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F. M. north highland Sacramento it's five twenty one from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm Elsa Chang and I'm Mary Louise Kelly note to a story about something that never happens in France a politician stepping aside because of something in his private life the politician is Benjamin Griveaux he was running for mayor of Paris int'l texts and videos he sent to a woman were leaked and shared on social media a woman who is not the woman he is married to and with whom he has had three kids in the Atlantic writer Rachel Donati makes the case that left failed revolt might mark the end of an era in which French public figures were able to keep their private lives private she joins us now from Paris ritual tonight you're welcome thanks for having me so what has people scandalized here is it that he had an affair that he got caught what is it well first of all we're not sure he had an affair he definitely exchange some quite racy images and texts with the woman who isn't his wife but what really has people scandalized in France is the fact that these were published and it violated his private life to give people some sense of what we're talking about here it is this is this kind of Frances and church of Anthony Weiner scandal that we all lived through here in the office it's even stranger because the person who leaked these texts is a Russian performance artist and he put these on a website saying that Griveaux had been a hypocrite because he was married to someone else and yet he had exchanged these text with another woman so there's a whole strange Russian element here too you mentioned that at that people in France have long tended to believe that a politician's life should be private and that in this case they're denouncing what they see as the Americanization of French political life does that suggest that for the most part French people support his right to privacy Griffin's right privacy I think that's definitely true that might be eroding a little bit but you just think that France walk alone the president in two thousand fourteen of course was the subject of a tabloid sting and which a tabloid magazine published pictures of a woman with whom he was having an affair and that was kind of seen as the beginning of the violation of private life here but what's different in this Griveaux case is that these were messages and videos exchanged online so this call is happening in the context of big data of the vulnerability of public figures to online threats what has also changed here that grief actually dropped out of the race to be mayor of Paris as you know France had already started down that slippery slope of of making politicians private lives public with France while longer not staying where he was photographed on his mopeds for him to deliver cross onto the actress with whom he was having an affair it happened it was made public but he didn't step down as president that's right and that is exactly what is new in this case the group stepped down and I do think that many people in France think that it's stunning that he would step down I also think that in the context of me too the world has changed dramatically in the last few years and the kinds of things that politicians even in France I think they're entitled to do that has changed there's this sense that there's this Americanization that American morality made him do this and people are resisting that they think it's not a great idea that he should still be entitled to his private life R. in this me too moment and on a somewhat related note I wonder what has been the reaction in France to the guilty verdict on two counts for Harvey Weinstein France is not really had its full me too moment that hasn't come to France I think there's this sense that no one has been brought to trial in France in the way Harvey Weinstein was brought to trial in the United States there's a sense that America has gone too far some people believe that in France I think it's a very much a generational divide I think an older generation of cultural figures things Americans there they've gone crazy in there too politically correct and they do all these you know there's a witch hunt and you definitely sense that among older male French cultural figures at the same time there's a younger generation that I think is more in tune to the spirit of what's happening in the United States with me too and that is waiting for it to come to France and make changes here that is it Rachel don't idea of the Atlantic speaking to us there from Paris ritual thanks so much thanks for having me a Philadelphia nonprofit says it is opening the country's first facility where people can inject illegal drugs under medical supervision yesterday a District Court judge ruled that the site does not violate federal drug laws NPR's Bobby Allen reports after a two year legal battle leaders at the nonprofit called safe house are ready to open their doors to the first official supervised injection site in America it's a facility where those struggling with addiction bring their own drugs and use with trained medical staff standing by to prevent overdoses it's been used in Canada and Europe and has been shown to save lives Randgold fine lead safe house we have the highest death rate of any big city in America the twenty nineteen death rate is expected to surpass twenty eighteen and with numbers like these we are compelled to last the decision was from a U. S. district judge in Philadelphia who found in October that the site safe house are proposing are more like a medical facility than what prosecutors have called a crack house the judge has now made his order final it's a blow for the justice department which sued to try to block the site here's U. S. attorney bill McSwain speaking a year ago when he and the trump administration first filed their lawsuit aimed at stopping safe house is our folks have good intentions but we think that this step of opening an injection site is a step the crosses the line he's not alone in believing this at a tense press conference today safehouse said their first facility will be in South Philadelphia that was a surprise to neighbors there Leanne Salah off wasn't pleased you blindsided us yeah thank you our children there is a lot says she doesn't want to live next to a site that will have a steady stream of substance abusers coming in and out pardon and you were speaking about gold find of safe houses says three to four people die from fatal overdoses every day in Philadelphia she says they're supervised injection sites are taking public injecting off the streets and into a medical facility we understand that your children should never have to walk over people publicly consuming and the goal is if it's not outside than inside studies have shown that injection sites do drive down fatal overdoses in the vicinity around the facilities Philadelphia health officials estimate that twenty five to seventy six people could be saved each year with the opening of the injection spaces former Pennsylvania governor ed Rendell is a big supporter but even in its hands twenty five months it's worth it supporters say will also serve as a way to connect with treatment housing and other social services Leo Beletsky is a health and law expert at Northwestern University he studies harm reduction efforts like supervised injection sites he says other U. S. cities are watching one of the key arguments against advocates has been that the law is not settled and you know the legal implications are unclear well that argument just suffered a setback federal officials say they are evaluating all their options under the law they have already filed an appeal safehouse has volunteers at the ready including Rendell the former Pennsylvania governor expected to escort drug users to the site early.