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Season One Highlights - Part 2

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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

Welcome to the show. Thank you thank you very much for having me here. It's great to have someone with so much experience and so much focus in motorsports fascinating topic and one that we haven't really had an opportunity to delve into thus far so it's great to have you as our guest to talk about what it really takes to win in Motorsport Competition. Yeah I've been a cop US and since I was. I don't know crawling around the floor home in England and that's where it always starts. I'm in the history of motor racing back in the UK. Goes back almost as long as it does in Italy and been super passionate about it. I remember being in the back of my parents car which was unfortunately not very exciting and just looking at the cars going by and being able to identify them at a very early age and you know I was very fortunate a just down the street. Maybe three houses down. He ran a garage and he used to have the local exotic car come by and he was a Jag. You A guy in. His personal transport was a series one e type an no driving around in mgb. Gt but that part of Essex where I grew up was just the capital of sort of the go. Fast Industry Motorsport we had Ford of boreham world. Rally House came out of we have people developing lots of other rally causing a gyco Terry Hoyle. Who's one of the biggest Ferrari restoration guys? He was just down the street and Early Memories of walking out on my driveway and seeing a Ferrari Daytona spyder sat there because he put up at the wrong house boy. That radium. Prince early does it. That's a that's a heck of a leader grow up yours. Yeah so for me. It's just been a passion and it was natural as I grew older and got pushed through the school system that when I started thinking about what he's a career to be. I wanted to be a race engineer from very early on and and really targeted where my education was taking me and I've been fortunate to be able to accomplish that and more so I've been very privileged. Well it's interesting that you had identified very early on what you wanted to be when you grow up as they say what about university I guess she went to university in the UK. There was only one place really to go in the UK to study car design. There was no specific courses. Like they're out today as a place called Love Brought University of Technology at the time and they had a course automotive tech college in the UK. It's like the equivalent here would be. Mit similar like that and they had a course automotive engineering and design twenty two spots and typically three four hundred applicants for those twenty two spots and I managed to snack one of those were. Ah Suspect took some talent I have to say. I'm not that rocket scientists the most brains guy at school. That's not me but I'm practical. A hardworking person and Israeli sort of dedication and sheer effort. That got me through the university system and I. I remember at the time because I I didn't go a conventional route. I didn't do the typical. Uk Root of which time was o level exams up until sixteen and then a level exams are ordinary and advanced level and chose sixteen to leave school and go to an engineering college. So I learned a bit of practical engineering. Learn how to work my way around a machine shop and I learn more about the hands on approach of engineering and I remember going to the interview. They win the head of the course. Lovebirds said you know. I don't think you're GONNA make unprepared to off your place but I don't think you're gonNA make it. I don't think academically you're strong enough kidding. And I remember seeing him three years later because he was actually four years later because he was my noise and vibration lecture. So I mean you look to me so that you still haven't said Yep so hey you know so much for his noise and vibration to obviously didn't have much resonance did it and good puns in there as well. I got three the my undergraduate degree. Well and the time I was trying to find a spot in major racing and it's not straightforward to come out of university. I mean you think it's not actually you know nothing. I wanted to be in Formula One because pure and motoracing and and you want to go work in the industry what you want to set your sights very high one for me was where I wanted to be. I wasn't able to find what I wanted in. An opportunity came up to actually further my education and two master's degree and so that's what I did. I moved over to the Cranfield Institute of Technology which is purely a postgraduate university. I spent a year. They're studying really similar but more advanced automotive engineering but I had an opportunity to work with a race car. Constructor called Lola cars no longer in business. These days time they were really starting to get into trying to project. How fast racing car will be before actually hit the track answer? My master's thesis was based on creating a mathematical model of racing cal and driving around the track and predicting the lap time was going to be. So that was complex math Tony when computing was not necessarily as advanced as I was writing the code in Fortran seventy seven. She's a language for probably nine hundred hundred of Sanskrit of But it was based around Lowest Formula. Three thousand car that was racing in Japan and Zucca circuit and Mizzou's circa in Japan is one of the most challenging not just from a driver's perspective but also from an engineer's perspective. And I challenge I had to do is to try and define the racing line or what line is the cog taken. A good driver will naturally find that but asking a computer is not straightforward. But that been some interesting work done by some guys at NASA which was looking at rocket trajectories so I started applying some of the algorithms. They were using on how to shoot a missile from point. Eight point being depending on what characteristics? You wanted that mistletoe. Shortest distance falsely speed. Whatever you could tune the algorithm so I played around with that and ultimately wrote a program which was very successful in predicting how fast the car would go low to use that quite a bit and even when my contact at lower ultimately decided to go a different direction. He took some of that knowledge with him. I remember getting a phone call. Saying Hey. I'm heading out to Miami to do the Miami Street race if I send you a track map. Can you for Jewish? And this was really before email and all the rest of it. I remember working through the night for several nights putting it on a three and a half inch floppy drill off here and Fedex ing him at the hotel and this was before they ran and then I got within three or four tenths of a second of the qualifying time. That is phenomenal. Let time programs today are fairly common. We use them all the time and you can write one in xl but back then none of these things existed even trying to create just the visual image of what the lap time would look like the speed tries against distance all time. It was a big challenges right in the actual program itself so for me just watching the way motors has embraced computing and the science behind. It has been a fascinating experience.