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Automatic TRANSCRIPT

A major legal protection for tech companies is under fire from the nation's top law enforcement official Attorney General William Barr questioning whether online platform should remain free from responsibility for harmful content here's NPR Shannon bond thanks to section two thirty of the communications decency act tech companies like Facebook and Google are not liable for most content users post on their sites but there are growing calls for that protection to be pared back at the justice department in about the law Attorney General William Barr said things have changed in section two thirty was written no longer are tech companies the underdog upstarts they have become Titans of US industry critics say the law shields companies from accountability for disinformation terrorism and child exploitation the justice department is reviewing the law as part of its wider probe of big tak Shannon bond NPR news San