finding my story anywhere and so I thought well, I have a good story. Maybe I'll maybe I'll submit it and I was a big fan of melody babies and so I just happened to twelve of her books. So I happened to look in the book and see well their published by this amazing place called women, and so I reached out to Hazelden and sure enough they were interested and it was it was an incredible

Cocaine Hazelton Betty Ford Jennifer Storm Jennifer Store Crack Cocaine Hazel Cisco Vietnam Insomnia Rape Allenwood Pennsylvania Officer Marijuana LSD
HE HAD TO BE SHOWN

Big Book Podcast

04:38 min | Last month

HE HAD TO BE SHOWN

"Who is convinced against his will is of the same opinion still. But not this man. I was the oldest of three children and my father was an alcoholic. One of the earliest memories that I have is of a bottle sitting on his desk with skull and crossbones and marked poison. At that time as I remember he had promised never to take another drink. Of course he did I can also remember that he was a salesman and a very good one. When he was uptown, we were living in the little town of Moscow. I went up to try to get some money from him to buy groceries. He wouldn't give me any money for the groceries, but he did take me across the street and buy me a bag of candy which I later took back traded for a loaf of bread. I was not more than six at that time. My father died in nineteen. Oh One when I was eight years old and I was in the second or third grade school. I immediately quit school and went to work and from that time until I was high school age, there was never a return to school. I always built up in my own mind. The great things that I was going to do, and in fact, I accomplished about fifty percent of them and then lost interest. That continued through my entire life. When I was sixteen years old my mother remarried and I was given the opportunity of going back to school. I went into the high school grades but having missed all the intermediate grades I didn't get along too well. So I developed the habit of going back to school just long enough for the football season and then quitting. There was always a tremendous drive and ambition to become a great guy because I think I recognized inwardly that I didn't have any special talents. At a comparatively early age I can remember being jealous of my brother. He did things much better than I did because he applied himself and learned how to do them and I never applied myself. Whether I could have done as well as he I don't know. I was married at the age of nineteen to a grand girl and had good business prospects. I had bought a piece of ground in Cuyahoga falls and cut it into lots and had a profit of approximately forty thousand dollars and that was a lot of money in those days. With that profit I built a number of houses, but then I neglected them. I wouldn't put sufficient time on them. Consequently, my labor bills ran up I. Lost Money and then just fool the way a large part of that profit. When I was eighteen at the end of high school, the High School team had a banquet at a well known roadhouse outside of Akron. We boys drove out in somebody's car and went to the bar on the way to the dining room and I in an effort to impress the other boys that I was city bread having lived in Scranton and Cleveland asked them. If they didn't want to drink, they looked at one another quarterly and finally one of them allowed he'd have a beer and they all followed him each of them saying he'd have a beer too. I ordered Martini extra dry. I didn't even know what a Martini looked like but I had heard a man down the bar order one. That was my first drink. I kept watching the man down the bar to see what he did with a contraption like that and he just smelled up his drink and set it down again. So I did the same. He took a couple of puffs of the cigarette and I took a couple of puffs on my cigarette. He tossed off half of his Martini I tossed off half a mind and nearly blew the top of my head off it. Irritated. My nostrils I choked I didn't like it. There was nothing about that drink that I liked but I watched him any tossed off the rest of his. So I tossed off the rest of mine he ate his olive and I ate mine I didn't even like the olive it was repulsive to me from every standpoint I drank nine Martinis in less than an hour. Twenty. Two years later Dr Bob told me that what I had done was like switch and setting up a demand for more alcohol in my system. I didn't know that then I had no more reason to drink those. Martinez than a Jack Rabbit. At that particular time the boys put me on a shudder and took me out to the shed and I lay in the car while they enjoyed their banquet. That was the first time. I. Ever Drank hard liquor. Blackout. Drinking. At once.

Salesman High School Martini Cuyahoga Falls Jack Rabbit Football Dr Bob Scranton Akron Moscow Martinez Cleveland
Pain into Purpose

Recovery Happy Hour

05:44 min | Last month

Pain into Purpose

"Well here we go. Everyone this is the season finale the final episode of season five before I take a break and come back later in the fall sometimes I put this invisible pressure on myself to make the final episode the best of the season because honestly it always ends up being one of the most downloaded, what people usually do when they check out podcasts as they listen to the most recent episode I before deciding to invest any more of their time and when you publish an episode and then take a six week break that final episode ends up being downloaded about twice as much as the other episodes. So no pressure, right? I've been thinking about this introduction all week you know wondering what I could say to have more of an impact. And they keep coming back to pain. Pain is what brought us all here I think I always joke around when I say that no one ends up in an AA meeting because they're having a really great day. But what I really mean by that is that pain is what brings people through the doors of a meeting for the first time or your. Pain is what people feel when their hearts break when they lose something that matters. When they're hurt. Pain is our company when we're at our lowest and that feeling of being at your lowest, it hurts so much. But it's important to realize that that kind of pain is only meant to be temporary. Pain is a teacher. Paint tells you what hurts so that you'll go in the opposite direction find that antidote or do whatever undoes the thing that made you find that pain in the first place. Maybe. The pain is by a bottle or two of wine every night. Which means the opposite of that is learning how to not drink the wine. and therein lies the problem. Right? You know how to learn to not drink which is hard. If you don't know how to do it in spoiler alert, most of us don't know how to quit drinking. You WanNa, quit drinking so that you can be sober and live your same life but alcohol free. And if this is you and you're still considering quitting and you just want to stop drinking and that's it. And this is where I'm going to stop and correct you. You may not know it now but quitting drinking is not about the alcohol. It's not about removing one thing from your life, and then everything else stays in place just as it was. When you decide to recover like really and truly dig into the things that caused you to drink everything changes. It will change and a capacity that is so much greater than realize that it has to be a surprise. We can't grasp the idea of that much change for we experiences. Five years ago in Twenty fifteen, I was going to surprise divorce after learning that my ex husband had two girlfriends on the side. We'd been married for five years and I was completely clueless. So the shock numbed some of the pain at first, but when the shock subsided. The physical pain in my chest was so great. That I wondered if my heart was actually breaking. And I drink to help that pain. Life was so hard to wake up and just have to live that I couldn't do it sober. You know I didn't know what to do with those feelings what to do with that much pain. In about fifteen months later, my already problematic drinking spiraled so hard and so fast. I had no choice but to quit, but my pain is what brought me there. When he quit drinking you don't just get rid of the pain and throw it out in the garbage and never see it again it's still there to teach you something. When I quit drinking eventually, I started to discover some kind of purpose I was learning these really great tips on how to stay sober starting to feel better and I began helping other people in early sobriety. Learn those tips too. I was involved in a facebook accountability group and would encourage people who felt like they were at the bottom to not give up just give it another day. Give it another try you can do this. In the feeling that I got from helping people with so rewarding and felt so good that it gave me something to look forward to when I got up. You know something that wasn't all about me. When I stop thinking about me and started thinking about other people and what would make the world a little bit better. A light bulb turned on. I wasn't supposed to be in that much pain in two thousand fifteen just to feel heartbreak and terrible hangovers and then nothing else. This is not an experience that someone goes through just to go through and then get nothing in return. The pain serves a purpose and that's to serve us our purpose. Our purpose is to get sober and help other people do that too. It's US finding away into a lifeboat, and once we've caught our breath, we reach out and start pulling other people out of the water. Your pain right now. Is Not meant for you to sit in and learn nothing from. Its to teach you where you need to go from here and that's usually up. It gives you a point to measure from. You are not going to stop drinking every night and then making no other changes. In recovery, you're GONNA, make some new friends. You might end old relationships find a new career change hobbies have a baby, get a dog sell your house do things that could alter the entire direction of your life. Your pain is teaching you what you want and what no longer serves you.

Pain Facebook United States
How Does Spirituality Help Us With Addiction and Recovery

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

05:50 min | Last month

How Does Spirituality Help Us With Addiction and Recovery

"Hey sober sellers me Linh from Peachtree City Georgia. ooh. Yeah lot of stuff happening this week with parents and teachers and kids and young adults going back to school I will tell you that I've received A. Norm Ass- amount of phone calls this week from people who are really finding it difficult to maneuver and find their way through this new way of life going back to school, and my heart goes out to each and everyone of you who are dealing with this either directly or indirectly. Deep breath everybody this is going to be difficult, but we can get through it. So today I WanNa talk about something that might help with what we're up against for the next several months of continued uncertainty in our lives around cove it around in the US. The elections just this. CADDY compass. Way of living if you will I've been thinking a lot about spirituality lately. I think it's one of the things that comes and goes in my life. Sometimes I feel very uplifted by my spirituality. I am not necessarily aligned with a lot of religious views although there in me I was raised Catholic and I still find that those values and believes are activated in me and I actually believe many of them still although I'm not a practicing. Catholic in regards to my recovery and my addiction. I know that there is a higher power that has helped me along. In this journey not only. While I've been in recovery but long before guiding me somehow toward. What was inevitably that pivot point in my life and helping support me and again guiding me in the right direction and I think for the most part. Before I actually started looking harder. At what my spiritual life was like inside of me. I thought about spiritual experiences as something that happened to me. Now I. Am more apt to it as a grounding philosophy in my life something that gives me framework for how to understand myself and therefore then connect with the world around me. You see because when I was actively using alcohol and over the counter medication and Benzodiazepines. I was profoundly damaging my spirituality and instead of being guided by my spiritual beliefs, I became trapped in this cycle of suffering, which kept me addicted to alcohol and cloud in my ability to connect to myself and others in a truly vulnerable and authentic way, and even in recovery with the haze of these substances gone from my life and lifted many of us still struggle to gain that true sense of self. And this struggle can create profound deep feelings of emptiness and hopelessness that threatens our newfound sobriety. No matter how long you've been practicing in recovery and able to sustain some abstinence or sobriety addiction depression and anxiety are diseases of the mind and body that isolate US each of these feeds shame and guilt and robs us of that connection that spiritual connection because it makes us believe that we're not worthy that we are alone and we in turn turn to numb ourselves from this very disconnected feeling in doing. So we disconnect ourselves from our intuition that vary spirit or power that we want to connect to. It makes us believe we have little or nothing to be grateful for and blinds us from being mindful and participating in our day to day realities actively participating in I know many of you out there and at times I have experienced the disdain in the put off Adminis- put off this. Yeah. That's word toward spirituality and the presence of religion in any kind of recovery program. Because it seemed to trigger things in me. I totally understand that which is why I want you to think more deeply in discern what spirituality means to you because. Many of us not having a religious background and feeling uninformed about religion spirituality just get confused or we feel that religion is about controlling people and not wanting to be controlled. Yeah. That's a big part of addiction. We don't want to be approached by others to forced this.

United States Adminis Peachtree City Georgia.
Grieving the Loss of Alcohol

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:52 min | Last month

Grieving the Loss of Alcohol

"A grieving process. I'm sure many of you have heard about the stages of grief right I think most of us are familiar with that and we're definitely GONNA dig into those today and I want to work on some perspective around this because you know I am crazy about your mindset in your perspective being right because that so much sets in motion what your experience is going to be if your perspective is good and healthy and your mindset is good and healthy, you're going to have a much different experience all the way around in everything that you do so I really want to dig into some of that stuff too. And as people with addiction, we tend to be very sensitive and we like to blow things out of proportion good things and bad things. But even just the simple fact of being an alcoholic we go it way out of proportion and convince ourselves that our problem is so much worse than other people's problems and no one understands us and we got the short end of the stick and it's so hard to be one of us. And it is hard to be an alcoholic. But it isn't any more difficult than being a million other things. Also what is so hard for one person may not be challenging at all for someone else. So making it seem like your problems are so much bigger or more difficult really doesn't even make sense in it doesn't serve you to have that sort of perspective in that outlook on it. There are so many. Mental health struggles disabilities, special needs that people have where they would love to be in a position to have support groups all over the world where they know all they have to do is show up for free by the way. And their problem can be solved. I promise you people with major illness like cancer or COPD or Ms. They would love the opportunity to just walk into a support group and let people love and support them and have their illness become manageable and almost non-existent. Would love that. Opportunity. I bet people with chronic depression were some people with bipolar disorder schizophrenia. They would love to have a solution so simple that would manage all the symptoms. and. Allow them to live a comfortable and amazing life full of love and community and support. And just think about all of the you know autism all the hundreds of learning challenges and thousands of physical challenges. People get hurt and injured every day and it changes their lives for ever. I would be willing to bet all those people. would. Love to have a challenge where the solution was so straightforward. And required a little personal investment and energy and willingness. Instead of. A lifetime of pain and pharmaceuticals and declining quality of life. You see what I'm saying. As alcoholics, we paint this picture for ourselves that we're so unlucky that we have this thing that is so awful and terrible and Whoa is US feel bad for us because we can't drink alcohol. But when you put it in perspective. There are much bigger challenges you could be facing. And I promise you, you will have bigger challenges in your lifetime because it's just the nature of life life is challenging. Life is hard. I really want you to keep this in perspective. You can't drink alcohol. So what? You only care so much about alcohol because you have an unhealthy relationship with alcohol. Non Alcoholic people do not care about alcohol. They don't obsess over how will they ever have fun again if they don't drink, they don't obsess over not having a drink because their lives in their brains don't revolve around alcohol. There are thousands

Copd Bipolar Disorder
Is It Addiction? Questions to Ask Yourself

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:09 min | Last month

Is It Addiction? Questions to Ask Yourself

"I'm your host William Moyers and today we're talking about the essentials of addiction we know that addiction affects about one in seven Americans in this country. But of course, our guest Christianity and can tell us addiction is everybody's problem. Chris. Thanks for joining us today my pleasure, William. Thank. You. We're here at the Betty Ford. Center where you are the administrator running the show here in Rancho, Mirage California how's that been for you? I'd spend an incredible honor and a wonderful experience. Obviously, we're encountering people at a very painful intersection of their lives, but it's deeply rewarding because of what recovery offers in terms of people getting their lives back who are struggling with addiction as you just said a moment ago it's everyone's problem. It's hard these days to find someone. Who doesn't know another person impacted by this disease talk more about that addiction discriminate. Absolutely, not we know the facts people from all walks of life and we see it every day. Right? It doesn't You know `economics doesn't protect financial backing doesn't protect someone from addiction it's. Affects, people irrespective of race or ethnicity or gender The, the solutions oftentimes have not always been equally offered to jewels. I think one of the wonderful legacies of the Betty Ford Center is early on the recognition of the way this disease affects women as much as it does men. and So that's a wonderful part of the legacy because it does impact. So many different people and families and children. So it doesn't discriminate at all. Unfortunately what are the signs that somebody might be struggling with a substance use disorder? Yeah. That's a great question The most basic sign is loss of control. a substance use disorder or addiction isn't simply just the misuse of a substance that leads to harm. addiction is really about compulsive use that leads to progressive brain changes. addiction is actually a chronic but treatable medical disease that impacts the brain It involves genetics the environment, a person's life experiences, and the interactions between those areas that leads to compulsive use often also involving harmful consequences That's the more technical. Definition from the American Society of Addiction Medicine but it's fundamental. Characteristic is a loss of control and part of the person, and is that true that drug is a drug is a drug and so if you've lost control over one drug lost control over all drugs I, think that's true of addiction right? The loss of control is addiction but depending on the drugs or the type of substances you're using it can have a different impact on the individual based on their genetics and based on the drug itself. If somebody's watching this right now and feeling a little bit squirrelly because they feel like you're talking about them, what would be the signs? The symptoms? The evidence that you would recommend they look at to determine if they might have a substance use problem. So squirrelly the juice. Yeah. Perhaps, Concern Yeah another great question you. First of all, you could see you could begin to ask yourself We'll take a look at the harmful consequences of us have you attempted to control or stop your US another good sign is to think about the amount of time you spend thinking about the substance or using might say preoccupation. So to what degree do I spend a Lotta time of my day either using or thinking about using or focusing my behavior on using, and that's also Another simple way to begin to think about the potential of having a an addiction or a concern here. What about other consequences? well, there's a whole variety of consequences. One of the older definitions of of addiction as I mentioned a moment ago that's been updated recently to include the concept of it being treatable, which is really important. But one of the older definitions broke it down in terms of biological, psychological, social, and spiritual manifestations of the condition of the disease, and so we can think about how it affects our body right in my experiencing harmful consequences in terms of anxiety, the inability to sleep well Other ways that it might be impacting me physiologically psychologically how is it impacting my perception, my emotions, my experience of the world psychologically socially. That's a real good clear indication socially and behaviorally as well how's it impacting my relationships and that's another key factor. So we could go on but there's lots of different ways that addiction impacts people powerfully,

American Society Of Addiction William Moyers Administrator Betty Ford United States Betty Ford Center Chris Mirage California